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D

D (named dee) is the 4th letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. [1]

45 relations: ASCII, Aspirated consonant, , , , Ď, Ɗ, B, British Sign Language, Circumflex, D with stroke, Dalet, De (Cyrillic), Delta (letter), Dinar, Dot (diacritic), EBCDIC, Egyptian hieroglyphs, English alphabet, Eth, Fijian language, Greek alphabet, Icelandic language, International Phonetic Alphabet, ISO basic Latin alphabet, Letter (alphabet), Letter case, Logogram, Macron below, Merriam-Webster, Navajo language, Old Italic script, Pinyin, Prenasalized consonant, Roman numerals, Scottish Gaelic, Serif, Standard Chinese, University of Hawaii Press, Vertical direction, Vietnamese alphabet, Vietnamese dong, Voice (phonetics), Voiced alveolar stop, 500 (number).

ASCII

ASCII, abbreviated from American Standard Code for Information Interchange, is a character-encoding scheme (the IANA prefers the name US-ASCII).

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Aspirated consonant

In phonetics, aspiration is the strong burst of breath that accompanies either the release or, in the case of preaspiration, the closure of some obstruents.

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(minuscule) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, formed from D with the addition of a dot diacritic.

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Ḑ (minuscule ḑ) or D-cedilla is a letter of the Latin alphabet, consists of the letter "D" with the cedilla under it.

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The character ∂ (html element: ∂ or ∂, unicode: U+2202) or \partial is a stylized d mainly used as a mathematical symbol to denote a partial derivative such as \frac (read as "the partial derivative of z with respect to x").

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Ď

The grapheme Ď (minuscule: ď) is a letter in the Czech and Slovak alphabets.

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Ɗ

(minuscule) is a letter of the Latin alphabet.

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B

B or b (pronounced) is the 2nd letter in the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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British Sign Language

British Sign Language (BSL) is the sign language used in the United Kingdom (UK), and is the first or preferred language of some deaf people in the UK; there are 125,000 deaf adults in the UK who use BSL plus an estimated 20,000 children.

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Circumflex

The circumflex is a diacritic in the Latin, Greek and Cyrillic scripts that is used in the written forms of many languages and in various romanization and transcription schemes.

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D with stroke

Đ (lowercase: đ, Latin alphabet), known as crossed D or dyet, formed from base character D/d overlaid with a crossbar.

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Dalet

Dalet (also spelled Daleth or Daled) is the fourth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Dālet, Hebrew 'Dālet ד, Aramaic Dālath, Syriac Dālaṯ ܕ, and Arabic د (in abjadi order; 8th in modern order).

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De (Cyrillic)

De (Д д; italics: Д д) is a letter of the Cyrillic script.

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Delta (letter)

Delta (uppercase Δ, lowercase δ or 𝛿; Δέλτα Délta; Modern Greek) is the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet.

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Dinar

The dinar or denar is a main currency unit in modern circulation in nine mostly-Islamic countries, and has historic use in several more.

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Dot (diacritic)

When used as a diacritic mark, the term dot is usually reserved for the Interpunct (·), or to the glyphs 'combining dot above' and 'combining dot below' which may be combined with some letters of the extended Latin alphabets in use in Central European languages and Vietnamese.

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EBCDIC

Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code (EBCDIC) is an 8-bit character encoding used mainly on IBM mainframe and IBM midrange computer operating systems.

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Egyptian hieroglyphs

Egyptian hieroglyphs (Egyptian: mdw·w-nṯr, "god's words") were a formal writing system used by the ancient Egyptians that combined logographic and alphabetic elements.

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English alphabet

The modern English alphabet is a Latin alphabet consisting of 26 letters (each having an uppercase and a lowercase form) – the same letters that are found in the ISO basic Latin alphabet: The exact shape of printed letters varies depending on the typeface.

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Eth

Eth (uppercase: Ð, lowercase: ð; also spelled edh or eð) is a letter used in Old English, Middle English, Icelandic, Faroese (in which it is called edd), and Elfdalian.

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Fijian language

Fijian (Na Vosa Vakaviti) is an Austronesian language of the Malayo-Polynesian family spoken in Fiji.

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Greek alphabet

The Greek alphabet has been used to write the Greek language since the 8th century BC.

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Icelandic language

Icelandic is a North Germanic language, the language of Iceland.

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International Phonetic Alphabet

The International Phonetic Alphabet (unofficially—though commonly—abbreviated IPA)"The acronym 'IPA' strictly refers to the 'International Phonetic Association'.

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ISO basic Latin alphabet

The ISO Basic Latin alphabet is a Latin-script alphabet and consists of two sets of 26 letters, codified in various national and international standards and used widely in international communication.

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Letter (alphabet)

A letter is a grapheme (written character) in an alphabetic system of writing, such as the Greek alphabet and its descendants.

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Letter case

In orthography and typography, letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger upper case (also capital letters, capitals, caps, large letters, or more formally majuscule (see ''Terminology'') and smaller lower case (also small letters, or more formally minuscule, see ''Terminology'') in the written representation of certain languages. Here is a comparison of the upper and lower case versions of each letter included in the English alphabet (the exact representation will vary according to the font used): Typographically, the basic difference between the majuscules and minuscules is not that the majuscules are big and minuscules small, but that the majuscules generally have the same height, whilst the height of the minuscules varies, as some of them have parts higher or lower than the average, i.e. ascenders and descenders. In Times New Roman, for instance, b, d, f, h, k, l, t are the letters with ascenders, and g, j, p, q, y are the ones with descenders. Further to this, with old-style numerals still used by some traditional or classical fonts—although most do have a set of alternative Lining Figures— 6 and 8 make up the ascender set, and 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9 the descender set. Letter case is often prescribed by the grammar of a language or by the conventions of a particular discipline. In orthography, the uppercase is primarily reserved for special purposes, such as the first letter of a sentence or of a proper noun, which makes the lowercase the more common variant in text. In mathematics, letter case may indicate the relationship between objects with uppercase letters often representing "superior" objects (e.g. X could be a set containing the generic member x). Engineering design drawings are typically labelled entirely in upper-case letters, which are easier to distinguish than lowercase, especially when space restrictions require that the lettering be small.

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Logogram

Logographic systems, or logographies, are writing systems in which each symbol represents a concept rather than a sound, as in syllabaric or phonographic systems.

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Macron below

Macron below,, is a combining diacritical mark used in various orthographies.

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Merriam-Webster

Merriam-Webster, Incorporated, is an American company that publishes reference books, especially dictionaries.

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Navajo language

Navajo or Navaho (Navajo: Diné bizaad or Naabeehó bizaad) is a Native American language of the Athabaskan branch of the Na-Dené family, by which it is related to languages spoken across the western areas of North America.

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Old Italic script

Old Italic is any of several now extinct alphabet systems used on the Italian Peninsula in ancient times for various Indo-European languages (predominantly Italic) and non-Indo-European (e.g. Etruscan) languages.

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Pinyin

Pinyin, or Hanyu Pinyin, is the official phonetic system for transcribing the Mandarin pronunciations of Chinese characters into the Latin alphabet in China, Taiwan, and Singapore. It is often used to teach Standard Chinese and a pinyin without diacritic markers is often used in foreign publications to spell Chinese names familiar to non-Chinese and may be used as an input method to enter Chinese characters into computers. The Hanyu Pinyin system was developed in the 1950s based on earlier forms of romanization. It was published by the Chinese government in 1958 and revised several times. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) adopted pinyin as an international standard in 1982. The system was adopted as the official standard in Taiwan in 2009, where it is used for romanization alone rather than for educational and computer input purposes. The word Hànyǔ means the spoken language of the Han people and pīnyīn literally means "spelled-out sounds".

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Prenasalized consonant

Prenasalized consonants are phonetic sequences of a nasal and an obstruent (or a non-nasal sonorant) that behave phonologically like single consonants.

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Roman numerals

Roman numerals, the numeric system used in ancient Rome, employs combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet to signify values.

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Scottish Gaelic

Scottish Gaelic, sometimes also referred to as Gaelic (Gàidhlig), is a Celtic language native to Scotland.

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Serif

In typography, a serif is a small line attached to the end of a stroke in a letter or symbol.

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Standard Chinese

Standard Chinese, also known as Modern Standard Mandarin and Putonghua, sometimes simply referred to as "Mandarin", is a standard language that is the sole official language of both China and Taiwan, and also one of the four official languages of Singapore.

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University of Hawaii Press

The University of Hawaii Press is a university press that is part of the University of Hawaiokinai.

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Vertical direction

In astronomy, geography, geometry and related sciences and contexts, a direction passing by a given point is said to be vertical if it is locally aligned with the gradient of the gravity field, i.e., with the direction of the gravitational force (per unit mass, i.e. gravitational acceleration vector) at that point.

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Vietnamese alphabet

The Vietnamese alphabet (chữ Quốc ngữ; literally national language script) is the modern writing system for the Vietnamese language.

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Vietnamese dong

The đồng (sign: ₫; code: VND) has been the currency of Vietnam since May 3, 1978.

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Voice (phonetics)

Voice or voicing is a term used in phonetics and phonology to characterize speech sounds, with sounds described as either voiceless (unvoiced) or voiced.

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Voiced alveolar stop

The voiced alveolar stop is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

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500 (number)

500 (five hundred) is the natural number following 499 and preceding 501.

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Redirects here:

D (letter), Dee (letter), , , , 🄓, 🄳, 🅓, 🅳.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D

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