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AP Physics

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In the United States, Advanced Placement (AP) Physics collectively refers to the College Board Advanced Placement Program courses and exams covering various areas of physics. [1]

27 relations: Advanced Placement, Algebra, AP Physics 1, AP Physics 2, AP Physics B, AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism, AP Physics C: Mechanics, Atomic physics, Calculus, Classical mechanics, College, College Board, Electricity, Engineering, Fluid mechanics, Glossary of physics, Magnetism, Major (academic), Newton's laws of motion, Nuclear physics, Optics, Outline of physical science, Physics, Thermodynamics, Trigonometry, United States, Wave.

Advanced Placement

Advanced Placement (AP) is a program in the United States and Canada created by the College Board which offers college-level curricula and examinations to high school students.

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Algebra

Algebra (from Arabic "al-jabr", literally meaning "reunion of broken parts") is one of the broad parts of mathematics, together with number theory, geometry and analysis.

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AP Physics 1

Advanced Placement (AP) Physics 1, along with AP Physics 2, is a year-long AP course whose first exam was given in 2015.

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AP Physics 2

Advanced Placement (AP) Physics 2, along with AP Physics 1, is a year-long AP course designed by the College Board to replace AP Physics B in the 2014 - 2015 school year.

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AP Physics B

AP Physics B was an Advanced Placement science course equivalent to a year-long introductory college course in physics.

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AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism (Also commonly referred to as AP Physics C: E&M, or simply E&M) is an Advanced Placement science course about electricity and magnetism.

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AP Physics C: Mechanics

AP Physics C: Mechanics (often referred to as AP C Mechanics, AP Mechanics, or simply AP Physics C) is an Advanced Placement science course that studies Newtonian mechanics.

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Atomic physics

Atomic physics is the field of physics that studies atoms as an isolated system of electrons and an atomic nucleus.

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Calculus

Calculus (from Latin calculus, literally 'small pebble', used for counting and calculations, as on an abacus), is the mathematical study of continuous change, in the same way that geometry is the study of shape and algebra is the study of generalizations of arithmetic operations.

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Classical mechanics

Classical mechanics describes the motion of macroscopic objects, from projectiles to parts of machinery, and astronomical objects, such as spacecraft, planets, stars and galaxies.

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College

A college (Latin: collegium) is an educational institution or a constituent part of one.

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College Board

College Board is an American non-profit organization that was formed in December 1899 as the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) to expand access to higher education.

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Electricity

Electricity is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge.

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Engineering

Engineering is the creative application of science, mathematical methods, and empirical evidence to the innovation, design, construction, operation and maintenance of structures, machines, materials, devices, systems, processes, and organizations.

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Fluid mechanics

Fluid mechanics is a branch of physics concerned with the mechanics of fluids (liquids, gases, and plasmas) and the forces on them.

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Glossary of physics

Most of the terms listed in Wikipedia glossaries are already defined and explained within Wikipedia itself.

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Magnetism

Magnetism is a class of physical phenomena that are mediated by magnetic fields.

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Major (academic)

An academic major is the academic discipline to which an undergraduate student formally commits.

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Newton's laws of motion

Newton's laws of motion are three physical laws that, together, laid the foundation for classical mechanics.

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Nuclear physics

Nuclear physics is the field of physics that studies atomic nuclei and their constituents and interactions.

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Optics

Optics is the branch of physics which involves the behaviour and properties of light, including its interactions with matter and the construction of instruments that use or detect it.

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Outline of physical science

Physical science is a branch of natural science that studies non-living systems, in contrast to life science.

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Physics

Physics (from knowledge of nature, from φύσις phýsis "nature") is the natural science that studies matterAt the start of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Richard Feynman offers the atomic hypothesis as the single most prolific scientific concept: "If, in some cataclysm, all scientific knowledge were to be destroyed one sentence what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that all things are made up of atoms – little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another..." and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force."Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or, in other words, to the regular succession of events." Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves."Physics is one of the most fundamental of the sciences. Scientists of all disciplines use the ideas of physics, including chemists who study the structure of molecules, paleontologists who try to reconstruct how dinosaurs walked, and climatologists who study how human activities affect the atmosphere and oceans. Physics is also the foundation of all engineering and technology. No engineer could design a flat-screen TV, an interplanetary spacecraft, or even a better mousetrap without first understanding the basic laws of physics. (...) You will come to see physics as a towering achievement of the human intellect in its quest to understand our world and ourselves."Physics is an experimental science. Physicists observe the phenomena of nature and try to find patterns that relate these phenomena.""Physics is the study of your world and the world and universe around you." Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines and, through its inclusion of astronomy, perhaps the oldest. Over the last two millennia, physics, chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics were a part of natural philosophy, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, these natural sciences emerged as unique research endeavors in their own right. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics often enable advances in new technologies. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society, such as television, computers, domestic appliances, and nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.

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Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics is the branch of physics concerned with heat and temperature and their relation to energy and work.

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Trigonometry

Trigonometry (from Greek trigōnon, "triangle" and metron, "measure") is a branch of mathematics that studies relationships involving lengths and angles of triangles.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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Wave

In physics, a wave is a disturbance that transfers energy through matter or space, with little or no associated mass transport.

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Redirects here:

AP Physics C, Advanced Placement Physics, Advanced Placement Physics C, Ap Physics, Ap physics c, Physics C.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AP_Physics

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