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Melvin B. Tolson

Melvin Beaunorus Tolson (February 6, 1898 – August 29, 1966) was an American Modernist poet, educator, columnist, and politician. [1]

60 relations: African American, Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, Cancer, Charlottesville, Virginia, Columbia University, Communication studies, Dallas, Debate, Denzel Washington, Dust Bowl, Edgar Lee Masters, English language, Epic poetry, European American, Fisk University, Greek alphabet, Greek language, Guthrie, Oklahoma, Harlem Renaissance, Hebrew language, Historically black colleges and universities, Iowa, James Farmer, Kansas City metropolitan area, Karl Shapiro, Langston Hughes, Langston University, Langston, Oklahoma, Latin, Liberia, Library of Congress, Lincoln University (Pennsylvania), List of poets from the United States, List of teachers portrayed in films, Marshall, Texas, Master's degree, Mayor, Methodism, Middlebury College, Moberly, Missouri, Modernist poetry, Muscogee, Nathan Hare, New York City, Oklahoma, Omega Psi Phi, Oprah Winfrey, Poet laureate, Southern United States, Southern University, ..., Sweatt v. Painter, Texas, The Atlantic, The Great Debaters, Tuskegee University, United States, University of Oklahoma, University of Southern California, University of Virginia, Wiley College. Expand index (10 more) »

African American

African American, also referred to as Black American or Afro-American, is an ethnic group of Americans (citizens or residents of the United States) with total or partial ancestry from any of the native populations of Sub-Saharan Africa.

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Bread Loaf Writers' Conference

The Middlebury Bread Loaf Writers' Conference is a writers' conference held every summer at the Bread Loaf Inn, near Bread Loaf Mountain, east of Middlebury, Vermont.

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Cancer

Cancer, also known as a malignant tumor or malignant neoplasm, is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body.

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Charlottesville, Virginia

Charlottesville is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

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Columbia University

Columbia University (officially Columbia University in the City of New York) is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City.

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Communication studies

Communication studies is an academic discipline that deals with processes of human communication.

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Dallas

Dallas is a major city in Texas and is the largest urban center of the fourth most populous metropolitan area in the United States.

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Debate

Debate is contention in argument; strife, dissension, quarrelling, controversy; especially a formal discussion of subjects before a public assembly or legislature, in Parliament or in any deliberative assembly.

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Denzel Washington

Denzel Hayes Washington, Jr. (born December 28, 1954) is an American actor and filmmaker.

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Dust Bowl

The Dust Bowl, also known as the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the US and Canadian prairies during the 1930s; severe drought and a failure to apply dryland farming methods to prevent wind erosion (the Aeolian processes) caused the phenomenon.

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Edgar Lee Masters

Edgar Lee Masters (August 23, 1868 – March 5, 1950) was an American attorney, poet, biographer, and dramatist.

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English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

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Epic poetry

An epic (from the Ancient Greek adjective ἐπικός (epikos), from ἔπος (epos) "word, story, poem") is a lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.

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European American

European Americans (also known as Euro-Americans) are Americans with ancestry from Europe.

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Fisk University

Fisk University is a historically black university founded in 1866 in Nashville, Tennessee, United States.

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Greek alphabet

The Greek alphabet has been used to write the Greek language since the 8th century BC.

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Greek language

Greek or Hellenic (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to the southern Balkans, the Aegean Islands, western Asia Minor, parts of northern and Eastern Anatolia and the South Caucasus, southern Italy, Albania and Cyprus.

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Guthrie, Oklahoma

Guthrie (Pawnee: Ruhkarihraapi, Ruhkárihaapi) is a city and county seat in Logan County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City Metroplex.

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Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance was a movement that spanned the 1920s.

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Hebrew language

Hebrew is a West Semitic language of the Afroasiatic language family.

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Historically black colleges and universities

Historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are institutions of higher education in the United States that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the black community.

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Iowa

Iowa is a U.S. state in the Midwestern United States, a region sometimes called the "American Heartland".

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James Farmer

James Leonard Farmer, Jr. (January 12, 1920 – July 9, 1999) was a civil rights activist and leader in the American Civil Rights Movement "who pushed for nonviolent protest to dismantle segregation, and served alongside Martin Luther King Jr." He was the initiator and organizer of the 1961 Freedom Ride, which eventually led to the desegregation of inter-state transportation in the United States.

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Kansas City metropolitan area

Kansas City (KC) is a fourteen-county metropolitan area, anchored by Kansas City, Missouri, that spans the border between the U.S. states of Missouri and Kansas.

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Karl Shapiro

Karl Jay Shapiro (November 10, 1913 – May 14, 2000) was an American poet.

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Langston Hughes

James Mercer Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967) was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist from Joplin, Missouri.

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Langston University

Langston University is a public university in Langston, Oklahoma, United States.

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Langston, Oklahoma

Langston is a town in Logan County, Oklahoma, United States, and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Liberia

Liberia, Cape Mesurado, Grain Coast, Pepper Coast, (Little America) or (LIB), commonly and officially referred to as the Republic of Liberia, is a country on the West African coast.

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Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress, but which is the de facto national library of the United States.

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Lincoln University (Pennsylvania)

The Lincoln University (LU) is the United States' first degree-granting historically black university.

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List of poets from the United States

The poets listed below were either born in the United States or else published much of their poetry while living in that country.

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List of teachers portrayed in films

The following real-life inspirational/motivational instructors/mentors have been portrayed in popular films.

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Marshall, Texas

Marshall is a city in and the county seat of Harrison County in the northeastern corner of the U.S. state of Texas.

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Master's degree

A master's degree (from Latin magister) is an academic degree awarded by universities upon completion of a course of study demonstrating a mastery or high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practice.

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Mayor

In many countries, a mayor (or, from the Latin maior, meaning "bigger") is the highest-ranking official in a municipal government such as that of a city or town.

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Methodism

Methodism, or the Methodist movement, is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley.

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Middlebury College

Middlebury College is a private liberal arts college located in Middlebury, Vermont.

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Moberly, Missouri

Moberly is a city in Randolph County, Missouri, United States.

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Modernist poetry

Modernist poetry refers to poetry written, mainly in Europe and North America, between 1890 and 1950 in the tradition of modernist literature, but the dates of the term depend upon a number of factors, including the nation of origin, the particular school in question, and the biases of the critic setting the dates.

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Muscogee

The Muscogee (or Muskogee), also known as the Creek, are a Native American people traditionally from the southeastern woodlands.

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Nathan Hare

Nathan Hare (born April 9, 1933) is an American sociologist, activist, academic, and psychologist.

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New York City

New York – often called New York City or the City of New York to distinguish it from the State of New York, of which it is a part – is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York metropolitan area, the premier gateway for legal immigration to the United States and one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world.

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Oklahoma

Oklahoma (Cherokee: Asgaya gigageyi / ᎠᏍᎦᏯ ᎩᎦᎨᏱ; or translated ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ (òɡàlàhoma), Pawnee: Uukuhuúwa, Cayuga: Gahnawiyoˀgeh) is a state located in the South Central United States.

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Omega Psi Phi

Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is an international fraternity with over 750 undergraduate and graduate chapters.

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Oprah Winfrey

Oprah Gail Winfrey (born January 29, 1954) is an American media proprietor, talk show host, actress, producer, and philanthropist.

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Poet laureate

A poet laureate (plural: poets laureate) is a poet officially appointed by a government or conferring institution, who is often expected to compose poems for special events and occasions.

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Southern United States

The Southern United States—commonly referred to as the American South, Dixie, or simply the South—is a region of the United States of America.

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Southern University

Southern University and A&M College is a historically black college in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

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Sweatt v. Painter

Sweatt v. Painter,, was a U.S. Supreme Court case that successfully challenged the "separate but equal" doctrine of racial segregation established by the 1896 case Plessy v. Ferguson.

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Texas

Texas (Texas or Tejas) is the second most populous and second largest state of the United States of America.

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The Atlantic

The Atlantic is an American magazine, founded (as The Atlantic Monthly) in 1857 in Boston, Massachusetts, now based in Washington, D.C. It was created as a literary and cultural commentary magazine, growing to achieve a national reputation as a high-quality review with a moderate worldview.

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The Great Debaters

The Great Debaters is a 2007 American biopic period drama film directed by and starring Denzel Washington and produced by Oprah Winfrey and her production company, Harpo Productions.

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Tuskegee University

Tuskegee University is a private, historically black university located in Tuskegee, Alabama, United States.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major territories and various possessions.

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University of Oklahoma

The University of Oklahoma (OU) is a coeducational public research university located in Norman, Oklahoma.

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University of Southern California

The University of Southern California (USC or SC) is a private not-for-profit and nonsectarian research university founded in 1880 with its main campus in the city area of Los Angeles, California.

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University of Virginia

The University of Virginia (UVA, U.Va. or Virginia), is a research university founded by U.S. President Thomas Jefferson and located in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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Wiley College

Wiley College is a four-year, private, historically black, liberal arts college located on the west side of Marshall, Texas.

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Redirects here:

M B Tolson, M. B. Tolson, M.B. Tolson, MB Tolson, Mel Tolson, Melvin Beaunorus Tolson, Melvin Tolson.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melvin_B._Tolson

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