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This article concerns the period between 9 BC and 1 BC, the last nine years of the Before Christ era. [1]

117 relations: Abgar V, AD 14, AD 20, AD 21, AD 23, AD 30, AD 40, AD 57, AD 6, AD 65, AD 69, AD 9, Amanishakheto, Anno Domini, Antiochus III of Commagene, Antipater (son of Herod the Great), Apostles, Aristobulus IV, Arminius, Arshak II of Iberia, Asconius Pedianus, Augustus, Av Beit Din, Bosporan Kingdom, China, Christianity, Cicero, Cilicia, Client state, Colchis, Conchobar Abradruad, Consort Ban, Consort Feng Yuan, Consort Fu, Crimthann Nia Náir, Curia (wife of Quintus Lucretius), Dong Xian, Eastern Buyeo, Emperor Ai of Han, Emperor Cheng of Han, Emperor Guangwu of Han, Emperor Ping of Han, Emperor Suinin, Empress Fu (Ai), Empress Wang (Ping), Empress Xu (Cheng), Erato of Armenia, Gaius Caesar, Gaius Maecenas, Galba, ..., Germania, Geumwa of Dongbuyeo, Han dynasty, Herod the Great, Herodian Tetrarchy, Hillel the Elder, Horace, Hyeokgeose of Silla, Iullus Antonius, Jesus, John the Baptist, Judea (Roman province), Kingdom of Iberia, List of High Kings of Ireland, List of monarchs of Kush, List of Roman emperors, Liu Xiang (scholar), Livy, Lugaid Riab nDerg, Marcus Tullius Tiro, Matthew the Apostle, Musa of Parthia, Nasi (Hebrew title), Natakamani, Nero Claudius Drusus, Osroene, Ovid, Parthian Empire, Philip the Tetrarch, Phraates IV, Phraates V, Polemon I of Pontus, Pontus (region), Ptolemy of Mauretania, Quintus Lucretius Vespillo, Quirinius, Roman consul, Roman emperor, Sanhedrin, Seneca the Younger, Shammai, Silla, Strato II, Tiberius, Tigranes IV, Wang Mang, Zhao Feiyan, Zhao Hede, 1 BC, 17 BC, 18 BC, 2 BC, 23 BC, 27 BC, 3 BC, 32 BC, 4 BC, 48 BC, 5 BC, 51 BC, 6 BC, 65 BC, 7 BC, 70 BC, 73 BC, 8 BC, 9 BC. Expand index (67 more) »

Abgar V

Abgar V the Black or Abgarus V of Edessa (ʾAḇgar al-kḤəmiš ʾUkkāmā,ʾAḇgar Ḥəmišāyā ʾUkkāmā, Abgar Hingerord Yedesatsi, Abgaros) (BC 4 – AD 7 and AD 13–c. 40) was an Arab holding his capital at Edessa.

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AD 14

AD 14 (XIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 20

AD 20 (XX) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 21

AD 21 (XXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 23

AD 23 (XXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 30

AD 30 (XXX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 40

AD 40 (XL) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 57

AD 57 (LVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 6

AD 6 (VI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 65

AD 65 (LXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 69

AD 69 (LXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 9

AD 9 (IX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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Amanishakheto

Amanishakheto was a Kandake of Kush.

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Anno Domini

The terms anno Domini (AD) and before Christ (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars.

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Antiochus III of Commagene

Antiochus III Epiphanes (Ἀντίοχος ὀ Ἐπιφανής, flourished 1st century BC and 1st century AD) was the ruler of the Kingdom of Commagene from 12 BC to 17 AD.

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Antipater (son of Herod the Great)

Antipater II (Ἀντίπατρος; c. 46 – 4 BC) was Herod the Great's first-born son, his only child by his first wife Doris.

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Apostles

In Christian theology and ecclesiology, the apostles, particularly the Twelve Apostles (also known as the Twelve Disciples or simply the Twelve), were the primary disciples of Jesus, the central figure in Christianity.

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Aristobulus IV

Aristobulus IV (31–7 BC) was a prince of Judea from the Herodian dynasty, and was married to his cousin, Berenice, daughter of Costobarus and Salome I. He was the son of Herod the Great and his second wife, Mariamne I, the last of the Hasmoneans, and was thus a descendant of the Hasmonean Dynasty.

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Arminius

Arminius (German: Hermann; 18/17 BC – AD 21) was a chieftain of the Germanic Cherusci tribe who famously led an allied coalition of Germanic tribes to a decisive victory against three Roman legions in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in 9 AD.

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Arshak II of Iberia

Arshak II (არშაკ) or Arsuk (არსუკ) (died in AD 1), of the Nimrodid Dynasty, was a king of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia) from c. 20 BC to AD 1.

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Asconius Pedianus

Quintus Asconius Pedianus (c. 9 BC – c. AD 76) was a Roman historian.

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Augustus

Augustus (Augustus; 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD) was a Roman statesman and military leader who was the first Emperor of the Roman Empire, controlling Imperial Rome from 27 BC until his death in AD 14.

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Av Beit Din

The av beit din (ʾabh bêth dîn, "chief of the court" or "chief justice"or "chief justice"), also spelled av beis din or abh beth din and abbreviated ABD, was the second-highest-ranking member of the Sanhedrin during the Second Temple period, and served as an assistant to the Nasi.

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Bosporan Kingdom

The Bosporan Kingdom, also known as the Kingdom of the Cimmerian Bosporus (Basileion tou Kimmerikou Bosporou), was an ancient state located in eastern Crimea and the Taman Peninsula on the shores of the Cimmerian Bosporus, the present-day Strait of Kerch (it was not named after the more famous Bosphorus beside Istanbul at the other end of the Black Sea).

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China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a unitary one-party sovereign state in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around /1e9 round 3 billion.

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Christianity

ChristianityFrom Ancient Greek Χριστός Khristós (Latinized as Christus), translating Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ, Māšîăḥ, meaning "the anointed one", with the Latin suffixes -ian and -itas.

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Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero (3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, orator, lawyer and philosopher, who served as consul in the year 63 BC.

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Cilicia

In antiquity, Cilicia(Armenian: Կիլիկիա) was the south coastal region of Asia Minor and existed as a political entity from Hittite times into the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia during the late Byzantine Empire.

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Client state

A client state is a state that is economically, politically, or militarily subordinate to another more powerful state in international affairs.

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Colchis

Colchis (კოლხეთი K'olkheti; Greek Κολχίς Kolkhís) was an ancient Georgian kingdom and region on the coast of the Black Sea, centred in present-day western Georgia.

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Conchobar Abradruad

Conchobar Abradruad ("red eyelashes"), son of Find File, son of Ros Ruad, son of Ferhus Fairgge, son of Nuadu Necht, of the Laigin, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

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Consort Ban

Consort Ban (c. 48 – c. 6 BCE), or Ban Jieyu, also known as Lady Ban (Pan), was a Chinese scholar and poet during the Western Han Dynasty (206 BCE – 23 CE).

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Consort Feng Yuan

Consort Feng Yuan (馮媛, imperial title Zhaoyi (昭儀), died 6 BC) was an imperial consort during China's Han Dynasty.

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Consort Fu

Consort Fu (傅昭儀, personal name unknown) (died 3 BC) was an imperial consort during Han Dynasty.

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Crimthann Nia Náir

Crimthann Nia Náir (nephew of Nár), son of Lugaid Riab nDerg, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

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Curia (wife of Quintus Lucretius)

Curia or Turia or Thuria (ca. 60 BC – 5 BC) was a Roman woman who became famous for her bravery and devotion.

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Dong Xian

Dong Xian (董賢) (23 BC(?) – 1 BC) was a Han Dynasty politician who quickly rose from obscurity as a minor official to being the most powerful official in the imperial administration of Emperor Ai within a span of a few years.

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Eastern Buyeo

Dongbuyeo was an ancient Korean kingdom that developed from Bukbuyeo, until conquered by the early Goguryeo, which then grew into one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

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Emperor Ai of Han

Emperor Ai of Han (27 BC – 15 August 1 BC) was an emperor of the Chinese Han Dynasty.

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Emperor Cheng of Han

Emperor Cheng of Han (51 BC – 17 April 7 BC) was an emperor of the Chinese Han Dynasty ruling from 33 until 7 BC.

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Emperor Guangwu of Han

Emperor Guangwu (born Liu Xiu; 15 January 5 BC – 29 March 57), courtesy name Wenshu, was an emperor of the Chinese Han dynasty, restorer of the dynasty in AD 25 and thus founder of the Later Han or Eastern Han (the restored Han Dynasty).

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Emperor Ping of Han

Emperor Ping (9 BC – 3 February 6) was an emperor of the Chinese Han Dynasty from 1 BC to AD 5.

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Emperor Suinin

; also known as Ikumeiribikoisachi no Mikoto; was the 11th emperor of Japan,Imperial Household Agency (Kunaichō):; retrieved 2013-8-22.

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Empress Fu (Ai)

Empress Fu (傅皇后) (died 1 BC), formally Empress Xiaoai (孝哀皇后), was an Empress during Han Dynasty.

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Empress Wang (Ping)

Empress Wang (王皇后, personal name unknown) (8 BC – AD 23), formally Empress Xiaoping (孝平皇后), formally during her father Wang Mang's Xin Dynasty Duchess Dowager of Ding'an (定安太后) then Princess Huanghuang (黃皇室主) was an empress during the Han Dynasty—the last of the Western Han Dynasty—who was the daughter of the eventual usurper Wang Mang.

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Empress Xu (Cheng)

Empress Xu (許皇后) (personal name unknown,but likely Xu Kua) (died 8 BC) was an empress during Han Dynasty, who came from a powerful family and who was initially very much loved by her husband Emperor Cheng, but who eventually lost favor and, as a result of the machinations of her eventual successor, Empress Zhao Feiyan, was deposed.

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Erato of Armenia

Erato also known as Queen Erato (flourished second half of 1st century BC & first half of 1st century, died sometime after 12) was a princess of the Kingdom of Armenia and member of the Artaxiad Dynasty.

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Gaius Caesar

Gaius Caesar (Latin: Gaius Julius Caesar; 20 BC – 21 February AD 4) was consul in AD 1 and the grandson of Augustus, the first emperor of the Roman Empire.

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Gaius Maecenas

Gaius Cilnius Maecenas (15 April 68 BC – 8 BC) was an ally, friend and political advisor to Octavian (who was to become the first Emperor of Rome as Caesar Augustus) as well as an important patron for the new generation of Augustan poets, including both Horace and Virgil.

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Galba

Galba (Servius Sulpicius Galba Caesar Augustus; 24 December 3 BC – 15 January 69 AD) was Roman emperor for seven months from 68 to 69.

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Germania

"Germania" was the Roman term for the geographical region in north-central Europe inhabited mainly by Germanic peoples.

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Geumwa of Dongbuyeo

Geumwa was the second ruler (48 BCE – 7 BCE) of Dongbuyeo.

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Han dynasty

The Han dynasty was the second imperial dynasty of China (206 BC–220 AD), preceded by the Qin dynasty (221–206 BC) and succeeded by the Three Kingdoms period (220–280 AD). Spanning over four centuries, the Han period is considered a golden age in Chinese history. To this day, China's majority ethnic group refers to themselves as the "Han Chinese" and the Chinese script is referred to as "Han characters". It was founded by the rebel leader Liu Bang, known posthumously as Emperor Gaozu of Han, and briefly interrupted by the Xin dynasty (9–23 AD) of the former regent Wang Mang. This interregnum separates the Han dynasty into two periods: the Western Han or Former Han (206 BC–9 AD) and the Eastern Han or Later Han (25–220 AD). The emperor was at the pinnacle of Han society. He presided over the Han government but shared power with both the nobility and appointed ministers who came largely from the scholarly gentry class. The Han Empire was divided into areas directly controlled by the central government using an innovation inherited from the Qin known as commanderies, and a number of semi-autonomous kingdoms. These kingdoms gradually lost all vestiges of their independence, particularly following the Rebellion of the Seven States. From the reign of Emperor Wu (r. 141–87 BC) onward, the Chinese court officially sponsored Confucianism in education and court politics, synthesized with the cosmology of later scholars such as Dong Zhongshu. This policy endured until the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1911 AD. The Han dynasty saw an age of economic prosperity and witnessed a significant growth of the money economy first established during the Zhou dynasty (c. 1050–256 BC). The coinage issued by the central government mint in 119 BC remained the standard coinage of China until the Tang dynasty (618–907 AD). The period saw a number of limited institutional innovations. To finance its military campaigns and the settlement of newly conquered frontier territories, the Han government nationalized the private salt and iron industries in 117 BC, but these government monopolies were repealed during the Eastern Han dynasty. Science and technology during the Han period saw significant advances, including the process of papermaking, the nautical steering ship rudder, the use of negative numbers in mathematics, the raised-relief map, the hydraulic-powered armillary sphere for astronomy, and a seismometer for measuring earthquakes employing an inverted pendulum. The Xiongnu, a nomadic steppe confederation, defeated the Han in 200 BC and forced the Han to submit as a de facto inferior partner, but continued their raids on the Han borders. Emperor Wu launched several military campaigns against them. The ultimate Han victory in these wars eventually forced the Xiongnu to accept vassal status as Han tributaries. These campaigns expanded Han sovereignty into the Tarim Basin of Central Asia, divided the Xiongnu into two separate confederations, and helped establish the vast trade network known as the Silk Road, which reached as far as the Mediterranean world. The territories north of Han's borders were quickly overrun by the nomadic Xianbei confederation. Emperor Wu also launched successful military expeditions in the south, annexing Nanyue in 111 BC and Dian in 109 BC, and in the Korean Peninsula where the Xuantu and Lelang Commanderies were established in 108 BC. After 92 AD, the palace eunuchs increasingly involved themselves in court politics, engaging in violent power struggles between the various consort clans of the empresses and empresses dowager, causing the Han's ultimate downfall. Imperial authority was also seriously challenged by large Daoist religious societies which instigated the Yellow Turban Rebellion and the Five Pecks of Rice Rebellion. Following the death of Emperor Ling (r. 168–189 AD), the palace eunuchs suffered wholesale massacre by military officers, allowing members of the aristocracy and military governors to become warlords and divide the empire. When Cao Pi, King of Wei, usurped the throne from Emperor Xian, the Han dynasty would eventually collapse and ceased to exist.

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Herod the Great

Herod (Greek:, Hērōdēs; 74/73 BCE – c. 4 BCE/1 CE), also known as Herod the Great and Herod I, was a Roman client king of Judea, referred to as the Herodian kingdom.

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Herodian Tetrarchy

The Herodian Tetrarchy was formed following the death of Herod the Great in 4 BCE, when his kingdom was divided between his sons Herod Archelaus as ethnarch, Herod Antipas and Philip as tetrarchs in inheritance, while Herod's sister Salome I shortly ruled a toparchy of Jamnia.

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Hillel the Elder

Hillel (הלל; variously called Hillel HaGadol, or Hillel HaZaken, Hillel HaBavli or HaBavli,. was born according to tradition in Babylon c. 110 BCE, died 10 CE in Jerusalem) was a Jewish religious leader, one of the most important figures in Jewish history.

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Horace

Quintus Horatius Flaccus (December 8, 65 BC – November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus (also known as Octavian).

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Hyeokgeose of Silla

Hyeokgeose of Silla (69 BC – 4 AD, r. 57 BC–4 AD), also known by his personal full name as Bak (Park, Pak) Hyeokgeose, was the founding monarch of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

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Iullus Antonius

Iullus Antonius (45 BC – 2 BC), also known as Iulus, Julus or Jullus, was a personage in Ancient Rome.

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Jesus

Jesus, also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ, was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.

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John the Baptist

John the Baptist (יוחנן המטביל Yokhanan HaMatbil, Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτιστής, Iōánnēs ho baptistḗs or Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτίζων, Iōánnēs ho baptízōn,Lang, Bernhard (2009) International Review of Biblical Studies Brill Academic Pub p. 380 – "33/34 CE Herod Antipas's marriage to Herodias (and beginning of the ministry of Jesus in a sabbatical year); 35 CE – death of John the Baptist" ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ ⲡⲓⲡⲣⲟⲇⲣⲟⲙⲟⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ ⲡⲓⲣϥϯⲱⲙⲥ, يوحنا المعمدان) was a Jewish itinerant preacherCross, F. L. (ed.) (2005) Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, 3rd ed.

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Judea (Roman province)

The Roman province of Judea (יהודה, Standard Tiberian; يهودا; Ἰουδαία; Iūdaea), sometimes spelled in its original Latin forms of Iudæa or Iudaea to distinguish it from the geographical region of Judea, incorporated the regions of Judea, Samaria and Idumea, and extended over parts of the former regions of the Hasmonean and Herodian kingdoms of Judea.

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Kingdom of Iberia

In Greco-Roman geography, Iberia (Ancient Greek: Ἰβηρία; Hiberia) was an exonym (foreign name) for the Georgian kingdom of Kartli (ქართლი), known after its core province, which during Classical Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages was a significant monarchy in the Caucasus, either as an independent state or as a dependent of larger empires, notably the Sassanid and Roman empires.

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List of High Kings of Ireland

Medieval Irish historical tradition held that Ireland had been ruled by an Ard Rí or High King since ancient times, and compilations like the 11th-century Lebor Gabála Érenn, followed by early modern works like the Annals of the Four Masters and Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn, purported to trace the line of High Kings.

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List of monarchs of Kush

This is an incomplete list for rulers with the title of Qore (king) or Kandake (queen) of the Kingdom of Kush.

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List of Roman emperors

The Roman Emperors were rulers of the Roman Empire, wielding power over its citizens and military.

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Liu Xiang (scholar)

Liu Xiang (77–6BCE), born Liu Gengsheng and bearing the courtesy name Zizheng, was a Chinese politician, historian, and writer of the Western Han Dynasty.

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Livy

Titus Livius Patavinus (64 or 59 BCAD 12 or 17) – often rendered as Titus Livy, or simply Livy, in English language sources – was a Roman historian.

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Lugaid Riab nDerg

Lugaid Riab nDerg ("the red-striped") or Réoderg ("Red Sky"), son of the three findemna, triplet sons of Eochu Feidlech, and their sister Clothru was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

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Marcus Tullius Tiro

Marcus Tullius Tiro (died c. 4 BC) was first a slave, then a freedman of Cicero.

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Matthew the Apostle

Matthew the Apostle (מַתִּתְיָהוּ Mattityahu or Mattay, "Gift of YHVH"; Ματθαῖος; ⲙⲁⲧⲑⲉⲟⲥ, Matthaios; also known as Saint Matthew and as Levi) was, according to the Christian Bible, one of the twelve apostles of Jesus and, according to Christian tradition, one of the four Evangelists.

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Musa of Parthia

Musa was Queen of the Parthian Empire from c. 2 BC to 4 AD.

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Nasi (Hebrew title)

() is a Hebrew title meaning "prince" in Biblical Hebrew, "Prince " in Mishnaic Hebrew, or "president" in Modern Hebrew.

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Natakamani

Natakamani was a King of Kush who reigned from around or earlier than 1 BC to c. AD 20.

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Nero Claudius Drusus

Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus (January 14, 38 BC – summer of 9 BC), born Decimus Claudius Drusus, also called Drusus Claudius Nero, Drusus, Drusus I, Nero Drusus, or Drusus the Elder was a Roman politician and military commander.

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Osroene

Osroene, also spelled Osroëne and Osrhoene (مملكة الرها; ܡܠܟܘܬܐ ܕܒܝܬ ܐܘܪܗܝ "Kingdom of Urhay"; Ὀσροηνή) and sometimes known by the name of its capital city, Edessa (now Şanlıurfa, Turkey), was a historical kingdom in Upper Mesopotamia, which was ruled by a dynasty of Arab origin.

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Ovid

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC – 17/18 AD), known as Ovid in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus.

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Parthian Empire

The Parthian Empire (247 BC – 224 AD), also known as the Arsacid Empire, was a major Iranian political and cultural power in ancient Iran and Iraq.

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Philip the Tetrarch

Philip the Tetrarch, sometimes called Herod Philip II (Hērōdēs Philippos) by modern writers (ruled from 4 BC until his death in AD 34) was the son of Herod the Great and his fifth wife, Cleopatra of Jerusalem.

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Phraates IV

Phraates IV of Parthia (son of Orodes II), ruled the Parthian Empire from 37–2 BC.

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Phraates V

Phraates V, known by the diminutive Phraataces (Φραατάκης), ruled the Parthian Empire from 2 BC to AD 4.

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Polemon I of Pontus

Polemon Pythodoros, also known as Polemon I or Polemon I of Pontus (Πολέμων Πυθόδωρος; fl. 1st century BC – died 8 BC) was the Roman Client King of Cilicia, Pontus, Colchis and the Bosporan Kingdom.

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Pontus (region)

Pontus (translit, "Sea") is a historical Greek designation for a region on the southern coast of the Black Sea, located in modern-day eastern Black Sea Region of Turkey.

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Ptolemy of Mauretania

Ptolemy of Mauretania (Πτολεμαῖος, whence Ptolemaeus; 13 BC/9 BC-40) was the last Roman client king and ruler of Mauretania for Rome.

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Quintus Lucretius Vespillo

Quintus Lucretius Vespillo was the son of another Quintus Lucretius Vespillo, an orator and jurist.

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Quirinius

Publius Sulpicius Quirinius (c. 51 BC – AD 21) was a Roman aristocrat.

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Roman consul

A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and ancient Romans considered the consulship the highest level of the cursus honorum (an ascending sequence of public offices to which politicians aspired).

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Roman emperor

The Roman Emperor was the ruler of the Roman Empire during the imperial period (starting in 27 BC).

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Sanhedrin

The Sanhedrin (Hebrew and Jewish Palestinian Aramaic: סנהדרין; Greek: Συνέδριον, synedrion, "sitting together," hence "assembly" or "council") was an assembly of twenty-three or seventy-one rabbis appointed to sit as a tribunal in every city in the ancient Land of Israel.

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Seneca the Younger

Seneca the Younger AD65), fully Lucius Annaeus Seneca and also known simply as Seneca, was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, and—in one work—satirist of the Silver Age of Latin literature.

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Shammai

Shammai (50 BCE – 30 CE, שמאי) was a Jewish scholar of the 1st century, and an important figure in Judaism's core work of rabbinic literature, the Mishnah.

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Silla

Silla (57 BC57 BC according to the Samguk Sagi; however Seth 2010 notes that "these dates are dutifully given in many textbooks and published materials in Korea today, but their basis is in myth; only Goguryeo may be traced back to a time period that is anywhere near its legendary founding." – 935 AD) was a kingdom located in southern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula.

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Strato II

Strato II "Soter" (Στράτων B΄ ὁ Σωτήρ, Strátōn B΄ ho Sotḗr; epithet means "the Saviour") was an Indo-Greek king.

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Tiberius

Tiberius (Tiberius Caesar Divi Augusti filius Augustus; 16 November 42 BC – 16 March 37 AD) was Roman emperor from 14 AD to 37 AD, succeeding the first emperor, Augustus.

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Tigranes IV

Tigranes IV (30s BC–1) was a Prince of the Kingdom of Armenia and member of the Artaxiad Dynasty who served as a Roman Client King of Armenia from 10 BC until 5 BC.

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Wang Mang

Wang Mang (c. 45 – 6 October 23 AD), courtesy name Jujun, was a Han Dynasty official and consort kin who seized the throne from the Liu family and founded the Xin (or Hsin, meaning "renewed") Dynasty (新朝), ruling 9–23 AD.

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Zhao Feiyan

Zhao Feiyan (c. 32 – 1 BC),Peterson, Barbara Bennett & He Hong Fei & Han Tie & Wang Jiyu & Zhang Guangyu.

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Zhao Hede

Zhao Hede (died 7 BC) was an imperial consort of the rank zhaoyi (昭儀) during the Han dynasty.

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1 BC

Year 1 BC was a common year starting on Friday or Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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17 BC

Year 17 BCE was either a common year starting on Sunday or Monday or a leap year starting on Saturday, Sunday or Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a leap year starting on Friday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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18 BC

Year 18 BC was either a common year starting on Friday, Saturday or Sunday or a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Thursday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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2 BC

Year 2 BC was a common year starting on Thursday or Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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23 BC

Year 23 BC was either a common year starting on Saturday or Sunday or a leap year starting on Friday, Saturday or Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Friday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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27 BC

Year 27 BC was either a common year starting on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday or a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Sunday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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3 BC

Year 3 BC was a common year starting on Wednesday or Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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32 BC

Year 32 BC was either a common year starting on Monday or Tuesday or a leap year starting on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Monday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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4 BC

Year 4 BC was a common year starting on Tuesday or Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Monday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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48 BC

Year 48 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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5 BC

Year 5 BC was a common year starting on Monday or Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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51 BC

Year 51 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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6 BC

Year 6 BC was a common year starting on Sunday or Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Friday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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65 BC

Year 65 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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7 BC

Year 7 BC was a common year starting on Saturday or Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Thursday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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70 BC

Year 70 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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73 BC

Year 73 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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8 BC

Year 8 BC was either a common year starting on Friday or Saturday or a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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9 BC

Year 9 BC was either a common year starting on Wednesday, Thursday or Friday or a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a leap year starting on Monday of the Proleptic Julian calendar.

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Redirects here:

0s BC (decade), 0s BCE.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0s_BC

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