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43 BC

Index 43 BC

Year 43 BC was either a common year starting on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday or a leap year starting on Sunday or Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Monday of the Proleptic Julian calendar. [1]

104 relations: Ab urbe condita, AD 17, AD 18, Aegean Sea, Anno Domini, Antipater the Idumaean, April 14, April 21, Assassination, Assassination of Julius Caesar, Atia (mother of Augustus), Augustus, Aulus Hirtius, Battle of Forum Gallorum, Battle of Mutina, Bologna, Brigandage, Calendar era, Centurion, Cicero, Clodia Pulchra (wife of Augustus), Common year starting on Monday, Common year starting on Sunday, Common year starting on Tuesday, Conscription, Consul, Cularo, December 7, Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus, Durrës, Emerald Buddha, Equites, Formia, Fulvia, Gaius Antonius (brother of Mark Antony), Gaius Cassius Longinus, Gaius Vibius Pansa Caetronianus, Genoa, Grenoble, Hostis humani generis, India, Iotapa (daughter of Artavasdes I), Julian calendar, Julius Caesar, Latakia, Leap year starting on Monday, Leap year starting on Sunday, Lex Titia, Ligurian Alps, Litter (vehicle), ..., Lugdunum, Lyon, Macedonia (Roman province), March 20, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (triumvir), Marcus Junius Brutus the Younger, Mark Antony, Medes, Military recruitment, Modena, Nagasena, November 26, Outlaw, Ovid, Parma, Patna, Philippicae, Piacenza, Porcia (wife of Brutus), Praetor, Proconsul, Proleptic Julian calendar, Promagistrate, Proscription, Publius Clodius Pulcher, Publius Cornelius Dolabella, Quintus Tullius Cicero, Rhodes, Roman consul, Roman Forum, Roman legion, Roman navy, Roman Republic, Roman Senate, Roman Syria, Rome, Rostra, Second Triumvirate, Sextus Pompey, Syria, Thrace, Trebonius, Tribune, Tribute, Troop, Vado Ligure, Verres, 102 BC, 106 BC, 120 BC, 70 BC, 85 BC, 90 BC, 92 BC. Expand index (54 more) »

Ab urbe condita

Ab urbe condita or Anno urbis conditae (abbreviated: A.U.C. or AUC) is a convention that was used in antiquity and by classical historians to refer to a given year in Ancient Rome.

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AD 17

AD 17 (XVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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AD 18

AD 18 (XVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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Aegean Sea

The Aegean Sea (Αιγαίο Πέλαγος; Ege Denizi) is an elongated embayment of the Mediterranean Sea located between the Greek and Anatolian peninsulas, i.e., between the mainlands of Greece and Turkey.

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Anno Domini

The terms anno Domini (AD) and before Christ (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars.

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Antipater the Idumaean

Antipater I the Idumaean (died 43 BC) was the founder of the Herodian Dynasty and father of Herod the Great. According to Josephus, he was the son of Antipas and had formerly held that name. A native of Idumaea, southeast of Judea between the Dead Sea and the Gulf of Aqaba, which during the time of the Hebrew Bible had been known as the land of Edom, Antipater became a powerful official under the later Hasmonean kings and subsequently became a client of the Roman general Pompey the Great when Pompey conquered Judea in the name of Roman Republic. When Julius Caesar defeated Pompey, Antipater rescued Caesar in Alexandria, and was made chief minister of Judea, with the right to collect taxes. Antipater eventually made his sons Phasaelus and Herod the Governors of Jerusalem and Galilee respectively. After the assassination of Caesar, Antipater was forced to side with Gaius Cassius Longinus against Mark Antony. The pro-Roman politics of Antipater led to his increasing unpopularity among the devout, non-Hellenized Jews. He died by poison. The diplomacy and artful politics of Antipater, as well as his insinuation into the Hasmonean court, paved the way for the rise of his son Herod the Great, who used this position to marry the Hasmonean princess Mariamne, endear himself to Rome and become king of Judea under Roman influence.

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April 14

No description.

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April 21

No description.

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Assassination

Assassination is the killing of a prominent person, either for political or religious reasons or for payment.

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Assassination of Julius Caesar

The assassination of Julius Caesar was the result of a conspiracy by many Roman senators led by Gaius Cassius Longinus, Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus, and Marcus Junius Brutus.

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Atia (mother of Augustus)

Atia (also Atia Balba or Atia Balba Caesonia)The caeso part in Caesonia originates from caedere ("to cut"), if it were her true cognomen, possibly indicating the relationship with her only maternal uncle, Julius Caesar.

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Augustus

Augustus (Augustus; 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD) was a Roman statesman and military leader who was the first Emperor of the Roman Empire, controlling Imperial Rome from 27 BC until his death in AD 14.

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Aulus Hirtius

Aulus Hirtius (c. 90 – 43 BC) was one of the consuls of the Roman Republic and a writer on military subjects.

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Battle of Forum Gallorum

The Battle of Forum Gallorum was fought on 14 April 43 BCE near a village in northern Italy (perhaps near modern-day Castelfranco Emilia) between the forces of Mark Antony and legions loyal to the Roman Senate under the overall command of consul Gaius Vibius Pansa Caetronianus, aided by his fellow consul Aulus Hirtius and the untested Caesar Octavian (the future Augustus).

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Battle of Mutina

The Battle of Mutina took place on 21 April 43 BC between the forces loyal to the Senate under consuls Gaius Vibius Pansa and Aulus Hirtius, supported by the legions of Caesar Octavian, and the Caesarian legions of Mark Antony who were besieging the troops of Decimus Brutus.

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Bologna

Bologna (Bulåggna; Bononia) is the capital and largest city of the Emilia-Romagna Region in Northern Italy.

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Brigandage

Brigandage is the life and practice of highway robbery and plunder.

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Calendar era

A calendar era is the year numbering system used by a calendar.

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Centurion

A centurion (centurio; κεντυρίων, kentyríōn, or ἑκατόνταρχος, hekatóntarkhos) was a professional officer of the Roman army after the Marian reforms of 107 BC.

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Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero (3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, orator, lawyer and philosopher, who served as consul in the year 63 BC.

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Clodia Pulchra (wife of Augustus)

Clodia Pulchra,also known as Claudia (born 57 BC/56 BC) was the daughter of Fulvia by her first husband Publius Clodius Pulcher.

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Common year starting on Monday

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year (i.e., a year with 365 days) that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December.

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Common year starting on Sunday

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year (i.e. a year with 365 days) that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December.

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Common year starting on Tuesday

A common year starting on Tuesday is any non-leap year (i.e. a year with 365 days) that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December.

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Conscription

Conscription, sometimes called the draft, is the compulsory enlistment of people in a national service, most often a military service.

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Consul

Consul (abbrev. cos.; Latin plural consules) was the title of one of the chief magistrates of the Roman Republic, and subsequently a somewhat significant title under the Roman Empire.

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Cularo

Cularo was the name of the Gallic city of Grenoble until 381, when it was renamed Gratianopolis in honor of Roman emperor Gratian.

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December 7

No description.

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Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus

Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus (born April 27, ca. 85–81 BC, died 43 BC) was a Roman politician and general of the 1st century BC and one of the leading instigators of Julius Caesar's assassination.

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Durrës

Durrës (Durazzo,, historically known as Epidamnos and Dyrrachium, is the second most populous city of the Republic of Albania. The city is the capital of the surrounding Durrës County, one of 12 constituent counties of the country. By air, it is northwest of Sarandë, west of Tirana, south of Shkodër and east of Rome. Located on the Adriatic Sea, it is the country's most ancient and economic and historic center. Founded by Greek colonists from Corinth and Corfu under the name of Epidamnos (Επίδαμνος) around the 7th century BC, the city essentially developed to become significant as it became an integral part of the Roman Empire and its successor the Byzantine Empire. The Via Egnatia, the continuation of the Via Appia, started in the city and led across the interior of the Balkan Peninsula to Constantinople in the east. In the Middle Ages, it was contested between Bulgarian, Venetian and Ottoman dominions. Following the declaration of independence of Albania, the city served as the capital of the Principality of Albania for a short period of time. Subsequently, it was annexed by the Kingdom of Italy and Nazi Germany in the interwar period. Moreover, the city experienced a strong expansion in its demography and economic activity during the Communism in Albania. Durrës is served by the Port of Durrës, one of the largest on the Adriatic Sea, which connects the city to Italy and other neighbouring countries. Its most considerable attraction is the Amphitheatre of Durrës that is included on the tentative list of Albania for designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Once having a capacity for 20,000 people, it is the largest amphitheatre in the Balkan Peninsula.

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Emerald Buddha

The Emerald Buddha (พระแก้วมรกต, or พระพุทธมหามณีรัตนปฏิมากร) is considered the palladium of the Kingdom of Thailand.

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Equites

The equites (eques nom. singular; sometimes referred to as "knights" in modern times) constituted the second of the property-based classes of ancient Rome, ranking below the senatorial class.

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Formia

Formia is a city and comune in the province of Latina, on the Mediterranean coast of Lazio (Italy).

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Fulvia

Fulvia (c. 83 BC – 40 BC) was an aristocratic Roman woman who lived during the Late Roman Republic.

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Gaius Antonius (brother of Mark Antony)

Gaius Antonius (died 42 BC) was the second son of Marcus Antonius Creticus and Julia Antonia, and thus, younger brother of Mark Antony, who was one of the members of the second triumvirate.

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Gaius Cassius Longinus

Gaius Cassius Longinus (October 3, before 85 BC – October 3, 42 BC) was a Roman senator, a leading instigator of the plot to kill Julius Caesar, and the brother in-law of Marcus Junius Brutus.

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Gaius Vibius Pansa Caetronianus

Gaius Vibius Pansa Caetronianus (died 22 April 43 BC) was consul of the Roman Republic in 43 BC.

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Genoa

Genoa (Genova,; Zêna; English, historically, and Genua) is the capital of the Italian region of Liguria and the sixth-largest city in Italy.

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Grenoble

Grenoble is a city in southeastern France, at the foot of the French Alps where the river Drac joins the Isère.

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Hostis humani generis

Hostis humani generis (Latin for "enemy of mankind") is a legal term of art that originates in admiralty law.

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India

India (IAST), also called the Republic of India (IAST), is a country in South Asia.

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Iotapa (daughter of Artavasdes I)

Iotapa (born in 43 BC-unknown date of death) was a princess of Media Atropatene, daughter of King Artavasdes I of Media Atropatene.

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Julian calendar

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC (708 AUC), was a reform of the Roman calendar.

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Julius Caesar

Gaius Julius Caesar (12 or 13 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC), known by his cognomen Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician and military general who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire.

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Latakia

Latakia, Lattakia or Latakiyah (اللَاذِقِيَّة Syrian pronunciation), is the principal port city of Syria, as well as the capital of the Latakia Governorate.

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Leap year starting on Monday

A leap year starting on Monday is any year with 366 days (i.e. it includes 29 February) that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December.

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Leap year starting on Sunday

A leap year starting on Sunday is any year with 366 days (i.e. it includes 29 February) that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December.

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Lex Titia

The lex Titia was a Roman law passed on 27 November 43 BC, that legalised the Second Triumvirate of Octavian, Mark Antony, and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus for a period of five years.

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Ligurian Alps

The Ligurian Alps are a mountain range in northwestern Italy.

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Litter (vehicle)

The litter is a class of wheelless vehicles, a type of human-powered transport, for the transport of persons.

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Lugdunum

Colonia Copia Claudia Augusta Lugdunum (modern: Lyon, France) was an important Roman city in Gaul.

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Lyon

Lyon (Liyon), is the third-largest city and second-largest urban area of France.

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Macedonia (Roman province)

The Roman province of Macedonia (Provincia Macedoniae, Ἐπαρχία Μακεδονίας) was officially established in 146 BC, after the Roman general Quintus Caecilius Metellus defeated Andriscus of Macedon, the last self-styled King of the ancient kingdom of Macedonia in 148 BC, and after the four client republics (the "tetrarchy") established by Rome in the region were dissolved.

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March 20

Typically the March equinox falls on this date, marking the vernal point in the Northern Hemisphere and the autumnal point in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (triumvir)

Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (c. 89 or 88 BC – late 13 or early 12 BC) was a Roman patrician who was a part of the Second Triumvirate alongside Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (the future Augustus) and Marcus Antonius, and the last Pontifex Maximus of the Roman Republic.

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Marcus Junius Brutus the Younger

Marcus Junius Brutus (the Younger) (85 BC – 23 October 42 BC), often referred to as Brutus, was a politician of the late Roman Republic.

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Mark Antony

Marcus Antonius (Latin:; 14 January 1 August 30 BC), commonly known in English as Mark Antony or Marc Antony, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the transformation of the Roman Republic from an oligarchy into the autocratic Roman Empire.

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Medes

The Medes (Old Persian Māda-, Μῆδοι, מָדַי) were an ancient Iranian people who lived in an area known as Media (northwestern Iran) and who spoke the Median language. At around 1100 to 1000 BC, they inhabited the mountainous area of northwestern Iran and the northeastern and eastern region of Mesopotamia and located in the Hamadan (Ecbatana) region. Their emergence in Iran is thought to have occurred between 800 BC and 700 BC, and in the 7th century the whole of western Iran and some other territories were under Median rule. Its precise geographical extent remains unknown. A few archaeological sites (discovered in the "Median triangle" in western Iran) and textual sources (from contemporary Assyrians and also ancient Greeks in later centuries) provide a brief documentation of the history and culture of the Median state. Apart from a few personal names, the language of the Medes is unknown. The Medes had an ancient Iranian religion (a form of pre-Zoroastrian Mazdaism or Mithra worshipping) with a priesthood named as "Magi". Later during the reigns of the last Median kings, the reforms of Zoroaster spread into western Iran.

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Military recruitment

Military recruitment refers to the activity of attracting people to, and selecting them for, military training and employment.

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Modena

Modena (Mutna; Mutina; Modenese: Mòdna) is a city and comune (municipality) on the south side of the Po Valley, in the Province of Modena in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy.

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Nagasena

Nāgasena was a Sarvastivadan Buddhist sage born in Kashmir and lived around 150 BCE.

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November 26

No description.

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Outlaw

In historical legal systems, an outlaw is declared as outside the protection of the law.

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Ovid

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC – 17/18 AD), known as Ovid in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus.

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Parma

Parma (Pärma) is a city in the northern Italian region of Emilia-Romagna famous for its prosciutto (ham), cheese, architecture, music and surrounding countryside.

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Patna

Patna is the capital and largest city of the state of Bihar in India.

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Philippicae

The Philippicae or Philippics are a series of 14 speeches Cicero gave condemning Mark Antony in 44 and 43 BC.

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Piacenza

Piacenza (Piacentino: Piaṡëinsa) is a city and comune in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy.

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Porcia (wife of Brutus)

Porcia Catonis (c.70 BC – June 43 BC (or October 42 BC)), (Porcia "of Cato", in full Porcia Catonis filia, "Porcia the daughter of Cato") also known simply as Portia, occasionally spelled "Portia" especially in 18th-century English literature, was a Roman woman who lived in the 1st century BC.

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Praetor

Praetor (also spelled prætor) was a title granted by the government of Ancient Rome to men acting in one of two official capacities: the commander of an army (in the field or, less often, before the army had been mustered); or, an elected magistratus (magistrate), assigned various duties (which varied at different periods in Rome's history).

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Proconsul

A proconsul was an official of ancient Rome who acted on behalf of a consul.

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Proleptic Julian calendar

The proleptic Julian calendar is produced by extending the Julian calendar backwards to dates preceding AD 4 when the quadrennial leap year stabilized.

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Promagistrate

In ancient Rome a promagistrate (pro magistratu) was an ex consul or ex praetor whose imperium (the power to command an army) was extended at the end of his annual term of office or later.

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Proscription

Proscription (proscriptio) is, in current usage, a "decree of condemnation to death or banishment" (OED) and can be used in a political context to refer to state-approved murder or banishment.

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Publius Clodius Pulcher

Publius Clodius Pulcher (c. December 93 BC – 52 BC, on January 18 of the pre-Julian calendar) was a Roman politician.

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Publius Cornelius Dolabella

Publius Cornelius Dolabella (c. 85–80 BC – 43 BC) was a Roman general, by far the most important of the Dolabellae.

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Quintus Tullius Cicero

Quintus Tullius Cicero (102 BC – 43 BC) was a Roman statesman and military leader, the younger brother of Marcus Tullius Cicero.

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Rhodes

Rhodes (Ρόδος, Ródos) is the largest of the Dodecanese islands of Greece in terms of land area and also the island group's historical capital.

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Roman consul

A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and ancient Romans considered the consulship the highest level of the cursus honorum (an ascending sequence of public offices to which politicians aspired).

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Roman Forum

The Roman Forum, also known by its Latin name Forum Romanum (Foro Romano), is a rectangular forum (plaza) surrounded by the ruins of several important ancient government buildings at the center of the city of Rome.

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Roman legion

A Roman legion (from Latin legio "military levy, conscription", from legere "to choose") was a large unit of the Roman army.

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Roman navy

The Roman navy (Classis, lit. "fleet") comprised the naval forces of the Ancient Roman state.

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Roman Republic

The Roman Republic (Res publica Romana) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire.

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Roman Senate

The Roman Senate (Senatus Romanus; Senato Romano) was a political institution in ancient Rome.

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Roman Syria

Syria was an early Roman province, annexed to the Roman Republic in 64 BC by Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War, following the defeat of Armenian King Tigranes the Great.

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Rome

Rome (Roma; Roma) is the capital city of Italy and a special comune (named Comune di Roma Capitale).

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Rostra

The Rostra (Rostri) was a large platform built in the city of Rome that stood during the republican and imperial periods.

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Second Triumvirate

The Second Triumvirate is the name historians have given to the official political alliance of Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (Caesar Augustus), Marcus Antonius (Mark Antony), and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, formed on 27 November 43 BC with the enactment of the Lex Titia, the adoption of which some view as marking the end of the Roman Republic, whilst others argue the Battle of Actium or Octavian becoming Caesar Augustus in 27 BC.

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Sextus Pompey

Sextus Pompeius Magnus Pius, in English Sextus Pompey (67 BC – 35 BC), was a Roman general from the late Republic (1st century BC).

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Syria

Syria (سوريا), officially known as the Syrian Arab Republic (الجمهورية العربية السورية), is a country in Western Asia, bordering Lebanon and the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Turkey to the north, Iraq to the east, Jordan to the south, and Israel to the southwest.

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Thrace

Thrace (Modern Θράκη, Thráki; Тракия, Trakiya; Trakya) is a geographical and historical area in southeast Europe, now split between Bulgaria, Greece and Turkey, which is bounded by the Balkan Mountains to the north, the Aegean Sea to the south and the Black Sea to the east.

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Trebonius

Gaius Trebonius (c. 92 BC – January 43 BC) was a military commander and politician of the late Roman Republic, who became suffect consul in 45 BC.

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Tribune

Tribune was the title of various elected officials in ancient Rome.

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Tribute

A tribute (/ˈtrɪbjuːt/) (from Latin tributum, contribution) is wealth, often in kind, that a party gives to another as a sign of respect or, as was often the case in historical contexts, of submission or allegiance.

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Troop

A troop is a military sub-subunit, originally a small formation of cavalry, subordinate to a squadron.

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Vado Ligure

Vado Ligure, in antiquity Vada Sabatia, is a town and comune in the province of Savona, Liguria, in northern Italy.

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Verres

Gaius Verres (ca. 120 BC – 43 BC) was a Roman magistrate, notorious for his misgovernment of Sicily.

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102 BC

Year 102 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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106 BC

Year 106 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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120 BC

Year 120 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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70 BC

Year 70 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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85 BC

Year 85 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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90 BC

Year 90 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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92 BC

Year 92 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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Redirects here:

43 BCE, 43BC.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/43_BC

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