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9th century

The 9th century is the period from 801 to 900 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Common Era. [1]

282 relations: Aachen, Abbasid Caliphate, Adi Shankara, Aghlabids, Ahmad ibn Tulun, Al-Jahiz, Al-Ma'mun, Alchemy, Alfonso III of Asturias, Alfred the Great, Algebra, Ambergris, Anglo-Saxons, Annals of Ulster, Arnulf of Carinthia, Ashot I of Armenia, Asturias, Áed mac Boanta, Árpád, Baghdad, Bagratuni dynasty, Balaputra, Basil I, Battle of Edington, Battle of Hafrsfjord, Battle of Pliska, Battle of Versinikia, Beowulf, Boris I of Bulgaria, Borobudur, Bosnia (region), Britain in the Middle Ages, Buddhism, Bulgar–Serb War (839–842), Bulgaria, Byzantine Empire, Byzantine–Bulgarian Treaty of 815, Caliphate, Cambodia, Carolingian Empire, Carolingian Renaissance, Charlemagne, Charles the Bald, Charles the Fat, Chess, China, Christian, Christianization of Bulgaria, Clement of Ohrid, Common Era, ..., Coptic period, Council of Preslav, Cyrillic script, Danelaw, Danube, Dál Riata, Defensive wall, Diamond Sutra, Duan Chengshi, Dublin, East Africa, East Francia, Emperor Wenzong of Tang, Emperor Xianzong of Tang, Emperor Xuānzong of Tang, Epirus, Eunuch, Fez, Morocco, First Bulgarian Empire, Forlì, Ghana Empire, Granary, Great Heathen Army, Guangzhou, Gunpowder, Guthrum, Halfdan Ragnarsson, Han Yu, Harald Fairhair, Harun al-Rashid, Heian period, Heptarchy, High King of Ireland, History of slavery, History of Sudan, House of Wisdom, Huang Chao, Hungarians, Hungary, Iceland, Igbo people, Igbo-Ukwu, Igboland, India, Ireland, Irene of Athens, Italy, Ivar the Boneless, Ivory trade, Japan, Jayavarman II, Julian calendar, Kana, Kawi script, Kenneth MacAlpin, Khmer Empire, Khmer people, Kingdom of East Anglia, Kingdom of Galicia, Kingdom of León, Kingdom of Northumbria, Kingdom of Nri, Krum, Kufic, Kyoto, Laguna Copperplate Inscription, Leonine City, Leshan Giant Buddha, Li Deyu, List of Asturian monarchs, List of Scottish monarchs, Longphort, Lothair I, Louis the German, Louis the Pious, Louvre, Luzon, Macedonian dynasty, Madagascar, Madrasa, Mali, Mauritania, Medieval Armenia, Medieval Warm Period, Mercia, Mesoamerican chronology, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Middle Francia, Mosque, Muḥammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī, Municipality, Muslim, Nalanda, Nalanda inscription, New York, Nigeria, Nikephoros I, Niu Sengru, Norsemen, North Sea, Norway, Nri-Igbo, Nubia, Old Church Slavonic, Ordoño I of Asturias, Orkney, Oseberg Ship, Pallava dynasty, Pannonia, Paris, Philippines, Picts, Pliska, Pope Joan, Pope Leo III, Pope Leo IV, Porcelain, Port, Prague Castle, Prambanan, Pramodhawardhani, Quran, Rakai Pikatan, Romance languages, Rome, Rurik, Rurik dynasty, Rus' (region), Sahelian kingdoms, Saint Naum, Saints Cyril and Methodius, Samaratungga, Samarkand, Sanriku Coast, Saracen, Scandinavian York, Scotland, Senegal River, Serbian Orthodox Church, Shetland, Ship burial, Shivagrha inscription, Sicily, Simeon I of Bulgaria, Somalia, South India, Sulaiman al-Tajir, Sumatra, Sweet Dew Incident, Syria, Taejo of Goryeo, Tang dynasty, Taoism, Túath, Tō-ji, The Compendious Book on Calculation by Completion and Balancing, Tiber, Timeline of 9th-century Muslim history, Toucouleur people, Treaty of Verdun, Tulunids, Tunis, University of al-Qarawiyyin, Utrecht Psalter, Uzbekistan, Veliki Preslav, Viking Age, Vikings, Vladimir of Bulgaria, Vulgar Latin, Wang Xianzhi (rebel), Wessex, West Francia, Woodblock printing, York, Zhu Wen, 800, 801, 802, 803, 805, 809, 811, 813, 814, 815, 820, 824, 825, 827, 830, 835, 839, 840, 841, 842, 843, 845, 846, 848, 850, 851, 852, 856, 859, 860, 862, 863, 864, 865, 867, 868, 869, 869 Sanriku earthquake, 870, 871, 875, 878, 879, 884, 885, 886, 888, 889, 893, 895, 896, 899, 900, 902, 909, 915. Expand index (232 more) »

Aachen

Aachen, also known as Bad Aachen (Ripuarian: Óche, Limburgish: Aoke, French: Aix-la-Chapelle, Dutch: Aken, Latin: Aquisgranum) is a German spa and border town located between the Eifel, South Limburg (Netherlands) and High Fens (Belgium) regions in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

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Abbasid Caliphate

The Abbasid Caliphate (or الخلافة العباسية) was the third of the Islamic caliphates to succeed the Islamic prophet Muhammad.

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Adi Shankara

Adi Shankara (pronounced; early 8th century CE) was a philosopher and theologian from India who consolidated the doctrine of Advaita Vedanta.

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Aghlabids

The Aghlabids (الأغالبة) were an Arab dynasty of emirs, who ruled Ifriqiya, nominally on behalf of the Abbasid Caliph, for about a century, until overthrown by the new power of the Fatimids.

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Ahmad ibn Tulun

Ahmad ibn Ṭūlūn (September 835 – March 884) was the founder of the Tulunid dynasty that ruled Egypt between 868 and 905 AD.

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Al-Jahiz

al-Jāḥiẓ (الجاحظ) (full name Abū ʿUthman ʿAmr ibn Baḥr al-Kinānī al-Baṣrī أبو عثمان عمرو بن بحر الكناني البصري) (born in Basra, 776 – December 868/January 869) was an Arabic prose writer and author of works of literature, Mu'tazili theology, and politico-religious polemics.

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Al-Ma'mun

Abū Jaʿfar Abdullāh al-Maʾmūn ibn Harūn (also spelled Almamon, Al-Maymun, Al-Ma’moon, Mahmoun and el-Mâmoûn (ابوجعفر عبدالله المأمون) (September 786 – 9 August 833) was an Abbasid caliph who reigned from 813 until his death in 833. He succeeded his brother al-Amin who was killed during the siege of Baghdad (813).

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Alchemy

Alchemy is an influential tradition whose practitioners have, from antiquity, claimed it to be the precursor to profound powers.

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Alfonso III of Asturias

Alfonso III (c. 848 – December 910), called the Great, was the king of León, Galicia and Asturias from 866 until his death.

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Alfred the Great

Alfred the Great (849 – 26 October 899) (Ælfrēd, Ælfrǣd, "elf counsel" or "wise elf") was King of Wessex from 871 to 899.

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Algebra

Algebra (from Arabic and Farsi "al-jabr" meaning "reunion of broken parts") is one of the broad parts of mathematics, together with number theory, geometry and analysis.

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Ambergris

Ambergris (or, Ambra grisea, Ambre gris, ambergrease or grey amber) is a solid, waxy, flammable substance of a dull grey or blackish colour produced in the digestive system of sperm whales.

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Anglo-Saxons

The Anglo-Saxons were a people who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century.

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Annals of Ulster

The Annals of Ulster (Annála Uladh) are annals of medieval Ireland.

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Arnulf of Carinthia

Arnulf of Carinthia (850 – 8 December 899) was the Carolingian King of East Francia from 887, the disputed King of Italy from 894 and the disputed Holy Roman Emperor from 22 February 896 until his death at Regensburg, Bavaria.

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Ashot I of Armenia

Ashot I (Աշոտ Ա; c. 820 – 890) was an Armenian king who oversaw the beginning of Armenia's second golden age (862 – 977).

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Asturias

Asturias (Asturies), officially the Principality of Asturias (Principado de Asturias; Principáu d'Asturies), is an autonomous community in north-west Spain.

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Áed mac Boanta

Áed mac Boanta (died 839) is believed to have been a king of Dál Riata.

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Árpád

Árpád (845 – 907) was the head of the confederation of the Hungarian tribes at the turn of the 9th and 10th centuries.

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Baghdad

Baghdad (بغداد, Iraqi pronunciation) is the capital of the Republic of Iraq, as well as the coterminous Baghdad Province.

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Bagratuni dynasty

The Bagratuni or Bagratid (Բագրատունի) royal dynasty was a royal family of Armenia that formerly ruled many regional polities of the medieval Kingdom of Armenia, such as Syunik, Lori, Vaspurakan, Vanand, Taron, and Tayk up until the 8th century.

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Balaputra

Balaputra was the maharaja of Srivijaya in the 9th century CE as well as the former head of the Sailendra dynasty.

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Basil I

Basil I, called the Macedonian (Βασίλειος ὁ Μακεδών, Basíleios hō Makedṓn; 811 – August 29, 886) was a Byzantine Emperor who reigned from 867 to 886.

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Battle of Edington

At the Battle of Edington an army of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex under Alfred the Great defeated the Great Heathen Army led by Guthrum on a date between 6 and 12 May AD 878.

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Battle of Hafrsfjord

The Battle of Hafrsfjord (Slaget i Hafrsfjord) has traditionally been regarded as the battle in which western Norway was for the first time unified under a single monarch.

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Battle of Pliska

The Battle of Pliska or Battle of Vărbitsa Pass was a series of battles between troops, gathered from all parts of the Byzantine Empire, led by the Emperor Nicephorus I Genik, and Bulgaria, governed by Khan Krum.

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Battle of Versinikia

The Battle of Versinikia (Битката при Версиникия, Μάχη της Βερσινικίας) was fought in 813 between the Byzantine Empire and the Bulgarian Empire, near the city of Adrianople (Edirne) in contemporary Turkey.

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Beowulf

Beowulf (in Old English) is an Old English epic poem consisting of 3182 alliterative long lines.

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Boris I of Bulgaria

Boris I, also known as Boris-Mikhail (Michael) and Bogoris (Борис I / Борис-Михаил; died 2 May 907), was the ruler of the First Bulgarian Empire in 852–889.

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Borobudur

Borobudur, or Barabudur, is a 9th-century Mahayana Buddhist Temple in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia.

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Bosnia (region)

Bosnia (Bosna/Босна) is the northern region of Bosnia and Herzegovina, encompassing roughly 80% of the country; the other eponymous region, the southern part, is Herzegovina.

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Britain in the Middle Ages

During most of the Middle Ages (c. 410–1485 AD), the island of Great Britain was divided into several kingdoms.

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Buddhism

Buddhism is a nontheistic religion or philosophy (Sanskrit: dharma; Pali: धम्म dhamma) that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on teachings attributed to Gautama Buddha, commonly known as the Buddha ("the awakened one").

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Bulgar–Serb War (839–842)

The Bulgarian-Serb War of 839–842 was fought between the Bulgarian Khanate and the Serbian Principality.

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Bulgaria

Bulgaria (България, tr.), officially the Republic of Bulgaria (Република България, tr.), is a country in southeastern Europe.

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Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, or Eastern Roman Empire, was the predominantly Greek-speaking continuation of the eastern part of the Roman Empire during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

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Byzantine–Bulgarian Treaty of 815

The Treaty of 815 (Договор от 815) was a 30-year peace agreement signed in Constantinople between the Bulgarian Khan Omurtag and the Byzantine Emperor Leo V the Armenian.

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Caliphate

A caliphate (خِلافة khilāfa) is a form of Islamic government led by a caliph (خَليفة)—a person considered a political and religious successor to the prophet Muhammad and a leader of the entire Muslim community.

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Cambodia

Cambodia (កម្ពុជា, Kampuchea), officially known as the Kingdom of Cambodia (ព្រះរាជាណាចក្រកម្ពុជា, Preah Reacheanachak Kampuchea) and once known as the Khmer Empire, is a country located in the southern portion of the Indochina Peninsula in Southeast Asia.

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Carolingian Empire

The Carolingian Empire (800–924) was the final stage in the history of the early medieval realm of the Franks, ruled by the Carolingian dynasty.

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Carolingian Renaissance

The Carolingian Renaissance, the first of three medieval renaissances, was a period of cultural activity in the Carolingian Empire occurring from the late eighth century to the ninth century, taking inspiration from the Christian Roman Empire of the 4th century.

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Charlemagne

Charlemagne (2 April 742/747/748Karl Ferdinand Werner: Das Geburtsdatum Karls des Großen, in: Francia 1, 1973, pp. 115–157;Matthias Becher: Neue Überlegungen zum Geburtsdatum Karls des Großen, in: Francia 19/1, 1992, pp. 37-60;R. McKitterick: Charlemagne. Cambridge 2008, p. 72.28 January 814), also known as Charles the Great (Carolus or Karolus Magnus) or Charles I, was King of the Franks who united most of Western Europe during the early Middle Ages and laid the foundations for modern France and Germany.

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Charles the Bald

Charles the Bald (13 June 823 – 6 October 877) was the King of West Francia (843–77), King of Italy (875–77) and Holy Roman Emperor (875–77, as Charles II).

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Charles the Fat

Charles the Fat (13 June 839 – 13 January 888), also known as Charles III, was the Carolingian Emperor from 881 to 888.

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Chess

Chess is a two-player strategy board game played on a chessboard, a checkered gameboard with 64 squares arranged in an eight-by-eight grid.

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China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a sovereign state in East Asia.

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Christian

A Christian is a person who adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.

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Christianization of Bulgaria

The Christianization of Bulgaria was the process by which 9th-century medieval Bulgaria converted to Christianity.

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Clement of Ohrid

Saint Clement of Ohrid (Κλήμης, gen. Κλήμεντος, Bulgarian and Macedonian: Свети Климент Охридски) (ca. 840 – 916) was a medieval Bulgarian saint, scholar, writer and enlightener of the Slavs.

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Common Era

Common Era (also Current Era or Christian Era), abbreviated as CE, is an alternative naming of the calendar era Anno Domini ("in the year of the/our Lord", abbreviated AD).

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Coptic period

The "Coptic period" is an informal designation for Late Antiquity in Egypt, an era defined by the religious shifts in Egyptian culture to Coptic Christianity from Roman religion until the Muslim conquest of Egypt.

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Council of Preslav

The People's Council of Preslav (Преславски народен събор) took place in 893.

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Cyrillic script

The Cyrillic script is an alphabetic writing system employed across Eastern Europe and north and central Asia.

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Danelaw

The Danelaw (also known as the Danelagh; Old English: Dena lagu; Danelagen), as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the Danes held sway and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons.

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Danube

The Danube (also known by other names) is Europe's second-longest river, located in Central and Eastern Europe.

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Dál Riata

Dál Riata (also Dalriada or Dalriata) was a Gaelic overkingdom that included parts of western Scotland and northeastern Ulster in Ireland, across the North Channel.

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Defensive wall

A defensive wall is a fortification used to protect a city, town or other settlement from potential aggressors.

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Diamond Sutra

The Diamond Sūtra is a Mahāyāna (Buddhist) sūtra from the Prajñāpāramitā, or "Perfection of Wisdom" genre, and emphasizes the practice of non-abiding and non-attachment.

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Duan Chengshi

Duan Chengshi (died 863) was an author and scholar of the Tang Dynasty in China.

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Dublin

Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland.

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East Africa

East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easterly region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics.

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East Francia

In medieval historiography, East Francia (Latin: Francia orientalis) or the Kingdom of the East Franks (regnum Francorum orientalium) forms the earliest stage of the Kingdom of Germany, lasting from about 840 until about 962.

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Emperor Wenzong of Tang

Emperor Wenzong of Tang (唐文宗 809–840), personal name Li Ang (李昂), né Li Han (李涵), was an emperor of the Tang Dynasty of China.

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Emperor Xianzong of Tang

Emperor Xianzong of Tang (778Old Book of Tang,.–February 14, 820;http://www.sinica.edu.tw/ftms-bin/kiwi1/luso.sh?lstype.

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Emperor Xuānzong of Tang

Emperor Xuānzong of Tang (July 27, 810 – September 7, 859) (reigned April 25, 846 – September 7, 859) was a later emperor of the Tang Dynasty of China.

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Epirus

Epirus is a geographical and historical region in southeastern Europe, now shared between Greece and Albania.

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Eunuch

A eunuch (εὐνοῦχος) is a man who (by the common definition of the term) may have been castrated, typically early enough in his life for this change to have major hormonal consequences.

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Fez, Morocco

Fez or Fes (فاس Fās; Berber: ⴼⴰⵙ Fas; Fès) is the second largest city of Morocco, with a population of 1.1 million (2014).

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First Bulgarian Empire

The First Bulgarian Empire (modern Първo българско царство, Parvo Balgarsko Tsarstvo) is the historiographical term for the khanate founded by the Bulgars circa 681, when they settled in the northeastern Balkans, subdued or drove out the Byzantines and made the South Slavic settlers their allies.

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Forlì

Forlì (Romagnol dialect: Furlè; Latin: Forum Livii) is a comune and city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, and is the capital of the province of Forlì-Cesena.

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Ghana Empire

The Ghana Empire (c. 300 until c. 1235) was located in what is now southeastern Mauritania and western Mali.

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Granary

A granary is a storehouse or room in a barn for threshed grain or animal feed.

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Great Heathen Army

The Great Viking Army or Great Danish Army, known by the Anglo-Saxons as the Great Heathen Army (OE: mycel heathen here), was a coalition of Norse warriors, originating from Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, who came together under a unified command to invade the four Anglo-Saxon kingdoms that constituted England in AD 865.

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Guangzhou

Guangzhou (Mandarin 廣州 Guǎngzhōu, also known as Canton, and less commonly as Kwangchow)"".

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Gunpowder

Gunpowder, also known as black powder, is a chemical explosive—the earliest known.

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Guthrum

Guthrum or Guðrum (died c. 890), christened Æthelstan on his conversion to Christianity in 878, was King of the Danish Vikings in the Danelaw.

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Halfdan Ragnarsson

Halfdan Ragnarsson (Hálfdan; Halfdene or Healfdene; Albann; died 877) was a Viking leader and a commander of the Great Heathen Army which invaded the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of England, starting in 865.

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Han Yu

Han Yu (768–824), born in Nanyang, Henan, China, was a precursor of Neo-Confucianism as well as an essayist and poet from the Tang dynasty.

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Harald Fairhair

Harald Fairhair (Old Norse: Haraldr Hárfagri, Norwegian: Harald Hårfagre; c. 850 – c. 932) was remembered by medieval historians as the first King of Norway.

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Harun al-Rashid

Harun al-Rashid (هَارُون الرَشِيد, Hārūn Ar-Rašīd; 17 March 763 or February 766 — 24 March 809) was the fifth Abbasid Caliph.

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Heian period

The is the last division of classical Japanese history, running from 794 to 1185.

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Heptarchy

The Heptarchy (from the Greek ἑπτά hepta, "seven" and ἄρχω arkho, "to rule") is a collective name applied to the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of south, east, and central England during late antiquity and the early Middle Ages, conventionally identified as seven: East Anglia, Essex, Kent, Mercia, Northumbria, Sussex, and Wessex.

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High King of Ireland

The High Kings of Ireland (Ard Rí na hÉireann) were sometimes historical and sometimes legendary figures who had, or who are claimed to have had, lordship over the whole of Ireland.

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History of slavery

The history of slavery spans nearly every culture, nationality and religion, and from ancient times to the present day.

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History of Sudan

This article covers the history of the territory which is today part of the Republic of Sudan.

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House of Wisdom

The House of Wisdom (بيت الحكمة; Bayt al-Hikma) was a major intellectual center during the Islamic Golden Age.

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Huang Chao

Huang Chao (died 884) was the leader of a major agrarian rebellion that, during the last decade of his life, seriously weakened the Tang dynasty.

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Hungarians

Hungarians, also known as Magyars (magyarok), are a nation and ethnic group who speak Hungarian and are primarily associated with Hungary.

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Hungary

Hungary (Magyarország) is a landlocked country in Central Europe.

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Iceland

Iceland is a Nordic island country between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean.

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Igbo people

The Igbo people, historically spelled "Ibo", are an ethnic group of southeastern Nigeria.

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Igbo-Ukwu

Igbo-Ukwu (Igbo: Great Igbo) is a town in the Nigerian state of Anambra in the southeastern part of the country.

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Igboland

Igboland (Standard), also known as Southeastern Nigeria and formerly known as Ibo or Iboland, is a non-governmental cultural region and a linguistic area in Nigeria that is defined by the Igbo culture and language.

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India

India, officially the Republic of India, is a country in South Asia.

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Ireland

Ireland (Éire; Ulster-Scots: Airlann) is an island in the North Atlantic separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel.

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Irene of Athens

Irene of Athens or Irene the Athenian (Εἰρήνη ἡ Ἀθηναία; c. 752 – 9 August 803) is the commonly known name of Irene Sarantapechaina (Εἰρήνη Σαρανταπήχαινα), Byzantine empress regnant from 797 to 802.

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Italy

Italy (Italia), officially the Italian Republic (Repubblica Italiana), is a unitary parliamentary republic in Europe.

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Ivar the Boneless

Ivar the Boneless (Ívarr hinn Beinlausi; Hyngwar) was a Viking leader and a commander of the Great Heathen Army which invaded the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of England, starting in 865.

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Ivory trade

The ivory trade is the commercial, often illegal trade in the ivory tusks of the hippopotamus, walrus, narwhal, mammoth, and most commonly, Asian and African elephants.

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Japan

Japan (日本 Nippon or Nihon; formally or Nihon-koku, "State of Japan") is an island country in East Asia.

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Jayavarman II

Jayavarman II (ជ័យវរ្ម័នទី២) (c. 770–835) was a 9th-century king of Cambodia, widely recognized as the founder of the Khmer Empire, which ruled much of the Southeast Asian mainland for more than six hundred years.

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Julian calendar

The Julian calendar, introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC (708 AUC), was a reform of the Roman calendar.

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Kana

are syllabic Japanese scripts, a part of the Japanese writing system contrasted with the logographic Chinese characters known in Japan as kanji (漢字).

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Kawi script

Aksara Kawi (from Sanskrit kavi "poet") is the name given to the writing system originating in Java and used across much of Maritime Southeast Asia from the 8th century to around 1500 AD.

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Kenneth MacAlpin

Cináed mac Ailpín (Modern Gaelic: Coinneach mac Ailpein), commonly Anglicised as Kenneth MacAlpin and known in most modern regnal lists as Kenneth I (810 – 13 February 858) was king of the Picts and, according to national myth, first king of Scots, earning him the posthumous nickname of An Ferbasach, "The Conqueror".

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Khmer Empire

The Khmer Empire (ចក្រភពខ្មែរ), the predecessor state to modern Cambodia ("Kampuchea" or "Srok Khmer" to the Khmer people), was a powerful Khmer Hindu-Buddhist empire in Southeast Asia.

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Khmer people

Khmer people (ខ្មែរ), Northern Khmer pronunciation) are the predominant ethnic group in Cambodia, accounting for approximately 90% of the 15.2 million people in the country. They speak the Khmer language, which is part of the larger Austro–Asiatic language family found throughout eastern and central India and Bangladesh, Southeast Asia, southern China and numerous islands in the Indian Ocean. The majority of the Khmer are followers of the Khmer style of Buddhism, a highly syncretic version which blends elements of Theravada Buddhism, Hinduism, animism and ancestor-spirit worship.; pg. 8; accessed August 21, 2006 Significant populations of Khmers reside in adjacent areas of Thailand (Northern Khmer) and the Mekong Delta region of neighboring Vietnam (Khmer Krom) whilst there are over one million Khmers in the Cambodian diaspora living mainly in France, the United States and Australia.

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Kingdom of East Anglia

The kingdom of the East Angles (Ēast Engla Rīce; Regnum Orientalium Anglorum), today known as the Kingdom of East Anglia, was a small independent kingdom of the Angles comprising what are now the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk and perhaps the eastern part of the Fens.

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Kingdom of Galicia

The Kingdom of Galicia (Reino de Galicia, or Galiza; Reino de Galicia; Reino da Galiza; Galliciense Regnum) was a political entity located in southwestern Europe, which at its territorial zenith occupied the entire northwest of the Iberian Peninsula.

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Kingdom of León

The Kingdom of León (Leonese:Reinu de Llión, Reino de León, Reino de León, Reino de Leão, Regnum Legionense) was an independent kingdom situated in the northwest region of the Iberian Peninsula.

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Kingdom of Northumbria

The Kingdom of Northumbria (Norþhymbra rīce, "kingdom of the Northumbrians") was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now northern England and south-east Scotland, which subsequently became an earldom in a unified English kingdom.

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Kingdom of Nri

The Kingdom of Nri (948–1911) was the West African medieval state of the Nri-Igbo, a subgroup of the Igbo people.

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Krum

Krum the Fearsome (Крум Страшни, Κρούμος) was Khan of Bulgaria during the First Bulgarian Empire from sometime after 796 but before 803 until his death in 814.

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Kufic

Kufic is the oldest calligraphic form of the various Arabic scripts and consists of a modified form of the old Nabataean script.

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Kyoto

, formerly known as Meaco, is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan.

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Laguna Copperplate Inscription

The Laguna Copperplate Inscription (Tagalog: Inskripsyon sa Binatbat na Tanso ng Laguna, Malay: Laguna kepingan tembaga Prasasti) is the earliest known written document found in the Philippines.

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Leonine City

The Leonine City (Latin: Civitas Leonina) is the part of the city of Rome around which the ninth-century Pope Leo IV commissioned the construction of the Leonine Wall.

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Leshan Giant Buddha

The Leshan Giant Buddha is a tall stone statue, built during the Tang Dynasty.

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Li Deyu

Li Deyu (787 – January 26, 850Old Book of Tang, vol. 174.), courtesy name Wenrao (文饒), formally the Duke of Wei (衛公), was an official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reigns of brothers Emperor Wenzong and Emperor Wuzong and (briefly) their uncle Emperor Xuānzong.

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List of Asturian monarchs

This is a list of the rulers of the Kingdom of Asturias, which was a Kingdom in the Iberian peninsula.

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List of Scottish monarchs

The monarch of Scotland was the head of state of the Kingdom of Scotland.

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Longphort

A longphort (Ir. plur. longphuirt) is a term used in Ireland for a Viking ship enclosureConnolly S.J (1998).

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Lothair I

Lothair I or Lothar I (German: Lothar, French: Lothaire, Italian: Lotario, Dutch: Lotharius) (795 – 29 September 855) was the Holy Roman Emperor (817–855, co-ruling with his father until 840), and the King of Bavaria (815–817), Italy (818–855) and Middle Francia (840–855).

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Louis the German

Louis (also Ludwig or Lewis) "the German" (c. 810 – 28 August 876), also known as Louis II, was a grandson of Charlemagne and the third son of the succeeding Frankish Emperor Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye.

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Louis the Pious

Louis the Pious (778 – 20 June 840), also called the Fair, and the Debonaire, was the King of Aquitaine from 781.

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Louvre

The Louvre or the Louvre Museum is one of the world's largest museums and a historic monument in Paris, France.

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Luzon

Luzon is the largest and most populous island in the Philippines.

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Macedonian dynasty

The Macedonian dynasty ruled the Byzantine Empire from 867 to 1056, following the Amorian dynasty.

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Madagascar

Madagascar (or; Madagasikara), officially the Republic of Madagascar (Repoblikan'i Madagasikara; République de Madagascar), and previously known as the Malagasy Republic, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Southeast Africa.

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Madrasa

Madrasa (مدرسة,, pl. مدارس,, Medrese) is the Arabic word for any type of educational institution, whether secular or religious (of any religion).

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Mali

Mali, officially the Republic of Mali (République du Mali), is a landlocked country in West Africa.

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Mauritania

Mauritania (موريتانيا; Berber: Muritanya or Agawej; Gànnaar; Soninke: Murutaane; Pulaar: Moritani), officially the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, is a country in the Maghreb region of western North Africa.

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Medieval Armenia

Western Armenia had been under Byzantine control since the partition of the Kingdom of Armenia in AD 387, while Eastern Armenia had been under the occupation of the Sassanid Empire starting 428.

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Medieval Warm Period

The Medieval Warm Period (MWP), Medieval Climate Optimum, or Medieval Climatic Anomaly was a time of warm climate in the North Atlantic region that may also have been related to other climate events around the world during that time, including China and other areas, lasting from about AD 950 to 1250.

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Mercia

The Kingdom of Mercia (Miercna rīce), usually referred to as Mercia, was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy.

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Mesoamerican chronology

Mesoamerican chronology divides the history of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica into several periods: the Paleo-Indian (first human habitation–3500 BCE), the Archaic (3500–2000), the Preclassic or Formative (2000 BCE–200 CE), the Classic (200 CE–1000CE), and the Postclassic (1000 CE–1697 CE).

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Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art (colloquially The Met), located in New York City, is the largest art museum in the United States and among the most visited art museums in the world.

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Middle Francia

Middle Francia (Francia media) was an ephemeral (843–855) Frankish kingdom.

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Mosque

A mosque (مسجد and مسجد masjid, plural مساجد masājid) is a place of worship for followers of Islam.

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Muḥammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī

There is some confusion in the literature on whether al-Khwārizmī's full name is or.

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Municipality

A municipality is usually an urban administrative division having corporate status and usually powers of self-government or jurisdiction.

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Muslim

A Muslim, sometimes spelled Moslem, relates to a person who follows the religion of Islam, a monotheistic and Abrahamic religion based on the Quran.

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Nalanda

Nalanda was an acclaimed Mahavihara, a large Buddhist monastery in the ancient kingdom of Magadha (modern-day Bihar) in India.

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Nalanda inscription

The Nalanda inscription is an inscription located in Nalanda, Bihar, India, and has been dated to 860 CE.

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New York

New York is a state in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States.

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Nigeria

Federal Republic of Nigeria, commonly referred to as Nigeria, is a federal constitutional republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north.

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Nikephoros I

Nikephoros I or Nicephorus I, also Logothetes or Genikos (Νικηφόρος Α΄, Nikēphoros I, "Bringer of Victory"; died July 26, 811), was Byzantine Emperor from 802 to 811 AD, when he was killed in the Battle of Pliska.

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Niu Sengru

Niu Sengru (牛僧孺) (780 – January 27, 849Li Jue, Commemorative Text for the Spirit Tablet for the Deceased Chancellor, Taizi Shaoshi, Posthumously-Honored Taiwei, Lord Niu, collected in All Tang Texts (全唐文),.), courtesy name Si'an (思黯), formally Duke Wenzhen of Qizhang (奇章文貞公), was an official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reigns of Emperor Muzong and his sons Emperor Jingzong and Emperor Wenzong.

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Norsemen

Norsemen refers to the group of people who spoke what is now called the Old Norse language between the 8th and 11th centuries.

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North Sea

The North Sea is a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean located between Great Britain, Scandinavia, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, and France.

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Norway

Norway (Norwegian: (Bokmål) or (Nynorsk)), officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a sovereign and unitary monarchy whose territory comprises the western portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula plus Jan Mayen and the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard.

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Nri-Igbo

Nri is an ancient Igbo city-state in Anambra State, Nigeria.

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Nubia

Nubia is a region along the Nile river located in what is today northern Sudan and southern Egypt.

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Old Church Slavonic

Old Church Slavonic, also known as Old Church Slavic (often abbreviated to OCS; self-name, slověnĭskŭ językŭ), was the first Slavic literary language.

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Ordoño I of Asturias

Ordoño I (c. 821 – 27 May 866) was King of Asturias from 850 until his death.

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Orkney

Orkney (Arcaibh), also known as the Orkney Islands, is an archipelago in the Northern Isles of Scotland, United Kingdom.

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Oseberg Ship

The Oseberg ship (Norwegian: Osebergskipet) is a well-preserved Viking ship discovered in a large burial mound at the Oseberg farm near Tønsberg in Vestfold county, Norway.

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Pallava dynasty

The Pallava dynasty existed between the 3rd and 9th centuries CE, ruling a portion of what is today southern India.

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Pannonia

Pannonia was an ancient province of the Roman Empire bounded north and east by the Danube, coterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia.

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Paris

Paris (UK:; US:; French) is the capital and most-populous city of France.

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Philippines

The Philippines (Pilipinas), officially known as the Republic of the Philippines (Republika ng Pilipinas), is a sovereign island country in Southeast Asia situated in the western Pacific Ocean.

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Picts

The Picts were a tribal confederation of peoples who lived in what is today eastern and northern Scotland during the Late Iron Age and Early Medieval periods.

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Pliska

Pliska (Пльсковъ, romanized: Plĭskovŭ) is the name of both the first capital of the First Bulgarian Empire and a small town (formerly known as Aboba) situated 20 km Northeast of the provincial capital Shumen.

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Pope Joan

Pope Joan is, according to popular legend, a woman who reigned as pope for a few years during the Middle Ages.

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Pope Leo III

Pope Leo III (750 – 12 June 816 AD) was Pope from 795 to his death in 816.

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Pope Leo IV

Pope Saint Leo IV (790 – 17 July 855) was Pope from 10 April 847 to his death in 855.

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Porcelain

Porcelain is a ceramic material made by heating materials, generally including kaolin, in a kiln to temperatures between.

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Port

A port is a location on a coast or shore containing one or more harbors where ships can dock and transfer people or cargo to or from land.

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Prague Castle

Prague Castle (Pražský hrad) is a castle complex in Prague, Czech Republic, dating from the 9th century and the official residence of the President of the Czech Republic.

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Prambanan

Candi Prambanan or Candi Rara Jonggrang is a 9th-century Hindu temple compound in Central Java, Indonesia, dedicated to the Trimurti, the expression of God as the Creator (Brahma), the Preserver (Vishnu) and the Destroyer (Shiva).

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Pramodhawardhani

Pramodhawardhani (also known as Çrī Kahulunnan or Çrī Sanjiwana) was the queen consort of king Rakai Pikatan of Medang Kingdom in 9th century Central Java.

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Quran

The Quran (القرآن, literally meaning "the recitation"; also romanized Qurʾan or Koran) is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God (الله, Allah).

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Rakai Pikatan

Rakai Pikatan was a king of the Sanjaya dynasty Medang Kingdom in Central Java who built the Prambanan temple, dedicated to Shiva, which was completed in 856 AD.

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Romance languages

The Romance languages— sometimes called the Latin languages, and occasionally the Romanic or Neo-Latin languages—are the modern languages that evolved from spoken Latin between the sixth and ninth centuries A.D. and that thus form a branch of the Italic languages within the Indo-European language family.

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Rome

Rome (Roma, Rōma) is a city and special comune (named "Roma Capitale") in Italy.

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Rurik

Rurik or Riurik (Рюрик, from Rørik; 830 – c. 879) was a legendary Varangian chieftain who gained control of Ladoga in 862, built the Holmgard settlement near Novgorod, and founded the Rurik Dynasty, which ruled Kievan Rus (and later Grand Duchy of Moscow and Tsardom of Russia) until the 17th century.

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Rurik dynasty

The Rurik dynasty or Rurikids (Рю́риковичи, Рю́риковичі, Ру́рыкавічы) was a dynasty founded by the Varangian prince Rurik, who established himself in Novgorod around the year 862 AD.

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Rus' (region)

Rus' (Old East Slavic русьскаꙗ землꙗ "land of the Rusĭ (Русь)") is an ethno-cultural region in Eastern Europe inhabited by Eastern Slavs.

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Sahelian kingdoms

The Sahelian kingdoms were a series of kingdoms or empires that were centered on the sahel, the area of grasslands south of the Sahara.

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Saint Naum

Saint Naum (Bulgarian and Macedonian:Свети Наум, Sveti Naum), also known as Naum of Ohrid or Naum of Preslav (c. 830 – December 23, 910) was a medieval Bulgarian writer, enlightener, one of the seven Apostles of the First Bulgarian Empire and missionary among the Slavs.

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Saints Cyril and Methodius

Saints Cyril and Methodius (Κύριλλος καὶ Μεθόδιος, Old Church Slavonic) were 9th-century Byzantine Greek brothers born in Thessalonica, Macedonia, in the Byzantine Empire.

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Samaratungga

/ Samaratungga was the head of the Sailendra dynasty who ruled Central Java and Srivijaya in the 8th and the 9th century.

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Samarkand

Samarkand (Samarqand; Самарқанд; سمرقند; Cyrillic/Самарканд from Sogdian: "Stone Fort" or "Rock Town"), alternatively Samarqand or Samarcand, traditionally was the second-largest city in Uzbekistan and the capital of Samarqand Region.

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Sanriku Coast

The is a coastal region on the Pacific Ocean, extending from southern Aomori prefecture, through Iwate prefecture and northern Miyagi prefecture in northeastern Honshū, which is Japan's main island.

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Saracen

Saracen was a generic term for Muslims widely used among Christian writers in Europe during the later medieval era.

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Scandinavian York

Scandinavian York (also referred to as Jórvík) is a term used by historians for the south of Northumbria (modern day Yorkshire) during the period of the late 9th century and first half of the 10th century, when it was dominated by Norse warrior-kings; in particular, used to refer to the city (York) controlled by these kings.

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Scotland

Scotland (Scots:; Alba) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.

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Senegal River

The Senegal River (Fleuve Sénégal) is a long river in West Africa that forms the border between Senegal and Mauritania.

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Serbian Orthodox Church

The Serbian Orthodox Church (Српска православна црква / Srpska pravoslavna crkva) is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches.

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Shetland

Shetland (Sealtainn), also called the Shetland Islands, is a subarctic archipelago of Scotland that lies north-east of the island of Great Britain and forms part of the United Kingdom.

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Ship burial

A ship burial or boat grave is a burial in which a ship or boat is used either as a container for the dead and the grave goods, or as a part of the grave goods itself.

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Shivagrha inscription

The Shivagrha inscription is an inscription from the Medang Kingdom of Central Java, dated in chandrasengkala (chronogram) ”Wwalung gunung sang wiku”, that is, the year 856 CE (or 778 in the native Saka Calendar).

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Sicily

Sicily (Sicilia, Old Norse: Sikiley) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea; along with surrounding minor islands, it constitutes an autonomous region of Italy officially referred to as Regione Sicilia.

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Simeon I of Bulgaria

Simeon (also Symeon) I the Great (Симеон I Велики, transliterated Simeon I Veliki) ruled over Bulgaria from 893 to 927,Lalkov, Rulers of Bulgaria, pp.

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Somalia

Somalia (Soomaaliya; الصومال), officially the Federal Republic of SomaliaThe Federal Republic of Somalia is the country's name per Article 1 of the.

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South India

South India (ದಕ್ಷಿಣ ಭಾರತ, തെക്കെ ഭാരതം, தெற்கு பாரதம், దక్షిణ భారతం) is the area encompassing India's states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Telangana, Tamil Nadu and Kerala as well as the union territories of Lakshadweep and Puducherry, occupying 19.31% of India's area. South India includes the southern part of the peninsular Deccan Plateau and is bounded by the Arabian Sea in the west, the Indian Ocean in the south and the Bay of Bengal in the east. The geography of the region is diverse, encompassing two mountain ranges, the Western and Eastern Ghats, and a plateau heartland. The Godavari, Krishna, Tungabhadra, Kaveri, and Vaigai rivers are important non-perennial sources of water. Chennai, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Vijayawada, Visakhapatnam, Coimbatore, Kochi and Thiruvananthapuram are the largest and most industrialized cities in the region. A majority of Indians from the southern region speak one of the following languages: Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, and Tulu. During its history, a number of dynastic kingdoms ruled over parts of South India whose invasions across southern and southeastern Asia impacted the history and cultures of modern sovereign states such as Sri Lanka, Singapore, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, and Malaysia. The region was colonized by Britain and gradually incorporated into the British Empire. South India, particularly Kerala, has been a major entry point of the religions of Christianity and later Islam to the Indian Subcontinent. After experiencing fluctuations in the decades immediately after Indian independence, the economies of South Indian states have registered higher than national average growth over the past three decades. While South Indian states have improved in some socio-economic metrics, poverty continues to affect the region much like the rest of the country, although it has considerably decreased over the years. HDI in southern states is high and the economy has undergone growth at a faster rate than most northern states. Literacy rates in southern states is also very high, with approximately 80% of the population capable of reading and writing, while in Kerala (which has the highest literacy rate in India) 94% of the population are literate. Honour killings are non-existent in South India. Violence against women in South India is relatively low, with southern states having a progressive attitude toward the rights for women. Agriculture is the single largest contributor to the regional net domestic product, while Information technology is a rapidly growing industry. Literary and architectural styles, evolved over two thousand years, differ from other parts of the country. Politics in South India is dominated by smaller regional political parties rather than by national political parties. South India ranks the highest in terms of social and economic development in areas such as fertility rate and infrastructure; the fertility rate of South India is 1.9, the lowest of all regions in India.

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Sulaiman al-Tajir

Sulaiman or Soleiman al-Tajir (Arabic for "Soloman the Merchant") was a 9th-century Muslim merchant, traveler and writer initially from Siraf in modern day Iran.

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Sumatra

Sumatra (Sumatera) is an island in western Indonesia and part of the Sunda Islands.

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Sweet Dew Incident

The Sweet Dew Incident (Ganlu incident, 甘露事變 or 甘露之變) referred to an incident on December 14, 835,Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 245.

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Syria

Syria (سوريا or سورية, Sūriyā or Sūrīyah), officially the Syrian Arab Republic, is a country in Western Asia.

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Taejo of Goryeo

Taejo of Goryeo (January 31, 877 – July 4, 943), also known as Taejo Wang Geon (Wang Kon, 왕건), was the founder of the Goryeo Dynasty, which ruled Korea from the 10th to the 14th century.

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Tang dynasty

The Tang dynasty, was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period.

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Taoism

Taoism (sometimes Daoism) is a philosophical, ethical or religious tradition of Chinese origin, or faith of Chinese exemplification, that emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao (also romanized as ''Dao'').

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Túath

Túath (plural túatha) was a medieval Irish polity smaller than a kingdom.

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Tō-ji

(East Temple) is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect in Kyoto, Japan.

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The Compendious Book on Calculation by Completion and Balancing

The Compendious Book on Calculation by Completion and Balancing (الكتاب المختصر في حساب الجبر والمقابلة,; Liber Algebræ et Almucabola) is an Arabic treatise on mathematics written by Muḥammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī around AD 820 while he was in the Abbasid capital of Baghdad.

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Tiber

The Tiber (Latin Tiberis, Italian Tevere) is the third-longest river in Italy, rising in the Apennine Mountains in Emilia-Romagna and flowing through Umbria and Lazio, where it is joined by the Aniene river, to the Tyrrhenian Sea.

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Timeline of 9th-century Muslim history

No description.

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Toucouleur people

The Toucouleurs or Tukulor (or ''Haalpulaar’en'') are a group distinct from but related to the Fula.

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Treaty of Verdun

The Treaty of Verdun, signed in August 843, was the first of the treaties that divided the Carolingian Empire into three kingdoms among the three surviving sons of Louis the Pious, the son and successor of Charlemagne.

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Tulunids

The Tulunids were a dynasty of Turkic origin and were the first independent dynasty to rule Islamic Egypt, as well as much of Syria.

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Tunis

Tunis (تونس; Amazigh: Tunes, ⵜⵓⵏⴻⵙ) is the capital of Tunisia.

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University of al-Qarawiyyin

The University of al-Qarawiyyin or al-Karaouine is a university located in Fes, Morocco.

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Utrecht Psalter

The Utrecht Psalter (Utrecht, Universiteitsbibliotheek, MS Bibl. Rhenotraiectinae I Nr 32.) is a ninth-century illuminated psalter which is a key masterpiece of Carolingian art; it is probably the most valuable manuscript in the Netherlands.

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Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan, officially the Republic of Uzbekistan (Uzbek: Oʻzbekiston Respublikasi/Ўзбекистон Республикаси), is a doubly landlocked country in Central Asia.

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Veliki Preslav

The modern Veliki Preslav or Great Preslav (Велики Преслав), former Preslav (till 1993), is a city and the seat of government of the Veliki Preslav Municipality (Great Preslav Municipality, new Bulgarian: obshtina), which in turn is part of Shumen Province.

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Viking Age

The Viking Age is the period A.D. 793–1066 in European history, especially Northern European and Scandinavian history, following the Germanic Iron Age.

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Vikings

Vikings (Norwegian and Vikinger; Swedish and Vikingar; Víkingar), from Old Norse víkingr, were Germanic Norse seafarers, speaking the Old Norse language, who raided and traded from their Scandinavian homelands across wide areas of northern and central Europe, as well as European Russia, during the late 8th to late 11th centuries.

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Vladimir of Bulgaria

Vladimir-Rasate was the ruler of Bulgaria from 889 to 893.

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Vulgar Latin

Vulgar Latin is a generic term for the nonstandard (as opposed to classical) sociolects of Latin from which the Romance languages developed.

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Wang Xianzhi (rebel)

Wang Xianzhi (王仙芝) (died 878) was a major agrarian rebel during the reign of Emperor Xizong of Tang, whose rebellion, while failing, along with those of his one-time ally Huang Chao, began a series of rebellions that led to Tang Dynasty's disintegration.

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Wessex

Wessex (Westseaxna rīce, "kingdom of the West Saxons") was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom in the south of Great Britain, from 519 until England was unified by Æthelstan in the early 10th century.

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West Francia

In medieval historiography, West Francia (Latin: Francia occidentalis) or the Kingdom of the West Franks (regnum Francorum occidentalium) forms the earliest stage of the Kingdom of France, lasting from about 840 until 987.

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Woodblock printing

Woodblock printing is a technique for printing text, images or patterns used widely throughout East Asia and originating in China in antiquity as a method of printing on textiles and later paper.

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York

York is a historic walled city at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England, and is the traditional county town of Yorkshire to which it gives its name.

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Zhu Wen

Emperor Taizu of Later Liang (後梁太祖), personal name Zhu Quanzhong (朱全忠) (852–912), né Zhu Wen (朱溫), name later changed to Zhu Huang (朱晃), nickname Zhu San (朱三, literally, "the third Zhu"), was a Jiedushi (military governor) at the end of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, who previously served as a general under the rival Emperor Huang Chao's Empire of Qi and overthrew Empire of Tang in 907, established the Later Liang as its emperor, and ushered in the era of the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms.

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800

Year 800 (DCCC) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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801

Year 801 (DCCCI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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802

Year 802 (DCCCII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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803

Year 803 (DCCCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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805

Year 805 (DCCCV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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809

Year 809 (DCCCIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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811

Year 811 (DCCCXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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813

Year 813 (DCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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814

Year 814 (DCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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815

Year 815 (DCCCXV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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820

Year 820 (DCCCXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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824

Year 824 (DCCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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825

Year 825 (DCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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827

Year 827 (DCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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830

Year 830 (DCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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835

Year 835 (DCCCXXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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839

Year 839 (DCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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840

Year 840 (DCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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841

Year 841 (DCCCXLI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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842

Year 842 (DCCCXLII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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843

Year 843 (DCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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845

Year 845 (DCCCXLV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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846

Year 846 (DCCCXLVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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848

Year 848 (DCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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850

For codepage, see CP850. Year 850 (DCCCL) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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851

Year 851 (DCCCLI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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852

Year 852 (DCCCLII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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856

Year 856 (DCCCLVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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859

Year 859 (DCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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860

Year 860 (DCCCLX) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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862

Year 862 (DCCCLXII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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863

Year 863 (DCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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864

Year 864 (DCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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865

Year 865 (DCCCLXV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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867

Year 867 (DCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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868

Year 868 (DCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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869

Year 869 (DCCCLXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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869 Sanriku earthquake

The and associated tsunami struck the area around Sendai in the northern part of Honshu on 9 July 869 (26th day of 5th month, 11th year of Jōgan).

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870

Year 870 (DCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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871

Year 871 (DCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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875

Year 875 (DCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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878

Year 878 (DCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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879

Year 879 (DCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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884

Year 884 (DCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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885

Year 885 (DCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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886

Year 886 (DCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

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888

Year 888 (DCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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889

Year 889 (DCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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893

Year 893 (DCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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895

Year 895 (DCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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896

Year 896 (DCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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899

Year 899 (DCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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900

Year 900 (CM) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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902

Year 902 (CMII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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909

Year 909 (CMIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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915

Year 915 (CMXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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Redirects here:

9 Century, 9th Century, 9th centuries, 9th century AD, 9th century CE, 9th-century, IX Century, IX century, Nineth century, Ninth Century, Ninth century, Ninth-century, Year in Review 9th Century.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9th_century

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