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J

J is the 10th letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. [1]

120 relations: Affricate consonant, Albanian language, ASCII, Azerbaijani language, Ĵ, Baltic languages, Basque language, Beijing, Cambridge University Press, Catalan language, Celtic languages, Chinese language, Combining character, Croatian language, Czech language, Danish language, Diaphoneme, Dimensional analysis, Diphthong, Dotless j, Dutch language, EBCDIC, English alphabet, English language, Estonian language, Finnish language, Fjord, French language, Fricative consonant, Galician language, German language, Germanic languages, Gian Giorgio Trissino, Greek language, Gwich’in language, Hallelujah, Hän language, Hungarian language, Hyperforeignism, I, Icelandic language, Iesi, Igbo language, Indonesian language, International Phonetic Alphabet, International System of Units, ISO basic Latin alphabet, Italian language, J with stroke, Je (Cyrillic), ..., Joule, Juventus F.C., Kaska language, Kiowa language, Konkani language, Latin, Latin script, Latvian language, Letojanni, Letter (alphabet), Letter case, Lithuanian language, Loanword, Luigi Pirandello, Luminous intensity, Luxembourgish language, Macedonian language, Malay language, Microsoft, Microsoft Developer Network, Middle High German, Navajo language, Norwegian language, Old English, Old French, Oromo language, Palatal approximant, Pashto, Pinyin, Polish language, Portuguese language, Q, Roman numerals, Romance languages, Romanian language, Royal Thai General System of Transcription, Sans-serif, Scots language, Serbian language, Shona language, Sicilian language, Slavic languages, Slovak language, Smiley, Somali language, Spanish language, Swahili language, Swash (typography), Swedish language, Tagish language, Taj Mahal, Tatar language, Tlingit language, Turkish language, Turkmen language, Tutchone language, U, Unicode Consortium, Uralic languages, Voice (phonetics), Voiced palatal fricative, Voiced palatal stop, Voiced palato-alveolar sibilant, Wikisource, Wingdings, X, Yodh, Yoruba language, Z, Zulu language. Expand index (70 more) »

Affricate consonant

An affricate is a consonant that begins as a stop and releases as a fricative, generally with the same place of articulation (most often coronal).

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Albanian language

Albanian (shqip or gjuha shqipe, meaning Albanian language) is an Indo-European language spoken by five million people, primarily in Albania, Kosovo, the Republic of Macedonia, and Greece, but also in other areas of Southeastern Europe in which there is an Albanian population, including Montenegro and the Preševo Valley of Serbia.

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ASCII

ASCII, abbreviated from American Standard Code for Information Interchange, is a character-encoding scheme (the IANA prefers the name US-ASCII).

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Azerbaijani language

Azerbaijani or Azeri, sometimes referred to as Azerbaijani Turkish or Azeri Turkish, is a Turkic language spoken primarily by the Azerbaijani people, who are concentrated mainly in the South Caucasus geographical region.

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Ĵ

Ĵ or ĵ (J circumflex) is a letter in Esperanto orthography representing the sound.

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Baltic languages

The Baltic languages belong to the Balto-Slavic branch of the Indo-European language family, and are spoken by the Balts.

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Basque language

Basque (Basque: Euskara) is a language isolate ancestral to the Basque people.

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Beijing

Beijing, formerly Peking, is the capital of the People's Republic of China and one of the most populous cities in the world.

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Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

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Catalan language

Catalan (Laurie Bauer, 2007, The Linguistics Student’s Handbook, Edinburgh; also or autonym: català or) is a Romance language named for its origins in Catalonia, in what is northeastern Spain and adjoining parts of France.

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Celtic languages

The Celtic languages (usually pronounced but sometimes) are descended from Proto-Celtic, or "Common Celtic"; a branch of the greater Indo-European language family.

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Chinese language

Chinese (汉语 / 漢語; Hànyǔ or 中文; Zhōngwén) is a group of related but in many cases mutually unintelligible language varieties, forming a branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family.

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Combining character

In digital typography, combining characters are characters that are intended to modify other characters.

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Croatian language

Croatian (hrvatski) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language used by Croats, principally in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Serbian province of Vojvodina and other neighbouring countries.

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Czech language

Czech (čeština), formerly known as Bohemian (lingua Bohemica in Latin), is a West Slavic language spoken by over 10 million people.

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Danish language

Danish (dansk; dansk sprog) is a North Germanic language spoken by around six million people, principally in Denmark and in the region of Southern Schleswig in northern Germany, where it has minority language status.

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Diaphoneme

A diaphoneme is an abstract phonological unit that identifies a correspondence between related sounds of two or more varieties of a language or language cluster.

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Dimensional analysis

In engineering and science, dimensional analysis is the analysis of the relationships between different physical quantities by identifying their fundamental dimensions (such as length, mass, time, and electric charge) and units of measure (such as miles vs. kilometers, or pounds vs. kilograms vs. grams) and tracking these dimensions as calculations or comparisons are performed.

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Diphthong

A diphthong (Greek: δίφθογγος, diphthongos, literally "two sounds" or "two tones"), also known as a gliding vowel, refers to two adjacent vowel sounds occurring within the same syllable.

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Dotless j

ȷ is a modified letter of the Latin alphabet, obtained by writing the lowercase letter j without a dot.

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Dutch language

Dutch is a West Germanic language that is spoken in the European Union by about 23 million people as a first language—including most of the population of the Netherlands and about sixty percent of that of Belgium—and by another 5 million as a second language.

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EBCDIC

Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code (EBCDIC) is an 8-bit character encoding used mainly on IBM mainframe and IBM midrange computer operating systems.

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English alphabet

The modern English alphabet is a Latin alphabet consisting of 26 letters (each having an uppercase and a lowercase form) – the same letters that are found in the ISO basic Latin alphabet: The exact shape of printed letters varies depending on the typeface.

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English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

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Estonian language

Estonian (eesti keel) is the official language of Estonia, spoken natively by about 1.1 million people in Estonia and tens of thousands in various migrant communities.

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Finnish language

Finnish (or suomen kieli) is the language spoken by the majority of the population in Finland and by ethnic Finns outside Finland.

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Fjord

Geologically, a fjord or fiord is a long, narrow inlet with steep sides or cliffs, created by glacial erosion.

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French language

French (le français or la langue française) is a Romance language, belonging to the Indo-European family.

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Fricative consonant

Fricatives are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together.

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Galician language

Galician (or; galego) is an Indo-European language of the Western Ibero-Romance branch.

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German language

German (Deutsch) is a West Germanic language that derives most of its vocabulary from the Germanic branch of the Indo-European language family.

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Germanic languages

The Germanic languages are a branch of the Indo-European language family spoken natively by a population of approximately 500 million people mainly in North America, Oceania, Central Europe, Western and Northern Europe.

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Gian Giorgio Trissino

Gian Giorgio Trissino (8 July 1478 – 8 December 1550), also called Giovan Giorgio Trissino, was an Italian Renaissance humanist, poet, dramatist, diplomat, and grammarian.

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Greek language

Greek or Hellenic (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to the southern Balkans, the Aegean Islands, western Asia Minor, parts of northern and Eastern Anatolia and the South Caucasus, southern Italy, Albania and Cyprus.

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Gwich’in language

The Gwich’in language is the Athabaskan language of the Gwich’in indigenous people.

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Hallelujah

Hallelujah is a transliteration of the Hebrew word הַלְּלוּיָהּ (Modern halleluya, Tiberian halləlûyāh), which is composed of two elements: הַלְּלוּ (second-person imperative masculine plural form of the Hebrew verb hallal: an exhortation to "praise" addressed to several peoplePage H. Kelley, Biblical Hebrew, an Introductory Grammar, page 169. Ethics & Public Policy Center, 1959. ISBN 978-0-8028-0598-0.) and יָהּ (the names of God Jah or Yah).

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Hän language

The Hän language (Dawson, Han-Kutchin, Moosehide) is a Native American endangered language spoken in only two places: Eagle, Alaska and Dawson City, Yukon.

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Hungarian language

Hungarian is the official language of Hungary and one of the 24 official languages of the European Union.

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Hyperforeignism

A hyperforeignism is a type of qualitative hypercorrection that involves speakers misidentifying the distribution of a pattern found in loanwords and extending it to other environments, including words and phrases not borrowed from the language that the pattern derives from.

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I

I (named i, plural ies) is the 9th letter and the third vowel in the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Icelandic language

Icelandic is a North Germanic language, the language of Iceland.

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Iesi

Iesi (Jesi) is a town and comune of the province of Ancona in Marche, Italy.

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Igbo language

Igbo (Laurie Bauer, 2007, The Linguistics Student's Handbook, Edinburgh archaically Ibo) (Igbo: Asụsụ Igbo), is the principal native language of the Igbo people, an ethnic group of southeastern Nigeria.

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Indonesian language

Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) is the official language of Indonesia.

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International Phonetic Alphabet

The International Phonetic Alphabet (unofficially—though commonly—abbreviated IPA)"The acronym 'IPA' strictly refers to the 'International Phonetic Association'.

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International System of Units

The International System of Units (Système International d'Unités, SI) is the modern form of the metric system, and is the most widely used system of measurement.

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ISO basic Latin alphabet

The ISO Basic Latin alphabet is a Latin-script alphabet and consists of two sets of 26 letters, codified in various national and international standards and used widely in international communication.

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Italian language

Italian (or lingua italiana) is a Romance language spoken mainly in Europe: Italy, Switzerland, San Marino, Vatican City, as a second language in Albania, Malta, Slovenia and Croatia, by minorities in Crimea, Eritrea, France, Libya, Monaco, Montenegro, Romania and Somalia, – Gordon, Raymond G., Jr.

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J with stroke

J with stroke (majuscule, minuscule) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, derived from J with the addition of a bar through the letter.

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Je (Cyrillic)

Je (Ј ј; italics: Ј ј) is a letter of the Cyrillic script, taken over from the Latin letter J.Maretić, Tomislav.

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Joule

The joule, symbol J, is a derived unit of energy in the International System of Units.

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Juventus F.C.

Juventus Football Club S.p.A. (from LatinThe name "Juventus" is a literal license in Piedmontese language of the Latin substantive iuventus (youth in English language). iuventus: youth, IPA pronunciation for Italian language), commonly referred to as Juventus and colloquially as Juve (pronounced), is a professional Italian association football club based in Turin, Piedmont.

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Kaska language

Kaska is a Northern Athabaskan language spoken by the Kaska people in the southeastern Yukon territory and northern British Columbia in Canada.

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Kiowa language

Kiowa or Cáuijògà / Cáuijò:gyà (″language of the Cáuigù (Kiowa)″) is a Tanoan language spoken by the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma in primarily Caddo, Kiowa, and Comanche counties.

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Konkani language

Konkani is an Indo-Aryan language belonging to the Indo-European family of languages and is spoken along the western coast of India.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Latin script

Latin script, or Roman script, is a set of graphic signs (script) based on the letters of the classical Latin alphabet, a form of the Cumaean Greek version of the Greek alphabet.

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Latvian language

Latvian (latviešu valoda) is the official state language of Latvia.

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Letojanni

Letojanni (Sicilian: Letujanni) is a comune (municipality), and coastal resort in the Province of Messina in the Italian region Sicily, located about east of Palermo and about southwest of Messina.

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Letter (alphabet)

A letter is a grapheme (written character) in an alphabetic system of writing, such as the Greek alphabet and its descendants.

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Letter case

In orthography and typography, letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger upper case (also capital letters, capitals, caps, large letters, or more formally majuscule (see ''Terminology'') and smaller lower case (also small letters, or more formally minuscule, see ''Terminology'') in the written representation of certain languages. Here is a comparison of the upper and lower case versions of each letter included in the English alphabet (the exact representation will vary according to the font used): Typographically, the basic difference between the majuscules and minuscules is not that the majuscules are big and minuscules small, but that the majuscules generally have the same height, whilst the height of the minuscules varies, as some of them have parts higher or lower than the average, i.e. ascenders and descenders. In Times New Roman, for instance, b, d, f, h, k, l, t are the letters with ascenders, and g, j, p, q, y are the ones with descenders. Further to this, with old-style numerals still used by some traditional or classical fonts—although most do have a set of alternative Lining Figures— 6 and 8 make up the ascender set, and 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9 the descender set. Letter case is often prescribed by the grammar of a language or by the conventions of a particular discipline. In orthography, the uppercase is primarily reserved for special purposes, such as the first letter of a sentence or of a proper noun, which makes the lowercase the more common variant in text. In mathematics, letter case may indicate the relationship between objects with uppercase letters often representing "superior" objects (e.g. X could be a set containing the generic member x). Engineering design drawings are typically labelled entirely in upper-case letters, which are easier to distinguish than lowercase, especially when space restrictions require that the lettering be small.

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Lithuanian language

Lithuanian (lietuvių kalba) is the official state language of Lithuania and is recognized as one of the official languages of the European Union.

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Loanword

A loanword (or loan word or loan-word) is a word borrowed from a donor language and incorporated into a recipient language without translation.

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Luigi Pirandello

Luigi Pirandello (28 June 1867 – 10 December 1936) was an Italian dramatist, novelist, poet and short story writer.

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Luminous intensity

In photometry, luminous intensity is a measure of the wavelength-weighted power emitted by a light source in a particular direction per unit solid angle, based on the luminosity function, a standardized model of the sensitivity of the human eye.

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Luxembourgish language

Luxembourgish, Luxemburgish or Letzeburgesch (Luxembourgish: Lëtzebuergesch) is a Moselle Franconian variety of West Central German that is spoken mainly in Luxembourg.

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Macedonian language

Macedonian (македонски јазик, makedonski jazik) is a South Slavic language, spoken as a first language by around two million people, principally in Macedonia and the Macedonian diaspora, with a smaller number of speakers throughout the transnational region of Macedonia.

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Malay language

Malay (Bahasa Melayu; Jawi script: بهاس ملايو) is a major language of the Austronesian family.

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Microsoft

Microsoft Corporation (commonly referred to as Microsoft) is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Redmond, Washington, that develops, manufactures, licenses, supports and sells computer software, consumer electronics and personal computers and services.

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Microsoft Developer Network

Microsoft Developer Network, widely referred to by its abbreviation, MSDN, is the portion of Microsoft responsible for managing the firm's relationship with developers and testers, such as hardware developers interested in the operating system (OS), and software developers developing on the various OS platforms or using the API and/or scripting languages of Microsoft's applications.

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Middle High German

Middle High German (Mittelhochdeutsch), abbreviated MHG (Mhd.), is the term used for the period in the history of the German language between 1050 and 1350.

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Navajo language

Navajo or Navaho (Navajo: Diné bizaad or Naabeehó bizaad) is a Native American language of the Athabaskan branch of the Na-Dené family, by which it is related to languages spoken across the western areas of North America.

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Norwegian language

Norwegian (norsk) is a North Germanic language spoken mainly in Norway, where it is the sole official language.

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Old English

Old English (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc) or Anglo-Saxon is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages.

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Old French

Old French (franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French ancien français) was the Gallo-Romance dialect continuum spoken from the 9th century to the 14th century.

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Oromo language

Oromo (pron. or) is an Afroasiatic language.

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Palatal approximant

The voiced palatal approximant is a type of consonantal sound used in many spoken languages.

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Pashto

No description.

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Pinyin

Pinyin, or Hanyu Pinyin, is the official phonetic system for transcribing the Mandarin pronunciations of Chinese characters into the Latin alphabet in China, Taiwan, and Singapore. It is often used to teach Standard Chinese and a pinyin without diacritic markers is often used in foreign publications to spell Chinese names familiar to non-Chinese and may be used as an input method to enter Chinese characters into computers. The Hanyu Pinyin system was developed in the 1950s based on earlier forms of romanization. It was published by the Chinese government in 1958 and revised several times. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) adopted pinyin as an international standard in 1982. The system was adopted as the official standard in Taiwan in 2009, where it is used for romanization alone rather than for educational and computer input purposes. The word Hànyǔ means the spoken language of the Han people and pīnyīn literally means "spelled-out sounds".

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Polish language

Polish (język polski, polszczyzna) is a Slavic language spoken primarily in Poland and the native language of the Poles.

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Portuguese language

Portuguese (português or, in full, língua portuguesa) is a Romance language and the sole official language of Portugal, Brazil, Mozambique, Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau and São Tomé and Príncipe.

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Q

Q (named cue) is the 17th letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Roman numerals

Roman numerals, the numeric system used in ancient Rome, employs combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet to signify values.

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Romance languages

The Romance languages— sometimes called the Latin languages, and occasionally the Romanic or Neo-Latin languages—are the modern languages that evolved from spoken Latin between the sixth and ninth centuries A.D. and that thus form a branch of the Italic languages within the Indo-European language family.

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Romanian language

Romanian (obsolete spellings Rumanian, Roumanian; autonym: română, limba română, "the Romanian language", or românește, lit. "in Romanian") is a Romance language spoken by around 24 million people as a native language, primarily in Romania and Moldova, and by another 4 million people as a second language.

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Royal Thai General System of Transcription

The Royal Thai General System of Transcription (RTGS; การถอดอักษรไทยเป็นอักษรโรมันแบบถ่ายเสียงของราชบัณฑิตยสถาน) is the official system for rendering Thai language words in the Latin alphabet, published by the Royal Institute of Thailand.

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Sans-serif

In typography, a sans-serif, sans serif, gothic, san serif or simply sans typeface is one that does not have the small projecting features called "serifs" at the end of strokes.

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Scots language

Scots is the Germanic language variety spoken in Lowland Scotland and parts of Ulster (where the local dialect is known as Ulster Scots).

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Serbian language

Serbian (српски, Latin: srpski) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language used chiefly by Serbs in Serbia, Montenegro, and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

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Shona language

Shona, or chiShona, is a Bantu language, native to the Shona people of Zimbabwe.

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Sicilian language

tags.

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Slavic languages

The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup of Indo-European languages, have speakers in most of Eastern Europe, much of the Balkans, parts of Central Europe, and the northern part of Asia.

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Slovak language

Slovak (slovenský jazyk,; slovenčina; not to be confused with slovenski jezik or slovenščina, the native names of the Slovene language) is an Indo-European language that belongs to the West Slavic languages (together with Czech, Polish, Silesian, Kashubian, and Sorbian).

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Smiley

A smiley (sometimes simply called a happy or smiling face) is a stylized representation of a smiling humanoid face, an important part of popular culture.

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Somali language

Somali Retrieved on 21 September 2013 (Af-Soomaali) is an Afroasiatic language, belonging to that family's Cushitic branch.

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Spanish language

Spanish (español), also called Castilian, is a Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain and today has hundreds of millions of native-speakers.

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Swahili language

Swahili, also known as Kiswahili, is a Bantu language and the first language of the Swahili people.

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Swash (typography)

A swash is a typographical flourish, such as an exaggerated serif, terminal, tail, entry stroke, etc.

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Swedish language

Swedish is a North Germanic language, spoken natively by about 9 million people predominantly in Sweden and parts of Finland, where it has equal legal standing with Finnish.

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Tagish language

Tagish is an endangered Northern Athabaskan language spoken by the Tagish people in the Yukon Territory in Canada.

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Taj Mahal

The Taj Mahal (more often; from Persian and Arabic, "crown of palaces") is a white marble mausoleum located on the southern bank of the Yamuna River in the Indian city of Agra.

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Tatar language

The Tatar language (татар теле, татарча, tatar tele, tatarça, تاتار تيلی) is a Turkic language spoken by Volga Tatars mainly located in modern Tatarstan, Bashkortostan and Nizhny Novgorod Oblast.

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Tlingit language

The Tlingit language (English:,; Tlingit: Lingít) is spoken by the Tlingit people of Southeast Alaska and Western Canada.

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Turkish language

Turkish, also referred to as Istanbul Turkish, is the most widely spoken of the Turkic languages, with around 10–15 million native speakers in Southeastern Europe and 55–60 million native speakers in Western Asia.

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Turkmen language

Turkmen or Torkoman (Türkmençe, türkmen dili, түркменче, түркмен дили, تورکمن تیلی,تورکمنچه), is a Turkic language spoken by 3½ million people in Turkmenistan, where it is the official state language, as well as by around 2 million people in northeastern Iran and 1½ million people in northwestern Afghanistan.

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Tutchone language

Tutchone is a threatened Athabaskan language spoken in the Yukon Territory in Canada.

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U

U (named u, plural ues) is the 21st letter in the ISO basic Latin alphabet and the fifth and last vowel in the English alphabet (if W and Y are not counted as vowels).

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Unicode Consortium

The Unicode Consortium (Unicode Inc.) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that coordinates the development of the Unicode standard.

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Uralic languages

The Uralic languages (sometimes called Uralian languages) constitute a language family of some 38 languages spoken by approximately 25 million people.

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Voice (phonetics)

Voice or voicing is a term used in phonetics and phonology to characterize speech sounds, with sounds described as either voiceless (unvoiced) or voiced.

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Voiced palatal fricative

The voiced palatal fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

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Voiced palatal stop

The voiced palatal stop or voiced palatal plosive is a type of consonantal sound, used in some vocal languages.

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Voiced palato-alveolar sibilant

The voiced palato-alveolar sibilant fricative or voiced domed postalveolar sibilant fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

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Wikisource

Wikisource is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation.

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Wingdings

Wingdings are a series of dingbat fonts which render letters as a variety of symbols.

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X

X (named ex, plural exes) is the 24th letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Yodh

Yodh (also spelled Yud, Yod, Jod, or Jodh) is the tenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Yōd, Hebrew Yōd, Aramaic Yodh, Syriac Yōḏ, and Arabic ي (in abjadi order, 28th in modern order).

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Yoruba language

Yoruba (Yor. èdè Yorùbá) is a language spoken in West Africa mainly in Nigeria.

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Z

Z (named zed ' or zee "Z", Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition (1989); Merriam-Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (1993); "zee", op. cit.) is the 26th and final letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Zulu language

Zulu or isiZulu is the language of the Zulu people with about 10 million speakers, the vast majority (over 95%) of whom live in South Africa.

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Redirects here:

I with hook, J (letter), Jay (letter), Jot (letter), Yot (letter), Ϳ, ϳ, , , , , 🄙, 🄹, 🅙, 🅹.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J

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