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Yellow Book of Lecan

The Yellow Book of Lecan (Leabhar Buidhe Leacáin), or TCD MS 1318 (olim H 2.16), is a late medieval Irish manuscript. [1]

102 relations: Aífe, Aldfrith of Northumbria, Athirne, Auraicept na n-Éces, Bec mac Dé, Bláthnat, Book of Ballymote, Book of Leinster, Bres, Brian Boru, Bricriu, Cashel, County Tipperary, Cú Chulainn, Cú Roí, Ciarraige, Colman mac Duagh, Colophon (publishing), Columba, Conchobar, Connla, Cormac mac Airt, Cormac mac Cuilennáin, County Sligo, County Tipperary, Crimthann, Crucifixion, Culdees, Cumméne, Dallán Forgaill, David, Diarmait mac Cerbaill, Dindsenchas, Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh, Edward Lhuyd, Elijah, Enoch (ancestor of Noah), Eochaid, Eugene O'Curry, Féchín of Fore, Fenian Cycle, Fergus mac Róich, Fiachnae mac Báetáin, Fianshruth, Fintan mac Bóchra, Fionn mac Cumhaill, Flann mac Lonáin, Folio, Four Treasures of the Tuatha Dé Danann, Fráech, Giolla Íosa Mór Mac Fir Bhisigh, ..., Great Book of Lecan, Guaire Aidne mac Colmáin, Hill of Tara, History of Ireland (1169–1536), Immacallam in dá Thuarad, Irish mythology, Jesus, John the Baptist, Kilglass, Kings of Osraige, Lebor na hUidre, Mac Con, Mac Fhirbhisigh, Manuscript, Maynooth, Máel Dúin, Mesca Ulad, Middle Irish, Mirrors for princes, Mo Ling, Mongán mac Fiachnai, Mug Ruith, Munster, Murchadh Ó Cuindlis, Nera (mythology), Niall of the Nine Hostages, Nollaig Ó Muraíle, Ogham, Patriarch, Ruaidhrí Ó Flaithbheartaigh, Saint Patrick, Sanas Cormaic, Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin, Senchán Torpéist, Solomon, Spiddal, Táin Bó, Táin Bó Cúailnge, Táin Bó Flidhais, Tír Fhíacrach Múaidhe, The Voyage of Bran, The Voyage of Snedgus and Mac Riagla, Tochmarc Étaíne, Togail Bruidne Dá Derga, Torna Éices, Triads of Ireland, Trinity College Library, Trinity College, Dublin, Tuatha Dé Danann, Ulster Cycle, Vellum, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie. Expand index (52 more) »

Aífe

Aífe (Old Irish, spelled Aoife in Modern Irish) is a character from the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology.

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Aldfrith of Northumbria

Aldfrith (Early Modern Irish: Flann Fína mac Ossu; Latin: Aldfrid, Aldfridus; died 14 December 704 or 705) was king of Northumbria from 685 until his death.

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Athirne

Athirne Ailgheasach or Athairne the Importunate was a poet and satirist of the court of Conchobar mac Nessa in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology, and he was the son of Fer Chedne(Ferchertne).

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Auraicept na n-Éces

Auraicept na n-Éces ("the scholars' primer") is claimed as a 7th-century work of Irish grammarians, written by a scholar named Longarad.

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Bec mac Dé

Bec mac Dé was a legendary Irish prophet, known from saga literature surrounding the historical High King Diarmait mac Cerbaill and from the Irish Annals, where he is said to have died c. 553-7.

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Bláthnat

Bláthnat ("Little flower"), sometimes Bláthíne, is a character in early Irish literature, a king's daughter, wife of the warrior Cú Roí and the lover of his rival Cú Chulainn.

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Book of Ballymote

The Book of Ballymote (RIA MS 23 P 12, 275 foll.), was written in 1390 or 1391 in or near the town of Ballymote, now in County Sligo, but then in the tuath of Corann.

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Book of Leinster

The Book of Leinster (Irish Lebor Laignech), is a medieval Irish manuscript compiled ca.

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Bres

In Irish mythology, Bres (or Bress) was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann.

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Brian Boru

Brian Boru (c. 94123 April 1014, Brian Bóruma mac Cennétig; Brian Bóruma; modern Brian Bóramha) was an Irish king who ended the domination of the High Kingship of Ireland by the Uí Néill.

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Bricriu

Bricriu (also Briccriu, Bricne) is a hospitaller (briugu), troublemaker and poet in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology.

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Cashel, County Tipperary

Cashel is a town in County Tipperary in Ireland.

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Cú Chulainn

Cú Chulainn, also spelt Cú Chulaind or Cúchulainn (Irish for "Culann's Hound") and sometimes known in English as Cuhullin, is an Irish mythological hero who appears in the stories of the Ulster Cycle, as well as in Scottish and Manx folklore.

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Cú Roí

Cú Roí (Cú Ruí, Cú Raoi) mac Dáire is a king of Munster in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology.

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Ciarraige

The Ciarraige were a people found in early medieval Ireland.

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Colman mac Duagh

Saint Colman mac Duagh was born at Cork, Kiltartan, County Galway, Ireland, (c. 560 - 632), the son of the Irish chieftain Duac (and thus, in Irish, mac Duach).

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Colophon (publishing)

In publishing, a colophon is a brief statement containing information about the publication of a book such as the place of publication, the publisher, and the date of publication.

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Columba

Saint Columba (Colm Cille, 'church dove'; 7 December 521 – 9 June 597) was an Irish abbot and missionary credited with spreading Christianity in what is today Scotland at the start of the Hiberno-Scottish mission.

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Conchobar

Conchobar (also spelled Conchobor, Conchobur; in Modern Irish: Conchobhar, Conchubhar, Conchúr) is an Irish male name meaning "lover of hounds".

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Connla

This page is about the Son of Cù Chullain, for Red Connla son of King Conn of the Hundred Battles, please see Conle Connla or Conlaoch is a character in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology, the son of the Ulster champion Cú Chulainn and the Scottish warrior woman Aífe.

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Cormac mac Airt

Cormac mac Airt (son of Art), also known as Cormac ua Cuinn (grandson of Conn) or Cormac Ulfada (long beard), was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

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Cormac mac Cuilennáin

Cormac mac Cuilennáin (died 13 September 908) was an Irish bishop and was king of Munster from 902 until his death at the Battle of Bellaghmoon.

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County Sligo

County Sligo (Contae Shligigh) is a county in Ireland.

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County Tipperary

County Tipperary (Contae Thiobraid Árann) is a county in Ireland.

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Crimthann

Crimthann, Cremthann or in Modern Irish Criofan, is a masculine Irish given name meaning fox.

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Crucifixion

Crucifixion is a form of slow and painful execution in which the victim is tied or nailed to a large wooden cross and left to hang until dead.

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Culdees

The Culdees (Céli Dé, "Companions of God") were members of ascetic Christian monastic and eremitical communities of Ireland, Scotland, and England in the Middle Ages.

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Cumméne

Cumméne, also Cuimín, Cummian, Cumin etc., is an early Irish name (Latinised as Cumianus) and may refer to.

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Dallán Forgaill

Eochaid Mac Colla (530 – 598), better known as Saint Dallan or Dallán Forgaill (Dallán Forchella; Dallanus Forcellius), was an early Christian Irish poet known as the writer of the "Amra Choluim Chille" ("Elegy of Saint Columba") and, traditionally, "Rop Tú Mo Baile" ("Be Thou My Vision").

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David

David (ISO 259-3 Dawid; داوُود; ܕܘܝܕ Dawid; Δαυίδ; Strong's: Daveed) was, according to the Books of Samuel, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel, and according to the New Testament, an ancestor of Jesus.

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Diarmait mac Cerbaill

Diarmait mac Cerbaill (died c. 565) was King of Tara or High King of Ireland.

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Dindsenchas

Dindsenchas or Dindshenchas (modern spellings: Dinnseanchas or Dinnsheanchas), meaning "lore of places" (the modern Irish word dinnseanchas means "topography") is a class of onomastic text in early Irish literature, recounting the origins of place-names and traditions concerning events and characters associated with the places in question.

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Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh

Dubhaltach MacFhirbhisigh, also known as Dubhaltach Óg mac Giolla Íosa Mór mac Dubhaltach Mór Mac Fhirbhisigh, Duald Mac Firbis, Dudly Ferbisie, and Dualdus Firbissius (fl. 1643 – January 1671) was an Irish scribe, translator, historian and genealogist.

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Edward Lhuyd

Edward Lhuyd (usually rewritten as Llwyd in recent times) (1660 – 30 June 1709) was a Welsh naturalist, botanist, linguist, geographer and antiquary.

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Elijah

Elijah (meaning "My God is Yahu") or Elias (Ηλίας Elías; Syriac: ܐܸܠܝܼܵܐ Elyāe; Arabic: إلياس or إليا, Ilyās or Ilyā) was a prophet and a wonder-worker in the northern kingdom of Israel during the reign of Ahab (9th century BC), according to the biblical Books of Kings.

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Enoch (ancestor of Noah)

Enoch (إدريس ʼIdrīs) is a figure in biblical literature.

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Eochaid

Eochaid or Eochaidh (earlier Eochu or Eocho, sometimes Anglicised as Eochy or Haughey) is a popular medieval Irish and Scots Gaelic name deriving from Old Irish ech, horse, borne by a variety of historical and legendary figures.

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Eugene O'Curry

Eugene O'Curry (Eoghan Ó Comhraí, 20 November 1794 – 30 July 1862) was an Irish philologist and antiquary.

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Féchín of Fore

Saint Féchín or Féichín (died 665), also known as Mo-Ecca, was a 7th-century Irish saint, chiefly remembered as the founder of the monastery at Fore (Fobar), County Westmeath.

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Fenian Cycle

The Fenian Cycle (an Fhiannaíocht), also referred to as the Ossianic Cycle after its narrator Oisín, is a body of prose and verse centring on the exploits of the mythical hero Fionn mac Cumhaill and his warriors the Fianna.

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Fergus mac Róich

Fergus mac Róich (son of Ró-ech or "great horse"; also mac Róig, mac Rossa) is a character of the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology.

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Fiachnae mac Báetáin

Fiachnae mac Báetáin (died 626), also called Fiachnae Lurgan or Fiachnae Find, was king of the Dál nAraidi and High King of the Ulaid in the early 7th century.

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Fianshruth

The title Fianṡruth (Find) refers to two alphabetically arranged Middle Irish lists of names associated with the Finn Cycle, preserved only in the Yellow Book of Lecan and probably datable to the twelfth century.

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Fintan mac Bóchra

In Irish mythology Fintan mac Bóchra (modern spelling: Fionntán), known as "the Wise", was a seer who accompanied Noah's granddaughter Cessair to Ireland before the deluge.

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Fionn mac Cumhaill

Fionn mac Cumhaill (Find mac Cumail or Umaill), sometimes transcribed in English as Finn MacCool or Finn MacCoul, was a mythical hunter-warrior of Irish mythology, occurring also in the mythologies of Scotland and the Isle of Man.

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Flann mac Lonáin

Flann mac Lonáin (died 896) was an Irish poet.

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Folio

The term "folio", from the Latin folium (leaf), has three interconnected but distinct meanings in the world of books and printing.

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Four Treasures of the Tuatha Dé Danann

In the Mythological Cycle of early Irish literature, the four treasures (or jewels) of the Tuatha Dé Danann are four magical items which the mythological Tuatha Dé Danann are supposed to have brought with them from the four island cities Murias, Falias, Gorias and Findias, when they arrived in Ireland.

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Fráech

Fráech (Fróech, Fraích, Fraoch) is a Connacht hero in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology.

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Giolla Íosa Mór Mac Fir Bhisigh

Gilla Íosa Mor mac Donnchadh MacFhirbhisigh (fl. 1390 – 1418) was a historian, scribe and poet of the learned Clan MacFhirbhisigh based at Lackan in Tír Fhíacrach, now part of County Sligo.

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Great Book of Lecan

The (Great) Book of Lecan (Irish: Leabhar (Mór) Leacain) (RIA, MS 23 P 2) is a medieval Irish manuscript written between 1397 and 1418 in Castle Forbes, Lecan (Lackan, Leckan; Irish Leacan) in the territory of Tír Fhíacrach, near modern Enniscrone, County Sligo.

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Guaire Aidne mac Colmáin

Guaire Aidne mac Colmáin (died 663) was a king of Connacht.

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Hill of Tara

The Hill of Tara (Teamhair or Teamhair na Rí), located near the River Boyne, is an archaeological complex that runs between Navan and Dunshaughlin in County Meath, Ireland.

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History of Ireland (1169–1536)

The history of Ireland from 1169–1536 covers the period from the arrival of the Cambro-Normans to the reign of Henry VIII of England, who made himself King of Ireland.

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Immacallam in dá Thuarad

The Immacallam in dá Thuarad, or The Colloquy of the two Sages ("Colloquy" sometimes being replaced with "Dialogue"), is an example of bardic, or Ollamhic in this case, interchange found in the twelfth century Book of Leinster.

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Irish mythology

The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity.

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Jesus

Jesus (Ἰησοῦς; 7–2 BC to AD 30–33), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus Christ, is the central figure of Christianity, whom the teachings of most Christian denominations hold to be the Son of God.

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John the Baptist

John the Baptist (Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτιστής Ioannēs ho baptistēs or Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτίζων Ioannēs ho baptizōn Lang, Bernhard (2009) International Review of Biblical Studies Brill Academic Pub ISBN 9004172548 Page 380 – "33/34 CE Herod Antipas's marriage to Herodias (and beginning of the ministry of Jesus in a sabbatical year); 35 CE – death of John the Baptist" was an itinerant preacherCross, F. L. (ed.) (2005) Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, 3rd ed. Oxford University Press ISBN 978-0-19-280290-3, article "John the Baptist, St" and a major religious figureFunk, Robert W. & the Jesus Seminar (1998). The Acts of Jesus: the search for the authentic deeds of Jesus. San Francisco: Harper; "John the Baptist" cameo, p. 268 in Christianity, Islam, the Bahá'í Faith, and Mandaeism. John is described as having the unique practice of baptism for the forgiveness of sins.Crossan, John Dominic (1998). The Essential Jesus. Edison: Castle Books; p. 146 Most scholars agree that John baptized Jesus. Scholars generally believe Jesus was a follower or disciple of JohnSanders, E.P. (1985) Jesus and Judaism. Philadelphia: Fortress Press; p. 91 and several New Testament accounts report that some of Jesus' early followers had previously been followers of John.Harris, Stephen L. (1985) Understanding the Bible. Palo Alto: Mayfield John the Baptist is also mentioned by the Jewish historian Josephus. Some scholars maintain that John was influenced by the semi-ascetic Essenes, who expected an apocalypse and practiced rituals corresponding strongly with baptism, although no direct evidence substantiates this. According to the New Testament, John anticipated a messianic figure greater than himself,Funk, Robert W. & the Jesus Seminar (1998). The Acts of Jesus: the search for the authentic deeds of Jesus.San Francisco: Harper; "Mark," pp. 51–161. and Jesus was the one whose coming John foretold. Christians commonly refer to John as the precursor or forerunner of Jesus, since John announces Jesus' coming. John is also identified with the prophet Elijah.Stephen L. Harris, Understanding the Bible. Palo Alto: Mayfield. 1985. ISBN 1-55934-655-8.

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Kilglass

Kilglass or Kilglas is a village in County Sligo, Ireland.

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Kings of Osraige

The kings of Osraige (alternately spelled Osraighe or Ossory) reigned over the Kingdom of Ossory from the first or second century AD until the late twelfth century.

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Lebor na hUidre

Lebor na hUidre or the Book of the Dun Cow (MS 23 E 25) is an Irish vellum manuscript dating to the 12th century.

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Mac Con

Lugaid Mac Con, often known simply as Mac Con, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

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Mac Fhirbhisigh

MacFirbis (Mac Fhirbhisigh), also known as Forbes, was the surname of a family of Irish hereditary historians based for much of their known history at Lecan, Tireragh (now Lackan, Kilglass parish, County Sligo).

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Manuscript

A manuscript is any document written by hand or typewritten, as opposed to being mechanically printed or reproduced in some automated way.

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Maynooth

Maynooth (Maigh Nuad) is a university town in north County Kildare, Ireland.

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Máel Dúin

Máel Dúin is the protagonist of Immram Maele Dúin or the Voyage of Máel Dúin, a tale of a sea voyage written in Old Irish around the end of the first millennium.

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Mesca Ulad

Mesca Ulad (English: The Intoxication of the Ulaid; the Ulstermen) is a narrative from the Ulster Cycle preserved in the 12th century manuscripts the Book of Leinster and in the Lebor na hUidre.

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Middle Irish

Middle Irish (sometimes called Middle Gaelic) is the Goidelic language which was spoken in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man from the 10th to 12th centuries; it is therefore a contemporary of late Old English and early Middle English.

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Mirrors for princes

The mirrors for princes (specula principum or rather, principum specula) are a genre – in the loose sense of the word – of political writing during the Early Middle Ages, Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

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Mo Ling

Saint Mo Ling (614–697), also named Moling Luachra, was the second Bishop of Ferns in Ireland and has been said to be "one of the four great prophets of Erin".

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Mongán mac Fiachnai

Mongán mac Fiachnai (died ca. 625) was an Irish prince of the Cruthin, a son of Fiachnae mac Báetáin.

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Mug Ruith

Mug Ruith (or Mogh Roith, "slave of the wheel") is a figure in Irish mythology, a powerful blind druid of Munster who lived on Valentia Island, County Kerry.

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Munster

Munster (an Mhumhain / Cúige Mumhan,.

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Murchadh Ó Cuindlis

Murchadh Ó Cuindlis (fl. 1398–1411) was an Irish scribe.

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Nera (mythology)

Nera (modern spelling Neara) is a warrior of Connacht in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology.

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Niall of the Nine Hostages

Niall Noígíallach (Old Irish "having nine hostages"), or in English, Niall of the Nine Hostages, was a prehistoric Irish king, the ancestor of the Uí Néill family that dominated Ireland from the 6th to the 10th century.

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Nollaig Ó Muraíle

Nollaig Ó Muraíle is an Irish scholar.

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Ogham

Ogham (Modern Irish or; ogam) is an Early Medieval alphabet used primarily to write the early Irish language (in the so-called "orthodox" inscriptions, 4th to 6th centuries), and later the Old Irish language (so-called scholastic ogham, 6th to 9th centuries).

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Patriarch

Originally, a patriarch was a man who exercised autocratic authority as a pater familias over an extended family.

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Ruaidhrí Ó Flaithbheartaigh

Roderic O'Flaherty (Ruaidhrí Ó Flaithbheartaigh; 1629 – 1718 or 1716) was an Irish historian.

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Saint Patrick

Saint Patrick (Patricius; Πατρίκιος; *Qatrikias; Modern Pádraig; Padrig) was a 5th-century Romano-British Christian missionary and bishop in Ireland.

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Sanas Cormaic

Sanas Cormaic (or Sanas Chormaic, Irish for "Cormac's narrative"), also known as Cormac's Glossary, is an early Irish glossary containing etymologies and explanations of over 1,400 Irish words, many of which are difficult or outdated.

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Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin

The Scéla Cano meic Gartnáin (The Story of Cano mac Gartnáin) is an Old Irish prose tale of the ninth century or later.

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Senchán Torpéist

Senchán Torpéist (ca. 560–647 AD) was a Gaelic-Irish poet.

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Solomon

Solomon (ISO 259-3 Šlomo; ܫܠܝܡܘܢ Shlemun; سُليمان, also colloquially: or; Σολομών Solomōn), also called Jedidiah (Hebrew), was, according to the Bible (Book of Kings: 1 Kings 1–11; Book of Chronicles: 1 Chronicles 28–29, 2 Chronicles 1–9), Qur'an, and Hidden Words a king of Israel and the son of David.

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Spiddal

Spiddal Placenames Database of Ireland.

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Táin Bó

The Táin Bó, or cattle raid (literally "driving-off of cows"), is one of the genres of early Irish literature.

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Táin Bó Cúailnge

Táin Bó Cúailnge ("the driving-off of cows of Cooley", commonly known as The Cattle Raid of Cooley or The Táin) is a legendary tale from early Irish literature, often considered an epic, although it is written primarily in prose rather than verse.

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Táin Bó Flidhais

Táin Bó Flidhais, also known as the Mayo Táin, is a tale from the Ulster Cycle of early Irish literature.

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Tír Fhíacrach Múaidhe

is a territory in County Sligo in northwest Ireland.

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The Voyage of Bran

Immram Brain (maic Febail) (The Voyage of Bran (son of Febail)) is a medieval Irish narrative.

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The Voyage of Snedgus and Mac Riagla

The Voyage of Snedgus and Mac Riagla is one of the three surviving Immrama, or ancient Irish voyage tales.

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Tochmarc Étaíne

Tochmarc Étaíne, meaning "The Wooing of Étaín/Éadaoin", is an early text of the Irish Mythological Cycle, and also features characters from the Ulster Cycle and the Cycles of the Kings.

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Togail Bruidne Dá Derga

Togail Bruidne Dá Derga (The Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel) is an Irish tale belonging to the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology.

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Torna Éices

Torna, nicknamed Éices or Éces ("the poet, sage"), was a legendary Irish poet of the 5th century, noted as "the last great bard of Pagan Ireland." He is not to be confused with Torna Éigeas, the 17th-century bard who figures in the Contention of the Bards.

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Triads of Ireland

The title Trecheng Breth Féne "A Triad of Judgments of the Irish", more widely known as "The Triads of Ireland", refers to a miscellaneous collection of about 214 Old Irish triads (and some numerical variants) on a variety of topics, such as nature, geography, law, custom and behaviour.

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Trinity College Library

The Library of Trinity College Dublin serves Trinity College and the University of Dublin.

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Trinity College, Dublin

Trinity College (Coláiste na Tríonóide), known in full as the College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin, is a research university and the sole constituent college of the University of Dublin in Ireland.

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Tuatha Dé Danann

The Tuath(a) Dé Danann (usually translated as "people(s)/tribe(s) of the goddess Danu"), also known by the earlier name Tuath Dé ("tribe of the gods"),Koch, John T. Celtic Culture: A Historical Encyclopedia.

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Ulster Cycle

The Ulster Cycle (an Rúraíocht), formerly known as the Red Branch Cycle, one of the four great cycles of Irish mythology, is a body of medieval Irish heroic legends and sagas of the traditional heroes of the Ulaid in what is now eastern Ulster and northern Leinster, particularly counties Armagh, Down and Louth, and taking place around or before the 1st century AD.

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Vellum

Vellum is derived from the Latin word "vitulinum" meaning "made from calf", leading to Old French "vélin" ("calfskin").

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Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie

The Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie is an academic journal of Celtic studies, which was established in 1897 by the German scholars Kuno Meyer and Ludwig Christian Stern.

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Redirects here:

H 2.16, Leabhar Buidhe Lecain, Lebor Buide Lecain, Lebor Buide Lecáin, TCD MS 1318.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_Book_of_Lecan

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