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P. H. Welshimer

Pearl Howard "P. [1]

16 relations: Ada, Ohio, Author, Canton, Ohio, Christian, Christian churches and churches of Christ, Hiram College, Millersburg, Ohio, Minister (Christianity), North American Christian Convention, Ohio, Restoration Movement, Sunday school, Tract (literature), Union County, Ohio, United States, Vermilion, Ohio.

Ada, Ohio

Ada;; is a village in Hardin County, Ohio, United States.

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Author

An author is broadly defined as "the person who originated or gave existence to anything" and whose authorship determines responsibility for what was created.

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Canton, Ohio

Canton is a city in and the county seat of Stark County, Ohio, United States.

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Christian

A Christian is a person who adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.

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Christian churches and churches of Christ

The group of Christians known as the Christian Churches or Churches of Christ are congregations within the Restoration Movement that no have formal denominational affiliation with other congregations, but still share many characteristics of belief and worship.

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Hiram College

Hiram College is a private liberal arts college located in Hiram, Ohio.

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Millersburg, Ohio

Millersburg is a village in and the county seat of Holmes County, Ohio, United States.

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Minister (Christianity)

In Christian churches, a minister is someone who is authorized by a church or religious organization to perform functions such as teaching of beliefs; leading services such as weddings, baptisms or funerals; or otherwise providing spiritual guidance to the community.

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North American Christian Convention

The North American Christian Convention is an annual summer convention supported by churches, colleges, institutions, and missions programs associated with the Christian churches and churches of Christ, mainly across the United States, but also in other parts of the world.

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Ohio

Ohio is a state in the Midwestern United States.

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Restoration Movement

The Restoration Movement (also known as the American Restoration Movement or the Stone-Campbell Movement, and pejoratively as Campbellism) is a Christian movement that began on the United States frontier during the Second Great Awakening (1790–1840) of the early 19th century. The pioneers of this movement were seeking to reform the church from within and sought "the unification of all Christians in a single body patterned after the church of the New Testament."Rubel Shelly, I Just Want to Be a Christian, 20th Century Christian, Nashville, TN 1984, ISBN 0-89098-021-7 It has been described as the "oldest ecumenical movement in America": Especially since the mid-20th century, members of these churches do not identify as Protestant but simply as Christian.. Richard Thomas Hughes, Reviving the Ancient Faith: The Story of Churches of Christ in America, William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1996 ISBN 978-0-8028-4086-8: "arguably the most widely distributed tract ever published by the Churches of Christ or anyone associated with that tradition."Samuel S Hill, Charles H Lippy, Charles Reagan Wilson, Encyclopedia of Religion in the South, Mercer University Press, 2005, ISBN 978-0-86554-758-2 pp. 854 The Restoration Movement developed from several independent strands of religious revival that idealized apostolic Christianity. Two groups, which independently developed similar approaches to the Christian faith, were particularly important. The first, led by Barton W. Stone, began at Cane Ridge, Kentucky, and identified as "Christians". The second began in western Pennsylvania and Virginia (now West Virginia) and was led by Thomas Campbell and his son, Alexander Campbell, both educated in Scotland; they eventually used the name "Disciples of Christ". Both groups sought to restore the whole Christian church on the pattern set forth in the New Testament, and both believed that creeds kept Christianity divided. In 1832 they joined in fellowship with a handshake. Among other things, they were united in the belief that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; that Christians should celebrate the Lord's Supper on the first day of each week; and that baptism of adult believers by immersion in water is a necessary condition for salvation. Because the founders wanted to abandon all denominational labels, they used the biblical names for the followers of Jesus.McAlister, Lester G and Tucker, William E (1975), Journey in Faith: A History of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), St. Louis, MO: Chalice Press, ISBN 978-0-8272-1703-4 Both groups promoted a return to the purposes of the 1st-century churches as described in the New Testament. One historian of the movement has argued that it was primarily a unity movement, with the restoration motif playing a subordinate role. The Restoration Movement has since divided into multiple separate groups. There are three main branches in the US: the Churches of Christ, the unaffiliated Christian Church/Church of Christ congregations, and the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Some characterize the divisions in the movement as the result of the tension between the goals of restoration and ecumenism: the Churches of Christ and unaffiliated Christian Church/Church of Christ congregations resolved the tension by stressing restoration, while the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) resolved the tension by stressing ecumenism.Leroy Garrett, The Stone-Campbell Movement: The Story of the American Restoration Movement, College Press, 2002, ISBN 978-0-89900-909-4, 573 pp. A number of groups outside the US also have historical associations with this movement, such as the Evangelical Christian Church in Canada and the Churches of Christ in Australia. Because the Restoration Movement lacks any centralized structure, having originated in a variety of places with different leaders, there is no consistent nomenclature for the movement as a whole.. The term "Restoration Movement" became popular during the 19th century; this appears to be due to the influence of Alexander Campbell's essays on "A Restoration of the Ancient Order of Things" in the Christian Baptist. The term "Stone-Campbell Movement" emerged towards the end of the 20th century as a way to avoid the difficulties associated with some of the other names that have been used, and to maintain a sense of the collective history of the movement. Other names that have been used include "the Brotherhood", "the Cause" and "the churches." While the use of the word "movement" is supported by a fairly broad consensus, no single terminology is generally accepted or has official status.

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Sunday school

A Sunday school (also sometimes referred to as a Sabbath school), is a Christian educational institution, usually (but not always) catering to children and other young people.

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Tract (literature)

A tract is a literary work, and in current usage, usually religious in nature.

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Union County, Ohio

Union County is a county located in the US state of Ohio.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major territories and various possessions.

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Vermilion, Ohio

Vermilion is a city in Erie and Lorain counties in the U.S. state of Ohio, on Lake Erie.

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P H Welshimer, P.H. Welshimer, PH Welshimer, Pearl Howard Welshimer.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P._H._Welshimer

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