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Eocephalites

Eocephalites is an extinct genus from a well-known class of fossil cephalopods, the ammonites. [1]

8 relations: Ammonoidea, Animal, Cephalopod, Extinction, Fossil, Genus, Jurassic, Mollusca.

Ammonoidea

Ammonites are an extinct group of marine mollusc animals in the subclass Ammonoidea of the class Cephalopoda.

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Animal

Animals are multicellular, eukaryotic organisms of the kingdom Animalia (also called Metazoa).

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Cephalopod

A cephalopod (pronounced) is any member of the molluscan class Cephalopoda (Greek plural κεφαλόποδα, kephalópoda; "head-feet").

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Extinction

In biology and ecology, extinction is the end of an organism or of a group of organisms (taxon), normally a species.

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Fossil

Fossils (from Classical Latin fossilis; literally, "obtained by digging") are the preserved remains or traces of animals, plants, and other organisms from the remote past.

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Genus

In biology, a genus (plural: genera) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms.

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Jurassic

The Jurassic (from Jura Mountains) is a geologic period and system that extends from 201.3± 0.6 Ma (million years ago) to 145± 4 Ma; from the end of the Triassic to the beginning of the Cretaceous.

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Mollusca

The molluscs or mollusksSpelled mollusks in the USA, see reasons given in Rosenberg's; for the spelling mollusc see the reasons given by compose the large phylum of invertebrate animals known as the Mollusca.

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eocephalites

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