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Adam

Index Adam

Adam (ʾĀdam; Adám) is the name used in the opening chapters of the Book of Genesis for the first man created by God, but it is also used in a collective sense as "mankind" and individually as "a human". [1]

69 relations: Abraham, Achaemenid Empire, Aclima, Adam Kadmon, Adamah, Adapa, Aggadah, Ahmadiyya, Al-Tabari, Apocalypse of Adam, Arabic, Augustine of Hippo, Awan (religious figure), Azura (religious figure), Bahir, Banu (Arabic), Book of Genesis, Book of Jubilees, Books of Adam, Books of Chronicles, Cain and Abel, Calvary, Chiasmus, Conflict of Adam and Eve with Satan, Eve, Garden of Eden, Genesis creation narrative, God, Iblis, Islam, Jewish mysticism, Kaaba, Kav ha-Yashar, Khalifa, Late antiquity, Life of Adam and Eve, LifeWay Christian Resources, Lilith, List of Old Testament pseudepigrapha, Mahabad (prophet), Manu (Hinduism), Messiah, Michael (archangel), Michelangelo, Middle Ages, Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, Motif (narrative), Muslim, Origen, Original sin, ..., Paradise Lost, Paul the Apostle, Prophet, Prophets and messengers in Islam, Quran, Raziel, Sefer Raziel HaMalakh, Sefer Yetzirah, Serpents in the Bible, Seth, Shia Islam, Sistine Chapel ceiling, Solomon's Temple, Table of prophets of Abrahamic religions, Testament of Adam, The Creation of Adam, Tree of the knowledge of good and evil, Y-chromosomal Adam, Zohar. Expand index (19 more) »

Abraham

Abraham (Arabic: إبراهيم Ibrahim), originally Abram, is the common patriarch of the three Abrahamic religions.

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Achaemenid Empire

The Achaemenid Empire, also called the First Persian Empire, was an empire based in Western Asia, founded by Cyrus the Great.

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Aclima

Aclima (also Luluwa) according to some religious traditions was the oldest daughter of Adam and Eve, the twin sister of Cain and wife of Abel.

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Adam Kadmon

Adam Kadmon (Primordial Man; also Adam Ila'a, אדם עילאה "supreme man"; abbreviated as א"ק, A"K), in Kabbalah, is the first spiritual World that came into being after the contraction of God's infinite light.

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Adamah

Adamah (Biblical Hebrew: אדמה) is a word, translatable as ground or earth, which occurs in the Biblical account of Creation of the Book of Genesis.

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Adapa

Adapa, is a Mesopotamian was a mythical figure who unknowingly refused the gift of immortality.

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Aggadah

Aggadah (Aramaic אַגָּדָה: "tales, lore"; pl. aggadot or (Ashkenazi) aggados; also known as aggad or aggadh or agâdâ) refers to non-legalistic exegetical texts in the classical rabbinic literature of Judaism, particularly as recorded in the Talmud and Midrash.

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Ahmadiyya

Ahmadiyya (officially, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community or the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama'at; الجماعة الإسلامية الأحمدية, transliterated: al-Jamā'ah al-Islāmiyyah al-Aḥmadiyyah; احمدیہ مسلم جماعت) is an Islamic religious movement founded in Punjab, British India, in the late 19th century.

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Al-Tabari

Abū Jaʿfar Muḥammad ibn Jarīr al-Ṭabarī (محمد بن جریر طبری, أبو جعفر محمد بن جرير بن يزيد الطبري) (224–310 AH; 839–923 AD) was an influential Persian scholar, historian and exegete of the Qur'an from Amol, Tabaristan (modern Mazandaran Province of Iran), who composed all his works in Arabic.

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Apocalypse of Adam

The Apocalypse of Adam, discovered at Nag Hammadi, is a Sethian tractate of Apocalyptic literature dating to the first to second century AD.

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Arabic

Arabic (العَرَبِيَّة) or (عَرَبِيّ) or) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia in the east to the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic, which is derived from Classical Arabic. As the modern written language, Modern Standard Arabic is widely taught in schools and universities, and is used to varying degrees in workplaces, government, and the media. The two formal varieties are grouped together as Literary Arabic (fuṣḥā), which is the official language of 26 states and the liturgical language of Islam. Modern Standard Arabic largely follows the grammatical standards of Classical Arabic and uses much of the same vocabulary. However, it has discarded some grammatical constructions and vocabulary that no longer have any counterpart in the spoken varieties, and has adopted certain new constructions and vocabulary from the spoken varieties. Much of the new vocabulary is used to denote concepts that have arisen in the post-classical era, especially in modern times. During the Middle Ages, Literary Arabic was a major vehicle of culture in Europe, especially in science, mathematics and philosophy. As a result, many European languages have also borrowed many words from it. Arabic influence, mainly in vocabulary, is seen in European languages, mainly Spanish and to a lesser extent Portuguese, Valencian and Catalan, owing to both the proximity of Christian European and Muslim Arab civilizations and 800 years of Arabic culture and language in the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in Arabic as al-Andalus. Sicilian has about 500 Arabic words as result of Sicily being progressively conquered by Arabs from North Africa, from the mid 9th to mid 10th centuries. Many of these words relate to agriculture and related activities (Hull and Ruffino). Balkan languages, including Greek and Bulgarian, have also acquired a significant number of Arabic words through contact with Ottoman Turkish. Arabic has influenced many languages around the globe throughout its history. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Spanish, Urdu, Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Hindi, Malay, Maldivian, Indonesian, Pashto, Punjabi, Tagalog, Sindhi, and Hausa, and some languages in parts of Africa. Conversely, Arabic has borrowed words from other languages, including Greek and Persian in medieval times, and contemporary European languages such as English and French in modern times. Classical Arabic is the liturgical language of 1.8 billion Muslims and Modern Standard Arabic is one of six official languages of the United Nations. All varieties of Arabic combined are spoken by perhaps as many as 422 million speakers (native and non-native) in the Arab world, making it the fifth most spoken language in the world. Arabic is written with the Arabic alphabet, which is an abjad script and is written from right to left, although the spoken varieties are sometimes written in ASCII Latin from left to right with no standardized orthography.

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Augustine of Hippo

Saint Augustine of Hippo (13 November 354 – 28 August 430) was a Roman African, early Christian theologian and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity and Western philosophy.

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Awan (religious figure)

According to the Book of Jubilees, Awan (also Avan or Aven, from Hebrew אָוֶן aven "vice", "iniquity", "potency") was the wife and sister of Cain and the daughter of Adam and Eve.

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Azura (religious figure)

Azura was the daughter of Adam and Eve and the wife (and sister) of Seth in the Book of Jubilees, chapter 4.

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Bahir

Bahir or Sefer HaBahir (Hebrew: סֵפֶר הַבָּהִיר, "Book of the Bright") is an anonymous mystical work, attributed to a 1st-century rabbinic sage Nehunya ben HaKanah (a contemporary of Yochanan ben Zakai) because it begins with the words, "R.

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Banu (Arabic)

Bani (بنو) is Arabic for "the children of" or "descendants of" and appears before the name of a tribal progenitor.

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Book of Genesis

The Book of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek "", meaning "Origin"; בְּרֵאשִׁית, "Bərēšīṯ", "In beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh) and the Old Testament.

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Book of Jubilees

The Book of Jubilees, sometimes called Lesser Genesis (Leptogenesis), is an ancient Jewish religious work of 50 chapters, considered canonical by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church as well as Beta Israel (Ethiopian Jews), where it is known as the Book of Division (Ge'ez: መጽሃፈ ኩፋሌ Mets'hafe Kufale).

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Books of Adam

The Books of Adam is a collective name of several apocryphal books relating to Adam and Eve.

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Books of Chronicles

In the Christian Bible, the two Books of Chronicles (commonly referred to as 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles, or First Chronicles and Second Chronicles) generally follow the two Books of Kings and precede Ezra–Nehemiah, thus concluding the history-oriented books of the Old Testament, often referred to as the Deuteronomistic history.

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Cain and Abel

In the biblical Book of Genesis, Cain and Abel are the first two sons of Adam and Eve.

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Calvary

Calvary, or Golgotha (Biblical Greek Γολγοθᾶ Golgotha, traditionally interpreted as reflecting Syriac (Aramaic) golgolta, as it were Hebrew gulgōleṯ "skull" Strong's Concordance.), was, according to the Gospels, a site immediately outside Jerusalem's walls where Jesus was crucified.

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Chiasmus

In rhetoric, chiasmus or, less commonly, chiasm (Latin term from Greek χίασμα, "crossing", from the Greek χιάζω, chiázō, "to shape like the letter Χ") is a “reversal of grammatical structures in successive phrases or clauses – but no repetition of words”.

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Conflict of Adam and Eve with Satan

The Conflict of Adam and Eve with Satan is a 6th century Christian extracanonical work found in Ge'ez, translated from an Arabic original.

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Eve

Eve (Ḥawwā’; Syriac: ܚܘܐ) is a figure in the Book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible.

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Garden of Eden

The Garden of Eden (Hebrew גַּן עֵדֶן, Gan ʿEḏen) or (often) Paradise, is the biblical "garden of God", described most notably in the Book of Genesis chapters 2 and 3, and also in the Book of Ezekiel.

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Genesis creation narrative

The Genesis creation narrative is the creation myth of both Judaism and Christianity.

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God

In monotheistic thought, God is conceived of as the Supreme Being and the principal object of faith.

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Iblis

(or Eblis) is the Islamic equivalent of Satan.

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Islam

IslamThere are ten pronunciations of Islam in English, differing in whether the first or second syllable has the stress, whether the s is or, and whether the a is pronounced, or (when the stress is on the first syllable) (Merriam Webster).

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Jewish mysticism

Academic study of Jewish mysticism, especially since Gershom Scholem's Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism (1941), distinguishes between different forms of mysticism across different eras of Jewish history.

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Kaaba

The Kaaba (ٱلْـكَـعْـبَـة, "The Cube"), also referred as al-Kaʿbah al-Musharrafah (ٱلْـكَـعْـبَـة الْـمُـشَـرًّفَـة, the Holy Ka'bah), is a building at the center of Islam's most important mosque, that is Al-Masjid Al-Ḥarām (ٱلْـمَـسْـجِـد الْـحَـرَام, The Sacred Mosque), in the Hejazi city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia.

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Kav ha-Yashar

Kav ha-Yashar (lit. The Just Measure; קב הישר) authored by Rabbi Tzvi Hirsch Kaidanover, is one of the most popular works of musar literature of the last three hundred years.

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Khalifa

Khalifa or Khalifah is a name or title which means "successor", "deputy" or "steward".

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Late antiquity

Late antiquity is a periodization used by historians to describe the time of transition from classical antiquity to the Middle Ages in mainland Europe, the Mediterranean world, and the Near East.

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Life of Adam and Eve

The Life of Adam and Eve, also known, in its Greek version, as the Apocalypse of Moses, is a Jewish pseudepigraphical group of writings.

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LifeWay Christian Resources

LifeWay Christian Resources, based in Nashville, Tennessee, is the publishing division of the Southern Baptist Convention and church business services provider; one of the largest providers of religious and Christian resources in the world.

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Lilith

Lilith (לִילִית Lîlîṯ) is a figure in Jewish mythology, developed earliest in the Babylonian Talmud (3rd to 5th centuries).

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List of Old Testament pseudepigrapha

Pseudepigrapha are falsely attributed works, texts whose claimed author is not the true author, or a work whose real author attributed it to a figure of the past.

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Mahabad (prophet)

Mahabad (Kurdish: مەهاباد Mehabad, Persian: مهاباد Mahābād) is believed to be a pre-Zoroastrian prophet.

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Manu (Hinduism)

Manu (मनु) is a term found with various meanings in Hinduism.

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Messiah

In Abrahamic religions, the messiah or messias is a saviour or liberator of a group of people.

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Michael (archangel)

Michael (translit; translit; Michahel;ⲙⲓⲭⲁⲏⲗ, translit) is an archangel in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

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Michelangelo

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni or more commonly known by his first name Michelangelo (6 March 1475 – 18 February 1564) was an Italian sculptor, painter, architect and poet of the High Renaissance born in the Republic of Florence, who exerted an unparalleled influence on the development of Western art.

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Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century.

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Mirza Ghulam Ahmad

Mirzā Ghulām Ahmad (13 February 1835 – 26 May 1908) was an Indian religious leader and the founder of the Ahmadiyya Movement in Islam.

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Motif (narrative)

In narrative, a motif is any recurring element that has symbolic significance in a story.

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Muslim

A Muslim (مُسلِم) is someone who follows or practices Islam, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion.

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Origen

Origen of Alexandria (184 – 253), also known as Origen Adamantius, was a Hellenistic scholar, ascetic, and early Christian theologian who was born and spent the first half of his career in Alexandria.

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Original sin

Original sin, also called "ancestral sin", is a Christian belief of the state of sin in which humanity exists since the fall of man, stemming from Adam and Eve's rebellion in Eden, namely the sin of disobedience in consuming the forbidden fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.

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Paradise Lost

Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton (1608–1674).

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Paul the Apostle

Paul the Apostle (Paulus; translit, ⲡⲁⲩⲗⲟⲥ; c. 5 – c. 64 or 67), commonly known as Saint Paul and also known by his Jewish name Saul of Tarsus (translit; Saũlos Tarseús), was an apostle (though not one of the Twelve Apostles) who taught the gospel of the Christ to the first century world.

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Prophet

In religion, a prophet is an individual regarded as being in contact with a divine being and said to speak on that entity's behalf, serving as an intermediary with humanity by delivering messages or teachings from the supernatural source to other people.

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Prophets and messengers in Islam

Prophets in Islam (الأنبياء في الإسلام) include "messengers" (rasul, pl. rusul), bringers of a divine revelation via an angel (Arabic: ملائكة, malāʾikah);Shaatri, A. I. (2007).

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Quran

The Quran (القرآن, literally meaning "the recitation"; also romanized Qur'an or Koran) is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God (Allah).

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Raziel

Raziel (רזיאל "Secret of God") is an archangel within the teachings of Jewish mysticism (of the Kabbalah of Judaism) who is the "Keeper of Secrets" and the "Angel of Mysteries".

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Sefer Raziel HaMalakh

Sefer Raziel HaMalakh, (Hebrew,ספר רזיאל המלאך., "the book of Raziel the angel"), is a medieval Practical Kabbalah grimoire written primarily in Hebrew and Aramaic.

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Sefer Yetzirah

Sefer Yetzirah (Sēpher Yəṣîrâh, Book of Formation, or Book of Creation) is the title of the earliest extant book on Jewish esotericism, although some early commentators treated it as a treatise on mathematical and linguistic theory as opposed to Kabbalah.

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Serpents in the Bible

Serpents (נחש nāḥāš) are referred to in both the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament.

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Seth

Seth (translit;; "placed", "appointed"; Σήθ), in Judaism, Christianity, Mandaeism, and Islam, was the third son of Adam and Eve and brother of Cain and Abel, who were the only other of their children mentioned by name in the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible).

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Shia Islam

Shia (شيعة Shīʿah, from Shīʻatu ʻAlī, "followers of Ali") is a branch of Islam which holds that the Islamic prophet Muhammad designated Ali ibn Abi Talib as his successor (Imam), most notably at the event of Ghadir Khumm.

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Sistine Chapel ceiling

The Sistine Chapel ceiling, painted by Michelangelo between 1508 and 1512, is a cornerstone work of High Renaissance art.

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Solomon's Temple

According to the Hebrew Bible, Solomon's Temple, also known as the First Temple, was the Holy Temple (בֵּית־הַמִּקְדָּשׁ: Beit HaMikdash) in ancient Jerusalem before its destruction by Nebuchadnezzar II after the Siege of Jerusalem of 587 BCE and its subsequent replacement with the Second Temple in the 6th century BCE.

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Table of prophets of Abrahamic religions

This is a table containing prophets of the modern Abrahamic religions.

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Testament of Adam

The Testament of Adam is a Christian pseudepigraphical work extant in Syriac, Arabic, Karshuni, Ethiopic, Armenian, Georgian and Greek.

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The Creation of Adam

The Creation of Adam is a fresco painting by Michelangelo, which forms part of the Sistine Chapel's ceiling, painted c. 1508–1512.

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Tree of the knowledge of good and evil

The tree of the knowledge of good and evil is one of two specific trees in the story of the Garden of Eden in Genesis 2–3, along with the tree of life.

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Y-chromosomal Adam

In human genetics, the Y-chromosomal most recent common ancestor (Y-MRCA, informally known as Y-chromosomal Adam) is the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) from whom all currently living men are descended patrilineally.

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Zohar

The Zohar (זֹהַר, lit. "Splendor" or "Radiance") is the foundational work in the literature of Jewish mystical thought known as Kabbalah.

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Redirects here:

ADAM, Adam (Bible), Adam (prophet of Islam), Adam in Early Christian Liturgy and Literature, אָדָם.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam

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