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1st millennium in North American history

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The 1st millennium in North American prehistory is characterized by the transition of the Middle Woodland Period (Hopewell tradition) to the Late Woodland Period in Eastern North America. [1]

48 relations: Adena culture, Adobe, Ancestral Puebloans, Arctic, Arizona, Basketmaker III Era, Blythe Intaglios, Brulé, California, Classic stage, Colorado Desert, Colorado River, Eastern Agricultural Complex, Florida, History of North America, Hohokam, Hopewell tradition, Indigenous peoples of Mexico, Indigenous peoples of the Eastern Woodlands, Ipiutak Site, Late Basketmaker II Era, Leif Erikson, List of archaeological periods (North America), Lost-wax casting, Maize, Mesoamerica, Mexico, Mississippian culture, Mohave people, Mound Builders, Norse colonization of North America, Oasisamerica, Ohio River, Patayan, Pit-house, Pottery, Pueblo, Pueblo Bonito, Quechan, Thames & Hudson, Vinland, Weeden Island culture, Winter count, Woodland period, Yucca, 11th century in North American history, 1st millennium, 1st millennium BC in North American history.

Adena culture

The Adena culture was a Pre-Columbian Native American culture that existed from 1000 to 200 BC, in a time known as the Early Woodland period.

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Adobe

Adobe is a building material made from earth and other organic materials.

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Ancestral Puebloans

The Ancestral Puebloans were an ancient Native American culture that spanned the present-day Four Corners region of the United States, comprising southeastern Utah, northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and southwestern Colorado.

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Arctic

The Arctic is a polar region located at the northernmost part of Earth.

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Arizona

Arizona (Hoozdo Hahoodzo; Alĭ ṣonak) is a U.S. state in the southwestern region of the United States.

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Basketmaker III Era

The Basketmaker III Era (AD 500 to 750) also called the "Modified Basketmaker" period, was the third period in which Ancient Pueblo People were cultivating food, began making pottery and living in more sophisticated clusters of pit-house dwellings.

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Blythe Intaglios

The Blythe Intaglios or Blythe Geoglyphs are a group of gigantic figures incised on the ground near Blythe, California in the Colorado Desert.

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Brulé

The Brulé are one of the seven branches or bands (sometimes called "sub-tribes") of the Teton (Titonwan) Lakota American Indian people. They are known as Sičháŋǧu Oyáte (in Lakota), or "Burnt Thighs Nation", and so, were called Brulé (literally "burnt") by the French. The name may have derived from an incident where they were fleeing through a grass fire on the plains.

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California

California is a state in the Pacific Region of the United States.

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Classic stage

In archaeological cultures of North America, the classic stage is the theoretical North and Meso-American societies that existed between DC 500 and 1200.

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Colorado Desert

California's Colorado Desert is a part of the larger Sonoran Desert.

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Colorado River

The Colorado River is one of the principal rivers of the Southwestern United States and northern Mexico (the other being the Rio Grande).

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Eastern Agricultural Complex

The Eastern Agricultural Complex was one of about 10 independent centers of plant domestication in the pre-historic world.

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Florida

Florida (Spanish for "land of flowers") is the southernmost contiguous state in the United States.

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History of North America

History of North America encompasses the past developments of people populating the continent of North America.

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Hohokam

The Hohokam were an ancient Native American culture centered in the present US state of Arizona.

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Hopewell tradition

The Hopewell tradition (also called the Hopewell culture) describes the common aspects of the Native American culture that flourished along rivers in the northeastern and midwestern United States from 100 BCE to 500 CE, in the Middle Woodland period.

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Indigenous peoples of Mexico

Indigenous peoples of Mexico (pueblos indígenas de México), Native Mexicans (nativos mexicanos), or Mexican Native Americans (Mexicanos nativo americanos), are those who are part of communities that trace their roots back to populations and communities that existed in what is now Mexico prior to the arrival of Europeans.

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Indigenous peoples of the Eastern Woodlands

The Eastern Woodlands is a cultural area of the indigenous people of North America.

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Ipiutak Site

The Ipiutak Site is a large archaeological site at Point Hope in northwest Alaska, United States.

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Late Basketmaker II Era

The Late Basketmaker II Era (AD 50 to 500) was a cultural period of Ancient Pueblo People when people began living in pit-houses, raised maize and squash, and were proficient basket makers and weavers.

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Leif Erikson

Leif Erikson or Leif Ericson (970 – c. 1020) was a Norse explorer from Iceland.

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List of archaeological periods (North America)

North American archaeological periods divides the history of pre-Columbian North America into a number of named successive eras or periods, from the earliest-known human habitation through to the early Colonial period which followed the European colonization of the Americas.

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Lost-wax casting

Lost-wax casting (also called "investment casting", "precision casting", or cire perdue in French) is the process by which a duplicate metal sculpture (often silver, gold, brass or bronze) is cast from an original sculpture.

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Maize

Maize (Zea mays subsp. mays, from maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico about 10,000 years ago.

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Mesoamerica

Mesoamerica is an important historical region and cultural area in the Americas, extending from approximately central Mexico through Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and northern Costa Rica, and within which pre-Columbian societies flourished before the Spanish colonization of the Americas in the 15th and 16th centuries.

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Mexico

Mexico (México; Mēxihco), officially called the United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicanos) is a federal republic in the southern portion of North America.

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Mississippian culture

The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American civilization archeologists date from approximately 800 CE to 1600 CE, varying regionally.

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Mohave people

Mohave or Mojave (Mojave: 'Aha Makhav) are a Native American people indigenous to the Colorado River in the Mojave Desert.

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Mound Builders

The various cultures collectively termed Mound Builders were inhabitants of North America who, during a 5,000-year period, constructed various styles of earthen mounds for religious, ceremonial, burial, and elite residential purposes.

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Norse colonization of North America

The Norse exploration of North America began in the late 10th century AD when Norsemen explored and settled areas of the North Atlantic including the northeastern fringes of North America.

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Oasisamerica

Oasisamerica is a term used by some scholars, primarily Mexican anthropologists, for the broad cultural area defining pre-Columbian southwestern North America.

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Ohio River

The Ohio River, which streams westward from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Cairo, Illinois, is the largest tributary, by volume, of the Mississippi River in the United States.

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Patayan

Patayan is a term used by archaeologists to describe prehistoric and historic Native American cultures who inhabited parts of modern-day Arizona, west to Lake Cahuilla in California, and in Baja California, between 700–1550 A.D. This included areas along the Gila River, Colorado River and in the Lower Colorado River Valley, the nearby uplands, and north to the vicinity of the Grand Canyon.

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Pit-house

A pit-house (or pithouse) is a building that is partly dug into the ground, and covered by a roof.

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Pottery

Pottery is the ceramic material which makes up pottery wares, of which major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain.

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Pueblo

Pueblos are modern and old communities of Native Americans in the Southwestern United States.

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Pueblo Bonito

Pueblo Bonito (Spanish for beautiful town) is the largest and best-known great house in Chaco Culture National Historical Park, northern New Mexico.

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Quechan

The Quechan (or Yuma) (Quechan: Kwtsaan 'those who descended') are a Native American tribe who live on the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation on the lower Colorado River in Arizona and California just north of the Mexican border.

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Thames & Hudson

Thames & Hudson (also Thames and Hudson and sometimes T&H for brevity) is a publisher of illustrated books on art, architecture, design, and visual culture.

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Vinland

Vinland, Vineland or Winland (Vínland) is the name for North American land explored by Norse Vikings, where Leif Erikson first landed 1000, approximately five centuries prior to the voyages of Christopher Columbus and John Cabot.

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Weeden Island culture

The Weeden Island Cultures are a group of related archaeological cultures that existed during the Late Woodland period of the North American Southeast.

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Winter count

Winter counts (Lakota: waníyetu wówapi or waníyetu iyáwapi) are pictorial calendars or histories in which tribal records and events were recorded by Native Americans in North America.

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Woodland period

In the classification of Archaeological cultures of North America, the Woodland period of North American pre-Columbian cultures spanned a period from roughly 1000 BCE to European contact in the eastern part of North America, with some archaeologists distinguishing the Mississippian period, from 1000 CE to European contact as a separate period.

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Yucca

Yucca is a genus of perennial shrubs and trees in the family Asparagaceae, subfamily Agavoideae.

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11th century in North American history

This is a timeline of the 11th century in North American prehistory.

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1st millennium

The first millennium was a period of time that began on January 1, AD 1, and ended on December 31, AD 1000, of the Julian calendar.

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1st millennium BC in North American history

The 1st millennium BC in North American prehistory is characterized by the overlap of the Formative stage with the early Woodland period cultures.

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_millennium_in_North_American_history

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