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First Epistle to the Corinthians

The First Epistle to the Corinthians (Α΄ Επιστολή προς Κορινθίους), often referred to as First Corinthians (and written as 1 Corinthians), is one of the Pauline epistles of the New Testament canon of Christian Bibles. [1]

52 relations: Acts of the Apostles, Anathema, Apollos, Apostle (Christian), Augustine of Hippo, Books of the Bible, Brothers of Jesus, Christ, Christian, Christian biblical canons, Christian headcovering, Development of the New Testament canon, Ephesus, Epistle, Epistle to the Romans, Glossolalia, God, Gospel of Matthew, Hellenization, Idolatry, Imitation of Christ, Interpolation (manuscripts), Jerome, Jerusalem in Christianity, Jesus, Jewish Christian, John Barton (theologian), John Muddiman, King James Version, Maranatha, Marcion of Sinope, Mennonite, New Testament, Paganism, Paul the Apostle, Paul the Apostle and women, Pauline epistles, Pauline privilege, Pentecost, Philippi, Resurrection, Resurrection of the dead, Saint Peter, Second Epistle to the Corinthians, Shipshewana, Indiana, Sosthenes, Tertullian, Third Epistle to the Corinthians, Yung Suk Kim, 1 Corinthians 11, ..., 1 Corinthians 13, 1 Corinthians 15. Expand index (2 more) »

Acts of the Apostles

The Acts of the Apostles (Πράξεις τῶν Ἀποστόλων, Práxeis tôn Apostólōn; Āctūs Apostolōrum), often referred to simply as Acts, is the fifth book of the New Testament; it tells of the founding of the Christian church and the spread of its message to the Roman empire.

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Anathema

Anathema is a term with several meanings.

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Apollos

Apollos (Ἀπολλώς) is a 1st century Alexandrian Jewish Christian mentioned several times in the New Testament.

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Apostle (Christian)

According to the Bible's New Testament, the Apostles were the primary disciples of Jesus, the central figure in Christianity.

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Augustine of Hippo

Augustine of Hippo (or; Oxford English Dictionary. March 2011. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 25 May 2011. Aurelius Augustinus Hipponensis; 13 November 354 – 28 August 430), also known as Saint Augustine or Saint Austin, and also sometimes as Blessed Augustine in the Eastern Orthodox Church, was an early Christian theologian and philosopher whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity and Western philosophy. He was the bishop of Hippo Regius (modern-day Annaba, Algeria), located in Numidia (Roman province of Africa). He is viewed as one of the most important Church Fathers in Western Christianity for his writings in the Patristic Era. Among his most important works are The City of God and Confessions. According to his contemporary, Jerome, Augustine "established anew the ancient Faith." In his early years, he was heavily influenced by Manichaeism and afterward by the Neo-Platonism of Plotinus. After his baptism and conversion to Christianity in 387, Augustine developed his own approach to philosophy and theology, accommodating a variety of methods and perspectives. Believing that the grace of Christ was indispensable to human freedom, he helped formulate the doctrine of original sin and made seminal contributions to the development of just war theory. When the Western Roman Empire began to disintegrate, Augustine developed the concept of the pre-Schism Catholic Church as a spiritual City of God, distinct from the material Earthly City. His thoughts profoundly influenced the medieval worldview. The segment of the Church that adhered to the concept of the Trinity as defined by the Council of Nicaea and the Council of Constantinople closely identified with Augustine's City of God. In the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion, he is a saint, a preeminent Doctor of the Church, and the patron of the Augustinians. His memorial is celebrated on 28 August, the day of his death. He is the patron saint of brewers, printers, theologians, the alleviation of sore eyes, and a number of cities and dioceses.. catholicapologetics.info Many Protestants, especially Calvinists, consider him to be one of the theological fathers of the Protestant Reformation due to his teachings on salvation and divine grace. In the East, some of his teachings are disputed and have in the 20th century in particular come under attack by such theologians as Father John Romanides. But other theologians and figures of the Orthodox Church have shown significant appropriation of his writings, chiefly Father Georges Florovsky. The most controversial doctrine surrounding his name is the filioque, which has been rejected by the Orthodox Church. Other disputed teachings include his views on original sin, the doctrine of grace, and predestination.Saint Augustine in the Greek Orthodox Tradition, by Rev. Dr. George C. Papademetriou. Webpage: http://www.goarch.org/ourfaith/ourfaith8153 Nevertheless, though considered to be mistaken on some points, he is still considered a saint, and has even had influence on some Eastern Church Fathers, most notably Saint Gregory Palamas. In the Orthodox Church his feast day is celebrated on 28 August and carries the title of Blessed.

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Books of the Bible

Different religious groups include different books in their Biblical canons, in varying orders, and sometimes divide or combine books, or incorporate additional material into canonical books.

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Brothers of Jesus

The New Testament describes James, Joseph (Joses), Judas (Jude) and Simon as brothers of Jesus.

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Christ

Christ (Χριστός, Christós, meaning "anointed") is a translation of the Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ (Māšîaḥ) and the Syriac ܡܫܝܚܐ (M'shiha), the Messiah, and is used as a title for Jesus in the New Testament.

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Christian

A Christian is a person who adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.

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Christian biblical canons

A Christian biblical canon is the set of books that a Christian denomination regards as divinely inspired and thus constituting a Christian Bible.

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Christian headcovering

Christian headcovering is the veiling of the head by women in a variety of Christian traditions.

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Development of the New Testament canon

The canon of the New Testament is the set of books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting the New Testament of the Christian Bible.

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Ephesus

Ephesus (Ἔφεσος Ephesos; Efes; ultimately from Hittite Apasa) was an ancient Greek city on the coast of Ionia, three kilometres southwest of present-day Selçuk in İzmir Province, Turkey.

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Epistle

An epistle (Greek ἐπιστολή, epistolē, "letter") is a writing directed or sent to a person or group of people, usually an elegant and formal didactic letter.

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Epistle to the Romans

The Epistle to the Romans, often shortened to Romans, is the sixth book in the New Testament.

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Glossolalia

Glossolalia or (speaking in tongues) is the fluid vocalizing of speech-like syllables that lack any readily comprehended meaning, in some cases as part of religious practice.

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God

In monotheism and henotheism, God is conceived as the Supreme Being and principal object of faith.

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Gospel of Matthew

The Gospel According to Matthew (κατὰ Ματθαῖον εὐαγγέλιον, kata Matthaion euangelion, τὸ εὐαγγέλιον κατὰ Ματθαῖον, to euangelion kata Matthaion) (Gospel of Matthew or simply Matthew) is one of the four canonical gospels, one of the three synoptic gospels, and the first book of the New Testament.

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Hellenization

Hellenization (American English) or Hellenisation (British) is the historical spread of ancient Greek culture and, to a lesser extent, language, over foreign peoples conquered by Greece or brought into its sphere of influence, particularly during the Hellenistic period following the campaigns of Alexander the Great (King of Macedon 336–323 BCE).

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Idolatry

Idolatry is the worship of an idol or a physical object as a representation of a god.

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Imitation of Christ

In Christian theology, the Imitation of Christ is the practice of following the example of Jesus.

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Interpolation (manuscripts)

An interpolation, in relation to literature and especially ancient manuscripts, is an entry or passage in a text that was not written by the original author.

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Jerome

Saint Jerome (Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus; Εὐσέβιος Σωφρόνιος Ἱερώνυμος; c.  347 – 30 September 420) was a Catholic priest, confessor, theologian and historian, who also became a Doctor of the Church.

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Jerusalem in Christianity

For Christians, Jerusalem's role in first century Christianity, during the ministry of Jesus and the Apostolic Age, as recorded in the New Testament, gives it great importance, in addition to its role in the Old Testament, the Hebrew Bible.

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Jesus

Jesus (Ἰησοῦς; 7–2 BC to AD 30–33), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus Christ, is the central figure of Christianity, whom the teachings of most Christian denominations hold to be the Son of God.

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Jewish Christian

Jewish Christians, also Hebrew Christians or Judeo-Christians, were the original members of the Jewish movement that later became Christianity.

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John Barton (theologian)

The Revd Professor John Barton FBA (born 1948) is the Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture.

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John Muddiman

The Reverend Dr John Muddiman was the G. B. Caird Fellow in New Testament Theology at Mansfield College, Oxford from 1990 until his retirement in 2012.

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King James Version

The King James Version (KJV), also known as the Authorized Version (AV) or King James Bible (KJB), is an English translation of the Christian Bible for the Church of England begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.

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Maranatha

Maranatha (either מרנא תא: maranâ thâ' or מרן אתא: maran 'athâ') is a two-word Aramaic formula occurring only once in the New Testament (see Aramaic of Jesus) and also in the Didache, which is part of the Apostolic Fathers' collection.

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Marcion of Sinope

Marcion of Sinope (Greek: Μαρκίων Σινώπης; c. 85 – c. 160) was an important leader in early Christianity.

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Mennonite

The Mennonites are Christian groups belonging to the church communities of Anabaptist denominations named after Menno Simons (1496–1561) of Friesland (at that time, a part of the Holy Roman Empire).

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New Testament

The New Testament (Koine Greek: Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē) is the second major part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, which is based on the Hebrew Bible.

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Paganism

Paganism is a term that developed among the Christian community of southern Europe during late antiquity to describe religions other than their own or Judaism.

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Paul the Apostle

Paul the Apostle (Paulos; c. 5 – c. 67), originally known as Saul of Tarsus (שאול התרסי; Saulos Tarseus), was an apostle (though not one of the Twelve Apostles) who taught the gospel of Christ to the first-century world.

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Paul the Apostle and women

The relationship between Paul the Apostle and women is an important element in the theological debate about Christianity and women because Paul was the first writer to give ecclesiastical directives about the role of women in the Church.

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Pauline epistles

The Pauline epistles, Epistles of Paul, or Letters of Paul, are the fourteen New Testament books which have the name Paul (Παῦλος) as the first word, hence claiming authorship by Paul the Apostle.

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Pauline privilege

The Pauline privilege (Privilegium Paulinum) is a Christian doctrine drawn from the apostle Paul's instructions in the First Epistle to the Corinthians.

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Pentecost

Pentecost (Πεντηκοστή, Pentēkostē, "the fiftieth ") is the Greek name for Shavuot, the Feast of Weeks, a prominent feast in the calendar of ancient Israel celebrating the giving of the Law to Moses at Sinai (still celebrated in Judaism as Shavuot).

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Philippi

Philippi (Φίλιπποι, Philippoi) was a city in eastern Macedonia, established by Philip II of Macedon in 356 BC and abandoned in the 14th century after the Ottoman conquest.

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Resurrection

Resurrection (from Latin resurrectio) is the concept of a living being coming back to life after death.

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Resurrection of the dead

Resurrection of the dead, or resurrection from the dead (Koine: ἀναστάσεως τῶν νεκρῶν, trans: anastasis ton nekros; literally: "a standing up again"; "raising up (of) the dead") is a term frequently used in the New Testament to describe an event by which a person, or people are resurrected (brought back to life).

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Saint Peter

Saint Peter (Petrus, Petros, Syriac/Aramaic: ܫܸܡܥܘܿܢ ܟܹ݁ܐܦ݂ܵܐ, Shemayon Keppa, שמעון בר יונה; died 64 AD), also known as Simon Peter, Simeon, or Simōn, according to the New Testament, was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus Christ, leaders of the early Christian Church.

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Second Epistle to the Corinthians

The Second Epistle to the Corinthians, often referred to as Second Corinthians (and written as 2 Corinthians), is the eighth book of the New Testament of the Bible.

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Shipshewana, Indiana

Shipshewana is a town in Newbury Township, LaGrange County, Indiana, United States.

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Sosthenes

Sosthenes (Greek, "safe in strength") was the chief ruler of the synagogue at Corinth, who, according to the New Testament, was seized and beaten by the mob in the presence of Gallio, the Roman governor, when he refused to proceed against Paul at the instigation of the Jews (Acts 18:12-17).

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Tertullian

Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, anglicised as Tertullian (c. 155 – c. 240 AD), was a prolific early Christian author from Carthage in the Roman province of Africa.

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Third Epistle to the Corinthians

The Third Epistle to the Corinthians is a pseudepigraphical text under the name of Paul the Apostle.

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Yung Suk Kim

Yung Suk Kim is a Korean-American biblical scholar and author.

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1 Corinthians 11

1 Corinthians 11 is the eleventh chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians in the New Testament of the Christian Bible.

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1 Corinthians 13

1 Corinthians 13 is the thirteenth chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians in the New Testament of the Christian Bible.

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1 Corinthians 15

1 Corinthians 15 is the fifteenth chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians by Paul the Apostle.

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Redirects here:

1 Cor, 1 Cor., 1 Corinthians, 1 Corinthians 9:22, 1 Corintians, 1 Cr., 1Cr., 1st Corinthians, All Things to All Men, All things to all men, Corinthians, Corinthians, First Epistle to the, First Corinthians, First Letter of Paul to the Church at Corinth, First Letter to the Corinthians, First epistle to the Corinthians, First epistle to the corinthians, First letter to the Corinthians, First letter to the corinthians, I Cor., I Corinthians, I Cr., Paul's First Letter to the Corinthians, THE FIRST LETTER OF PAUL TO THE CORINTHIANS.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Epistle_to_the_Corinthians

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