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William Blackstone

Sir William Blackstone KC SL (10 July 1723 – 14 February 1780) was an English jurist, judge and Tory politician of the eighteenth century. [1]

140 relations: A Discourse on the Study of the Law, Abraham Lincoln, Advowson, Age of Enlightenment, Alexander Popham (penal reformer), Alexis de Tocqueville, Alfred Denning, Baron Denning, All Souls College, Oxford, American Bar Association, An Analysis of the Laws of England, Apothecary, Assizes, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Bachelor of Civil Law, Barrister, Benjamin Franklin, Blackstone, Virginia, Burgess (title), Bursar, Call to the bar, Cesare Beccaria, Charles Dillon, 12th Viscount Dillon, Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden, Charles Viner (jurist), Charles Yorke, Charterhouse School, Chauncy Townsend, Cheapside, Chevalier d'Eon, Codrington Library, Commentaries on the Laws of England, Common law, Constitution Avenue, Convocation, Court of Chancery, Court of Common Pleas (England), Court of King's Bench (England), Diabetes mellitus type 2, Dizziness, Doctor of Civil Law, Earl of Abingdon, Edward Clive (judge), English law, Exchequer of Pleas, Frederick North, Lord North, George III of the United Kingdom, George Steevens, Gout, Greek language, Henry Finch, ..., Hindon (UK Parliament constituency), Holy orders, Inner Temple, Institutes of the Lawes of England, James Calthorpe (Yeoman of the Removing Wardrobe), James Iredell, James Kent, James Wilson, Jeremy Bentham, John Adams, John Bacon (sculptor), John Fortescue (judge), John Heath (judge), John Jay, John Marshall, John Milton, John Morton (MP), John St Leger Douglas, John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute, Jonathan Rashleigh (1693–1764), Joseph Yates (judge), Judge, Jurist, Justice of Chester, Justice of the Common Pleas, Lord Chancellor, Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, Louis XV of France, Maimonides, Member of parliament, Mental breakdown, Mercery, Middle Temple, Middlesex, Montesquieu, New College, Oxford, Owen Ruffhead, Oxford University Press, Parliamentary sovereignty, Pasture, Patent of precedence, Paul Wayland Bartlett, Pembroke College, Oxford, Peregrine Bertie (of Low Leyton), Queen's Counsel, Queens' College, Cambridge, Recorder (judge), Regius Professor of Civil Law (Oxford), River Thames, Robert Chambers (English judge), Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington, Robert Walpole, Roger Newdigate, Rotten and pocket boroughs, Royal Courts of Justice, Sardinia, Selden Society, Serjeant-at-law, Sir William Blackstone's Reports, Social structure of the United Kingdom, Society of Antiquaries of London, Solicitor General for England and Wales, St Peter's Church, Wallingford, Stanley Nider Katz, Substantive law, Supreme Court of the United States, The Federalist Papers, Tories (British political party), United States Congress, United States Constitution, United States Declaration of Independence, University of Oxford, Vinerian Professor of English Law, Voltaire, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, Warden (college), Westbury (UK Parliament constituency), Will and testament, William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland, William Henry Ashurst (judge), William Hussey (died 1813), William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield, William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne, William Searle Holdsworth, William Shakespeare, Willoughby Bertie, 3rd Earl of Abingdon, Willoughby Bertie, 4th Earl of Abingdon, Wiltshire, World War II. Expand index (90 more) »

A Discourse on the Study of the Law

A Discourse on the Study of the Law is a treatise by Sir William Blackstone first published in 1758.

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Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865.

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Advowson

Advowson (or "patronage") is the right in English law of a patron (avowee) to present to the diocesan bishop (or in some cases the ordinary if not the same person) a nominee for appointment to a vacant ecclesiastical benefice or church living, a process known as presentation (jus praesentandi, Latin: "the right of presenting").

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Age of Enlightenment

The Age of Enlightenment or simply the Enlightenment or Age of Reason is an era from the 1620s to the 1780s in which cultural and intellectual forces in Western Europe emphasized reason, analysis, and individualism rather than traditional lines of authority.

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Alexander Popham (penal reformer)

Alexander Popham (18 July 1729 – 13 October 1810) was a British politician and penal reformer.

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Alexis de Tocqueville

Alexis-Charles-Henri Clérel de Tocqueville (29 July 1805 – 16 April 1859) was a French political thinker and historian best known for his works Democracy in America (appearing in two volumes: 1835 and 1840) and The Old Regime and the Revolution (1856).

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Alfred Denning, Baron Denning

Alfred Thompson "Tom" Denning, Baron Denning, OM, PC, DL, QC (23 January 1899 – 5 March 1999), commonly known as Lord Denning, was an English lawyer and judge.

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All Souls College, Oxford

All Souls College, Oxford (official name: The Warden and the College of the Souls of All Faithful People Deceased in the University of Oxford) is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England.

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American Bar Association

The American Bar Association (ABA), founded August 21, 1878, is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States.

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An Analysis of the Laws of England

An Analysis of the Laws of England is a legal treatise by British legal professor William Blackstone.

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Apothecary

An apothecary was a medical professional who formulated and dispensed materia medica to physicians, surgeons and patients.

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Assizes

The courts of assize, or assizes, were periodic courts held around England and Wales until 1972, when together with the quarter sessions they were abolished by the Courts Act 1971 and replaced by a single permanent Crown Court.

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Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States.

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Bachelor of Civil Law

Bachelor of Civil Law (abbreviated "BCL" or "B.C.L.") is the name of various degrees in law conferred by English-language universities.

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Barrister

A barrister (also known as barrister-at-law or Bar-at-law) is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions with a split legal profession.

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Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin (April 17, 1790) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

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Blackstone, Virginia

Blackstone, formerly named Blacks and White, and Bellefonte, is a town in Nottoway County, Virginia, United States.

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Burgess (title)

Burgess is a word in English that originally meant a freeman of a borough (England) or burgh (Scotland).

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Bursar

A bursar (derived from "bursa", Latin for purse) is a professional financial administrator in a school or university.

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Call to the bar

The call to the bar is a legal term of art in most common law jurisdictions where persons must be qualified to be allowed to argue in court on behalf of another party, and are then said to have been "called to the bar" or to have received a "call to the bar".

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Cesare Beccaria

Cesare Bonesana-Beccaria, Marquis of Gualdrasco and Villareggio (15 March 1738 – 28 November 1794) was an Italian criminologist, jurist, philosopher, and politician, who is recognized as the most talented jurist and one of the greatest thinkers of the Enlightenment.

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Charles Dillon, 12th Viscount Dillon

Charles Dillon-Lee, 12th Viscount Dillon, KP, PC (6 November 1745 – 9 November 1813) was Member of Parliament (MP) for the English borough of Westbury (1770).

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Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden

Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden (baptised 21 March 1714 – 18 April 1794) was an English lawyer, judge and Whig politician who was first to hold the title of Earl of Camden.

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Charles Viner (jurist)

Charles Viner (1678–1756) was an English jurist, known as the author of Viner's Abridgment, and the benefactor of the Vinerian chair and the Vinerian Scholarship at the University of Oxford.

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Charles Yorke

Charles Yorke PC (30 December 1722 – 20 January 1770) was Lord Chancellor of Great Britain.

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Charterhouse School

Charterhouse, originally The Hospital of King James and Thomas Sutton in Charterhouse is a collegiate independent boarding school (also referred to as a public school) situated at Godalming in the English county of Surrey.

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Chauncy Townsend

Chauncy Townsend (23 February 1708 – 28 March 1770) was a businessman and a Member of Parliament (MP) in the British Parliament.

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Cheapside

Cheapside is a street in the City of London, the historic and modern financial centre of London, which forms part of the A40 London to Fishguard road.

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Chevalier d'Eon

Due to the unique circumstances of d'Éon's life, this article avoids the use of gendered pronouns by repeating the name instead (see talk page). Charles-Geneviève-Louis-Auguste-André-Timothée d'Éon de Beaumont (5 October 1728 – 21 May 1810), usually known as the Chevalier d'Éon, was a French diplomat, spy, freemason and soldier who fought in the Seven Years' War.

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Codrington Library

The Codrington Library is an academic library in the city of Oxford, England.

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Commentaries on the Laws of England

The Commentaries on the Laws of England are an influential 18th-century treatise on the common law of England by Sir William Blackstone, originally published by the Clarendon Press at Oxford, 1765–1769.

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Common law

Common law (also known as case law or precedent) is law developed by judges through decisions of courts and similar tribunals that decide individual cases, as opposed to statutes adopted through the legislative process or regulations issued by the executive branch.

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Constitution Avenue

Constitution Avenue is a major east-west street in the northwest and northeast quadrants of the city of Washington, D.C., in the United States.

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Convocation

A convocation (from the Latin convocare meaning "to call/come together", a translation of the Greek ἐκκλησία ekklēsia) is a group of people formally assembled for a special purpose, mostly ecclesiastical or academic.

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Court of Chancery

The Court of Chancery was a court of equity in England and Wales that followed a set of loose rules to avoid the slow pace of change and possible harshness (or "inequity") of the common law.

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Court of Common Pleas (England)

The Court of Common Pleas, or Common Bench, was a common law court in the English legal system that covered "common pleas"; actions between subject and subject, which did not concern the king.

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Court of King's Bench (England)

The Court of King's Bench (or Court of Queen's Bench during the reign of a female monarch), formally known as The Court of the King Before the King Himself, was an English court of common law in the English legal system.

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Diabetes mellitus type 2

Diabetes mellitus type 2 (formerly noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes) is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) in the context of insulin resistance and relative lack of insulin.

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Dizziness

Dizziness is an impairment in spatial perception and stability.

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Doctor of Civil Law

Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) is a degree offered by some universities, such as the University of Oxford, instead of the more common Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) degrees.

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Earl of Abingdon

Earl of Abingdon is a title in the Peerage of England.

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Edward Clive (judge)

Sir Edward Clive (1704 — 16 April 1771) was a British politician and judge.

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English law

English law means the legal system of England and Wales.

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Exchequer of Pleas

The Exchequer of Pleas or Court of Exchequer was a court that dealt with matters of equity, a set of legal principles based on natural law and common law in England and Wales.

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Frederick North, Lord North

Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (13 April 1732 – 5 August 1792), more often known by his courtesy title, Lord North, which he used from 1752 until 1790, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782.

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George III of the United Kingdom

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death.

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George Steevens

George Steevens (10 May 1736 – 22 January 1800) was an English Shakespearean commentator.

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Gout

Gout (also known as podagra when it involves the big toe) is a medical condition usually characterized by recurrent attacks of acute inflammatory arthritis—a red, tender, hot, swollen joint.

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Greek language

Greek or Hellenic (Modern Greek: ελληνικά, elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα, ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to the southern Balkans, the Aegean Islands, western Asia Minor, parts of northern and Eastern Anatolia and the South Caucasus, southern Italy, Albania and Cyprus.

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Henry Finch

Sir Henry Finch (died 1625) was an English lawyer and politician, created serjeant-at-law and knighted, and remembered as a legal writer.

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Hindon (UK Parliament constituency)

Hindon was a parliamentary borough consisting of the village of Hindon in Wiltshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1448 until 1832, when the borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

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Holy orders

In the Christian churches, holy orders are ordained ministries such as bishop, priest or deacon.

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Inner Temple

The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court (professional associations for barristers and judges) in London.

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Institutes of the Lawes of England

The Institutes of the Lawes of England are a series of legal treatises written by Sir Edward Coke.

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James Calthorpe (Yeoman of the Removing Wardrobe)

James Calthorpe, DL (25 March 1699 – 11 March 1784) was a British politician and courtier.

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James Iredell

James Iredell (October 5, 1751 – October 20, 1799) was one of the first Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States.

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James Kent

James Kent (July 31, 1763 Fredericksburg, then Dutchess, now Putnam County, New York – December 12, 1847 New York City) was an American jurist and legal scholar.

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James Wilson

James Wilson (September 14, 1742August 21, 1798) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and a signatory of the United States Declaration of Independence.

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Jeremy Bentham

Jeremy Bentham (– 6 June 1832) was a British philosopher, jurist, and social reformer.

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John Adams

John Adams, Jr. (October 30 [O.S. October 19] 1735 – July 4, 1826) was an American lawyer, author, statesman, and diplomat. He served as the second President of the United States (1797–1801), the first Vice President (1789–1797), and as a Founding Father was a leader of American independence from Great Britain. Adams was a political theorist in the Age of Enlightenment who promoted republicanism and a strong central government. His innovative ideas were frequently published. He was also a dedicated diarist and correspondent, particularly with his wife and key advisor Abigail. He collaborated with his cousin, revolutionary leader Samuel Adams, but he established his own prominence prior to the American Revolution. After the Boston Massacre, despite severe local anti-British sentiment, he provided a successful though unpopular legal defense of the accused British soldiers, driven by his devotion to the right to counsel and the "protection of innocence". As a delegate from Massachusetts to the Continental Congress, Adams played a leading role in persuading Congress to declare independence. He assisted Thomas Jefferson in drafting the Declaration of Independence in 1776, and was its foremost advocate in the Congress. As a diplomat in Europe, he helped negotiate the eventual peace treaty with Great Britain, and acquired vital governmental loans from Amsterdam bankers. Adams was the primary author of the Massachusetts Constitution in 1780 which influenced American political theory, as did his earlier Thoughts on Government. Adams' credentials as a revolutionary secured for him two terms as President George Washington's vice president (1789 to 1797) and also his own election in 1796 as the second president. In his single term as president, he encountered fierce criticism from the Jeffersonian Republicans, as well as the dominant faction in his own Federalist Party, led by his opponent Alexander Hamilton. Adams signed the controversial Alien and Sedition Acts, and built up the army and navy in the face of an undeclared naval "Quasi-War" with France. The major accomplishment of his presidency was a peaceful resolution of the conflict in the face of Hamilton's opposition. Due to his strong posture on defense, Adams is "often called the father of the American Navy". He was the first U.S. president to reside in the executive mansion, now known as the White House. In 1800, Adams lost re-election to Thomas Jefferson, and retired to Massachusetts. He resumed his friendship with Jefferson upon the latter's own retirement by initiating a correspondence which lasted fourteen years. He and his wife established a family of politicians, diplomats, and historians now referred to as the Adams political family. Adams was the father of John Quincy Adams, the sixth President of the United States. He died on the fiftieth anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. Modern historians in the aggregate have ranked his administration as the twelfth most successful.

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John Bacon (sculptor)

John Bacon (November 24, 1740 – August 4, 1799) was a British sculptor who worked in the late 18th century.

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John Fortescue (judge)

Sir John Fortescue (1394 – c. 1480) was the Chief Justice of the King's Bench of England and the author of De laudibus legum Angliæ (Commendation of the Laws of England, first published posthumously around 1543), an influential treatise on English law.

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John Heath (judge)

John Heath (1736–1816) was a judge chiefly in criminal trials, in which he earned a reputation for severe sentencing.

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John Jay

John Jay (December 23, 1745 (December 12, 1745 OS) – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, Patriot, diplomat, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, signer of the Treaty of Paris, and first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–95).

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John Marshall

John Marshall (September 24, 1755July 6, 1835) was the fourth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1801–1835).

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John Milton

John Milton (9 December 16088 November 1674) was an English poet, polemicist, man of letters, and a civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell.

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John Morton (MP)

John Morton (c. 1716 – 25 July 1780) was an English Tory politician.

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John St Leger Douglas

John St.

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John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute

John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute (25 May 1713 – 10 March 1792), styled Lord Mount Stuart before 1723, was a Scottish nobleman who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain (1762–1763) under George III, and was arguably the last important favourite in British politics.

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Jonathan Rashleigh (1693–1764)

Jonathan Rashleigh (19 January 1693 – 24 November 1764) was a politician from Cornwall.

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Joseph Yates (judge)

Sir Joseph Yates (1722 – June 7, 1770) of Peel Hall, Little Hulton, Lancashire was an eminent English judge.

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Judge

A judge presides over court proceedings, either alone or as a part of a panel of judges.

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Jurist

A jurist (a word coming from medieval Latin), also known as legal scholar or legal theorist, is someone who researches and studies jurisprudence (theory of law).

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Justice of Chester

The Justice of Chester was the chief judicial authority for the county palatine of Chester, from the establishment of the county until the abolition of the Great Sessions in Wales and the palatine judicature in 1830.

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Justice of the Common Pleas

Justice of the Common Pleas was a puisne judicial position within the Court of Common Pleas of England and Wales, under the Chief Justice.

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Lord Chancellor

The Lord Chancellor, formally the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom.

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Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales

The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales is the head of the judiciary and President of the Courts of England and Wales.

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Lord Chief Justice of Ireland

The Court of King's Bench (or Court of Queen's Bench during the reign of a Queen) was one of the senior courts of common law in Ireland.

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Louis XV of France

Louis XV (15 February 1710 – 10 May 1774), known as Louis the Beloved (Louis le bien aimé), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who ruled as King of France from 1 September 1715 until his death.

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Maimonides

Moshe ben Maimon (משה בן-מימון), or Mūsā ibn Maymūn (موسى بن ميمون), acronymed Rambam (רמב"ם – for "Rabbeinu Moshe Ben Maimon", "Our Rabbi/Teacher Moses Son of Maimon"), and Latinized Moses Maimonides, a preeminent medieval Sephardic Jewish philosopher and astronomer, became one of the most prolific and influential Torah scholars and physicians of the Middle Ages.

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Member of parliament

A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament.

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Mental breakdown

Mental breakdown (also known as a nervous breakdown) is a general term for an acute, time-limited psychiatric disorder that manifests primarily as severe stress-induced depression, anxiety, and/or dissociation in a previously functional individual, to the extent that they are no longer able to function on a day-to-day basis until the disorder is resolved.

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Mercery

Mercery (from French mercerie, the notions trade) initially referred to silk, linen, and fustian textiles imported to England in the 12th century.

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Middle Temple

The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, commonly known simply as Middle Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court exclusively entitled to call their members to the English Bar as barristers, the others being the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and Lincoln's Inn.

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Middlesex

Middlesex (abbreviation: Middx) was a county in southeast England, that is now mostly part of Greater London, with small sections in neighbouring counties.

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Montesquieu

Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu (18 January 1689 – 10 February 1755), generally referred to as simply Montesquieu, was a French lawyer, man of letters, and political philosopher who lived during the Age of Enlightenment.

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New College, Oxford

New College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.

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Owen Ruffhead

Owen Ruffhead (1723 – 25 October 1769) was a miscellaneous writer, and the descendant of a Welsh family who were bakers to King George I of Great Britain.

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Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second-oldest, after Cambridge University Press.

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Parliamentary sovereignty

Parliamentary sovereignty (also called parliamentary supremacy or legislative supremacy) is a concept in the constitutional law of some parliamentary democracies.

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Pasture

Pasture (from the Latin pastus, past participle of pascere, "to feed") is land used for grazing.

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Patent of precedence

A patent of precedence is a grant to an individual by letters patent of a higher social or professional position than the precedence to which his ordinary rank entitles him.

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Paul Wayland Bartlett

Paul Wayland Bartlett (January 24, 1865 – September 20, 1925) was an American sculptor working in the Beaux-Arts tradition of heroic realism.

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Pembroke College, Oxford

Pembroke College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England, located in Pembroke Square.

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Peregrine Bertie (of Low Leyton)

Peregrine Bertie (?1723 – 28 December 1786) was a Tory Member of Parliament.

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Queen's Counsel

Queen's Counsel (postnominal QC), also known as King's Counsel (postnominal KC) if during the reign of a male sovereign, are particularly eminent jurists appointed by letters patent to be one of His Majesty's Counsel learned in the law (or "Her").

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Queens' College, Cambridge

Queens' College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England.

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Recorder (judge)

A Recorder is a judicial officer in England and Wales and some other common law jurisdictions.

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Regius Professor of Civil Law (Oxford)

The Regius Chair of Civil Law, founded in the 1540s, is one of the oldest of the professorships at the University of Oxford.

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River Thames

The River Thames is a river that flows through southern England.

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Robert Chambers (English judge)

Sir Robert Chambers (14 January 1737–9 May 1803), was a jurist, Vinerian Professor of English Law, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Judicature at Fort William in Bengal.

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Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington

Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington PC (c. 1708 - 14 January 1772), was the Lord Chancellor of Great Britain.

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Robert Walpole

Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745), known before 1742 as Sir Robert Walpole, was a British statesman who is generally regarded as the first Prime Minister of Great Britain.

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Roger Newdigate

Sir Roger Newdigate, 5th Baronet (30 May 1719 – 23 November 1806) was an English politician and collector of antiquities.

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Rotten and pocket boroughs

A rotten or pocket borough, more formally known as a nomination borough or proprietarial borough, was a parliamentary borough or constituency in England, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom in existence prior to the Reform Act 1832 which had a very small electorate and could be used by a patron to gain undue and unrepresentative influence within the Unreformed House of Commons.

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Royal Courts of Justice

The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a court building in London which houses both the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales.

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Sardinia

Sardinia (Sardegna, Sardìgna, Sardìnnia /, Sassarese: Sardhigna, Gallurese: Saldigna, Algherese: Saldegna, Tabarchino: Sardegna) is the second largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily and before Cyprus) and an autonomous region of Italy, which goes by the official name of Regione Autonoma della Sardegna / Regione Autònoma de Sardigna (Autonomous Region of Sardinia).

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Selden Society

The Selden Society is a learned society concerned with the study of English legal history.

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Serjeant-at-law

A Serjeant-at-Law (SL), commonly known simply as a Serjeant, was a member of an order of barristers at the English bar.

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Sir William Blackstone's Reports

Reports in K.B. and C.P., from 1746 to 1779 is the title of a collection of nominate reports, by Sir William Blackstone, of cases decided between approximately 1746 and 1780.

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Social structure of the United Kingdom

The social structure of the United Kingdom has historically been highly influenced by the concept of social class, with the concept still affecting British society in the early-21st century.

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Society of Antiquaries of London

The Society of Antiquaries of London (SAL) is a learned society "charged by its Royal Charter of 1751 with 'the encouragement, advancement and furtherance of the study and knowledge of the antiquities and history of this and other countries'." It is based at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London (a building owned by the UK government), and is a registered charity.

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Solicitor General for England and Wales

Her Majesty's Solicitor General for England and Wales, known informally as the Solicitor General, is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Attorney General, whose duty is to advise the Crown and Cabinet on the law.

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St Peter's Church, Wallingford

St Peter's Church is a redundant Anglican church in Wallingford, Oxfordshire, England.

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Stanley Nider Katz

Stanley Nider Katz (born April 23, 1934 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American historian specializing in American legal and constitutional history and the history of philanthropy.

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Substantive law

Substantive law is the statutory, or written law, that defines rights and duties, such as crimes and punishments (in the criminal law), civil rights and responsibilities in civil law.

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Supreme Court of the United States

The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest federal court of the United States.

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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist (later known as The Federalist Papers) is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay (under the pseudonym Publius) promoting the ratification of the United States Constitution.

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Tories (British political party)

The Tories were members of two political parties which existed, sequentially, in the Kingdom of England, the Kingdom of Great Britain and later the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from the 17th to the early 19th centuries.

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United States Congress

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States consisting of two houses: the Senate and the House of Representatives.

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United States Constitution

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America.

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United States Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independence is the statement adopted by the Continental Congress meeting at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on July 4, 1776, which announced that the thirteen American colonies, then at war with Great Britain, regarded themselves as thirteen newly independent sovereign states, and no longer a part of the British Empire.

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University of Oxford

The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University or simply Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

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Vinerian Professor of English Law

The Vinerian Professorship of English Law, formerly Vinerian Professorship of Common Law, was established by Charles Viner who by his will, dated 29 December 1755, left about £12,000 to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford, to establish a Professorship of the Common Law in that University, as well as a number of Vinerian scholarships and readerships.

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Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet (21 November 1694 – 30 May 1778), known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on the established Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of expression, and separation of church and state.

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Wallingford, Oxfordshire

Wallingford is a market town and civil parish in the upper Thames Valley in England.

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Warden (college)

Warden is the title given to or adopted by the head of some university colleges and other institutions.

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Westbury (UK Parliament constituency)

Westbury was a parliamentary constituency in Wiltshire from 1449 to 2010.

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Will and testament

A will or testament is a legal declaration by which a person, the testator, names one or more persons to manage his or her estate and provides for the distribution of his or her property at death.

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William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland

William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland PC (Ire), FRS (3 April 1745 – 28 May 1814) was a British statesman and diplomat.

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William Henry Ashurst (judge)

William Henry Ashurst (or Ashhurst) (1725–1807) was an English judge.

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William Hussey (died 1813)

William Hussey was an English politician.

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William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield

William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield, SL, PC (2 March 1705 – 20 March 1793) was a British barrister, politician and judge noted for his reform of English law.

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William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne

William Petty-Fitzmaurice, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne (2 May 1737 – 7 May 1805), known as The Earl of Shelburne between 1761 and 1784, by which title he is generally known to history, was an Irish-born British Whig statesman who was the first Home Secretary in 1782 and then Prime Minister 1782–1783 during the final months of the American War of Independence.

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William Searle Holdsworth

Sir William Searle Holdsworth, OM, KC, DCL, LL.D, FBA (7 May 1871 – 2 January 1944), was Vinerian Professor of English Law at Oxford University and a legal historian, amongst whose works is the 17 volume History of English Law.

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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616) was an English:poet,:playwright, actor and an Italophile, who is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

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Willoughby Bertie, 3rd Earl of Abingdon

Willoughby Bertie, 3rd Earl of Abingdon (28 November 1692 – 10 June 1760) was an English peer.

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Willoughby Bertie, 4th Earl of Abingdon

Willoughby Bertie, 4th Earl of Abingdon (16 January 1740 – 26 September 1799) was an English peer and music patron.

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Wiltshire

Wiltshire is a county in South West England with an area of.

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World War II

World War II (WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, though related conflicts began earlier.

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Redirects here:

Blackstonian, Sir Blackstone, Sir William Blackstone, W Blackstone, Wm. Blackstone.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Blackstone

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