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8th century BC

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The 8th century BC started the first day of 800 BC and ended the last day of 701 BC. [1]

207 relations: Ab urbe condita, Adad-nirari III, Ahaz, Alcmaeon of Athens, Alcmenes, Alphabet, Amaziah of Judah, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, Ancient Greek units of measurement, Ancient Olympic Games, Ancient Rome, Archelaus of Sparta, Archon, Arctinus of Miletus, Argishti I of Urartu, Argos, Arpad, Syria, Ashur-dan III, Ashur-nirari V, Assyria, Assyrian people, Athens, Babylon, Babylonia, Baghdad, Bakenranef, Biskupin, Black Sea, Brahmana, Capital city, Carchemish, Carthage, Celtic Britons, Central Europe, Chalcis, Chronology of the ancient Near East, Cimmerians, Cinaethon of Sparta, Classical antiquity, Colony, Crown (headgear), Crown prince, Cyzicus, Dacia, Damascus, Demotic (Egyptian), Desmon of Corinth, Dido, Duke Zhuang of Zheng, ..., Dur-Sharrukin, Earring, Egypt, Erebuni Fortress, Eriba-Marduk, Etruscan civilization, Euboea, Eumelus of Corinth, Founding of Rome, Greeks, Gyges of Lydia, Haojing, Hesiod, Hezekiah, Hinduism, Hiram II, Historical Vedic religion, History of ancient Egypt, History of Egypt, History of Rome, Hittites, Homer, Hoshea, Iraq, Iron Age in India, Isaiah, Iuput, Jerusalem, Kashta, King Huan of Zhou, King Ping of Zhou, King Xuan of Zhou, King You of Zhou, Kingdom of Israel (Samaria), Kingdom of Judah, List of Assyrian kings, List of kings of Athens, List of kings of Babylon, List of kings of Sparta, List of political entities in the 8th century BC, Luoyang, Lusatian culture, Lydia, Magna Graecia, Marduk-apla-usur, Mediterranean Sea, Meles of Lydia, Memphis, Egypt, Menua, Midas, Nabonassar, Napata, National Archaeological Museum, Athens, National Museum of Iraq, Naxos (Sicily), Neo-Assyrian Empire, Nile Delta, Nimrud, Nineveh, Northern Italy, Nubia, Numa Pompilius, Olympiad, Orsippus, Osorkon III, Osorkon IV, Pharaoh, Phrygia, Piye, Polychares of Messenia, Pontifex maximus, Pygmalion of Tyre, Pythagoras of Laconia, Rhea Silvia, Rivallo, Roman calendar, Roman Empire, Rome, Romulus, Romulus and Remus, Rosette (design), Rudamun, Rusa I, Sabines, Samaria, Sargon II, Scythians, Sennacherib, Shabaka, Shakha, Shalmaneser IV, Shalmaneser V, Shoshenq III, Sicily, Solar eclipse, Southern Italy, Sparta, Spring and Autumn period, Syria, Takelot III, Taranto, Tefnakht, Tellis of Sicyon, The Crown, Thraco-Cimmerian, Tiglath-Pileser III, Titus Tatius, Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt, Twenty-fourth Dynasty of Egypt, Twenty-second Dynasty of Egypt, Twenty-third Dynasty of Egypt, Tyre, Lebanon, Upanishads, Vedanta, Vedic period, Villanovan culture, Yerevan, Zalmoxis, Zheng (state), Zhou dynasty, 13th century BC, 700 BC, 700s BC (decade), 701 BC, 704 BC, 705 BC, 706 BC, 710s BC, 713 BC, 715 BC, 716 BC, 717 BC, 718 BC, 719 BC, 720s BC, 730s BC, 739 BC, 740 BC, 740s BC, 743 BC, 745 BC, 747 BC, 750s BC, 753 BC, 755 BC, 756 BC, 760s BC, 770 BC, 770s BC, 771 BC, 774 BC, 776 BC, 780s BC, 781 BC, 782 BC, 790s BC, 800 BC. Expand index (157 more) »

Ab urbe condita

Ab urbe condita or Anno urbis conditae (abbreviated: A.U.C. or AUC) is a convention that was used in antiquity and by classical historians to refer to a given year in Ancient Rome.

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Adad-nirari III

Adad-nirari III (also Adad-narari) was a King of Assyria from 811 to 783 BC.

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Ahaz

Ahaz (Ἄχαζ, Ἀχάζ Akhaz; Achaz; an abbreviation of Jehoahaz, "Yahweh has held" (𒅀𒌑𒄩𒍣 Ia-ú-ḫa-zi)Hayim Tadmor and Shigeo Yamada, The Royal Inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), Kings of Assyria. (The Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period 1; Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2011), Tiglath-Pileser III 47 r 11'. was king of Judah, and the son and successor of Jotham. Ahaz was 20 when he became king of Judah and reigned for 16 years. Ahaz is portrayed as an evil king in the Second Book of Kings (2 Kings 16:2). Edwin R. Thiele concluded that Ahaz was co-regent with Jotham from 736/735 BC, and that his sole reign began in 732/731 and ended in 716/715 BC. William F. Albright has dated his reign to 744 – 728 BC. The Gospel of Matthew lists Ahaz of Judah in the genealogy of Jesus. He is also mentioned in according to the King James Version.

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Alcmaeon of Athens

Alcmaeon (Ἀλκμαίων) was the last perpetual Archon of Athens, and member of the storied Alcmaeonid family.

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Alcmenes

Alcmenes (Ἀλκμένης) or Alcamenes, Alkamenos, was the 9th king of Sparta of the Agiad dynasty, from c. 740 to c. 700 BC.

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Alphabet

An alphabet is a standard set of letters (basic written symbols or graphemes) that is used to write one or more languages based upon the general principle that the letters represent phonemes (basic significant sounds) of the spoken language.

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Amaziah of Judah

Amaziah of Judah, (pronounced,; (αμασιας; Amasias) was a king of Judah, the son and successor of Joash. His mother was Jehoaddan and his son was Uzziah. He took the throne at the age of 25, after the assassination of his father, and reigned for 29 years, 24 years of which were with the co-regency of his son. The second Book of Kings and the second Book of Chronicles in the Hebrew Bible consider him a righteous king, but with some hesitation. He is praised for killing the assassins of his father only and sparing their children, as dictated by the law of Moses. Edwin R. Thiele dates his reign from 797/796 to 768/767 BCE. Thiele's chronology has his son, Uzziah becoming co-regent with Amaziah in the fifth year of Amaziah's reign, in 792/791 BCE, when Uzziah was 16 years old.

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Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egypt was a civilization of ancient Northeastern Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile River - geographically Lower Egypt and Upper Egypt, in the place that is now occupied by the countries of Egypt and Sudan.

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Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (AD 600).

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Ancient Greek units of measurement

Ancient Greek units of measurement varied according to location and epoch.

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Ancient Olympic Games

The ancient Olympic Games were originally a festival, or celebration of and for Zeus; later, events such as a footrace, a javelin contest, and wrestling matches were added.

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Ancient Rome

In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire until the fall of the western empire.

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Archelaus of Sparta

Archelaus (Ἀρχέλαος, Ἀrkhélaos; reigned from c. 790 to c. 760 BC) was the 7th Agiad dynasty king of Sparta.

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Archon

Archon (ἄρχων, árchon, plural: ἄρχοντες, árchontes) is a Greek word that means "ruler", frequently used as the title of a specific public office.

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Arctinus of Miletus

Arctinus of Miletus or Arctinus Milesius (Ἀρκτῖνος Μιλήσιος) was a Greek epic poet whose reputation is purely legendary, as none of his works survive.

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Argishti I of Urartu

Argishti I, was the sixth known king of Urartu, reigning from 786 BC to 764 BC.

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Argos

Argos (Modern Greek: Άργος; Ancient Greek: Ἄργος) is a city in Argolis, the Peloponnese, Greece and is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world.

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Arpad, Syria

Arpad (probably modern Tell Rifaat, Syria) was an ancient Aramaean Syro-Hittite city located in north-western Syria, north of Aleppo.

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Ashur-dan III

Ashur-dan III was King of Assyria from 772 to 755 BC.

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Ashur-nirari V

Ashur-nirari V was King of Assyria from 755 to 745 BC.

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Assyria

Assyria, also called the Assyrian Empire, was a major Semitic speaking Mesopotamian kingdom and empire of the ancient Near East and the Levant.

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Assyrian people

Assyrian people (ܐܫܘܪܝܐ), or Syriacs (see terms for Syriac Christians), are an ethnic group indigenous to the Middle East.

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Athens

Athens (Αθήνα, Athína; Ἀθῆναι, Athênai) is the capital and largest city of Greece.

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Babylon

Babylon (KA2.DIĜIR.RAKI Bābili(m); Aramaic: בבל, Babel; بَابِل, Bābil; בָּבֶל, Bavel; ܒܒܠ, Bāwēl) was a key kingdom in ancient Mesopotamia from the 18th to 6th centuries BC.

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Babylonia

Babylonia was an ancient Akkadian-speaking state and cultural area based in central-southern Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq).

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Baghdad

Baghdad (بغداد) is the capital of Iraq.

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Bakenranef

Bakenranef, known by the ancient Greeks as Bocchoris, was briefly a king of the Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt.

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Biskupin

The archaeological open-air museum Biskupin is an archaeological site and a life-size model of an Iron Age fortified settlement in Poland (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship).

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Black Sea

The Black Sea is a body of water and marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean between Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Western Asia.

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Brahmana

The Brahmanas (Sanskrit: ब्राह्मणम्, Brāhmaṇa) are a collection of ancient Indian texts with commentaries on the hymns of the four Vedas.

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Capital city

A capital city (or simply capital) is the municipality exercising primary status in a country, state, province, or other administrative region, usually as its seat of government.

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Carchemish

Carchemish, also spelled Karkemish (Hittite: Karkamiš; Turkish: Karkamış; Greek: Εὔρωπος; Latin: Europus), was an important ancient capital in the northern part of the region of Syria.

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Carthage

Carthage (from Carthago; Punic:, Qart-ḥadašt, "New City") was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis in what is now the Tunis Governorate in Tunisia.

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Celtic Britons

The Britons, also known as Celtic Britons or Ancient Britons, were Celtic people who inhabited Great Britain from the British Iron Age into the Middle Ages, at which point their culture and language diverged into the modern Welsh, Cornish and Bretons (among others).

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Central Europe

Central Europe is the region comprising the central part of Europe.

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Chalcis

Chalcis (Ancient Greek & Katharevousa: Χαλκίς, Chalkís) or Chalkida (Modern Χαλκίδα) is the chief town of the island of Euboea in Greece, situated on the Euripus Strait at its narrowest point.

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Chronology of the ancient Near East

The chronology of the ancient Near East provides a framework of dates for various events, rulers and dynasties.

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Cimmerians

The Cimmerians (also Kimmerians; Greek: Κιμμέριοι, Kimmérioi) were an ancient people, who appeared about 1000 BC and are mentioned later in 8th century BC in Assyrian records.

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Cinaethon of Sparta

Cinaethon of Sparta (Κιναίθων ὁ Λακεδαιμόνιος Kinaithon ho Lakedaimonios) is a legendary Greek poet to whom different sources ascribe the lost epics Oedipodea, Little Iliad and Telegony.

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Classical antiquity

Classical antiquity (also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the period of cultural history between the 8th century BC and the 5th or 6th century AD centered on the Mediterranean Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world.

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Colony

In history, a colony is a territory under the immediate complete political control of a state, distinct from the home territory of the sovereign.

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Crown (headgear)

A crown is a traditional symbolic form of headwear, or hat, worn by a monarch or by a deity, for whom the crown traditionally represents power, legitimacy, victory, triumph, honor, and glory, as well as immortality, righteousness, and resurrection.

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Crown prince

A crown prince is the male heir apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy.

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Cyzicus

Cyzicus (Κύζικος Kyzikos; آیدینجق, Aydıncıḳ) was an ancient town of Mysia in Anatolia in the current Balıkesir Province of Turkey.

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Dacia

In ancient geography, especially in Roman sources, Dacia was the land inhabited by the Dacians.

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Damascus

Damascus (دمشق, Syrian) is the capital of the Syrian Arab Republic; it is also the country's largest city, following the decline in population of Aleppo due to the battle for the city.

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Demotic (Egyptian)

Demotic (from δημοτικός dēmotikós, "popular") is the ancient Egyptian script derived from northern forms of hieratic used in the Nile Delta, and the stage of the Egyptian language written in this script, following Late Egyptian and preceding Coptic.

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Desmon of Corinth

Desmon of Corinth was an ancient Greek athlete from Corinth who won the stadion race of the 14th Ancient Olympic Games in 724 BC.

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Dido

Dido was, according to ancient Greek and Roman sources, the founder and first queen of Carthage.

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Duke Zhuang of Zheng

Duke Zhuang of Zheng (757–701 BC) was the third ruler of the State of Zheng during the Spring and Autumn period in ancient China.

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Dur-Sharrukin

Dur-Sharrukin ("Fortress of Sargon"; دور شروكين), present day Khorsabad, was the Assyrian capital in the time of Sargon II of Assyria.

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Earring

An earring is a piece of jewelry attached to the ear via a piercing in the earlobe or another external part of the ear (except in the case of clip earrings, which clip onto the lobe). Earrings are worn by both sexes, although more common among women, and have been used by different civilizations in different times. Locations for piercings other than the earlobe include the rook, tragus, and across the helix (see image at right). The simple term "ear piercing" usually refers to an earlobe piercing, whereas piercings in the upper part of the external ear are often referred to as "cartilage piercings". Cartilage piercings are more complex to perform than earlobe piercings and take longer to heal. Earring components may be made of any number of materials, including metal, plastic, glass, precious stone, beads, wood, bone, and other materials. Designs range from small loops and studs to large plates and dangling items. The size is ultimately limited by the physical capacity of the earlobe to hold the earring without tearing. However, heavy earrings worn over extended periods of time may lead to stretching of the earlobe and the piercing.

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Egypt

Egypt (مِصر, مَصر, Khēmi), officially the Arab Republic of Egypt, is a transcontinental country spanning the northeast corner of Africa and southwest corner of Asia by a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula.

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Erebuni Fortress

Erebuni Fortress (Էրեբունի), also known as Arin Berd (Արին Բերդ; meaning the "Fortress of Blood"), is an Urartian fortified city, located in Yerevan, Armenia.

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Eriba-Marduk

Erība-Marduk, inscribed mri-ba,Kinglist A, tablet BM 33332, iv 1.

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Etruscan civilization

The Etruscan civilization is the modern name given to a powerful and wealthy civilization of ancient Italy in the area corresponding roughly to Tuscany, western Umbria and northern Lazio.

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Euboea

Euboea or Evia; Εύβοια, Evvoia,; Εὔβοια, Eúboia) is the second-largest Greek island in area and population, after Crete. The narrow Euripus Strait separates it from Boeotia in mainland Greece. In general outline it is a long and narrow island; it is about long, and varies in breadth from to. Its geographic orientation is from northwest to southeast, and it is traversed throughout its length by a mountain range, which forms part of the chain that bounds Thessaly on the east, and is continued south of Euboea in the lofty islands of Andros, Tinos and Mykonos. It forms most of the regional unit of Euboea, which also includes Skyros and a small area of the Greek mainland.

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Eumelus of Corinth

Eumelus of Corinth (Εὔμελος ὁ Κορίνθιος Eumelos ho Korinthios), of the clan of the Bacchiadae, is a semi-legendary early Greek poet to whom were attributed several epic poems as well as a celebrated prosodion, the treasured processional anthem of Messenian independence that was performed on Delos.

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Founding of Rome

The founding of Rome can be investigated through archaeology, but traditional stories handed down by the ancient Romans themselves explain the earliest history of their city in terms of legend and myth.

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Greeks

The Greeks or Hellenes (Έλληνες, Éllines) are an ethnic group native to Greece, Cyprus, southern Albania, Italy, Turkey, Egypt and, to a lesser extent, other countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. They also form a significant diaspora, with Greek communities established around the world.. Greek colonies and communities have been historically established on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea, but the Greek people have always been centered on the Aegean and Ionian seas, where the Greek language has been spoken since the Bronze Age.. Until the early 20th century, Greeks were distributed between the Greek peninsula, the western coast of Asia Minor, the Black Sea coast, Cappadocia in central Anatolia, Egypt, the Balkans, Cyprus, and Constantinople. Many of these regions coincided to a large extent with the borders of the Byzantine Empire of the late 11th century and the Eastern Mediterranean areas of ancient Greek colonization. The cultural centers of the Greeks have included Athens, Thessalonica, Alexandria, Smyrna, and Constantinople at various periods. Most ethnic Greeks live nowadays within the borders of the modern Greek state and Cyprus. The Greek genocide and population exchange between Greece and Turkey nearly ended the three millennia-old Greek presence in Asia Minor. Other longstanding Greek populations can be found from southern Italy to the Caucasus and southern Russia and Ukraine and in the Greek diaspora communities in a number of other countries. Today, most Greeks are officially registered as members of the Greek Orthodox Church.CIA World Factbook on Greece: Greek Orthodox 98%, Greek Muslim 1.3%, other 0.7%. Greeks have greatly influenced and contributed to culture, arts, exploration, literature, philosophy, politics, architecture, music, mathematics, science and technology, business, cuisine, and sports, both historically and contemporarily.

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Gyges of Lydia

Gyges (Γύγης) was the founder of the third or Mermnad dynasty of Lydian kings and reigned from 716 BC to 678 BC.

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Haojing

Hao or Haojing, also called Zongzhou (宗周), was one of the two settlements comprising the capital of the Western Zhou dynasty (1066-770 BCE), the other being Fēng or Fēngjīng (灃京).

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Hesiod

Hesiod (or; Ἡσίοδος Hēsíodos) was a Greek poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC, around the same time as Homer.

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Hezekiah

Hezekiah was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the son of Ahaz and the 13th king of Judah.

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Hinduism

Hinduism is an Indian religion and dharma, or a way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent.

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Hiram II

Hiram II (Hi-ru-mu) was the Phoenician king of Tyre from 737 to 729 BC.

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Historical Vedic religion

The historical Vedic religion (also known as Vedism, Brahmanism, Vedic Brahmanism, and ancient Hinduism) was the religion of the Indo-Aryans of northern India during the Vedic period.

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History of ancient Egypt

The history of ancient Egypt spans the period from the early prehistoric settlements of the northern Nile valley to the Roman conquest, in 30 BC.

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History of Egypt

The history of Egypt has been long and rich, due to the flow of the Nile River with its fertile banks and delta, as well as the accomplishments of Egypt's native inhabitants and outside influence.

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History of Rome

Roman history has been among the most influential to the modern world, from supporting the tradition of the rule by law to influencing the American Founding Fathers to the creation of the Catholic church.

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Hittites

The Hittites were an Ancient Anatolian people who played an important role in establishing an empire centered on Hattusa in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC.

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Homer

Homer (Ὅμηρος, Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature.

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Hoshea

See also Hosea, who has the same name in Biblical Hebrew. Hoshea (Osee) was the last king of the Israelite Kingdom of Israel and son of Elah (not the Israelite king Elah).

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Iraq

Iraq (or; العراق; عێراق), officially known as the Republic of Iraq (جُمُهورية العِراق; کۆماری عێراق), is a country in Western Asia, bordered by Turkey to the north, Iran to the east, Kuwait to the southeast, Saudi Arabia to the south, Jordan to the southwest and Syria to the west.

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Iron Age in India

In the prehistory of the Indian subcontinent, an "Iron Age" is recognized as succeeding the Late Harappan (Cemetery H) culture.

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Isaiah

Isaiah (or;; ܐܹܫܲܥܝܵܐ ˀēšaˁyā; Greek: Ἠσαΐας, Ēsaïās; Latin: Isaias; Arabic: إشعيا Ašaʿyāʾ or šaʿyā; "Yah is salvation") was the 8th-century BC Jewish prophet for whom the Book of Isaiah is named.

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Iuput

Iuput A or simply Iuput, was High Priest of Amun from 944 to 924 BCE, during the reigns of his father Shoshenq I and his brother Osorkon I. Iuput held a variety of titles including high priest of Amun, generalissimo and army-leader and Governor of Upper Egypt.

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Jerusalem

Jerusalem (יְרוּשָׁלַיִם; القُدس) is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea.

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Kashta

Kashta was a king of the Kushite Dynasty and the successor of Alara.

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King Huan of Zhou

King Huan of Zhou (died 697 BC) was the fourteenth king of the Chinese Zhou Dynasty and the second of the Eastern Zhou Dynasty (770-256 BC).

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King Ping of Zhou

King Ping of Zhou (died 720 BC), formerly romanized as King P’ing of Chou, was the thirteenth king of the Chinese Zhou Dynasty and the first of Eastern Zhou Dynasty.

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King Xuan of Zhou

King Xuan of Zhou was the eleventh king of the Chinese Zhou Dynasty.

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King You of Zhou

King You of Zhou (795–771 BC) was the eleventh king of the Chinese Zhou Dynasty and the last of Western Zhou Dynasty.

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Kingdom of Israel (Samaria)

According to the Hebrew Bible, the Kingdom of Israel was one of two successor states to the former United Kingdom of Israel and Judah.

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Kingdom of Judah

The Kingdom of Judah (מַמְלֶכֶת יְהוּדָה, Mamlekhet Yehudāh) was an Iron Age kingdom of the Southern Levant.

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List of Assyrian kings

The list of Assyrian kings are compiled from the Assyrian King List, which begins approximately 2500 BC and continues to the 8th century BC.

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List of kings of Athens

Before the Athenian democracy, the tyrants, and the Archons, the city-state of Athens was ruled by kings.

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List of kings of Babylon

The following is a list of the kings of Babylonia (ancient southern-central Iraq), compiled from the traditional Babylonian king lists and modern archaeological findings.

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List of kings of Sparta

This list of kings of Sparta details the important rulers of the Greek city-state of Sparta in the Peloponnesus.

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List of political entities in the 8th century BC

;Political entities in the 9th century BC – Political entities in the 7th century BC – Political entities by century This is a list of political entities in the 8th century BC (800–701 BC).

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Luoyang

Luoyang, formerly romanized as Loyang, is a city located in the confluence area of Luo River and Yellow River in the west of Henan province.

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Lusatian culture

The Lusatian culture existed in the later Bronze Age and early Iron Age (1300 BC – 500 BC) in most of today's Poland and parts of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, eastern Germany, and western Ukraine.

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Lydia

Lydia (Assyrian: Luddu; Λυδία, Lydía; Lidya) was an Iron Age kingdom of western Asia Minor located generally east of ancient Ionia in the modern western Turkish provinces of Uşak, Manisa and inland İzmir.

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Magna Graecia

Magna Graecia (Latin meaning "Great Greece", Μεγάλη Ἑλλάς, Megálē Hellás, Magna Grecia) was the name given by the Romans to the coastal areas of Southern Italy in the present-day regions of Campania, Apulia, Basilicata, Calabria and Sicily that were extensively populated by Greek settlers; particularly the Achaean settlements of Croton, and Sybaris, and to the north, the settlements of Cumae and Neapolis.

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Marduk-apla-usur

Marduk-apla-uṣur, inscribed dAMAR.UTU-A-ŠE,Dynastic Chronicle (ADD 888) vi 3’-5’.

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Mediterranean Sea

The Mediterranean Sea is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa and on the east by the Levant.

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Meles of Lydia

Meles (fl. 8th century BC; also known as Myrsus) was a king of Lydia.

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Memphis, Egypt

Memphis (مَنْف; ⲙⲉⲙϥⲓ; Μέμφις) was the ancient capital of Aneb-Hetch, the first nome of Lower Egypt.

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Menua

Menua (Մենուա) was the fifth known king of Urartu from c. 810 BC to approximately 786 BC.

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Midas

Midas (Μίδας) is the name of at least three members of the royal house of Phrygia.

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Nabonassar

Nabû-nāṣir, inscribed in cuneiform as dAG-PAB or dAG-ŠEŠ-ir, Greek: Ναβονάσσαρος, whence "Nabonassar", and meaning "Nabû (is) protector", was the king of Babylon 747–734 BC.

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Napata

Napata was a city-state of ancient Nubia on the west bank of the Nile River, at the site of modern Karima, Northern Sudan.

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National Archaeological Museum, Athens

The National Archaeological Museum (Εθνικό Αρχαιολογικό Μουσείο) in Athens houses some of the most important artifacts from a variety of archaeological locations around Greece from prehistory to late antiquity.

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National Museum of Iraq

The National Museum of Iraq (Arabic: المتحف العراقي) is a museum located in Baghdad, Iraq.

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Naxos (Sicily)

Naxos or Naxus (Νάξος) was an ancient Greek city of Sicily on the east coast of the island between Catana (modern Catania) and Messana (modern Messina).

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Neo-Assyrian Empire

The Neo-Assyrian Empire was an Iron Age Mesopotamian empire, in existence between 911 and 609 BC, and became the largest empire of the world up till that time.

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Nile Delta

The Nile Delta (دلتا النيل or simply الدلتا) is the delta formed in Northern Egypt (Lower Egypt) where the Nile River spreads out and drains into the Mediterranean Sea.

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Nimrud

Nimrud (النمرود) is the name that Carsten NiebuhrNiebuhr wrote on:: "Bei Nimrud, einem verfallenen Castell etwa 8 Stunden von Mosul, findet man ein merkwürdigeres Werk.

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Nineveh

Nineveh (𒌷𒉌𒉡𒀀 URUNI.NU.A Ninua); ܢܝܼܢܘܹܐ was an ancient Assyrian city of Upper Mesopotamia, located on the outskirts of Mosul in modern-day northern Iraq.

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Northern Italy

Northern Italy (Italia settentrionale or just Nord) is a geographical region in the northern part of Italy.

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Nubia

Nubia is a region along the Nile river encompassing the area between Aswan in southern Egypt and Khartoum in central Sudan.

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Numa Pompilius

Numa Pompilius (753–673 BC; reigned 715–673 BC) was the legendary second king of Rome, succeeding Romulus.

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Olympiad

An Olympiad (Ὀλυμπιάς, Olympiás) is a period of four years associated with the Olympic Games of the Ancient Greeks.

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Orsippus

Orsippus (Ὄρσιππος) was a Greek runner from Megara who was famed as the first to run the footrace naked at the Olympic Games and "first of all Greeks to be crowned victor naked." Others argue that it was Acanthus instead who first introduced Greek athletic nudity.

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Osorkon III

Usermaatre Setepenamun Osorkon III Si-Ese was Pharaoh of Egypt in the 8th Century BC.

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Osorkon IV

Usermaatre Osorkon IV was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh during the late Third Intermediate Period.

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Pharaoh

Pharaoh (ⲡⲣ̅ⲣⲟ Prro) is the common title of the monarchs of ancient Egypt from the First Dynasty (c. 3150 BCE) until the annexation of Egypt by the Roman Empire in 30 BCE, although the actual term "Pharaoh" was not used contemporaneously for a ruler until circa 1200 BCE.

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Phrygia

In Antiquity, Phrygia (Φρυγία, Phrygía, modern pronunciation Frygía; Frigya) was first a kingdom in the west central part of Anatolia, in what is now Asian Turkey, centered on the Sangarios River, later a region, often part of great empires.

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Piye

Piye (once transliterated as Piankhi; d. 714 BC) was an ancient Kushite king and founder of the Twenty-fifth dynasty of Egypt who ruled Egypt from 744–714 BC.

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Polychares of Messenia

Polychares of Messenia was an athlete from Messenia who won the stadion race in the fourth Ancient Olympic Games in 764 BC.

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Pontifex maximus

The Pontifex Maximus or pontifex maximus (Latin, "greatest priest") was the chief high priest of the College of Pontiffs (Collegium Pontificum) in ancient Rome.

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Pygmalion of Tyre

Pygmalion (also known as Pu'mayyaton) was king of Tyre from 831 to 785 BC and a son of King Mattan I (840-832 BC).

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Pythagoras of Laconia

Pythagoras of Laconia was an ancient Greek athlete listed by Eusebius of Caesarea as a victor in the stadion race of the 16th Olympiad (716 BC).

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Rhea Silvia

Rhea Silvia (also written as Rea Silvia), and also known as Ilia, was the mythical mother of the twins Romulus and Remus, who founded the city of Rome.

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Rivallo

Rivallo (Welsh: Rhiwallon) was a legendary king of the Britons as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth.

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Roman calendar

The Roman calendar was the calendar used by the Roman kingdom and republic.

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Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

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Rome

Rome (Roma; Roma) is the capital city of Italy and a special comune (named Comune di Roma Capitale).

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Romulus

Romulus was the legendary founder and first king of Rome.

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Romulus and Remus

In Roman mythology, Romulus and Remus are twin brothers, whose story tells the events that led to the founding of the city of Rome and the Roman Kingdom by Romulus.

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Rosette (design)

A rosette is a round, stylized flower design.

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Rudamun

Rudamun was the final pharaoh of the Twenty-third dynasty of Ancient Egypt.

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Rusa I

Rusa I (Ռուսա Ա, ruled: 735–713 BC) was a King of Urartu.

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Sabines

The Sabines (Sabini; Σαβῖνοι Sabĩnoi; Sabini, all exonyms) were an Italic tribe which lived in the central Apennines of ancient Italy, also inhabiting Latium north of the Anio before the founding of Rome.

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Samaria

Samaria (שֹׁמְרוֹן, Standard, Tiberian Šōmərôn; السامرة, – also known as, "Nablus Mountains") is a historical and biblical name used for the central region of ancient Land of Israel, also known as Palestine, bordered by Galilee to the north and Judaea to the south.

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Sargon II

Sargon II (Assyrian Šarru-ukīn (LUGAL-GI.NA 𒈗𒄀𒈾).; Aramaic סרגן; reigned 722–705 BC) was an Assyrian king.

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Scythians

or Scyths (from Greek Σκύθαι, in Indo-Persian context also Saka), were a group of Iranian people, known as the Eurasian nomads, who inhabited the western and central Eurasian steppes from about the 9th century BC until about the 1st century BC.

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Sennacherib

Sennacherib was the king of Assyria from 705 BCE to 681 BCE.

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Shabaka

Neferkare Shabaka (or Shabako) was the third Kushite pharaoh of the Twenty-fifth dynasty of Egypt, who reigned from 705–690 BC.

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Shakha

A shakha (Sanskrit, "branch" or "limb"), is a Hindu theological school that specializes in learning certain Vedic texts, or else the traditional texts followed by such a school.

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Shalmaneser IV

Shalmaneser IV was king of Assyria (783–773 BC).

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Shalmaneser V

Shalmaneser V was king of Assyria from 727 to 722 BC.

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Shoshenq III

King Usermaatre Setepenre/Setepenamun Shoshenq III ruled Egypt's 22nd Dynasty for 39 years according to contemporary historical records.

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Sicily

Sicily (Sicilia; Sicìlia) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea.

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Solar eclipse

A solar eclipse (as seen from the planet Earth) is a type of eclipse that occurs when the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth, and when the Moon fully or partially blocks ("occults") the Sun.

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Southern Italy

Southern Italy or Mezzogiorno (literally "midday") is a macroregion of Italy traditionally encompassing the territories of the former Kingdom of the two Sicilies (all the southern section of the Italian Peninsula and Sicily), with the frequent addition of the island of Sardinia.

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Sparta

Sparta (Doric Greek: Σπάρτα, Spártā; Attic Greek: Σπάρτη, Spártē) was a prominent city-state in ancient Greece.

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Spring and Autumn period

The Spring and Autumn period was a period in Chinese history from approximately 771 to 476 BC (or according to some authorities until 403 BC) which corresponds roughly to the first half of the Eastern Zhou Period.

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Syria

Syria (سوريا), officially known as the Syrian Arab Republic (الجمهورية العربية السورية), is a country in Western Asia, bordering Lebanon and the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Turkey to the north, Iraq to the east, Jordan to the south, and Israel to the southwest.

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Takelot III

Usimare Setepenamun Takelot III Si-Ese (reigned 774–759 BC) was Osorkon III's eldest son and successor.

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Taranto

Taranto (early Tarento from Tarentum; Tarantino: Tarde; translit; label) is a coastal city in Apulia, Southern Italy.

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Tefnakht

Shepsesre Tefnakht (in Greek known as Tnephachthos) was a prince of Sais and founder of the relatively short Twenty-fourth dynasty of Egypt; he rose to become a Chief of the Ma in his home city.

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Tellis of Sicyon

Tellis of Sicyon was an ancient Greek athlete listed by Eusebius of Caesarea as a victor in the stadion race of the 18th Olympiad (708 BC).

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The Crown

The Crown is the state in all its aspects within the jurisprudence of the Commonwealth realms and their sub-divisions (such as Crown dependencies, provinces, or states).

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Thraco-Cimmerian

Thraco-Cimmerian is a historiographical and archaeological term, composed of the names of the Thracians and the Cimmerians.

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Tiglath-Pileser III

Tiglath-Pileser III (cuneiform: TUKUL.TI.A.É.ŠÁR.RA; Akkadian: Tukultī-apil-Ešarra, "my trust is in the son of the Ešarra") was a prominent king of Assyria in the eighth century BCE (ruled 745–727 BCE) who introduced advanced civil, military, and political systems into the Neo-Assyrian Empire.

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Titus Tatius

According to the Roman foundation myth, Titus Tatius was the king of the Sabines from Cures and joint-ruler of Rome for several years.

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Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt

The Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXV, alternatively 25th Dynasty or Dynasty 25), also known as the Nubian Dynasty or the Kushite Empire, was the last dynasty of the Third Intermediate Period that occurred after the Nubian invasion of Ancient Egypt.

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Twenty-fourth Dynasty of Egypt

The Twenty-fourth Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXIV, alternatively 24th Dynasty or Dynasty 24), is usually classified as the fourth Dynasty of the Ancient Egyptian Third Intermediate Period.

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Twenty-second Dynasty of Egypt

The Twenty-second Dynasty of Egypt is also known as the Bubastite Dynasty, since the pharaohs originally ruled from the city of Bubastis.

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Twenty-third Dynasty of Egypt

The Twenty-third Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXIII, alternatively 23rd Dynasty or Dynasty 23) is usually classified as the third dynasty of the ancient Egyptian Third Intermediate Period.

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Tyre, Lebanon

Tyre (صور, Ṣūr; Phoenician:, Ṣūr; צוֹר, Ṣōr; Tiberian Hebrew, Ṣōr; Akkadian:, Ṣurru; Greek: Τύρος, Týros; Sur; Tyrus, Տիր, Tir), sometimes romanized as Sour, is a district capital in the South Governorate of Lebanon.

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Upanishads

The Upanishads (उपनिषद्), a part of the Vedas, are ancient Sanskrit texts that contain some of the central philosophical concepts and ideas of Hinduism, some of which are shared with religious traditions like Buddhism and Jainism.

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Vedanta

Vedanta (Sanskrit: वेदान्त, IAST) or Uttara Mīmāṃsā is one of the six orthodox (''āstika'') schools of Hindu philosophy.

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Vedic period

The Vedic period, or Vedic age, is the period in the history of the northwestern Indian subcontinent between the end of the urban Indus Valley Civilisation and a second urbanisation in the central Gangetic Plain which began in BCE.

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Villanovan culture

The Villanovan culture was the earliest Iron Age culture of central and northern Italy, abruptly following the Bronze Age Terramare culture and giving way in the 7th century BC to an increasingly orientalizing culture influenced by Greek traders, which was followed without a severe break by the Etruscan civilization.

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Yerevan

Yerevan (Երևան, sometimes spelled Erevan) is the capital and largest city of Armenia as well as one of the world's oldest continuously inhabited cities.

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Zalmoxis

Zalmoxis (Ζάλμοξις) is a supposed divinity of the Getae and Dacians (a people of the lower Danube), mentioned by Herodotus in his ''Histories'' Book IV, 93–96, written before 425 BC.

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Zheng (state)

Zheng (Old Chinese: *) was a vassal state in China during the Zhou Dynasty (1046–221 BCE) located in the centre of ancient China in modern-day Henan Province on the North China Plain about east of the royal capital at Luoyang.

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Zhou dynasty

The Zhou dynasty or the Zhou Kingdom was a Chinese dynasty that followed the Shang dynasty and preceded the Qin dynasty.

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13th century BC

The 13th century BC was the period from 1300 to 1201 BC.

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700 BC

No description.

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700s BC (decade)

This article concerns the period 709 BC – 700 BC.

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701 BC

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704 BC

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705 BC

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706 BC

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710s BC

This article concerns the period 719 BC – 710 BC.

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713 BC

Year 713 BC was the first year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar.

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715 BC

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716 BC

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717 BC

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718 BC

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719 BC

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720s BC

This article concerns the period 729 BC – 720 BC.

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730s BC

This article concerns the period 739 BC – 730 BC.

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739 BC

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740 BC

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740s BC

This article concerns the period 749 BC – 740 BC.

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743 BC

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745 BC

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747 BC

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750s BC

This article concerns the period 759 BC – 750 BC.

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753 BC

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755 BC

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756 BC

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760s BC

This article concerns the period 769 BC – 760 BC.

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770 BC

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770s BC

This article concerns the period 779 BC – 770 BC.

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771 BC

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774 BC

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776 BC

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780s BC

This article concerns the period 789 BC – 780 BC.

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781 BC

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782 BC

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790s BC

The 790s BC witnessed the surging power of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, albeit a brief moment of weakness following in subsequent decades, the further decadence of Egypt, and the beginnings of modern civilization with the rise of the city-states in Ancient Greece.

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800 BC

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Redirects here:

700s BC, 700s BCE, 800 BCE, 8th Century BC, 8th century B.C., 8th century B.C.E., 8th century BCE, Eighth century BC, Eighth century BCE, Year in Review 8th Century BC.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8th_century_BC

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