Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

101st kilometre

Index 101st kilometre

The phrase 101st kilometre (101-й километр, sto pervyy kilometr) is a colloquial name for the law restricting freedom of movement in the Soviet Union. [1]

18 relations: Boondocks, Colloquialism, Freedom of movement, Gulag, Jeffrey Tayler, Lishenets, Moscow, Political prisoner, Prison, Propiska in the Soviet Union, Residential segregation in the United States, Russia, Soviet Union, The Atlantic, Urban area, Washington University Law Review, Wolf ticket (Russia), 1980 Summer Olympics.

Boondocks

The boondocks is an American expression that stems from the Tagalog word bundók ("mountain").

New!!: 101st kilometre and Boondocks · See more »

Colloquialism

Everyday language, everyday speech, common parlance, informal language, colloquial language, general parlance, or vernacular (but this has other meanings too), is the most used variety of a language, which is usually employed in conversation or other communication in informal situations.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Colloquialism · See more »

Freedom of movement

Freedom of movement, mobility rights, or the right to travel is a human rights concept encompassing the right of individuals to travel from place to place within the territory of a country,Jérémiee Gilbert, Nomadic Peoples and Human Rights (2014), p. 73: "Freedom of movement within a country encompasses both the right to travel freely within the territory of the State and the right to relocate oneself and to choose one's place of residence".

New!!: 101st kilometre and Freedom of movement · See more »

Gulag

The Gulag (ГУЛАГ, acronym of Главное управление лагерей и мест заключения, "Main Camps' Administration" or "Chief Administration of Camps") was the government agency in charge of the Soviet forced labor camp system that was created under Vladimir Lenin and reached its peak during Joseph Stalin's rule from the 1930s to the 1950s.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Gulag · See more »

Jeffrey Tayler

Jeffrey Tayler is a U.S.-born author and journalist.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Jeffrey Tayler · See more »

Lishenets

A lishenets (p), лишение deprivation + -ец -ee; "disenfranchised"; plural lishentsy, лишенцы) was a person stripped of the right of voting in the Soviet Union of 1918–1936. Disfranchisement was a means of repression of the categories of population that were classified as "enemies of the working people". The 1918 Soviet Constitution enumerated the categories of disenfranchised people.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Lishenets · See more »

Moscow

Moscow (a) is the capital and most populous city of Russia, with 13.2 million residents within the city limits and 17.1 million within the urban area.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Moscow · See more »

Political prisoner

A political prisoner is someone imprisoned because they have opposed or criticized the government responsible for their imprisonment.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Political prisoner · See more »

Prison

A prison, also known as a correctional facility, jail, gaol (dated, British English), penitentiary (American English), detention center (American English), or remand center is a facility in which inmates are forcibly confined and denied a variety of freedoms under the authority of the state.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Prison · See more »

Propiska in the Soviet Union

A propiska (a) was both a residency permit and a migration-recording tool, used in the Russian Empire before 1917 and in the Soviet Union from the 1930s.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Propiska in the Soviet Union · See more »

Residential segregation in the United States

Residential segregation in the United States is the physical separation of two or more groups into different neighborhoods, or a form of segregation that "sorts population groups into various neighborhood contexts and shapes the living environment at the neighborhood level".

New!!: 101st kilometre and Residential segregation in the United States · See more »

Russia

Russia (rɐˈsʲijə), officially the Russian Federation (p), is a country in Eurasia. At, Russia is the largest country in the world by area, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area, and the ninth most populous, with over 144 million people as of December 2017, excluding Crimea. About 77% of the population live in the western, European part of the country. Russia's capital Moscow is one of the largest cities in the world; other major cities include Saint Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny Novgorod. Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, Russia spans eleven time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk and the U.S. state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. The East Slavs emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century. In 988 it adopted Orthodox Christianity from the Byzantine Empire, beginning the synthesis of Byzantine and Slavic cultures that defined Russian culture for the next millennium. Rus' ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde in the 13th century. The Grand Duchy of Moscow gradually reunified the surrounding Russian principalities, achieved independence from the Golden Horde. By the 18th century, the nation had greatly expanded through conquest, annexation, and exploration to become the Russian Empire, which was the third largest empire in history, stretching from Poland on the west to Alaska on the east. Following the Russian Revolution, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic became the largest and leading constituent of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the world's first constitutionally socialist state. The Soviet Union played a decisive role in the Allied victory in World War II, and emerged as a recognized superpower and rival to the United States during the Cold War. The Soviet era saw some of the most significant technological achievements of the 20th century, including the world's first human-made satellite and the launching of the first humans in space. By the end of 1990, the Soviet Union had the world's second largest economy, largest standing military in the world and the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, twelve independent republics emerged from the USSR: Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and the Baltic states regained independence: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania; the Russian SFSR reconstituted itself as the Russian Federation and is recognized as the continuing legal personality and a successor of the Soviet Union. It is governed as a federal semi-presidential republic. The Russian economy ranks as the twelfth largest by nominal GDP and sixth largest by purchasing power parity in 2015. Russia's extensive mineral and energy resources are the largest such reserves in the world, making it one of the leading producers of oil and natural gas globally. The country is one of the five recognized nuclear weapons states and possesses the largest stockpile of weapons of mass destruction. Russia is a great power as well as a regional power and has been characterised as a potential superpower. It is a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council and an active global partner of ASEAN, as well as a member of the G20, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO), the Council of Europe, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), and the World Trade Organization (WTO), as well as being the leading member of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) and one of the five members of the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU), along with Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Russia · See more »

Soviet Union

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) was a socialist state in Eurasia that existed from 1922 to 1991.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Soviet Union · See more »

The Atlantic

The Atlantic is an American magazine and multi-platform publisher, founded in 1857 as The Atlantic Monthly in Boston, Massachusetts.

New!!: 101st kilometre and The Atlantic · See more »

Urban area

An urban area is a human settlement with high population density and infrastructure of built environment.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Urban area · See more »

Washington University Law Review

The Washington University Law Review is a bimonthly law review published by students at Washington University School of Law.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Washington University Law Review · See more »

Wolf ticket (Russia)

Wolf ticket is a literal translation of the Russian language phrase волчий билет (volchiy bilyet), a colloquial expression to denote a version of a document with restrictive clauses in comparison to the full document.

New!!: 101st kilometre and Wolf ticket (Russia) · See more »

1980 Summer Olympics

The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad (r), was an international multi-sport event held in Moscow, Soviet Union, in present-day Russia.

New!!: 101st kilometre and 1980 Summer Olympics · See more »

Redirects here:

101 km, 101km, 101st kilometer, 101st kilometre rule, 101st km.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/101st_kilometre

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »