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T. S. Eliot

Thomas Stearns Eliot OM (26 September 1888 – 4 January 1965), usually known as T. S. Eliot, was an essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic, and "one of the twentieth century's major poets". [1]

267 relations: A Song for Simeon, Agrarianism, Alain-Fournier, Alan Rawsthorne, Allen Tate, Americanization, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Anglicanism, Anglo-Catholicism, Anthony Julius, Antisemitism, Arthur Rimbaud, Arthur Symons, Ash Wednesday (poem), Bachelor's degree, Bertrand Russell, Birkbeck, University of London, Bishop of Chichester, Blue plaque, Boston Brahmin, British nationality law, British subject, Broadway theatre, Bronchitis, Buckinghamshire, Burnt Norton, Canterbury Festival, Carole Seymour-Jones, Cats (musical), Charles Eliot Norton, Charles Whibley, Charlotte Champe Stearns, Chinmoy Guha, Christopher Ricks, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Church of England, Churchwarden, Classical element, Colitis, Commemorative stamp, Commentary (magazine), Common Room (university), Conrad Aiken, Craig Raine, Cynthia Ozick, Dante Alighieri, Dictionary of National Biography, Diocese of London, E. M. Forster, E. Martin Browne, ..., East Coker, East Coker (poem), Edmund Wilson, Edward FitzGerald (poet), Edwin Muir, Eliot College, Kent, Eliot family (America), Elizabethan era, England, English language, Eoghan Ó Tuairisc, Ezra Pound, F. H. Bradley, Faber and Faber, Fatigue (medical), Find a Grave, Florence, Four Quartets, Frank Aydelotte, Frank Kermode, Gabriel, Geoffrey Faber, Geoffrey Hill, George Bell (bishop), George Steiner, George VI, Georgian Poetry, Gerontion, Gilbert Seldes, Giorgos Seferis, Golders Green Crematorium, Governess, Gunpowder Plot, Guy Fawkes, Hamburg, Hamlet, Hamlet and His Problems, Hanseatic Goethe Prize, Harold Bloom, Harriet Monroe, Harry Ransom Center, Hart Crane, Harvard College, Harvard University, Helen Gardner (critic), Henri Bergson, Henry Sherek, Henry Ware Eliot, Highgate School, Hugh Kenner, Igorot people, Inguinal hernia, Insomnia, Institute for Advanced Study, Intellectual, Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Irish language, James E. Miller, James Fenton, James George Frazer, James Joyce, Jazz, Jews, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, John Betjeman, John Crowe Ransom, John Davy Hayward, John Gross, John Milton, John of the Cross, John Richardson (art historian), John Webster, Joseph Bottum (author), Joseph Conrad, Journey of the Magi, Jules Laforgue, Julian of Norwich, Kamau Brathwaite, Kensington, Kensington Court Gardens, King's College, Cambridge, Lancelot Andrewes, Legion of Honour, Light poetry, Literary criticism, Little Gidding (poem), Lloyds Bank, London Review of Books, Louis Untermeyer, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Lyndall Gordon, Mantra, Marburg, Mark Twain, Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School, Mary Trevelyan, Massachusetts, Máirtín Ó Direáin, Merton College, Oxford, Metaphysical poets, Michael North (professor), Migraine, Milton Academy, Mississippi River, Missouri, Modernism, Modernism/modernity, Modernist poetry in English, Murder in the Cathedral, Naturalization, Neoclassicism, New Criticism, New England, Nobel Prize in Literature, Objective correlative, Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats, Omar Khayyám, Oral exam, Order of Merit, Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, Oxford University Press, Paul Verlaine, Peter Ackroyd, Poetry (magazine), Poets' Corner, Portrait of a Lady (poem), Presidential Medal of Freedom, Reynolds Stone, Richard Aldington, Richard Ellmann, Romanticism, Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe, Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Rudolf Steiner, Rudyard Kipling, Russell Kirk, Salvation, Sanctification, Sanskrit, Scofield Thayer, Seamus Heaney, Seán Ó Ríordáin, Selected Essays, 1917-1932, Shanti Mantra, Social work, Society of King Charles the Martyr, Sorbonne, St Michael and All Angels' Church, East Coker, St. Louis, St. Louis Walk of Fame, Stephen Greenblatt, Stephen Spender, Stockholm, Stoke Newington, Stream of consciousness (narrative mode), Sui generis, Sweeney Agonistes, Symbolism (arts), T. S. Eliot's Ariel poems, Tachycardia, Ted Hughes, Terry Eagleton, The Blitz, The Cocktail Party, The Confidential Clerk, The Criterion, The Dry Salvages, The Elder Statesman, The Family Reunion, The Frontiers of Criticism, The Harvard Advocate, The Hollow Men, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, The Man Who Would Be King, The Queen's Book of the Red Cross, The Rock (play), The Symbolist Movement in Literature, The Times Literary Supplement, The Waste Land, Theology, Thomas Becket, Thomas Kyd, Thomas Middleton, Tom & Viv, Tom Paulin, Tom Sawyer, Tony Award, Touchstone (magazine), Tradition and the Individual Talent, Treaty of Versailles, Tristan Corbière, Troy Southgate, Ulysses (novel), Unitarianism, University of Kent, University of London, University of Oxford, University of Paris, University of Texas at Austin, University of Virginia, Valerie Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Vivienne Haigh-Wood Eliot, W. H. Auden, W. W. Norton & Company, Washington University in St. Louis, Wesleyan University Press, Westminster Abbey, William Carlos Williams, William Empson, William Gaddis, William Greenleaf Eliot, William Shakespeare, World War I, World War II, Wyndham Lewis, Yankee. Expand index (217 more) »

A Song for Simeon

"A Song for Simeon" is a 37-line poem written in 1928 by American-English poet T. S. Eliot (1888–1965).

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Agrarianism

Agrarianism has two common meanings.

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Alain-Fournier

Alain-Fournier was the pseudonym of Henri-Alban Fournier (3 October 1886 – 22 September 1914 Secrétariat Général pour l'Administration), a French author and soldier.

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Alan Rawsthorne

Alan Rawsthorne (2 May 1905 – 24 July 1971) was a British composer.

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Allen Tate

John Orley Allen Tate (November 19, 1899 – February 9, 1979) was an American poet, essayist, social commentator, and Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 1943 to 1944.

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Americanization

In countries outside of the United States, americanization or americanisation is the influence American culture has on the culture of other countries, such as their popular culture, media, cuisine, technology, business practices, or political techniques.

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Andrew Lloyd Webber

Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is an English composer and impresario of musical theatre.

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Anglicanism

Anglicanism is a tradition within Christianity comprising the Church of England and churches which are historically tied to it or hold similar beliefs, worship practices and church structures.

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Anglo-Catholicism

The terms Anglo-Catholicism, Anglican Catholicism and Catholic Anglicanism refer to people, beliefs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise the Catholic heritage and identity of the various Anglican churches.

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Anthony Julius

Anthony Robert Julius (born 16 July 1956) is a British solicitor advocate and academic, known for his actions on behalf of Diana, Princess of Wales, Deborah Lipstadt and Heather Mills.

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Antisemitism

Antisemitism (also spelled anti-Semitism or anti-semitism) is prejudice against, hatred of, or discrimination against Jews as an ethnic, religious, or racial group.

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Arthur Rimbaud

Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud (or;; 20 October 1854 – 10 November 1891) was a French poet born in Charleville, Ardennes.

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Arthur Symons

Arthur William Symons (28 February 1865 – 22 January 1945), was a British poet, critic and magazine editor.

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Ash Wednesday (poem)

Ash Wednesday (sometimes Ash-Wednesday) is the first long poem written by T. S. Eliot after his 1927 conversion to Anglicanism.

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Bachelor's degree

A bachelor's degree (from Middle Latin baccalarius) or baccalaureate (from Modern Latin baccalaureatus) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded by colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study lasting three to seven years (depending on institution and academic discipline).

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Bertrand Russell

Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, writer, social critic and political activist.

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Birkbeck, University of London

Birkbeck, University of London (formerly Birkbeck College, informally Birkbeck), is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, which specialises in evening higher education, and a constituent college of the federal University of London.

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Bishop of Chichester

The Bishop of Chichester is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Chichester in the Province of Canterbury. The diocese covers the counties of East and West Sussex. The see is based in the City of Chichester where the bishop's seat is located at the Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity. On 3 May 2012 the appointment was announced of Martin Warner, Bishop of Whitby, as the next Bishop of Chichester. His enthronement took place on 25 November 2012 in Chichester Cathedral. The bishop's residence is The Palace, Chichester.

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Blue plaque

A blue plaque is a permanent sign installed in a public place in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to commemorate a link between that location and a famous person or event, serving as a historical marker.

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Boston Brahmin

A Boston Brahmin is a member of Boston's traditional upper class.

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British nationality law

British nationality law is the law of the United Kingdom which concerns citizenship and other categories of British nationality.

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British subject

The term British subject has had a number of different legal meanings over time.

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Broadway theatre

Broadway theatre,Although theater is the generally preferred spelling in the United States (see American and British English spelling differences), many Broadway venues, performers and trade groups for live dramatic presentations use the spelling theatre.

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Bronchitis

Bronchitis is inflammation of the bronchi (large and medium-sized airways) of the lungs.

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Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire (or; archaically the County of Buckingham; abbreviated Bucks) is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan home county in South East England.

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Burnt Norton

Burnt Norton is the first poem of T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets.

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Canterbury Festival

The Canterbury Festival is Kent's international festival of the arts.

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Carole Seymour-Jones

Carole Veronica Gillian Seymour-Jones (3 March 1943 - 23 May 2015) was a Welsh writer.

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Cats (musical)

Cats is a musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber, based on Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats by T. S. Eliot, and produced by Cameron Mackintosh.

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Charles Eliot Norton

Charles Eliot Norton (November 16, 1827 – October 21, 1908) was a leading American author, social critic, and professor of art.

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Charles Whibley

Charles Whibley (1859–1930) was an English literary journalist and author.

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Charlotte Champe Stearns

Charlotte Champe Stearns (1843–1929), was a school teacher, poet, social worker, and the mother of poet T. S. Eliot.

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Chinmoy Guha

Chinmoy Guha (born in September 1958 in Kolkata, India) is a Professor and former Head of Department of English at the University of Calcutta a Bengali essayist and translator and a French-language scholar.

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Christopher Ricks

Sir Christopher Bruce Ricks, FBA (born 18 September 1933) is a British (although he lives in the US) literary critic and scholar.

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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), also known as chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD), and chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), among others, is a type of obstructive lung disease characterized by chronically poor airflow.

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Church of England

The Church of England is the officially-established Christian church in England, and the mother church of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

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Churchwarden

A churchwarden is a lay official in a parish or congregation of the Anglican Communion, usually working as a part-time volunteer.

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Classical element

Many philosophies and worldviews have a set of classical elements believed to reflect the simplest essential parts and principles of which anything can consist or upon which the constitution and fundamental powers of everything are based.

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Colitis

Colitis (pl. colitides) refers to an inflammation of the colon.

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Commemorative stamp

A commemorative stamp is a postage stamp, often issued on a significant date such as an anniversary, to honor or commemorate a place, event, person, or object.

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Commentary (magazine)

Commentary is a monthly American magazine on politics, Judaism, social and cultural issues.

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Common Room (university)

In some universities in the United Kingdom and Ireland — particularly collegiate universities such as Oxford, Cambridge, Dublin, Durham, York and Lancaster— students and the academic body are organised into common rooms.

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Conrad Aiken

Conrad Potter Aiken (August 5, 1889 – August 17, 1973) was an American writer, whose work includes poetry, short stories, novels, a play, and an autobiography.

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Craig Raine

Craig Anthony Raine, FRSL (born 3 December 1944) is an English poet.

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Cynthia Ozick

Cynthia Ozick (born April 17, 1928) is an American-Jewish short story writer, novelist, and essayist.

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Dante Alighieri

Durante degli Alighieri, simply called Dante (c. 1265–1321), was a major Italian poet of the late Middle Ages.

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Dictionary of National Biography

The Dictionary of National Biography (DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885.

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Diocese of London

The Diocese of London forms part of the Church of England's Province of Canterbury in England.

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E. M. Forster

Edward Morgan Forster OM, CH (1 January 18797 June 1970) was an English novelist, short story writer, essayist and librettist.

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E. Martin Browne

E.

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East Coker

East Coker is a village and civil parish in the South Somerset district of Somerset, England.

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East Coker (poem)

East Coker is the second poem of T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets.

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Edmund Wilson

Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, literary and social critic, and man of letters.

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Edward FitzGerald (poet)

Edward FitzGerald (31 March 1809 – 14 June 1883) was an English poet and writer, best known as the poet of the first and most famous English translation of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.

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Edwin Muir

Edwin Muir (15 May 1887 – 3 January 1959) was an Orcadian poet, novelist and translator, born on a farm in Deerness.

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Eliot College, Kent

Eliot College is the oldest college of the University of Kent.

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Eliot family (America)

The Eliot family is the American branch of one of several British families to hold this surname.

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Elizabethan era

The Elizabethan era is the epoch in English history marked by the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603).

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England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.

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English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

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Eoghan Ó Tuairisc

Eoghan Ó Tuairisc (Eugene Rutterford Watters) (April 3, 1919–24 August 1982) was an Irish poet and writer.

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Ezra Pound

Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (30 October 1885 – 1 November 1972) was an expatriate US poet and critic who was a major figure in the early modernist movement.

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F. H. Bradley

Francis Herbert Bradley OM (30 January 1846 – 18 September 1924) was a British idealist philosopher.

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Faber and Faber

Faber and Faber Limited, often abbreviated to Faber, is an independent publishing house in the United Kingdom.

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Fatigue (medical)

Fatigue (also called exhaustion, tiredness, languidness, languor, lassitude, and listlessness) is a subjective feeling of tiredness which is distinct from weakness, and has a gradual onset.

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Find a Grave

Find A Grave is a commercial website that allows the public to access and add to an online database of cemetery records.

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Florence

Florence (Firenze, alternative obsolete form: Fiorenza; Latin: Florentia) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany and of the province of Florence.

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Four Quartets

Four Quartets is a set of four poems written by T. S. Eliot that were published individually over a six-year period.

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Frank Aydelotte

Franklin Ridgeway Aydelotte (1880–1956) was a U.S. educator.

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Frank Kermode

Sir John Frank Kermode FBA (29 November 1919 – 17 August 2010) was a British literary critic best known for his work The Sense of an Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction, published in 1967 (revised 2000), and for his extensive book-reviewing and editing.

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Gabriel

In the Abrahamic religions, Gabriel (Arabic: جبريل, Jibrīl or جبرائيل Jibrāʾīl; Ancient Greek: Γαβριήλ, Gabriēl) is an angel who typically serves as a messenger sent from God to certain people.

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Geoffrey Faber

Sir Geoffrey Cust Faber (23 August 1889, Great Malvern – 31 March 1961) was a British academic, publisher, and poet.

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Geoffrey Hill

Sir Geoffrey William Hill, FRSL (born 18 June 1932) is an English poet, professor emeritus of English literature and religion, and former co-director of the Editorial Institute, at Boston University.

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George Bell (bishop)

George Kennedy Allen Bell (4 February 1883 – 3 October 1958) was an Anglican theologian, Dean of Canterbury, Bishop of Chichester, member of the House of Lords and a pioneer of the Ecumenical Movement.

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George Steiner

Francis George Steiner, FBA (born April 23, 1929) is a French-born American literary critic, essayist, philosopher, novelist, and educator.

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George VI

George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Commonwealth from 11 December 1936 until his death.

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Georgian Poetry

Georgian Poetry refers to a series of anthologies showcasing the work of a school of English poetry that established itself during the early years of the reign of King George V of the United Kingdom.

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Gerontion

"Gerontion" is a poem by T. S. Eliot that was first published in 1920.

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Gilbert Seldes

Gilbert Vivian Seldes (January 3, 1893 – September 29, 1970) was an American writer and cultural critic.

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Giorgos Seferis

Giorgos or George Seferis (Γιώργος Σεφέρης), the pen name of Georgios Seferiades (Γεώργιος Σεφεριάδης; – September 20, 1971), was a Greek poet-diplomat.

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Golders Green Crematorium

Golders Green Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.

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Governess

A governess is a girl, lady, or woman employed to teach and train children in a private household.

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Gunpowder Plot

The Gunpowder Plot of 1605, in earlier centuries often called the Gunpowder Treason Plot or the Jesuit Treason, was a failed assassination attempt against King James I of England and VI of Scotland by a group of provincial English Catholics led by Robert Catesby.

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Guy Fawkes

Guy Fawkes (13 April 1570 – 31 January 1606), also known as Guido Fawkes, the name he adopted while fighting for the Spanish, was a member of a group of provincial English Catholics who planned the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

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Hamburg

Hamburg (local pronunciation; Low German/Low Saxon: Hamborg), officially Freie und Hansestadt HamburgConstitution of Hamburg (Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg), is the second largest city in Germany and the eighth largest city in the European Union.

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Hamlet

The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, often shortened to Hamlet, is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare at an uncertain date between 1599 and 1602.

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Hamlet and His Problems

Hamlet and His Problems is an essay written by T.S. Eliot in 1919 that offers a critical reading of ''Hamlet''.

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Hanseatic Goethe Prize

The Hansischer Goethe-Preis is a German literary and artistic award, given biennially since 1949 to a figure of European stature.

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Harold Bloom

Harold Bloom (born July 11, 1930) is an American literary critic and Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University.

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Harriet Monroe

Harriet Monroe (December 23, 1860 – September 26, 1936) was an American editor, scholar, literary critic, poet and patron of the arts.

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Harry Ransom Center

The Harry Ransom Center is an archive, library and museum at the University of Texas at Austin, specializing in the collection of literary and cultural artifacts from the United States and Europe for the purpose of advancing the study of the arts and humanities.

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Hart Crane

Harold Hart Crane (July 21, 1899 – April 27, 1932) was an American poet.

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Harvard College

Harvard College is one of two schools within Harvard University granting undergraduate degrees (the other being Harvard Extension School).

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Harvard University

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, established in 1636.

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Helen Gardner (critic)

Professor Dame Helen Louise Gardner DBE (13 February 1908 – 4 June 1986) was an English literary critic and academic.

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Henri Bergson

Henri-Louis Bergson (18 October 1859 – 4 January 1941) was a major French philosopher, influential especially in the first half of the 20th century.

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Henry Sherek

Jules Henry Sherek (1900-1967) was a British theatrical manager, known for producing the plays of T. S. Eliot.

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Henry Ware Eliot

Henry Ware Eliot (November 25, 1843 – January 7, 1919) was an American industrialist and philanthropist who lived in St. Louis, Missouri.

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Highgate School

Highgate School is a British day-only independent school in Highgate, London, England.

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Hugh Kenner

William Hugh Kenner (January 7, 1923 – November 24, 2003), was a Canadian literary scholar, critic and professor.

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Igorot people

Igorot, or Cordillerans, is the collective name of several Austronesian ethnic groups in The Philippines, who inhabit the mountains of Luzon.

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Inguinal hernia

An inguinal hernia is a protrusion of abdominal-cavity contents through the inguinal canal.

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Insomnia

Insomnia, or trouble sleeping, is a sleep disorder in which there is an inability to fall asleep or to stay asleep as long as desired.

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Institute for Advanced Study

The Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States, is an independent postdoctoral research center for theoretical research and intellectual inquiry.

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Intellectual

An intellectual is a person who engages in critical study, thought, and reflection about the reality of society, and proposes solutions for the normative problems of that society, and, by such discourse in the public sphere, he or she gains authority within the public opinion.

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Intercollegiate Studies Institute

The Intercollegiate Studies Institute, Inc.

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Irish language

Irish (Gaeilge), sometimes referred to as Gaelic or Irish Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Indo-European language family, originating in Ireland and historically spoken by the Irish people.

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James E. Miller

James E. Miller, Jr. (1920–2010) was an American scholar and the Helen A. Regenstein Professor Emeritus of English Language and Literature at the University of Chicago, where he completed his graduate work, taught, and served as chairman of the English department.

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James Fenton

James Martin Fenton FRSL FRSA (born 25 April 1949, Lincoln) is an English poet, journalist and literary critic.

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James George Frazer

Sir James George Frazer (1 January 1854 – 7 May 1941), was a Scottish social anthropologist influential in the early stages of the modern studies of mythology and comparative religion.

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James Joyce

James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist and poet, considered to be one of the most influential writers in the modernist avant-garde of the early 20th century.

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Jazz

Jazz is a genre of music that originated in African American communities in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th century.

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Jews

The Jews (יְהוּדִים ISO 259-3, Israeli pronunciation), also known as the Jewish people, are an ethnoreligious and ethno-cultural group descended from the Israelites of the Ancient Near East and originating from the historical kingdoms of Israel and Judah.

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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang Goethe (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and statesman.

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John Betjeman

Sir John Betjeman, CBE (28 August 190619 May 1984) was an English poet, writer, and broadcaster who described himself in Who's Who as a "poet and hack".

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John Crowe Ransom

John Crowe Ransom (April 30, 1888 – July 3, 1974) was an American educator, scholar, literary critic, poet, essayist and editor.

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John Davy Hayward

John Davy Hayward (2 February 1905 – 1965) was an English editor, critic, anthologist and bibliophile.

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John Gross

John Gross FRSL (12 March 1935 – 10 January 2011) was an eminent English man of letters.

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John Milton

John Milton (9 December 16088 November 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and a civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell.

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John of the Cross

Saint John of the Cross, O.C.D. (San Juan de la Cruz; 1542 – 14 December 1591), was a major figure of the Counter-Reformation, a Spanish mystic, a Roman Catholic saint, a Carmelite friar and a priest who was born at Fontiveros, Old Castile.

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John Richardson (art historian)

Sir John Patrick Richardson, KBE, FBA (born 22 February 1924 in London) is a British art historian and Picasso biographer.

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John Webster

John Webster (c. 1580 – c. 1634) was an English Jacobean dramatist best known for his tragedies The White Devil and The Duchess of Malfi, which are often regarded as masterpieces of the early 17th-century English stage.

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Joseph Bottum (author)

Joseph Bottum (often nicknamed “Jody,” born April 30, 1959) is an American author, best known for his writings about literature, American religion, and neoconservative politics.

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Joseph Conrad

Joseph Conrad (born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski; 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-British writer regarded as one of the greatest novelists to write in the English language.

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Journey of the Magi

"Journey of the Magi" is a 43-line poem written in 1927 by T. S. Eliot (1888–1965).

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Jules Laforgue

Jules Laforgue (16 August 1860 – 20 August 1887) was a Franco-Uruguayan poet, often referred to as a Symbolist poet.

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Julian of Norwich

Julian of Norwich (c. 8 November 1342 – c. 1416) was an English anchoress who is regarded as an important Christian mystic.

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Kamau Brathwaite

Edward Kamau Brathwaite (born 11 May 1930, Bridgetown, Barbados) is widely considered one of the major voices in the Caribbean literary canon.

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Kensington

Kensington is a district within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in west London.

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Kensington Court Gardens

Kensington Court Gardens is a late Victorian mansion block, completed in 1889, near to Kensington Palace and Gardens.

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King's College, Cambridge

King's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England.

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Lancelot Andrewes

Lancelot Andrewes (1555 – 25 September 1626) was an English bishop and scholar, who held high positions in the Church of England during the reigns of Elizabeth I and James I. During the latter's reign, Andrewes served successively as Bishop of Chichester, of Ely and of Winchester and oversaw the translation of the King James Version of the Bible (or Authorized Version).

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Legion of Honour

The Legion of Honour, or in full the National Order of the Legion of Honour (Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur), is a French order established by Napoleon Bonaparte on 19 May 1802.

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Light poetry

Light poetry, or light verse, is poetry that attempts to be humorous.

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Literary criticism

Literary criticism is the study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature.

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Little Gidding (poem)

Little Gidding is the fourth and final poem of T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets, a series of poems that discuss time, perspective, humanity, and salvation.

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Lloyds Bank

Lloyds Bank plc is a British retail and commercial bank with branches across England and Wales.

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London Review of Books

The London Review of Books (or LRB) is a British journal of literary and intellectual essays.

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Louis Untermeyer

Louis Untermeyer (October 1, 1885 – December 18, 1977) was an American poet, anthologist, critic, and editor.

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Louisiana Purchase Exposition

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition, informally known as the St.

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Lyndall Gordon

Lyndall Gordon (born 4 November 1941) is a British-based writer and academic, known for her literary biographies.

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Mantra

"Mantra" means a sacred utterance, numinous sound, or a syllable, word, phonemes, or group of words believed by some to have psychological and spiritual power in Sanskrit.

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Marburg

Marburg is a university town in the German federal state (Bundesland) of Hessen, capital of the Marburg-Biedenkopf district (Landkreis).

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Mark Twain

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist.

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Mary Institute and St. Louis Country Day School

Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School or "MICDS" is a secular, co-educational, private school home to more than 1,200 students ranging from grades Junior Kindergarten (age 4) through 12, including a separate "lower school" for children in Junior Kindergarten through Grade 4 known as the Ronald Beasley or "Beasley" School, the MICDS "Middle School", spanning grades 5 through 8, and the "Upper School", consisting of grades 9 through 12.

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Mary Trevelyan

Mary Trevelyan (22 January 1897 – 10 January 1983) was warden of Student Movement House then founder and governor of International Students House, London, and founder of the Goats Club for foreign students.

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Massachusetts

Massachusetts, officially the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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Máirtín Ó Direáin

Máirtín Ó Direáin (29 November 1910 – 19 March 1988), one of the foremost Irish language poets of the twentieth century, was born in Sruthán on Inis Mór in the Aran Islands.

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Merton College, Oxford

Merton College (in full: The House or College of Scholars of Merton in the University of Oxford) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England.

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Metaphysical poets

The metaphysical poets is a term coined by the poet and critic Samuel Johnson to describe a loose group of English lyric poets of the 17th century, whose work was characterized by the inventive use of conceits, and by speculation about topics such as love or religion.

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Michael North (professor)

Michael North is an American literary critic and a professor in the department of English at the University of California, Los Angeles.

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Migraine

Migraine is a neurological disease characterized by recurrent moderate to severe headaches often in association with a number of autonomic nervous system symptoms.

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Milton Academy

Milton Academy (also known as Milton) is a coeducational, independent preparatory, boarding and day school in Milton, Massachusetts consisting of a grade 9–12 Upper School and a grade K–8 Lower School.

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Mississippi River

The Mississippi River is the chief river of the largest drainage system on the North American continent.

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Missouri

Missouri (see pronunciations) is a state located in the Midwestern United States.

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Modernism

Modernism is a philosophical movement that, along with cultural trends and changes, arose from wide-scale and far-reaching transformations in Western society in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Modernism/modernity

Modernism/modernity is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal established in 1994 by Lawrence Rainey and Robert van Hallberg.

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Modernist poetry in English

Modernist poetry in English started in the early years of the 20th century with the appearance of the Imagists.

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Murder in the Cathedral

Murder in the Cathedral is a verse drama by T. S. Eliot that portrays the assassination of Archbishop Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral in 1170, first performed in 1935.

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Naturalization

Naturalization (or naturalisation) is the legal act or process by which a non-citizen in a country may acquire citizenship or nationality of that country.

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Neoclassicism

Neoclassicism (from Greek νέος nèos and κλασσικός klassikòs classicus) is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of Ancient Greece or Ancient Rome.

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New Criticism

New Criticism was a formalist movement in literary theory that dominated American literary criticism in the middle decades of the 20th century.

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New England

New England is a region which comprises six states of the Northeastern United States: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

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Nobel Prize in Literature

Since 1901, the Nobel Prize in Literature (Nobelpriset i litteratur) has been awarded annually to an author from any country who has, in the words of the will of Alfred Nobel, produced "in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction" (original Swedish: den som inom litteraturen har producerat det mest framstående verket i en idealisk riktning).

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Objective correlative

An objective correlative is a literary term referring to a symbolic article used to provide explicit, rather than implicit, access to such traditionally inexplicable concepts as emotion or color.

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Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats (1939) is a collection of whimsical poems by T. S. Eliot about feline psychology and sociology, published by Faber and Faber.

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Omar Khayyám

Omar Khayyám; born (غیاث‌الدین ابوالفتح عمر ابراهیم خیام نیشابورﻯ,; 18 May 1048 – 4 December 1131), was a Persian mathematician, astronomer, philosopher, and poet, who is widely considered to be one of the most influential scientists of all time.

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Oral exam

The oral exam (also oral test or viva voce) is a practice in many schools and disciplines, where an examiner poses questions to the student in spoken form.

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Order of Merit

The Order of Merit (Ordre du Mérite) is a dynastic order recognising distinguished service in the armed forces, science, art, literature, or for the promotion of culture.

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Ordre des Arts et des Lettres

The Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (Order of Arts and Letters) is an Order of France, established on 2 May 1957 by the Minister of Culture, and its supplementary status to the Ordre national du Mérite was confirmed by President Charles de Gaulle in 1963.

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Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second-oldest, after Cambridge University Press.

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Paul Verlaine

Paul-Marie Verlaine (30 March 1844 – 8 January 1896) was a French poet associated with the Symbolist movement.

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Peter Ackroyd

Peter Ackroyd, CBE, FRSL (born 5 October 1949) is an English biographer, novelist and critic with a particular interest in the history and culture of London.

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Poetry (magazine)

Poetry (founded as, Poetry: A Magazine of Verse), published in Chicago since 1912, is one of the leading monthly poetry journals in the English-speaking world.

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Poets' Corner

Poets' Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey because of the high number of poets, playwrights, and writers buried and commemorated there.

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Portrait of a Lady (poem)

Portrait of a Lady is a poem by American-British poet T. S. Eliot (1888–1965), first published in September 1915 in Others: A Magazine of the New Verse.

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Presidential Medal of Freedom

The Presidential Medal of Freedom is an award bestowed by the President of the United States and is—along with the comparable Congressional Gold Medal, bestowed by an act of U.S. Congress—the highest civilian award of the United States.

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Reynolds Stone

Alan Reynolds Stone, CBE, RDI (13 March 1909 – 23 June 1979), more commonly known as Reynolds Stone, was a noted English wood engraver, engraver, designer, typographer and painter.

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Richard Aldington

Richard Aldington (8 July 1892 – 27 July 1962), born Edward Godfree Aldington, was an English writer and poet.

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Richard Ellmann

Richard David Ellmann (March 15, 1918 – May 13, 1987) was a prominent American literary critic and biographer of the Irish writers James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, and William Butler Yeats.

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Romanticism

Romanticism (also the Romantic era or the Romantic period) was an artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850.

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Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe

The Royal Grammar School High Wycombe (RGS or RGSHW for short) is a selective boys grammar school situated in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England.

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Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám (رباعیات عمر خیام) is the title that Edward FitzGerald gave to his translation of a selection of poems, originally written in Persian and numbering about a thousand, attributed to Omar Khayyám (1048–1131), a Persian poet, mathematician, and astronomer.

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Rudolf Steiner

Rudolf Joseph Lorenz Steiner (27 (25?) February 1861 – 30 March 1925) was an Austrian philosopher, author, social reformer, architect, and esotericist.

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Rudyard Kipling

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936)The Times, (London) 18 January 1936, p. 12 was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist.

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Russell Kirk

Russell Amos Kirk (October 19, 1918 in Plymouth, Michigan – April 29, 1994 in Mecosta, Michigan) was an American political theorist, moralist, historian, social critic, literary critic, and fiction author known for his influence on 20th century American conservatism.

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Salvation

Salvation (Latin salvatio; Greek sōtēria; Hebrew yeshu'ah) is being saved or protected from harm or being saved or delivered from some dire situation.

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Sanctification

Sanctification is the act or process of acquiring sanctity, of being made or becoming holy.

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Sanskrit

Sanskrit (Sanskrit: or, originally, "refined speech") is the primary sacred language of Hinduism, a philosophical language in Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism, and a literary language that was in use as a lingua franca in Greater India.

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Scofield Thayer

Scofield Thayer (12 December 1889 – 9 July 1982) was a wealthy American poet and publisher, best known for his art collection, now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and as a publisher and editor of the literary magazine The Dial during the 1920s.

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Seamus Heaney

Seamus Justin Heaney, MRIA (13 April 1939 – 30 August 2013) was an Irish poet, playwright, translator and lecturer, and the recipient of the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature.

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Seán Ó Ríordáin

Seán Pádraig Ó Ríordáin (3 December 1916 – 21 February 1977) was one of the most important Irish language poets of the twentieth century and arguably the most significant figure in introducing European themes into traditional poetry.

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Selected Essays, 1917-1932

Selected Essays, 1917-1932 is a collection of prose and literary criticism by T. S. Eliot.

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Shanti Mantra

The Shanti Mantras or "Peace Mantras" are Hindu prayers for Peace (Shanti) from the Vedas.

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Social work

Social work is a professional and academic discipline that will to improve the quality of life and enhance wellbeing of individuals, families, couples, groups, and communities through research, policy planning, community development, direct practice, crisis intervention, ensuring social welfare and security for those affected by social disadvantages such as poverty, psychosocial care to mentally and physically disabled, and raising voices against social injustice for social reforms, including social actions against violations of civil liberties and human rights.

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Society of King Charles the Martyr

The Society of King Charles the Martyr is an Anglican devotional society and one of the Catholic Societies of the Church of England.

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Sorbonne

The Sorbonne is an edifice of the Latin Quarter, in Paris, France, which was the historical house of the former University of Paris.

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St Michael and All Angels' Church, East Coker

St Michael and All Angels’ Church, East Coker is a Grade II* listed parish church in the Church of England in East Coker, Somerset.

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St. Louis

St.

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St. Louis Walk of Fame

The St.

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Stephen Greenblatt

Stephen Jay Greenblatt (born November 7, 1943) is an American literary critic, theorist, scholar, and Pulitzer Prize winning author.

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Stephen Spender

Sir Stephen Harold Spender CBE (28 February 1909 – 16 July 1995) was an English poet, novelist and essayist who concentrated on themes of social injustice and the class struggle in his work.

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Stockholm

Stockholm () is the capital of Sweden and the most populous city in the Nordic region, with 914,909 people living in the municipality, approximately 1.4 million in the urban area, and 2.2 million in the metropolitan area.

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Stoke Newington

Stoke Newington is a district in the London Borough of Hackney.

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Stream of consciousness (narrative mode)

In literary criticism, stream of consciousness, also known as interior monologue, is a narrative mode or device that depicts the multitudinous thoughts and feelings which pass through the mind.

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Sui generis

Sui generis is a Latin phrase, meaning "of its (his, her, or their) own kind; in a class by itself; unique".

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Sweeney Agonistes

Sweeney Agonistes by T.S. Eliot was his first attempt at writing a verse drama although he was unable to complete the piece.

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Symbolism (arts)

Symbolism was a late nineteenth-century art movement of French, Russian and Belgian origin in poetry and other arts.

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T. S. Eliot's Ariel poems

T. S. Eliot's Ariel poems are those written for Faber and Faber's series of ''Ariel Poems''.

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Tachycardia

Tachycardia, also called tachyarrhythmia, is a heart rate that exceeds the normal resting rate.

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Ted Hughes

Edward James "Ted" Hughes, OM (17 August 1930 – 28 October 1998) was an English poet and children's writer.

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Terry Eagleton

Terence Francis "Terry" Eagleton FBA (born 22 February 1943) is a prominent British literary theorist, critic and public intellectual.

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The Blitz

The Blitz (shortened from German Blitzkrieg, "lightning war") was the period of sustained strategic bombing of the United Kingdom by Nazi Germany during the Second World War.

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The Cocktail Party

The Cocktail Party is a play by T. S. Eliot.

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The Confidential Clerk

First edition cover (Faber & Faber) The Confidential Clerk is a comic verse play by T. S. Eliot.

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The Criterion

The Criterion was a British literary magazine published from October 1922 to January 1939.

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The Dry Salvages

The Dry Salvages is the third poem of T. S. Eliot's Four Quartets and marks the beginning of when the series was consciously being formed as a set of four poems.

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The Elder Statesman

The Elder Statesman is a play in verse by T. S. Eliot first performed in 1958 and published in 1959.

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The Family Reunion

The Family Reunion is a play by T. S. Eliot.

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The Frontiers of Criticism

"The Frontiers of Criticism" is a lecture given by T. S. Eliot at the University of Minnesota in 1956.

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The Harvard Advocate

The Harvard Advocate, the art and literary magazine of Harvard College, is the oldest continuously published college art and literary magazine in the United States.

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The Hollow Men

"The Hollow Men" (1925) is a poem by T. S. Eliot.

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The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock", commonly known as "Prufrock", is a poem by American-British poet T. S. Eliot (1888–1965).

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The Man Who Would Be King

"The Man Who Would Be King" (1888) is a novella by Rudyard Kipling.

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The Queen's Book of the Red Cross

The Queen's Book of the Red Cross was published in November 1939 in a fundraising effort to aid the Red Cross during World War II.

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The Rock (play)

The Rock was a pageant play with words by T. S. Eliot and music by Martin Shaw, first performed at Sadler's Wells Theatre in London on 28 May 1934.

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The Symbolist Movement in Literature

The Symbolist Movement in Literature, first published in 1899, and with additional material in 1919, is a work by Arthur Symons largely credited with bringing French Symbolism to the attention of Anglo-American literary circles.

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The Times Literary Supplement

The Times Literary Supplement (or TLS, on the front page from 1969) is a weekly literary review published in London by News UK, a subsidiary of News Corp.

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The Waste Land

The Waste Land is a long poem by T. S. Eliot.

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Theology

Theology is the systematic and rational study of concepts of God and of the nature of religious ideas, but can also mean the learned profession acquired by completing specialized training in religious studies, usually at a university, seminary, or school of divinity.

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Thomas Becket

Thomas Becket (also known as Saint Thomas of Canterbury, Thomas of London, and later Thomas à Becket; 21 December c. 1118 (or 1120) – 29 December 1170) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his murder in 1170.

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Thomas Kyd

Thomas Kyd (baptised 6 November 1558; buried 15 August 1594) was an English playwright, the author of The Spanish Tragedy, and one of the most important figures in the development of Elizabethan drama.

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Thomas Middleton

Thomas Middleton (1580 – July 1627) was an English Jacobean playwright and poet.

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Tom & Viv

Tom & Viv is a 1994 film directed by Brian Gilbert, which tells the story of the relationship between the American poet T. S. Eliot and his first wife, Vivienne Haigh-Wood Eliot.

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Tom Paulin

Thomas Neilson Paulin (born 25 January 1949 in Leeds, England) is a Northern Irish poet and critic of film, music and literature.

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Tom Sawyer

Thomas "Tom" Sawyer is the title character of the Mark Twain novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876).

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Tony Award

The Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre, more commonly known informally as the Tony Award, recognizes achievement in live Broadway theatre.

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Touchstone (magazine)

Touchstone Magazine is a bimonthly publication of the Fellowship of St. James.

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Tradition and the Individual Talent

"Tradition and the Individual Talent" (1919) is an essay written by poet and literary critic T. S. Eliot.

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Treaty of Versailles

The Treaty of Versailles (Traité de Versailles) was one of the peace treaties at the end of World War I. It ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers.

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Tristan Corbière

Tristan Corbière (18 July 1845 – 1 March 1875), born Édouard-Joachim Corbière, was a French poet born in Coat-Congar, Ploujean (now part of Morlaix) in Brittany, where he lived most of his life before dying of tuberculosis at the age of 29.

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Troy Southgate

Troy Southgate (born 22 July 1965) is a British author, editor, musician, publisher, cultural commentator and National-Anarchist activist.

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Ulysses (novel)

Ulysses is a modernist novel by Irish writer James Joyce.

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Unitarianism

Unitarianism is a Christian theological movement named for the affirmation that God is one entity, in direct contrast to Trinitarianism, which defines God as three persons in one being.

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University of Kent

The University of Kent (formerly the University of Kent at Canterbury, abbreviated as UKC or Cantuar. for post-nominals) is a public research university based in Kent, United Kingdom.

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University of London

The University of London (informally referred to as London University) is a collegiate research university located in London, England, consisting of 18 constituent colleges, 10 research institutes and a number of central bodies.

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University of Oxford

The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University or simply Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

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University of Paris

The University of Paris (L'Université de Paris), metonymically known as the Sorbonne, was a French university, founded circa 1150 in Paris, France, recognised 1200 by King Philip II and 1215 by Pope Innocent III, as one of the first universities.

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University of Texas at Austin

The University of Texas at Austin, informally UT Austin, UT, University of Texas, or Texas in sports contexts, is a public research university and the flagship institution of The University of Texas System.

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University of Virginia

The University of Virginia (UVA, U.Va. or Virginia), is a research university founded by U.S. President Thomas Jefferson and located in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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Valerie Eliot

Esme Valerie Eliot (née Fletcher; 17 August 19269 November 2012) was the second wife and later widow of the Nobel prize-winning poet, T. S. Eliot.

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Virginia Woolf

Adeline Virginia Woolf (née Stephen; 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English writer and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century.

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Vivienne Haigh-Wood Eliot

Vivienne Haigh-Wood Eliot (28 May 1888 – 22 January 1947) was an English governess and writer, who became known for her marriage in 1915 to the American poet T. S. Eliot.

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W. H. Auden

Wystan Hugh AudenThe name Wystan derives from the 9th-century St Wystan, who was murdered by Beorhtfrith, the son of Beorhtwulf, king of Mercia, after Wystan objected to Beorhtfrith's plan to marry Wystan's mother.

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W. W. Norton & Company

W.

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Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University in St.

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Wesleyan University Press

Wesleyan University Press is a university press that is part of Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut.

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Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster.

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William Carlos Williams

William Carlos Williams (September 17, 1883 – March 4, 1963) was an American poet closely associated with modernism and imagism.

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William Empson

Sir William Empson (27 September 1906 – 15 April 1984) was an English literary critic and poet, widely influential for his practice of closely reading literary works, a practice fundamental to New Criticism.

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William Gaddis

William Thomas Gaddis, Jr. (December 29, 1922 – December 16, 1998) was an American novelist.

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William Greenleaf Eliot

William Greenleaf Eliot (August 5, 1811 – January 23, 1887) was an American educator, Unitarian minister, and civic leader in Missouri.

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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616) was an English:poet,:playwright, actor and an Italophile, who is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

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World War I

World War I (WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war centered in Europe that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918.

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World War II

World War II (WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, though related conflicts began earlier.

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Wyndham Lewis

Percy Wyndham Lewis (18 November 1882 – 7 March 1957) was an English painter and author (he dropped the name 'Percy', which he disliked).

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Yankee

The term "Yankee" and its contracted form "Yank" have several interrelated meanings, all referring to people from the United States.

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Redirects here:

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T._S._Eliot

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