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7th century

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The 7th century is the period from 601 to 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Common Era. [1]

301 relations: Abu Bakr, Ajaw, Algeria, Ali, Alopen, Anglo-Saxons, Ann Arbor, Michigan, Anna of East Anglia, Antarah ibn Shaddad, Apostles, Appar, Arab–Byzantine wars, Arab–Khazar wars, Arabian Peninsula, Arabs, Ashina Jiesheshuai, Asparuh of Bulgaria, Asuka period, Ælfflæd of Whitby, Æthelberht of Kent, Æthelburh of Faremoutiers, Æthelburh of Kent, Æthelfrith, Æthelthryth, Baekje, Balhae, Balkans, Banknote, Basilica of Sant'Apollinare in Classe, Battle of al-Qādisiyyah, Battle of Baekgang, Battle of Chester, Battle of Karbala, Battle of Ongal, Berbers, Bertha of Kent, Brahmagupta, British Columbia, Buddhism, Bulgaria, Bulgarian Empire, Bulgarians, Bulgars, Byzantine Empire, Caliphate, Canada, Carthage, Cædmon, Cenn Fáelad mac Ailella, Central Asia, ..., Chan Buddhism, Chan Imix K'awiil, Chang'an, Chenla, Chess, China, Common Era, Compass, Constantinople, Copán, Coptic period, Councils of Toledo, Croats, Cuthbert, De mirabilibus sacrae scripturae, Duchy of Croatia, Eanflæd, Early Lý dynasty, Early Muslim conquests, Eastern Turkic Khaganate, Egica, Egypt, Emperor Gaozong of Tang, Emperor Gaozu of Tang, Emperor Taizong of Tang, Emperor Tenji, English poetry, Ethiopia, First Fitna, Funan, Göktürks, Go of Balhae, Goguryeo, Goguryeo–Tang War, Greek fire, Guangzhou, Gupta Empire, Harsha, Hasan ibn Ali, Hōryū-ji, Hegira, Heptarchy, Heraclius, Hereswith, Hilda of Whitby, History of the Malay language, Huineng, Husayn ibn Ali, Iberian Peninsula, Ifriqiya, Ikaruga, Ilterish Qaghan, Imamah (Shia), India, Iran, Isaac of Nineveh, Islam, Islamic calendar, Japan, Jerusalem, Jews, Julian calendar, Justinian II, K'inich Janaab' Pakal, Kabul, Kalingga Kingdom, Kedukan Bukit inscription, Khalid ibn al-Walid, Khan (title), Khazars, Khosrow II, Kingdom of Kent, Korea, Korean Peninsula, Kota Kapur inscription, Kufa, Kumārila Bhaṭṭa, Lake Chad, Later Silla, Latin, Leontia, Li Jing (Tang dynasty), Li Shiji, List of Byzantine emperors, List of monarchs of Kent, Mamallapuram, Maya civilization, Mecca, Medieval Greek, Medina, Melayu Kingdom, Merv, Mexico, Mexico City, Mosque, Mount Edziza volcanic complex, Muawiyah I, Muhammad, Muslim, Muslim conquest of Armenia, Muslim conquest of Egypt, Muslim conquest of Persia, Muslim conquest of the Levant, Muslim conquest of the Maghreb, Nara Prefecture, Narasimhavarman I, National Museum of Anthropology (Mexico), Nestorianism, North India, North–South States Period, Palenque, Palestine (region), Pannonian Avars, Phocas, Pope, Pope Benjamin I of Alexandria, Pope Gregory I, Pope Sabinian, Porga of Croatia, Port, Pulakeshin II, Quran, Rashidun Caliphate, Rædwald of East Anglia, Roman Senate, Roman–Persian Wars, Rome, Saint Asaph, Saint Boniface, Saiva, Sambandar, Samo, Sasanian Empire, Sa`d ibn Abi Waqqas, Seaxburh of Ely, Second Fitna, Shah, Shailendra dynasty, Shatranj, Shinto, Ship burial, Shugendō, Siege of Constantinople (674–678), Sigeberht of East Anglia, Silla, Sindh, Slavery, Slavs, Smallpox, South-pointing chariot, Sri Jayanasa of Srivijaya, Srivijaya, Stirrup, Strait of Malacca, Su Dingfang, Sui dynasty, Sumatra, Sunda Strait, Sutton Hoo, Talang Tuo inscription, Tamil Nadu, Tang campaign against the Eastern Turks, Tang dynasty, Taoism, Tarumanagara, Telaga Batu inscription, Temple of the Inscriptions, Teotihuacan, Third Chinese domination of Vietnam, Timgad, Tong Yabghu Qaghan, Tonyukuk, True Cross, Turkic Khaganate, Tuyuhun, Umar, Umayyad Caliphate, University of Michigan, Unknown Archon, Uqba ibn Nafi, Uthman, Visigoths, Welsh people, Western Turkic Khaganate, Wihtburh, World population, Wu Zetian, Xuanzang, Xumi Pagoda, Yamato Province, Yazdegerd III, Yeon Gaesomun, Yijing (monk), Zhengding County, 540, 570, 592, 599, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 606, 607, 610, 615, 616, 618, 622, 623, 626, 627, 629, 630, 632, 635, 636, 638, 639, 641, 642, 649, 650, 651, 656, 657, 658, 661, 663, 664, 668, 670, 670s, 671, 674, 677, 679, 680, 681, 682, 683, 685, 686, 687, 688, 690, 691, 694, 698, 700. Expand index (251 more) »

Abu Bakr

Abū Bakr aṣ-Ṣiddīq ‘Abdallāh bin Abī Quḥāfah (أبو بكر الصديق عبد الله بن أبي قحافة; 573 CE23 August 634 CE), popularly known as Abu Bakr (أبو بكر), was a senior companion (Sahabi) and—through his daughter Aisha—the father-in-law of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. Abu Bakr became the first openly declared Muslim outside Muhammad's family.Muhammad Mustafa Al-A'zami (2003), The History of The Qur'anic Text: From Revelation to Compilation: A Comparative Study with the Old and New Testaments, p.26, 59. UK Islamic Academy.. Abu Bakr served as a trusted advisor to Muhammad. During Muhammad's lifetime, he was involved in several campaigns and treaties.Tabqat ibn al-Saad book of Maghazi, page no:62 He ruled over the Rashidun Caliphate from 632 to 634 CE when he became the first Muslim Caliph following Muhammad's death. As caliph, Abu Bakr succeeded to the political and administrative functions previously exercised by Muhammad. He was commonly known as The Truthful (الصديق). Abu Bakr's reign lasted for 2 years, 2 months, 2 weeks and 1 day ending with his death after an illness.

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Ajaw

Ajaw or Ahau ('Lord') is a pre-Columbian Maya political title attested from epigraphic inscriptions.

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Algeria

Algeria (الجزائر, familary Algerian Arabic الدزاير; ⴷⵣⴰⵢⴻⵔ; Dzayer; Algérie), officially the People's Democratic Republic of Algeria, is a sovereign state in North Africa on the Mediterranean coast.

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Ali

Ali (ʿAlī) (15 September 601 – 29 January 661) was the cousin and the son-in-law of Muhammad, the last prophet of Islam.

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Alopen

Alopen (Middle Chinese: AlapuənX); also "Aleben", "Aluoben", "Olopen," "Olopan," or "Olopuen") is the first recorded Christian missionary to have reached China, during the Tang Dynasty. He was a missionary from the Church of the East (also known as the Nestorian Church), and probably a Syriac-speaker from the Persian Empire, or from Syria in the Byzantine Empire. He is known exclusively from the Nestorian Stele, which describes his arrival in the Chinese capital of Chang-an in AD 635 and his acceptance by Emperor Taizong. His is the earliest known name that can be attached to the history of Nestorianism in China.

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Anglo-Saxons

The Anglo-Saxons were a people who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century.

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Ann Arbor is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan and the county seat of Washtenaw County.

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Anna of East Anglia

Anna (or Onna; killed 653 or 654) was king of East Anglia from the early 640s until his death.

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Antarah ibn Shaddad

Antarah ibn Shaddad (عنترة بن شداد العبسي, ʿAntarah ibn Shaddād al-ʿAbsī; 525–608), also known as ʿAntar, was a pre-Islamic Arab knight and poet, famous for both his poetry and his adventurous life.

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Apostles

In Christian theology and ecclesiology, the apostles, particularly the Twelve Apostles (also known as the Twelve Disciples or simply the Twelve), were the primary disciples of Jesus, the central figure in Christianity.

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Appar

Appar Tirunavukkarasar Nayanar (திருநாவுக்கரசர் "King of the Tongue, Lord of Language"), also known as Navakkarasar and Appar "Father", was a seventh-century Śaiva Tamil poet-saint, one of the most prominent of the sixty-three Nayanars.

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Arab–Byzantine wars

The Arab–Byzantine wars were a series of wars between the mostly Arab Muslims and the East Roman or Byzantine Empire between the 7th and 11th centuries AD, started during the initial Muslim conquests under the expansionist Rashidun and Umayyad caliphs in the 7th century and continued by their successors until the mid-11th century.

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Arab–Khazar wars

The Arab–Khazar wars were a series of conflicts fought between the armies of the Khazar Khaganate and the Umayyad Caliphate (as well as its Abbasid successor) and their respective vassals.

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Arabian Peninsula

The Arabian Peninsula, simplified Arabia (شِبْهُ الْجَزِيرَةِ الْعَرَبِيَّة, ‘Arabian island’ or جَزِيرَةُ الْعَرَب, ‘Island of the Arabs’), is a peninsula of Western Asia situated northeast of Africa on the Arabian plate.

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Arabs

Arabs (عَرَب ISO 233, Arabic pronunciation) are a population inhabiting the Arab world.

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Ashina Jiesheshuai

Kurshad (Ashina Jieshe'er) (/ ''Old Book of Tang'' Vol. 3 Pinyin: Ashǐnà Jiēshèěr, Wade-Giles: Ashihna Chieh-she-erh, Middle Chinese: (Guanyun)) or Ashina Jiesheshuai (Chinese: /,''New Book of Tang'' Vol. 2Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 195.''Old Book of Tang'' Vol. 194-1''New Book of Tang'' Vol. 215-1 Pinyin: Ashǐnà Jiēshèshuai, Wade-Giles: Ashihna Chieh-she-shuai, Middle Chinese (Guangyun), b: ? – d. 19 May 639) was a member of the Ashina clan of the Eastern Turkic Khaganate and general (Zhonglangjiang) of the Tang dynasty.

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Asparuh of Bulgaria

Asparukh (also Ispor; Asparuh or (rarely) Isperih) was а ruler of Bulgars in the second half of the 7th century and is credited with the establishment of the First Bulgarian Empire in 680/681.

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Asuka period

The was a period in the history of Japan lasting from 538 to 710 (or 592 to 645), although its beginning could be said to overlap with the preceding Kofun period.

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Ælfflæd of Whitby

Saint Ælfflæd (654–714) was the daughter of King Oswiu of Northumbria and Eanflæd.

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Æthelberht of Kent

Æthelberht (also Æthelbert, Aethelberht, Aethelbert or Ethelbert, Old English Æðelberht,; 550 – 24 February 616) was King of Kent from about 589 until his death.

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Æthelburh of Faremoutiers

Saint Æthelburg (died 7 July 664), known as Ethelburga, was an Anglo-Saxon princess, abbess and saint.

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Æthelburh of Kent

Æthelburh of Kent (born 601, sometimes spelled Æthelburg, Ethelburga, Æthelburga;, also known as Tate or Tata), was an early Anglo-Saxon queen consort of Northumbria, the second wife of King Edwin.

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Æthelfrith

Æthelfrith (died c. 616) was King of Bernicia from c. 593 until his death.

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Æthelthryth

Æthelthryth (or Æðelþryð or Æþelðryþe; 636 – 23 June 679 AD) is the name for the Anglo-Saxon saint known, particularly in a religious context, as Etheldreda or Audrey.

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Baekje

Baekje (18 BC – 660 AD) was a kingdom located in southwest Korea.

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Balhae

Balhae (698–926), also known as Parhae or Bohai was a multi-ethnic kingdom in Manchuria and the Korean peninsula.

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Balkans

The Balkans, or the Balkan Peninsula, is a geographic area in southeastern Europe with various and disputed definitions.

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Banknote

A banknote (often known as a bill, paper money, or simply a note) is a type of negotiable promissory note, made by a bank, payable to the bearer on demand.

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Basilica of Sant'Apollinare in Classe

The Basilica of Sant' Apollinare in Classe is an important monument of Byzantine art near Ravenna, Italy.

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Battle of al-Qādisiyyah

The Battle of al-Qādisiyyah (معركة القادسيّة; transliteration, Ma'rakatu al-Qādisiyyah; alternative spellings: Qadisiyya, Qadisiyyah, Kadisiya, Ghadesiyeh, نبرد قادسیه; transliteration: Nabard-e Qādsieh), fought in 636, was a decisive battle between the Arab Muslim army and the Sassanid Persian army during the first period of Muslim expansion.

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Battle of Baekgang

The Battle of Baekgang or Battle of Baekgang-gu, also known as Battle of Hakusukinoe (白村江の戦い Hakusuki-no-e no Tatakai or Hakusonkō no Tatakai) in Japan, as Battle of Baijiangkou (白江口之战 Bāijiāngkǒu Zhīzhàn) in China, was a battle between Baekje restoration forces and their ally, Yamato Japan, against the allied forces of Silla and the Tang dynasty of ancient China.

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Battle of Chester

The Battle of Chester (Old Welsh: Guaith Caer Legion; Welsh: Brwydr Caer) was a major victory for the Anglo Saxons over the native Britons near the city of Chester, England in the early 7th century.

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Battle of Karbala

The Battle of Karbala took place on Muharram 10, in the year 61 AH of the Islamic calendar (October 10, 680 AD) in Karbala, in present-day Iraq.

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Battle of Ongal

The Battle of Ongal took place in the summer of 680 in the Ongal area, an unspecified location in around the Danube delta near the Peuce Island, present-day Tulcea County, Romania.

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Berbers

Berbers or Amazighs (Berber: Imaziɣen, ⵉⵎⴰⵣⵉⵗⴻⵏ; singular: Amaziɣ, ⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵗ) are an ethnic group indigenous to North Africa, primarily inhabiting Algeria, northern Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, northern Niger, Tunisia, Libya, and a part of western Egypt.

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Bertha of Kent

Saint Bertha or Saint Aldeberge (c. 565 – d. in or after 601) was the queen of Kent whose influence led to the Christianization of Anglo-Saxon England.

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Brahmagupta

Brahmagupta (born, died) was an Indian mathematician and astronomer.

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British Columbia

British Columbia (BC; Colombie-Britannique) is the westernmost province of Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean and the Rocky Mountains.

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Buddhism

Buddhism is the world's fourth-largest religion with over 520 million followers, or over 7% of the global population, known as Buddhists.

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Bulgaria

Bulgaria (България, tr.), officially the Republic of Bulgaria (Република България, tr.), is a country in southeastern Europe.

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Bulgarian Empire

In the medieval history of Europe, Bulgaria's status as the Bulgarian Empire (Българско царство, Balgarsko tsarstvo), wherein it acted as a key regional power (particularly rivaling Byzantium in Southeastern Europe) occurred in two distinct periods: between the seventh and eleventh centuries, and again between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries.

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Bulgarians

Bulgarians (българи, Bǎlgari) are a South Slavic ethnic group who are native to Bulgaria and its neighboring regions.

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Bulgars

The Bulgars (also Bulghars, Bulgari, Bolgars, Bolghars, Bolgari, Proto-Bulgarians) were Turkic semi-nomadic warrior tribes that flourished in the Pontic-Caspian steppe and the Volga region during the 7th century.

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Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium).

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Caliphate

A caliphate (خِلافة) is a state under the leadership of an Islamic steward with the title of caliph (خَليفة), a person considered a religious successor to the Islamic prophet Muhammad and a leader of the entire ummah (community).

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Canada

Canada is a country located in the northern part of North America.

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Carthage

Carthage (from Carthago; Punic:, Qart-ḥadašt, "New City") was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis in what is now the Tunis Governorate in Tunisia.

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Cædmon

Cædmon (fl. c. AD 657–684) is the earliest English (Northumbrian) poet whose name is known.

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Cenn Fáelad mac Ailella

Cenn Fáelad mac Ailella (alias Cennfaeladh) (died 679) was an Irish scholar renowned for having his memory markedly improve and possibly becoming eidetic after suffering a head wound in battle.

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Central Asia

Central Asia stretches from the Caspian Sea in the west to China in the east and from Afghanistan in the south to Russia in the north.

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Chan Buddhism

Chan (of), from Sanskrit dhyāna (meaning "meditation" or "meditative state"), is a Chinese school of Mahāyāna Buddhism.

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Chan Imix K'awiil

Chan Imix K'awiil was the twelfth ruler of the Maya city state Copan.

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Chang'an

Chang'an was an ancient capital of more than ten dynasties in Chinese history, today known as Xi'an.

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Chenla

Chenla or Zhenla (ចេនឡា; Chân Lạp) is the Chinese designation for the successor polity of the Kingdom of Funan preceding the Khmer Empire that existed from around the late sixth to the early ninth century in Indochina.

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Chess

Chess is a two-player strategy board game played on a chessboard, a checkered gameboard with 64 squares arranged in an 8×8 grid.

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China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a unitary one-party sovereign state in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around /1e9 round 3 billion.

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Common Era

Common Era or Current Era (CE) is one of the notation systems for the world's most widely used calendar era – an alternative to the Dionysian AD and BC system.

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Compass

A compass is an instrument used for navigation and orientation that shows direction relative to the geographic cardinal directions (or points).

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Constantinople

Constantinople (Κωνσταντινούπολις Konstantinoúpolis; Constantinopolis) was the capital city of the Roman/Byzantine Empire (330–1204 and 1261–1453), and also of the brief Latin (1204–1261), and the later Ottoman (1453–1923) empires.

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Copán

Copán is an archaeological site of the Maya civilization located in the Copán Department of western Honduras, not far from the border with Guatemala.

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Coptic period

The "Coptic period" is an informal designation for Late Roman Egypt (3rd−4th centuries) and Byzantine Egypt (4th−7th centuries).

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Councils of Toledo

Councils of Toledo (Concilia toletana).

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Croats

Croats (Hrvati) or Croatians are a nation and South Slavic ethnic group native to Croatia.

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Cuthbert

Cuthbert (c. 634 – 20 March 687) is a saint of the early Northumbrian church in the Celtic tradition.

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De mirabilibus sacrae scripturae

De mirabilibus sacrae scripturae (in English: On the miraculous things in sacred scripture) is a Latin treatise written around 655 by an anonymous Irish writer and philosopher known as Augustinus Hibernicus or the Irish Augustine.

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Duchy of Croatia

"Duchy of Croatia" (also "Duchy of the Croats", Kneževina Hrvata; "Dalmatian Croatia", Dalmatinska Hrvatska; "Littoral Croatia", Primorska Hrvatska; Greek: Χρωβατία, Chrovatía), was a medieval Croatian duchy that was established in the former Roman province of Dalmatia.

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Eanflæd

Eanflæd (19 April 626 – after 685, also known as Enfleda) was a Deiran princess, queen of Northumbria and later, the abbess of an influential Christian monastery in Whitby, England.

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Early Lý dynasty

The Early, Former or Anterior Lý dynasty (nhà Tiền Lý) was a dynasty which ruled Vietnam from 544 to 602.

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Early Muslim conquests

The early Muslim conquests (الفتوحات الإسلامية, al-Futūḥāt al-Islāmiyya) also referred to as the Arab conquests and early Islamic conquests began with the Islamic prophet Muhammad in the 7th century.

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Eastern Turkic Khaganate

The Eastern Turkic Khaganate (Chinese: 東突厥; pinyin: Dōng tūjué) was a Turkic khaganate formed as a result of the internecine wars in the beginning of the 7th century (AD 593–603) after the Göktürk Khaganate (founded in the 6th century in Mongolia by the Ashina clan) had splintered into two polities – Eastern and Western. Finally, the Eastern Turkic power was absorbed by the Chinese Tang Empire.

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Egica

Egica, Ergica, or Egicca (c. 610 – 701x703), was the Visigoth King of Hispania and Septimania from 687 until his death.

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Egypt

Egypt (مِصر, مَصر, Khēmi), officially the Arab Republic of Egypt, is a transcontinental country spanning the northeast corner of Africa and southwest corner of Asia by a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula.

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Emperor Gaozong of Tang

Emperor Gaozong of Tang (21 July 628 – 27 December 683), personal name Li Zhi, was the third emperor of the Tang dynasty in China, ruling from 649 to 683 (although after January 665 much of the governance was in the hands of his second wife Empress Wu, later known as Wu Zetian).

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Emperor Gaozu of Tang

Emperor Gaozu of Tang (8 April 566 – 25 June 635), born Li Yuan, courtesy name Shude, was the founder of the Tang Dynasty of China, and the first emperor of this dynasty from 618 to 626.

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Emperor Taizong of Tang

Emperor Taizong of Tang (28January 598 10July 649), previously Prince of Qin, personal name Li Shimin, was the second emperor of the Tang dynasty of China, ruling from 626 to 649.

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Emperor Tenji

, also known as Emperor Tenchi, was the 38th emperor of Japan,Imperial Household Agency (Kunaichō): according to the traditional order of succession.

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English poetry

This article focuses on poetry written in English from the United Kingdom: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland (and Ireland before 1922).

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Ethiopia

Ethiopia (ኢትዮጵያ), officially the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (የኢትዮጵያ ፌዴራላዊ ዲሞክራሲያዊ ሪፐብሊክ, yeʾĪtiyoṗṗya Fēdēralawī Dēmokirasīyawī Rīpebilīk), is a country located in the Horn of Africa.

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First Fitna

The First Fitna (فتنة مقتل عثمان fitnat maqtal ʿUthmān "strife/sedition of the killing of Uthman") was a civil war within the Rashidun Caliphate which resulted in the overthrowing of the Rashidun caliphs and the establishment of the Umayyad dynasty.

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Funan

Funan, (ហ្វូណន - Fonon), (Phù Nam) or Nokor Phnom (នគរភ្នំ) was the name given by Chinese cartographers, geographers and writers to an ancient Indianised state—or, rather a loose network of states (Mandala)—located in mainland Southeast Asia centered on the Mekong Delta that existed from the first to sixth century CE.

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Göktürks

The Göktürks, Celestial Turks, Blue Turks or Kok Turks (Old Turkic: 𐰜𐰇𐰛:𐱅𐰇𐰼𐰰, Kök Türük;, Middle Chinese: *duət̚-kʉɐt̚, Тўҗүә; Khotanese Saka: Ttūrka, Ttrūka; Old Tibetan: Drugu), were a nomadic confederation of Turkic peoples in medieval Inner Asia.

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Go of Balhae

Dae Joyeong (or; died 719), also known as King Go, established the state of Balhae, reigning from 699 to 719.

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Goguryeo

Goguryeo (37 BCE–668 CE), also called Goryeo was a Korean kingdom located in the northern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula and the southern and central parts of Manchuria.

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Goguryeo–Tang War

The Goguryeo–Tang War occurred from 645 to 668 and was initially fought between the Goguryeo kingdom and Tang Dynasty.

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Greek fire

Greek fire was an incendiary weapon used by the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire that was first developed.

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Guangzhou

Guangzhou, also known as Canton, is the capital and most populous city of the province of Guangdong.

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Gupta Empire

The Gupta Empire was an ancient Indian empire, existing from approximately 240 to 590 CE.

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Harsha

Harsha (c. 590–647 CE), also known as Harshavardhana, was an Indian emperor who ruled North India from 606 to 647 CE.

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Hasan ibn Ali

Al-Ḥasan ibn Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib (الحسن ابن علي ابن أبي طالب, 624–670 CE), commonly known as Hasan or Hassan, is the eldest son of Muhammad's daughter Fatimah and of Ali, and the older brother to Husayn.

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Hōryū-ji

is a Buddhist temple that was once one of the powerful Seven Great Temples, in Ikaruga, Nara Prefecture, Japan.

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Hegira

The Hegira (also called Hijrah, هِجْرَة) is the migration or journey of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and his followers from Mecca to Yathrib, later renamed by him to Medina, in the year 622.

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Heptarchy

The Heptarchy is a collective name applied to the seven petty kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England from the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain in 5th century until their unification into the Kingdom of England in the early 10th century.

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Heraclius

Heraclius (Flavius Heracles Augustus; Flavios Iraklios; c. 575 – February 11, 641) was the Emperor of the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) Empire from 610 to 641.

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Hereswith

Hereswith or Hereswitha (Hǣreswīþ), also spelt Hereswithe, Hereswyde or Haeresvid, was a 7th-century Northumbrian saint.

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Hilda of Whitby

Hilda of Whitby or Hild of Whitby (c. 614–680) is a Christian saint and the founding abbess of the monastery at Whitby, which was chosen as the venue for the Synod of Whitby.

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History of the Malay language

Malay is a major language of the Austronesian language family.

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Huineng

Dajian Huineng (638–713), also commonly known as the Sixth Patriarch or Sixth Ancestor of Chan, is a semi-legendary but central figure in the early history of Chinese Chan Buddhism.

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Husayn ibn Ali

Al-Ḥusayn ibn Ali ibn Abi Talib (الحسين ابن علي ابن أبي طالب; 10 October 625 – 10 October 680) (3 Sha'aban AH 4 (in the ancient (intercalated) Arabic calendar) – 10 Muharram AH 61) (his name is also transliterated as Husayn ibn 'Alī, Husain, Hussain and Hussein), was a grandson of the Islamic ''Nabi'' (نَـبِي, Prophet) Muhammad, and son of Ali ibn Abi Talib (the first Shia Imam and the fourth Rashid caliph of Sunni Islam), and Muhammad's daughter, Fatimah.

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Iberian Peninsula

The Iberian Peninsula, also known as Iberia, is located in the southwest corner of Europe.

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Ifriqiya

Ifriqiya or Ifriqiyah or el-Maghrib el-Adna (Lower West) was the area during medieval history that comprises what is today Tunisia, Tripolitania (western Libya) and the Constantinois (eastern Algeria); all part of what was previously included in the Africa Province of the Roman Empire.

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Ikaruga

is a shoot 'em up developed by Treasure.

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Ilterish Qaghan

Ilterish Khaghan (Old Turkic:, İlteriş qağan; 頡跌利施可汗/颉跌利施可汗; personal name: Ashina Qutlugh, 阿史那骨篤祿/阿史那骨笃禄, āshǐnà gǔdǔlù, a-shih-na ku-tu-lu) (died 694), was the founder of the Second Turkic Khaganate (reigning 682–694).

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Imamah (Shia)

In Shia Islam, the imamah (إمامة) is the doctrine that the figures known as imams are rightfully the central figures of the ummah; the entire Shi'ite system of doctrine focuses on the imamah.

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India

India (IAST), also called the Republic of India (IAST), is a country in South Asia.

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Iran

Iran (ایران), also known as Persia, officially the Islamic Republic of Iran (جمهوری اسلامی ایران), is a sovereign state in Western Asia. With over 81 million inhabitants, Iran is the world's 18th-most-populous country. Comprising a land area of, it is the second-largest country in the Middle East and the 17th-largest in the world. Iran is bordered to the northwest by Armenia and the Republic of Azerbaijan, to the north by the Caspian Sea, to the northeast by Turkmenistan, to the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan, to the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, and to the west by Turkey and Iraq. The country's central location in Eurasia and Western Asia, and its proximity to the Strait of Hormuz, give it geostrategic importance. Tehran is the country's capital and largest city, as well as its leading economic and cultural center. Iran is home to one of the world's oldest civilizations, beginning with the formation of the Elamite kingdoms in the fourth millennium BCE. It was first unified by the Iranian Medes in the seventh century BCE, reaching its greatest territorial size in the sixth century BCE, when Cyrus the Great founded the Achaemenid Empire, which stretched from Eastern Europe to the Indus Valley, becoming one of the largest empires in history. The Iranian realm fell to Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE and was divided into several Hellenistic states. An Iranian rebellion culminated in the establishment of the Parthian Empire, which was succeeded in the third century CE by the Sasanian Empire, a leading world power for the next four centuries. Arab Muslims conquered the empire in the seventh century CE, displacing the indigenous faiths of Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism with Islam. Iran made major contributions to the Islamic Golden Age that followed, producing many influential figures in art and science. After two centuries, a period of various native Muslim dynasties began, which were later conquered by the Turks and the Mongols. The rise of the Safavids in the 15th century led to the reestablishment of a unified Iranian state and national identity, with the country's conversion to Shia Islam marking a turning point in Iranian and Muslim history. Under Nader Shah, Iran was one of the most powerful states in the 18th century, though by the 19th century, a series of conflicts with the Russian Empire led to significant territorial losses. Popular unrest led to the establishment of a constitutional monarchy and the country's first legislature. A 1953 coup instigated by the United Kingdom and the United States resulted in greater autocracy and growing anti-Western resentment. Subsequent unrest against foreign influence and political repression led to the 1979 Revolution and the establishment of an Islamic republic, a political system that includes elements of a parliamentary democracy vetted and supervised by a theocracy governed by an autocratic "Supreme Leader". During the 1980s, the country was engaged in a war with Iraq, which lasted for almost nine years and resulted in a high number of casualties and economic losses for both sides. According to international reports, Iran's human rights record is exceptionally poor. The regime in Iran is undemocratic, and has frequently persecuted and arrested critics of the government and its Supreme Leader. Women's rights in Iran are described as seriously inadequate, and children's rights have been severely violated, with more child offenders being executed in Iran than in any other country in the world. Since the 2000s, Iran's controversial nuclear program has raised concerns, which is part of the basis of the international sanctions against the country. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, an agreement reached between Iran and the P5+1, was created on 14 July 2015, aimed to loosen the nuclear sanctions in exchange for Iran's restriction in producing enriched uranium. Iran is a founding member of the UN, ECO, NAM, OIC, and OPEC. It is a major regional and middle power, and its large reserves of fossil fuels – which include the world's largest natural gas supply and the fourth-largest proven oil reserves – exert considerable influence in international energy security and the world economy. The country's rich cultural legacy is reflected in part by its 22 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the third-largest number in Asia and eleventh-largest in the world. Iran is a multicultural country comprising numerous ethnic and linguistic groups, the largest being Persians (61%), Azeris (16%), Kurds (10%), and Lurs (6%).

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Isaac of Nineveh

Isaac of Nineveh (Arabic: إسحاق النينوي Ishak an-Naynuwī; Ἰσαὰκ Σύρος; c. 613 – c. 700) also remembered as Saint Isaac the Syrian, Abba Isaac, Isaac Syrus and Isaac of Qatar was a 7th-century Church of the East Syriac Christian bishop and theologian best remembered for his written works on Christian asceticism.

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Islam

IslamThere are ten pronunciations of Islam in English, differing in whether the first or second syllable has the stress, whether the s is or, and whether the a is pronounced, or (when the stress is on the first syllable) (Merriam Webster).

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Islamic calendar

The Islamic, Muslim, or Hijri calendar (التقويم الهجري at-taqwīm al-hijrī) is a lunar calendar consisting of 12 months in a year of 354 or 355 days.

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Japan

Japan (日本; Nippon or Nihon; formally 日本国 or Nihon-koku, lit. "State of Japan") is a sovereign island country in East Asia.

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Jerusalem

Jerusalem (יְרוּשָׁלַיִם; القُدس) is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea.

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Jews

Jews (יְהוּדִים ISO 259-3, Israeli pronunciation) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation, originating from the Israelites Israelite origins and kingdom: "The first act in the long drama of Jewish history is the age of the Israelites""The people of the Kingdom of Israel and the ethnic and religious group known as the Jewish people that descended from them have been subjected to a number of forced migrations in their history" and Hebrews of the Ancient Near East.

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Julian calendar

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC (708 AUC), was a reform of the Roman calendar.

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Justinian II

Justinian II (Ἰουστινιανός Β΄, Ioustinianos II; Flavius Iustinianus Augustus; 668 – 11 December 711), surnamed the Rhinotmetos or Rhinotmetus (ὁ Ῥινότμητος, "the slit-nosed"), was the last Byzantine Emperor of the Heraclian Dynasty, reigning from 685 to 695 and again from 705 to 711.

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K'inich Janaab' Pakal

K'inich Janaab Pakal IThe ruler's name, when transcribed is K'INICH-JANA:B-PAKAL-la, translated "Radiant ? Shield", Martin & Grube 2008, p. 162.

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Kabul

Kabul (کابل) is the capital of Afghanistan and its largest city, located in the eastern section of the country.

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Kalingga Kingdom

Kalingga (Karajan Kalingga; 訶陵 Hēlíng or 闍婆 Dūpó in Chinese sources) was the 6th century Indianized kingdom on the north coast of Central Java, Indonesia.

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Kedukan Bukit inscription

The Kedukan Bukit Inscription was discovered by the Dutchman M. Batenburg on 29 November 1920 at Kedukan Bukit, South Sumatra, Indonesia, on the banks of the River Tatang, a tributary of the River Musi.

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Khalid ibn al-Walid

Abū Sulaymān Khālid ibn al-Walīd ibn al-Mughīrah al-Makhzūmī (أبو سليمان خالد بن الوليد بن المغيرة المخزومي‎; 585–642), also known as Sayf ullah al-Maslūl (سيف الله المسلول; Drawn Sword of God) was a companion of Muhammad.

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Khan (title)

Khan خان/khan; is a title for a sovereign or a military ruler, used by Mongolians living to the north of China. Khan has equivalent meanings such as "commander", "leader", or "ruler", "king" and "chief". khans exist in South Asia, Middle East, Central Asia, Eastern Europe, East Africa and Turkey. The female alternatives are Khatun and Khanum. These titles or names are sometimes written as Khan/خان in Persian, Han, Kan, Hakan, Hanum, or Hatun (in Turkey) and as "xan", "xanım" (in Azerbaijan), and medieval Turkic tribes.

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Khazars

The Khazars (خزر, Xəzərlər; Hazarlar; Хазарлар; Хәзәрләр, Xäzärlär; כוזרים, Kuzarim;, Xazar; Хоза́ри, Chozáry; Хаза́ры, Hazáry; Kazárok; Xazar; Χάζαροι, Cházaroi; p./Gasani) were a semi-nomadic Turkic people, who created what for its duration was the most powerful polity to emerge from the break-up of the Western Turkic Khaganate.

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Khosrow II

Khosrow II (Chosroes II in classical sources; Middle Persian: Husrō(y)), entitled "Aparvēz" ("The Victorious"), also Khusraw Parvēz (New Persian: خسرو پرویز), was the last great king of the Sasanian Empire, reigning from 590 to 628.

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Kingdom of Kent

The Kingdom of the Kentish (Cantaware Rīce; Regnum Cantuariorum), today referred to as the Kingdom of Kent, was an early medieval kingdom in what is now South East England.

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Korea

Korea is a region in East Asia; since 1945 it has been divided into two distinctive sovereign states: North Korea and South Korea.

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Korean Peninsula

The Korean Peninsula is a peninsula of Eurasia located in East Asia.

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Kota Kapur inscription

Kota Kapur Inscription is an inscription discovered in western coast of Bangka Island, offcoast South Sumatra, Indonesia, by J.K. van der Meulen in December 1892.

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Kufa

Kufa (الْكُوفَة) is a city in Iraq, about south of Baghdad, and northeast of Najaf.

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Kumārila Bhaṭṭa

(fl. roughly 700) was a Hindu philosopher and Mīmāṃsā scholar from present-day India.

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Lake Chad

Lake Chad (French: Lac Tchad) is a historically large, shallow, endorheic lake in Africa, which has varied in size over the centuries.

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Later Silla

Later Silla (668–935) or Unified Silla is the name often applied to the Korean kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after it conquered Baekje and Goguryeo in the 7th century, unifying the central and southern regions of the Korean peninsula.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Leontia

Leontia (fl. 610), was the Empress consort of Phocas of the Byzantine Empire.

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Li Jing (Tang dynasty)

Li Jing (571 – July 2, 649), courtesy name Yaoshi, posthumously known as Duke Jingwu of Wei (also spelled as Duke of Wey), was a Chinese general who lived in the early Tang dynasty and was most active during the reign of Emperor Taizong.

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Li Shiji

Li Shiji (594The Old Book of Tang indicated that Li Shiji was 75 at the time of his death, while the New Book of Tang indicated that Li Shiji was 85 at the time of his death. Compare Old Book of Tang, vol. 67 with New Book of Tang, vol. 93. The Zizhi Tongjian, while not explicitly stating that Li Shiji was 75 at the time of his death, appeared to follow the Old Book of Tang by quoting Li Shiji as stating that he was satisfied with living almost to 80. See Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 201. (The New Book of Tang, containing apparently the same quote, had a slightly different version that had Li Shiji stating that he was satisfied with living over 80.) – December 31, 669), courtesy name Maogong, posthumously known as Duke Zhenwu of Ying, was a Chinese general who lived in the early Tang dynasty.

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List of Byzantine emperors

This is a list of the Byzantine emperors from the foundation of Constantinople in 330 AD, which marks the conventional start of the Byzantine Empire (or the Eastern Roman Empire), to its fall to the Ottoman Empire in 1453 AD.

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List of monarchs of Kent

This is a list of the kings of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Kent.

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Mamallapuram

Mamallapuram or Seven Pagodas or Mahabalipuram, is a town in Kancheepuram district in the southeastern Indian state of Tamil Nadu.

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Maya civilization

The Maya civilization was a Mesoamerican civilization developed by the Maya peoples, and noted for its hieroglyphic script—the only known fully developed writing system of the pre-Columbian Americas—as well as for its art, architecture, mathematics, calendar, and astronomical system.

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Mecca

Mecca or Makkah (مكة is a city in the Hejazi region of the Arabian Peninsula, and the plain of Tihamah in Saudi Arabia, and is also the capital and administrative headquarters of the Makkah Region. The city is located inland from Jeddah in a narrow valley at a height of above sea level, and south of Medina. Its resident population in 2012 was roughly 2 million, although visitors more than triple this number every year during the Ḥajj (حَـجّ, "Pilgrimage") period held in the twelfth Muslim lunar month of Dhūl-Ḥijjah (ذُو الْـحِـجَّـة). As the birthplace of Muhammad, and the site of Muhammad's first revelation of the Quran (specifically, a cave from Mecca), Mecca is regarded as the holiest city in the religion of Islam and a pilgrimage to it known as the Hajj is obligatory for all able Muslims. Mecca is home to the Kaaba, by majority description Islam's holiest site, as well as being the direction of Muslim prayer. Mecca was long ruled by Muhammad's descendants, the sharifs, acting either as independent rulers or as vassals to larger polities. It was conquered by Ibn Saud in 1925. In its modern period, Mecca has seen tremendous expansion in size and infrastructure, home to structures such as the Abraj Al Bait, also known as the Makkah Royal Clock Tower Hotel, the world's fourth tallest building and the building with the third largest amount of floor area. During this expansion, Mecca has lost some historical structures and archaeological sites, such as the Ajyad Fortress. Today, more than 15 million Muslims visit Mecca annually, including several million during the few days of the Hajj. As a result, Mecca has become one of the most cosmopolitan cities in the Muslim world,Fattah, Hassan M., The New York Times (20 January 2005). even though non-Muslims are prohibited from entering the city.

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Medieval Greek

Medieval Greek, also known as Byzantine Greek, is the stage of the Greek language between the end of Classical antiquity in the 5th–6th centuries and the end of the Middle Ages, conventionally dated to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453.

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Medina

Medina (المدينة المنورة,, "the radiant city"; or المدينة,, "the city"), also transliterated as Madīnah, is a city in the Hejaz region of the Arabian Peninsula and administrative headquarters of the Al-Madinah Region of Saudi Arabia.

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Melayu Kingdom

The Melayu Kingdom (also known as Malayu, Dharmasraya Kingdom or the Jambi Kingdom;, reconstructed Middle Chinese pronunciation mat-la-yu kwok)Muljana, Slamet, (2006), Sriwijaya, Yogyakarta: LKIS,.

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Merv

Merv (Merw, Мерв, مرو; مرو, Marv), formerly Achaemenid Persian Satrapy of Margiana, and later Alexandria (Margiana) (Ἀλεξάνδρεια) and Antiochia in Margiana (Ἀντιόχεια τῆς Μαργιανῆς), was a major oasis-city in Central Asia, on the historical Silk Road, located near today's Mary in Turkmenistan.

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Mexico

Mexico (México; Mēxihco), officially called the United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicanos) is a federal republic in the southern portion of North America.

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Mexico City

Mexico City, or the City of Mexico (Ciudad de México,; abbreviated as CDMX), is the capital of Mexico and the most populous city in North America.

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Mosque

A mosque (from masjid) is a place of worship for Muslims.

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Mount Edziza volcanic complex

The Mount Edziza volcanic complex is a large and potentially active north-south trending complex volcano in Stikine Country, northwestern British Columbia, Canada, located southeast of the small community of Telegraph Creek.

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Muawiyah I

Muawiyah I (Muʿāwiyah ibn Abī Sufyān; 602 – 26 April 680) established the Umayyad dynasty of the caliphate, and was the second caliph from the Umayyad clan, the first being Uthman ibn Affan.

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Muhammad

MuhammadFull name: Abū al-Qāsim Muḥammad ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn ʿAbd al-Muṭṭalib ibn Hāšim (ابو القاسم محمد ابن عبد الله ابن عبد المطلب ابن هاشم, lit: Father of Qasim Muhammad son of Abd Allah son of Abdul-Muttalib son of Hashim) (مُحمّد;;Classical Arabic pronunciation Latinized as Mahometus c. 570 CE – 8 June 632 CE)Elizabeth Goldman (1995), p. 63, gives 8 June 632 CE, the dominant Islamic tradition.

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Muslim

A Muslim (مُسلِم) is someone who follows or practices Islam, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion.

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Muslim conquest of Armenia

The Arab conquest of Armenia was a part of the Muslim conquests after the death of Muhammad in 632 CE.

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Muslim conquest of Egypt

At the commencement of the Muslim conquest of Egypt or Arab conquest of Egypt, Egypt was part of the Byzantine Empire, which had its capital at Constantinople.

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Muslim conquest of Persia

The Muslim conquest of Persia, also known as the Arab conquest of Iran, led to the end of the Sasanian Empire of Persia in 651 and the eventual decline of the Zoroastrian religion in Iran (Persia).

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Muslim conquest of the Levant

The Muslim conquest of the Levant (اَلْـفَـتْـحُ الْإٍسْـلَامِيُّ لِـلـشَّـامِ, Al-Faṫṫḥul-Islāmiyyuash-Shām) or Arab conquest of the Levant (اَلْـفَـتْـحُ الْـعَـرَبِيُّ لِـلـشَّـامِ, Al-Faṫṫḥul-ʿArabiyyu Lish-Shām) occurred in the first half of the 7th century,"Syria." Encyclopædia Britannica.

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Muslim conquest of the Maghreb

The Muslim conquest of the Maghreb (الفَتْحُ الإسْلَامِيُّ لِلمَغْرِبِ) continued the century of rapid Arab Early Muslim conquests following the death of Muhammad in 632 AD and into the Byzantine-controlled territories of Northern Africa.

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Nara Prefecture

is a prefecture in the Kansai region of Japan.

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Narasimhavarman I

Narasimhavarman I (ுதலாம் நரசிம்மவர்மன்.) was a Tamil king of the Pallava dynasty who ruled South India from 630–668 AD.

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National Museum of Anthropology (Mexico)

The National Museum of Anthropology (Museo Nacional de Antropología, MNA) is a national museum of Mexico.

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Nestorianism

Nestorianism is a Christological doctrine that emphasizes a distinction between the human and divine natures of the divine person, Jesus.

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North India

North India is a loosely defined region consisting of the northern part of India.

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North–South States Period

North–South States Period (698–926 CE) is the period in Korean history when Later Silla and Balhae coexisted in the south and north of the peninsula, respectively.

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Palenque

Palenque (Yucatec Maya: Bàakʼ /ɓàːkʼ/), also anciently known as Lakamha (literally: "Big Water"), was a Maya city state in southern Mexico that flourished in the 7th century.

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Palestine (region)

Palestine (فلسطين,,; Παλαιστίνη, Palaistinē; Palaestina; פלשתינה. Palestina) is a geographic region in Western Asia.

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Pannonian Avars

The Pannonian Avars (also known as the Obri in chronicles of Rus, the Abaroi or Varchonitai at the Encyclopedia of Ukraine (Varchonites) or Pseudo-Avars in Byzantine sources) were a group of Eurasian nomads of unknown origin: "...

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Phocas

Phocas (Flavius Phocas Augustus; Φωκᾶς, Phokas; – 5 October 610) was Byzantine Emperor from 602 to 610.

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Pope

The pope (papa from πάππας pappas, a child's word for "father"), also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest priest"), is the Bishop of Rome and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.

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Pope Benjamin I of Alexandria

Pope Benjamin I of Alexandria, 38th Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of St. Mark.

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Pope Gregory I

Pope Saint Gregory I (Gregorius I; – 12 March 604), commonly known as Saint Gregory the Great, Gregory had come to be known as 'the Great' by the late ninth century, a title which is still applied to him.

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Pope Sabinian

Pope Sabinian (Sabinianus, d. 22 February 606) was Pope from 13 September 604 to his death in 606, during the Byzantine (Eastern Roman) domination of the Papacy; he was the fourth former apocrisiarius to Constantinople to be elected pope.

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Porga of Croatia

Porga (Iranian pouru-gâo, translated as "rich in cattle") was a ruler of the White Croats who was baptized during the reign of Heraclius (610-641).

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Port

A port is a maritime commercial facility which may comprise one or more wharves where ships may dock to load and discharge passengers and cargo.

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Pulakeshin II

Pulakeshin II (610–642 CE), also spelt Pulakesi II and Pulikeshi II, was the most famous ruler of the Chalukya dynasty.

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Quran

The Quran (القرآن, literally meaning "the recitation"; also romanized Qur'an or Koran) is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God (Allah).

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Rashidun Caliphate

The Rashidun Caliphate (اَلْخِلَافَةُ ٱلرَّاشِدَةُ) (632–661) was the first of the four major caliphates established after the death of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad.

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Rædwald of East Anglia

Rædwald (Rædwald, 'power in counsel'), also written as Raedwald or Redwald, was a 7th-century king of East Anglia, a long-lived Anglo-Saxon kingdom which included the present-day English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk.

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Roman Senate

The Roman Senate (Senatus Romanus; Senato Romano) was a political institution in ancient Rome.

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Roman–Persian Wars

The Roman–Persian Wars were a series of conflicts between states of the Greco-Roman world and two successive Iranian empires: the Parthian and the Sasanian.

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Rome

Rome (Roma; Roma) is the capital city of Italy and a special comune (named Comune di Roma Capitale).

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Saint Asaph

Saint Asaph (or Asaf, Asa) was, in the second half of the 6th century, the first Bishop of St Asaph, i.e. bishop of the diocese of Saint Asaph.

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Saint Boniface

Saint Boniface (Bonifatius; 675 – 5 June 754 AD), born Winfrid (also spelled Winifred, Wynfrith, Winfrith or Wynfryth) in the kingdom of Wessex in Anglo-Saxon England, was a leading figure in the Anglo-Saxon mission to the Germanic parts of the Frankish Empire during the 8th century.

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Saiva

Saiva is a genus of Asian lanternbugs, family Fulgoridae.

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Sambandar

Sambandar (also called Thirugyana Sambandar, Tirugnana Sambanthar, Campantar, Champantar, Jnanasambandar, Gnanasambandar) was a young Saiva poet-saint of Tamil Nadu who lived around the 7th century CE.

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Samo

Samo founded the first recorded political union of Slavic tribes, known as Samo's Empire (realm, kingdom, or tribal union), stretching from Silesia to present-day Slovenia, ruling from 623 until his death in 658.

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Sasanian Empire

The Sasanian Empire, also known as the Sassanian, Sasanid, Sassanid or Neo-Persian Empire (known to its inhabitants as Ērānshahr in Middle Persian), was the last period of the Persian Empire (Iran) before the rise of Islam, named after the House of Sasan, which ruled from 224 to 651 AD. The Sasanian Empire, which succeeded the Parthian Empire, was recognised as one of the leading world powers alongside its neighbouring arch-rival the Roman-Byzantine Empire, for a period of more than 400 years.Norman A. Stillman The Jews of Arab Lands pp 22 Jewish Publication Society, 1979 International Congress of Byzantine Studies Proceedings of the 21st International Congress of Byzantine Studies, London, 21–26 August 2006, Volumes 1-3 pp 29. Ashgate Pub Co, 30 sep. 2006 The Sasanian Empire was founded by Ardashir I, after the fall of the Parthian Empire and the defeat of the last Arsacid king, Artabanus V. At its greatest extent, the Sasanian Empire encompassed all of today's Iran, Iraq, Eastern Arabia (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatif, Qatar, UAE), the Levant (Syria, Palestine, Lebanon, Israel, Jordan), the Caucasus (Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Dagestan), Egypt, large parts of Turkey, much of Central Asia (Afghanistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan), Yemen and Pakistan. According to a legend, the vexilloid of the Sasanian Empire was the Derafsh Kaviani.Khaleghi-Motlagh, The Sasanian Empire during Late Antiquity is considered to have been one of Iran's most important and influential historical periods and constituted the last great Iranian empire before the Muslim conquest and the adoption of Islam. In many ways, the Sasanian period witnessed the peak of ancient Iranian civilisation. The Sasanians' cultural influence extended far beyond the empire's territorial borders, reaching as far as Western Europe, Africa, China and India. It played a prominent role in the formation of both European and Asian medieval art. Much of what later became known as Islamic culture in art, architecture, music and other subject matter was transferred from the Sasanians throughout the Muslim world.

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Sa`d ibn Abi Waqqas

Saʿd ibn Abī Waqqās (سعد بن أبي وقاص) was of the companions of the Islamic prophet.

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Seaxburh of Ely

Seaxburh (Old English: Sexburh); also Saint Sexburga of Ely, (died about 699) was the queen of King Eorcenberht of Kent, as well as an abbess and a saint of the Christian Church.

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Second Fitna

The Second Fitna was a period of general political and military disorder that afflicted the Islamic empire during the early Umayyad dynasty, following the death of the first Umayyad caliph Muawiyah I. Historians date its start variously as 680 AD and its end as being somewhere between 685 and 692.

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Shah

Shah (Šāh, pronounced, "king") is a title given to the emperors, kings, princes and lords of Iran (historically also known as Persia).

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Shailendra dynasty

The Shailendra dynasty (derived from Sanskrit combined words Śaila and Indra, meaning "King of the Mountain", also spelled Sailendra, Syailendra or Selendra) was the name of a notable Indianised Indonesian dynasty that emerged in 8th century Java, whose reign signified a cultural renaissance in the region.

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Shatranj

Shatranj (شطرنج, from Middle Persian chatrang) is an old form of chess, as played in the Persian Empire.

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Shinto

or kami-no-michi (among other names) is the traditional religion of Japan that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connection between present-day Japan and its ancient past.

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Ship burial

A ship burial or boat grave is a burial in which a ship or boat is used either as a container for the dead and the grave goods, or as a part of the grave goods itself.

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Shugendō

is a highly syncretic religion that originated in Heian Japan.

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Siege of Constantinople (674–678)

The First Arab Siege of Constantinople in 674–678 was a major conflict of the Arab–Byzantine wars, and the first culmination of the Umayyad Caliphate's expansionist strategy towards the Byzantine Empire, led by Caliph Mu'awiya I. Mu'awiya, who had emerged in 661 as the ruler of the Muslim Arab empire following a civil war, renewed aggressive warfare against Byzantium after a lapse of some years and hoped to deliver a lethal blow by capturing the Byzantine capital, Constantinople.

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Sigeberht of East Anglia

Sigeberht of East Anglia (also known as Saint Sigebert), (Old English: Sigebryht) was a saint and a king of East Anglia, the Anglo-Saxon kingdom which today includes the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk.

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Silla

Silla (57 BC57 BC according to the Samguk Sagi; however Seth 2010 notes that "these dates are dutifully given in many textbooks and published materials in Korea today, but their basis is in myth; only Goguryeo may be traced back to a time period that is anywhere near its legendary founding." – 935 AD) was a kingdom located in southern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula.

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Sindh

Sindh (سنڌ; سِندھ) is one of the four provinces of Pakistan, in the southeast of the country.

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Slavery

Slavery is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.

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Slavs

Slavs are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group who speak the various Slavic languages of the larger Balto-Slavic linguistic group.

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Smallpox

Smallpox was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.

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South-pointing chariot

The south-pointing chariot (or carriage) was an ancient Chinese two-wheeled vehicle that carried a movable pointer to indicate the south, no matter how the chariot turned.

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Sri Jayanasa of Srivijaya

Dapunta Hyang Sri Jayanasa was the first Maharaja of Srivijaya and thought to be the dynastic founder of Kadatuan Srivijaya.

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Srivijaya

Srivijaya (also written Sri Vijaya, Indonesian/Malay: Sriwijaya, Javanese: ꦯꦿꦶꦮꦶꦗꦪ, Sundanese:, ศรีวิชัย, Sanskrit: श्रीविजय, Śrīvijaya, Khmer: ស្រីវិជ័យ "Srey Vichey", known by the Chinese as Shih-li-fo-shih and San-fo-ch'i t) was a dominant thalassocratic Malay city-state based on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, which influenced much of Southeast Asia.

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Stirrup

A stirrup is a light frame or ring that holds the foot of a rider, attached to the saddle by a strap, often called a stirrup leather.

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Strait of Malacca

The Strait of Malacca (Selat Melaka, Selat Malaka; Jawi: سلت ملاک) or Straits of Malacca is a narrow, stretch of water between the Malay Peninsula (Peninsular Malaysia) and the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

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Su Dingfang

Su Dingfang (591–667), formal name Su Lie (蘇烈) but went by the courtesy name of Dingfang, formally Duke Zhuang of Xing (邢莊公), was a general of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty who succeeded in destroying the Western Turkic Khaganate in 657.

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Sui dynasty

The Sui Dynasty was a short-lived imperial dynasty of China of pivotal significance.

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Sumatra

Sumatra is an Indonesian island in Southeast Asia that is part of the Sunda Islands.

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Sunda Strait

The Sunda Strait (Indonesian: Selat Sunda) is the strait between the Indonesian islands of Java and Sumatra.

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Sutton Hoo

Sutton Hoo, near Woodbridge, Suffolk, is the site of two 6th- and early 7th-century cemeteries.

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Talang Tuo inscription

The Talang Tuo inscription is a 7th-century Srivijaya inscription discovered by Louis Constant Westenenk on 17 November 1920, on the foot of Bukit Seguntang near Palembang.

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Tamil Nadu

Tamil Nadu (• tamiḻ nāḍu ? literally 'The Land of Tamils' or 'Tamil Country') is one of the 29 states of India.

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Tang campaign against the Eastern Turks

Emperor Taizong of Tang (r. 626-649), the second emperor of Chinese Tang Dynasty, faced a major threat from Tang's northern neighbor, the Eastern Turkic Khaganate.

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Tang dynasty

The Tang dynasty or the Tang Empire was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period.

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Taoism

Taoism, also known as Daoism, is a religious or philosophical tradition of Chinese origin which emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao (also romanized as ''Dao'').

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Tarumanagara

Tarumanagara or Taruma Kingdom or just Taruma is an early Sundanese Indianised kingdom, whose 5th-century ruler, Purnawarman, produced the earliest known inscriptions on Java island.

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Telaga Batu inscription

Telaga Batu inscription is a 7th-century Srivijayan inscription discovered in Sabokingking, 3 Ilir, Ilir Timur II, Palembang, South Sumatra, Indonesia, around the 1950s.

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Temple of the Inscriptions

The Temple of the Inscriptions (Classic Maya: Bʼolon Yej Teʼ Naah "House of the Nine Sharpened Spears") is the largest Mesoamerican stepped pyramid structure at the pre-Columbian Maya civilization site of Palenque, located in the modern-day state of Chiapas, Mexico.

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Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan, (in Spanish: Teotihuacán), is an ancient Mesoamerican city located in a sub-valley of the Valley of Mexico, located in the State of Mexico northeast of modern-day Mexico City, known today as the site of many of the most architecturally significant Mesoamerican pyramids built in the pre-Columbian Americas.

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Third Chinese domination of Vietnam

The third Chinese domination refers to the time in Vietnam from the end of the Early Lý dynasty in 602 to the rise of the Khúc family by Khúc Thừa Dụ in 905 or until 938, following the expulsion of the Southern Han invaders by Ngô Quyền.

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Timgad

Timgad (called Thamugas or Thamugadi in old Berber) was a Roman-Berber city in the Aurès Mountains of Algeria.

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Tong Yabghu Qaghan

Tong Yabghu Qaghan (r. 618–628 or 630) (also known as T'ung Yabghu, Ton Yabghu, Tong Yabghu Khagan, Tun Yabghu, and Tong Yabğu, Traditional Chinese 統葉護可汗, Simplified Chinese: 统叶护可汗, pinyin Tǒngyèhù Kěhán, Wade-Giles: t'ung-yeh-hu k'o-han) was khagan of the Western Turkic Khaganate from 618 to 628 AD.

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Tonyukuk

Tonyukuk (Old Turkic: Bilge Tuňuquq, born c. 646, died c. 726) was the baga-tarkhan (military leader) of four Göktürk khagans, the best known of whom is Bilge Khan.

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True Cross

The True Cross is the name for physical remnants which, by a Christian Church tradition, are said to be from the cross upon which Jesus was crucified.

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Turkic Khaganate

The Turkic Khaganate (Old Turkic: 𐰜𐰇𐰛:𐱅𐰇𐰼𐰰 Kök Türük) or Göktürk Khaganate was a khaganate established by the Ashina clan of the Göktürks in medieval Inner Asia.

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Tuyuhun

Tuyuhun (Tibetan: ‘A-zha) was a powerful kingdom established by nomadic peoples related to the Xianbei in the Qilian Mountains and upper Yellow River valley.

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Umar

Umar, also spelled Omar (عمر بن الخطاب, "Umar, Son of Al-Khattab"; c. 584 CE 3 November 644 CE), was one of the most powerful and influential Muslim caliphs in history.

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Umayyad Caliphate

The Umayyad Caliphate (ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلأُمَوِيَّة, trans. Al-Khilāfatu al-ʾUmawiyyah), also spelt, was the second of the four major caliphates established after the death of Muhammad.

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University of Michigan

The University of Michigan (UM, U-M, U of M, or UMich), often simply referred to as Michigan, is a public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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Unknown Archon

The Unknown Archon (непознати архонт/nepoznati arhont, непознати кнез/nepoznati knez), Unnamed Serb Archon (неименовани српски архонт/neimenovani srpski arhont), or simply Serb Archon (архонт Србин/arhont Srbin) refers to the Serbian prince who led the White Serbs from their homeland to settle in the Balkans during the reign of Byzantine Emperor Heraclius (610–641), as mentioned in Emperor Constantine VII's De Administrando Imperio (950s).

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Uqba ibn Nafi

ʿUqbah ibn Nāfiʿ (عقبة بن نافع, also referred to as Oqba ibn Nafi, Uqba bin Nafe, Uqba ibn al Nafia, or Akbah; 622–683) was an Arab general serving the Rashidun Caliphate since the Reign of Umar and later on the Umayyad Caliphate during the reigns of Muawiyah I and Yazid I, leading the Muslim conquest of the Maghreb, including present-day Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Morocco.

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Uthman

Uthman ibn Affan (ʿUthmān ibn ʿAffān), also known in English by the Turkish and Persian rendering, Osman (579 – 17 June 656), was a companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and the third of the Rashidun, or "Rightly Guided Caliphs".

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Visigoths

The Visigoths (Visigothi, Wisigothi, Vesi, Visi, Wesi, Wisi; Visigoti) were the western branches of the nomadic tribes of Germanic peoples referred to collectively as the Goths.

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Welsh people

The Welsh (Cymry) are a nation and ethnic group native to, or otherwise associated with, Wales, Welsh culture, Welsh history, and the Welsh language.

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Western Turkic Khaganate

The Western Turkic Khaganate or Onoq Khaganate was a Turkic khaganate formed as a result of the wars in the beginning of the 7th century (AD 593–603) after the split of the Göktürk Khaganate (founded in the 6th century in Mongolia by the Ashina clan) into the Western khaganate and the Eastern Turkic Khaganate. At its height, the Western Turkic Khaganate included what is now Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and parts of Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Russia. The ruling elite or perhaps the whole confederation was called Onoq or "ten arrows", possibly from oğuz (literally "arrow"), a subdivision of the Turkic tribes. A connection to the earlier Onogurs, which also means 'ten tribes', is questionable. The khaganate's capitals were Navekat (the summer capital) and Suyab (the principal capital), both situated in the Chui River valley of Kyrgyzstan, to the east from Bishkek. Tong Yabgu's summer capital was near Tashkent and his winter capital Suyab. Turkic rule in Mongolia was restored as Second Turkic Khaganate in 682.

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Wihtburh

Wihtburh (or Withburga) (died 743) was an East Anglia saint, princess and abbess who was possibly a daughter of Anna of East Anglia, located in present-day England.

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World population

In demographics, the world population is the total number of humans currently living, and was estimated to have reached 7.6 billion people as of May 2018.

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Wu Zetian

Wu Zetian (624 December16, 705),Paludan, 100 alternatively named Wu Zhao, Wu Hou, and during the later Tang dynasty as Tian Hou, also referred to in English as Empress Consort Wu or by the deprecated term "Empress Wu", was a Chinese sovereign who ruled unofficially as empress consort and empress dowager and later, officially as empress regnant (皇帝) during the brief Zhou dynasty (周, 684–705), which interrupted the Tang dynasty (618–690 & 705–907).

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Xuanzang

Xuanzang (fl. c. 602 – 664) was a Chinese Buddhist monk, scholar, traveller, and translator who travelled to India in the seventh century and described the interaction between Chinese Buddhism and Indian Buddhism during the early Tang dynasty.

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Xumi Pagoda

The Xumi Pagoda or Sumeru Pagoda, also known as Summer Pagoda is a Chinese pagoda of the Buddhist Kaiyuan Monastery west of Zhengding, Hebei province, China.

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Yamato Province

was a province of Japan, located in Kinai, corresponding to present-day Nara Prefecture in Honshū.

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Yazdegerd III

Yazdegerd III or Yazdgerd III (literally meaning "made by God"; New Persian: یزدگرد; Izdegerdes in classical sources), was the thirty-eighth and last king of the Sasanian Empire of Iran from 632 to 651.

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Yeon Gaesomun

Yeon GaesomunSome Chinese and Korean sources stated that his surname was Yeongae (연개, 淵蓋) and personal name was Somun (소문, 蘇文), but the majority of sources suggest a one-syllable surname and a three-syllable personal name.

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Yijing (monk)

Yijing (635–713 CE) was a Tang dynasty Chinese Buddhist monk originally named Zhang Wenming.

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Zhengding County

Zhengding, originally Zhending and formerly romanized as Chengting, is a county of southwestern Hebei Province, China, located approximately south of Beijing.

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540

Year 540 (DXL) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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570

Year 570 (DLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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592

Year 592 (DXCII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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599

Year 599 (DXCIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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600

Year 600 (DC) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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601

Year 601 (DCI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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602

Year 602 (DCII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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603

Year 603 (DCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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604

Year 604 (DCIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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606

Year 606 (DCVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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607

Year 607 (DCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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610

Year 610 (DCX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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615

Year 615 (DCXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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616

Year 616 (DCXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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618

Year 618 (DCXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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622

Year 622 (DCXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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623

Year 623 (DCXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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626

Year 626 (DCXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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627

Year 627 (DCXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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629

Year 629 (DCXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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630

Year 630 (DCXXX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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632

Year 632 (DCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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635

Year 635 (DCXXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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636

Year 636 (DCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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638

Year 638 (DCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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639

Year 639 (DCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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641

Year 641 (DCXLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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642

Year 642 (DCXLII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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649

Year 649 (DCXLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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650

Year 650 (DCL) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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651

Year 651 (DCLI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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656

Year 656 (DCLVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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657

Year 657 (DCLVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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658

Year 658 (DCLVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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661

Year 661 (DCLXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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663

Year 663 (DCLXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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664

Year 664 (DCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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668

Year 668 (DCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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670

Year 670 (DCLXX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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670s

The 670s decade ran from January 1, 670, to December 31, 679.

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671

Year 671 (DCLXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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674

Year 674 (DCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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677

Year 677 (DCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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679

Year 679 (DCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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680

Year 680 (DCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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681

Year 681 (DCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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682

Year 682 (DCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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683

Year 683 (DCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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685

Year 685 (DCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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686

Year 686 (DCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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687

Year 687 (DCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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688

Year 688 (DCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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690

Year 690 (DCXC) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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691

Year 691 (DCXCI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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694

Year 694 (DCXCIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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698

Year 698 (DCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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700

The denomination 700 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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Redirects here:

7 Century, 7th CE, 7th Century, 7th centuries, 7th century A.D, 7th century AD, 7th century CE, 7th-century, Seventh Century, Seventh century, Seventh century AD, Seventh-century, VII Century, VII century, Year in Review 7th Century.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7th_century

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