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Arthur Sullivan

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Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan MVO (13 May 1842 – 22 November 1900) was an English composer. [1]

336 relations: Ada Leverson, Adelaide Anne Procter, Ages Ago, Alexander Mackenzie (composer), Alfred Cellier, Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Alhambra Theatre, Anthem, Anvil Chorus, Arthur Jacobs, Arthur O'Leary (composer), Arthur Wing Pinero, B. C. Stephenson, Bab Ballads, Barcarolle, Basil Hood, Bass clarinet, Bassoon, Bayswater, Belshazzar's Feast (Walton), Birmingham Triennial Music Festival, Blank verse, Boy soprano, Brompton Cemetery, Brunhild, Cachucha, Camille Saint-Saëns, Cantata, Carl Reinecke, Carl Rosa, Cello Concerto (Sullivan), Chandos Records, Chapel Royal, Chappell & Co., Charles Gounod, Charles Groves, Charles Mackerras, Chelsea, London, Chester Square, Chromaticism, Clara Butt, Comic opera, Consecutive fifths, Contrabassoon, Cornet, Cox and Box, Crystal Palace School, Cultural influence of Gilbert and Sullivan, D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, ..., Daniel Auber, David Lloyd-Jones (conductor), David Russell Hulme, Diamond jubilee, Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, Dorothy (opera), Dorothy Vernon, Edison Records, Eduard Hanslick, Edward Elgar, Edward German, Edward Greenfield, Edward VII, Elijah (oratorio), Enrico Caruso, Ernest Walker (composer), Ernst Richter, F. C. Burnand, Fanny Ronalds, Felix Mendelssohn, Festival Te Deum, Frank Howes, Franz Liszt, Franz Schubert, Fred Sullivan, Frederic Clay, Frederic Richard Sullivan, Freemasonry, French horn, French Riviera, Fugue, Fun (magazine), Gaetano Donizetti, Gaiety Theatre, London, Gavotte, Geoffrey Toye, George Bernard Shaw, George Edward Gouraud, George Frideric Handel, George Grossmith, George Grove, George Thomas Smart, German Reed Entertainments, Gervase Hughes, Gilbert and Sullivan, Gilbert and Sullivan for All, Gioachino Rossini, Giuseppe Verdi, Glasgow, Glee (music), Gramophone (magazine), Gramophone Company, Grand opera, Great Fantasia and Fugue in G minor, BWV 542, H.M.S. Pinafore, Haddon Hall (opera), Henry Chorley, Henry Hart Milman, Henry Irving, Henry Lytton, Henry Pleasants (music critic), Henry Purcell, Henry VIII (play), Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Henry Wood, Herbert Sullivan, Herman Klein, Hollywood Pinafore, Hot Mikado, Hubert Parry, Hymn, Ignaz Moscheles, Il trovatore, Impresario, Incidental music, International Gilbert and Sullivan Festival, Iolanthe, Ivanhoe, Ivanhoe (opera), J. Comyns Carr, Jacques Offenbach, Jenny Lind, Johann Sebastian Bach, John Alexander Fuller Maitland, John Goss (composer), John Hollingshead, John Scott Russell, Joseph Haydn, Joseph Joachim, Julian Lloyd Webber, Julian Sturgis, Julius Rietz, Kensington, Key (music), Knight Bachelor, L'Île Enchantée, La belle Hélène, La Périchole, Lambeth, Leeds Festival (classical music), Legion of Honour, Leitmotif, Les cloches de Corneville, List of Cambridge Companions to Music, List of compositions by Arthur Sullivan, London Figaro, Los Angeles, Louis Plaidy, Louis Spohr, Ludwig van Beethoven, Lyceum Theatre, London, Macbeth, Madrigal, Malcolm Sargent, Margaret the Virgin, Memphis Bound, Mendelssohn Scholarship, Messiah (Handel), Michael Arne, Michael William Balfe, Military band, Morality play, Moritz Hauptmann, Muses, Musikdrama, Nancy McIntosh, Nearer, My God, to Thee, Neue Zeitschrift für Musik, Norfolk and Norwich Festival, Ogg, Ohio Light Opera, On Shore and Sea, One Thousand and One Nights, Onward, Christian Soldiers, Opéra comique, Opera (magazine), Opera Australia, Opera Comique, Operetta, Oratorio, Order of the Medjidie, Orpheus in the Underworld, Ottoman Empire, Overture di Ballo, Overture in C, "In Memoriam", Palace Theatre, London, Parlour music, Parody, Part song, Pastiche, Patience (opera), Pedal point, Peter Gammond, Piccolo, Pimlico, Pineapple Poll, Pirates of Penzance – The Ballet!, Pizzicato, Potpourri (music), Princess Ida, Processional hymn, Pygmalion and Galatea (play), Queen Victoria, Reed Miller, Richard Bonynge, Richard D'Oyly Carte, Richard Wagner, Rigoletto, Robert Planquette, Robert Schumann, Robert the Devil (Gilbert), Robin Wilson (mathematician), Rodney Milnes, Ronald Corp, Rosamunde, Royal Academy of Music, Royal Albert Hall, Royal Aquarium, Royal Gallery of Illustration, Royal Military College, Sandhurst, Royal Philharmonic Society, Royal Victorian Order, Royalty Theatre, Ruddigore, Rudyard Kipling, Rule, Britannia!, Rupert D'Oyly Carte, Sabine Baring-Gould, Saltarello, San Francisco Chronicle, Savoy opera, Savoy Theatre, Second Boer War, Sonata form, Song cycle, St James's Palace, St Paul's Cathedral, Stephen Hudson, Sydney Grundy, Symphony in E (Sullivan), Symphony No. 1 (Schubert), Symphony No. 2 (Schubert), Symphony No. 3 (Schubert), Symphony No. 4 (Schubert), Symphony No. 5 (Schubert), Symphony No. 6 (Schubert), Symphony No. 8 (Schubert), Synagogue, Tarantella, Te Deum Laudamus (Sullivan), The Absent-Minded Beggar, The Athenaeum (British magazine), The Beauty Stone, The Black Mikado, The Chieftain, The Contrabandista, The Crystal Palace, The Daily Telegraph, The Dream of Gerontius, The Emerald Isle, The Foresters, The Golden Legend (cantata), The Gondoliers, The Grand Duke, The Hot Mikado (1939 production), The Light of the World (Sullivan), The Long Day Closes (song), The Lost Chord, The Martyr of Antioch, The Masque at Kenilworth, The Merchant of Venice, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Mikado, The Musical Times, The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, The New York Times, The Observer, The Palace of Truth, The Pirates of Penzance, The Prodigal Son (Sullivan), The Rose of Persia, The Salvation Army, The Sapphire Necklace, The Sorcerer, The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan, The Swing Mikado, The Tempest (Sullivan), The Times, The Window (song cycle), The World (journal), The Yeomen of the Guard, The Zoo, Thespis (opera), Thomas Attwood (composer), Thomas Dunhill, Thomas Edison, Thomas German Reed, Thomas Helmore, Three Choirs Festival, Timpani, Tonic (music), Topsy-Turvy, Tower of London, Trial by Jury, Tritone, United Grand Lodge of England, United States Marine Band, University of Cambridge, University of Kansas, University of Music and Theatre Leipzig, University of Oxford, Utopia, Limited, Venice, Victor Talking Machine Company, Victoria and Merrie England, Victoria Embankment, Victorian burlesque, Vincenzo Bellini, W. S. Gilbert, Walter Scott, West End theatre, William Shakespeare, William Sterndale Bennett, William Walton, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Worcester Cathedral. Expand index (286 more) »

Ada Leverson

Ada Esther Leverson (née Beddington; 10 October 1862 – 30 August 1933) was a British writer who is known for her friendship with Oscar Wilde and for her work as a witty novelist of the fin-de-siècle.

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Adelaide Anne Procter

Adelaide Anne Procter (30 October 1825 – 2 February 1864) was an English poet and philanthropist.

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Ages Ago

Ages Ago, sometimes stylised as Ages Ago! or Ages Ago!!, is a musical entertainment with a libretto by W. S. Gilbert and music by Frederic Clay that premiered on 22 November 1869 at the Royal Gallery of Illustration.

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Alexander Mackenzie (composer)

Sir Alexander Campbell Mackenzie KCVO (22 August 184728 April 1935) was a Scottish composer, conductor and teacher best known for his oratorios, violin and piano pieces, Scottish folk music and works for the stage.

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Alfred Cellier

Alfred Cellier (1 December 184428 December 1891) was an English composer, orchestrator and conductor.

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Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Alfred (Alfred Ernest Albert; 6 August 184430 July 1900) reigned as Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha from 1893 to 1900.

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Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892) was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign and remains one of the most popular British poets.

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Alhambra Theatre

The Alhambra was a popular theatre and music hall located on the east side of Leicester Square, in the West End of London.

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Anthem

An anthem is a musical composition of celebration, usually used as a symbol for a distinct group, particularly the national anthems of countries.

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Anvil Chorus

The Anvil Chorus is the English name for the (Italian for "Gypsy chorus"), a chorus from act 2, scene 1 of Giuseppe Verdi's 1853 opera Il trovatore.

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Arthur Jacobs

Arthur David Jacobs (14 June 1922 – 13 December 1996) was an English musicologist, music critic, teacher, librettist and translator.

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Arthur O'Leary (composer)

Arthur O'Leary (15 March 1834 – 13 March 1919) was an Irish composer, pianist and teacher.

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Arthur Wing Pinero

Sir Arthur Wing Pinero (24 May 1855 – 23 November 1934) was an English actor and later an important dramatist and stage director.

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B. C. Stephenson

Benjamin Charles Stephenson or B. C. Stephenson (1839 – 22 January 1906) was an English dramatist, lyricist and librettist.

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Bab Ballads

The Bab Ballads is a collection of light verses by W. S. Gilbert, illustrated with his own comic drawings.

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Barcarolle

A barcarolle (from French, also barcarole; originally, Italian barcarola or barcaruola, from barca 'boat') is a traditional folk song sung by Venetian gondoliers, or a piece of music composed in that style.

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Basil Hood

Basil Willett Charles Hood (5 April 1864 – 7 August 1917) was a British dramatist and lyricist, perhaps best known for writing the libretti of half a dozen Savoy Operas and for his English adaptations of operettas, including The Merry Widow.

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Bass clarinet

The bass clarinet is a musical instrument of the clarinet family.

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Bassoon

The bassoon is a woodwind instrument in the double reed family that typically plays music written in the bass and tenor clefs, and occasionally the treble.

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Bayswater

Bayswater is an area within the City of Westminster and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in central London.

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Belshazzar's Feast (Walton)

Belshazzar's Feast is a cantata by the English composer William Walton.

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Birmingham Triennial Music Festival

The Birmingham Triennial Musical Festival, in Birmingham, England, founded in 1784, was the longest-running classical music festival of its kind.

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Blank verse

Blank verse is poetry written with regular metrical but unrhymed lines, almost always in iambic pentameter.

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Boy soprano

A boy soprano is a young male singer with an unchanged voice in the soprano range.

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Brompton Cemetery

Brompton Cemetery is a London cemetery in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.

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Brunhild

Brunhild, also known as Brunhilda or Brynhild (Old Norse Brynhildr, Middle High German Brünhilt, Modern German Brünhild or Brünhilde) is a powerful female figure from Germanic heroic legend.

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Cachucha

Cachucha is a Spanish solo dance in 3/4 to 3/8 time, similar to Bolero.

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Camille Saint-Saëns

Charles-Camille Saint-Saëns (9 October 183516 December 1921) was a French composer, organist, conductor and pianist of the Romantic era.

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Cantata

A cantata (literally "sung", past participle feminine singular of the Italian verb cantare, "to sing") is a vocal composition with an instrumental accompaniment, typically in several movements, often involving a choir.

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Carl Reinecke

Carl Reinecke (23 June 182410 March 1910) was a German composer, conductor, and pianist.

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Carl Rosa

Carl August Nicholas Rosa (22 March 184230 April 1889) was a German-born musical impresario best remembered for founding an English opera company known as the Carl Rosa Opera Company.

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Cello Concerto (Sullivan)

The Cello Concerto in D major is Arthur Sullivan's only concerto and was one of his earliest large-scale works.

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Chandos Records

Chandos Records is a British independent classical music recording company based in Colchester.

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Chapel Royal

In both the United Kingdom and Canada, a Chapel Royal refers not to a building but to a distinct body of priests and singers who explicitly serve the spiritual needs of the sovereign.

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Chappell & Co.

Chappell & Co. was an English company that published music and manufactured pianos.

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Charles Gounod

Charles-François Gounod (17 June 181817 or 18 October 1893) was a French composer, best known for his Ave Maria, based on a work by Bach, as well as his opera Faust.

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Charles Groves

Sir Charles Barnard Groves CBE (10 March 191520 June 1992) was an English conductor.

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Charles Mackerras

Sir Alan Charles Maclaurin Mackerras (1925 2010) was an Australian conductor.

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Chelsea, London

Chelsea is an affluent area of South West London, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

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Chester Square

Chester Square is a small residential garden square located in London's Belgravia district.

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Chromaticism

Chromaticism is a compositional technique interspersing the primary diatonic pitches and chords with other pitches of the chromatic scale.

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Clara Butt

Dame Clara Ellen Butt, DBE (1 February 1872 – 23 January 1936) was an English contralto.

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Comic opera

Comic opera denotes a sung dramatic work of a light or comic nature, usually with a happy ending.

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Consecutive fifths

In music, consecutive fifths, or parallel fifths, are progressions in which the interval of a perfect fifth is followed by a different perfect fifth between the same two musical parts (or voices): for example, from C to D in one part along with G to A in a higher part.

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Contrabassoon

The contrabassoon, also known as the double bassoon, is a larger version of the bassoon, sounding an octave lower.

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Cornet

The cornet is a brass instrument similar to the trumpet but distinguished from it by its conical bore, more compact shape, and mellower tone quality.

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Cox and Box

Cox and Box; or, The Long-Lost Brothers, is a one-act comic opera with a libretto by F. C. Burnand and music by Arthur Sullivan, based on the 1847 farce Box and Cox by John Maddison Morton.

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Crystal Palace School

Crystal Palace School of Art, Science, and Literature, which opened in 1854, was set up by the Crystal Palace Company as a new enterprise to occupy part of its buildings when it re-erected the Crystal Palace in suburban Sydenham in 1853.

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Cultural influence of Gilbert and Sullivan

For nearly 150 years, Gilbert and Sullivan have pervasively influenced popular culture in the English-speaking world.

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D'Oyly Carte Opera Company

The D'Oyly Carte Opera Company is a professional light opera company that staged Gilbert and Sullivan's Savoy operas nearly year-round in the UK and sometimes toured in Europe, North America and elsewhere, from the 1870s until 1982.

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Daniel Auber

Daniel François Esprit Auber (29 January 178212/13 May 1871) was a French composer.

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David Lloyd-Jones (conductor)

David Matthias Lloyd-Jones (born 19 November 1934) is a British conductor who has specialised in British and Russian music.

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David Russell Hulme

David Russell Hulme (born 19 June 1951) is a Welsh conductor and musicologist.

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Diamond jubilee

A diamond jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 60th anniversary of an event related to a person (e.g. accession to the throne, wedding, etc.). In the case of an event not relating to a person (e.g. the founding of an organization), a diamond jubilee is observed at the 75th anniversary.

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Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg

("The Master-Singers of Nuremberg") is a music drama (or opera) in three acts, written and composed by Richard Wagner.

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Dorothy (opera)

Dorothy is a comic opera in three acts with music by Alfred Cellier and a libretto by B. C. Stephenson.

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Dorothy Vernon

Dorothy Vernon (1544 – 24 June 1584), the younger daughter of Sir George Vernon, was the heiress of Haddon Hall, an English country house in Derbyshire with its origins in the 12th century.

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Edison Records

Edison Records was one of the earliest record labels which pioneered sound recording and reproduction and was an important player in the early recording industry.

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Eduard Hanslick

Eduard Hanslick (11 September 18256 August 1904) was a German Bohemian music critic.

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Edward Elgar

Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English composer, many of whose works have entered the British and international classical concert repertoire.

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Edward German

Sir Edward German (17 February 1862 – 11 November 1936) was an English musician and composer of Welsh descent, best remembered for his extensive output of incidental music for the stage and as a successor to Arthur Sullivan in the field of English comic opera.

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Edward Greenfield

Edward Harry Greenfield OBE (3 July 1928 – 1 July 2015) was an English music critic and broadcaster.

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Edward VII

Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910.

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Elijah (oratorio)

Elijah (Elias), Op. 70, MWV A 25, is an oratorio written by Felix Mendelssohn.

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Enrico Caruso

Enrico Caruso (25 February 1873 – 2 August 1921) was an Italian operatic tenor.

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Ernest Walker (composer)

Ernest Walker (15 July 187021 February 1949) was an Indian-born English composer, pianist, organist, teacher and writer on music.

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Ernst Richter

Ernst Friedrich Eduard Richter (24 October 1808 – 9 April 1879), was a German musical theorist, born at Großschönau, Saxony.

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F. C. Burnand

Sir Francis Cowley Burnand (29 November 1836 – 21 April 1917), usually known as F. C. Burnand, was an English comic writer and prolific playwright, best known today as the librettist of Arthur Sullivan's opera Cox and Box.

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Fanny Ronalds

Mary Frances "Fanny" Ronalds (August 23, 1839 – July 28, 1916) was an American socialite and amateur singer who is best known for her long affair with the composer Arthur Sullivan in London in the last decades of the nineteenth century.

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Felix Mendelssohn

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (3 February 1809 4 November 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period.

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Festival Te Deum

The Festival Te Deum is the popular name for an 1872 composition by Arthur Sullivan, written to celebrate the recovery of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII of the United Kingdom) from typhoid fever.

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Frank Howes

Frank Stewart Howes (2 April 1891 – 28 September 1974) was an English music critic.

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Franz Liszt

Franz Liszt (Liszt Ferencz, in modern usage Liszt Ferenc;Liszt's Hungarian passport spelt his given name as "Ferencz". An orthographic reform of the Hungarian language in 1922 (which was 36 years after Liszt's death) changed the letter "cz" to simply "c" in all words except surnames; this has led to Liszt's given name being rendered in modern Hungarian usage as "Ferenc". From 1859 to 1867 he was officially Franz Ritter von Liszt; he was created a Ritter (knight) by Emperor Francis Joseph I in 1859, but never used this title of nobility in public. The title was necessary to marry the Princess Carolyne zu Sayn-Wittgenstein without her losing her privileges, but after the marriage fell through, Liszt transferred the title to his uncle Eduard in 1867. Eduard's son was Franz von Liszt. 22 October 181131 July 1886) was a prolific 19th-century Hungarian composer, virtuoso pianist, conductor, music teacher, arranger, organist, philanthropist, author, nationalist and a Franciscan tertiary during the Romantic era.

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Franz Schubert

Franz Peter Schubert (31 January 179719 November 1828) was an Austrian composer of the late Classical and early Romantic eras.

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Fred Sullivan

Frederic Sullivan (–) was an English actor and singer.

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Frederic Clay

Frederic Emes Clay (3 August 1838 – 24 November 1889) was an English composer known principally for his music written for the stage.

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Frederic Richard Sullivan

Frederic Richard "Dickie" Sullivan (sometimes credited as "Frederick"; 18 July 1872 – 24 July 1937), was an English-born American film director and actor of the silent era.

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Freemasonry

Freemasonry or Masonry consists of fraternal organisations that trace their origins to the local fraternities of stonemasons, which from the end of the fourteenth century regulated the qualifications of stonemasons and their interaction with authorities and clients.

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French horn

The French horn (since the 1930s known simply as the "horn" in some professional music circles) is a brass instrument made of tubing wrapped into a coil with a flared bell.

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French Riviera

The French Riviera (known in French as the Côte d'Azur,; Còsta d'Azur; literal translation "Coast of Azure") is the Mediterranean coastline of the southeast corner of France.

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Fugue

In music, a fugue is a contrapuntal compositional technique in two or more voices, built on a subject (a musical theme) that is introduced at the beginning in imitation (repetition at different pitches) and which recurs frequently in the course of the composition.

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Fun (magazine)

Fun was a Victorian weekly magazine, first published on 21 September 1861.

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Gaetano Donizetti

Domenico Gaetano Maria Donizetti (29 November 1797 – 8 April 1848) was an Italian composer.

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Gaiety Theatre, London

The Gaiety Theatre was a West End theatre in London, located on Aldwych at the eastern end of the Strand.

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Gavotte

The gavotte (also gavot, gavote, or gavotta) is a French dance, taking its name from a folk dance of the Gavot, the people of the Pays de Gap region of Dauphiné in the southeast of France, where the dance originated according to one source.

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Geoffrey Toye

Edward Geoffrey Toye (17 February 1889 – 11 June 1942), known as Geoffrey Toye, was an English conductor, composer and opera producer.

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George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856 – 2 November 1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist, and political activist.

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George Edward Gouraud

George Edward Gouraud (30 June 1842 – 20 February 1912) was an American Civil War recipient of the Medal of Honor who later became famous for introducing the new Edison Phonograph cylinder audio recording technology to England in 1888.

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George Frideric Handel

George Frideric (or Frederick) Handel (born italic; 23 February 1685 (O.S.) – 14 April 1759) was a German, later British, Baroque composer who spent the bulk of his career in London, becoming well-known for his operas, oratorios, anthems, and organ concertos.

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George Grossmith

George Grossmith (9 December 1847 – 1 March 1912) was an English comedian, writer, composer, actor, and singer.

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George Grove

Sir George Grove, CB (13 August 1820 – 28 May 1900) was an English writer on music, known as the founding editor of Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians.

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George Thomas Smart

Sir George Thomas Smart (10 May 1776 – 23 February 1867) was an English musician.

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German Reed Entertainments

The German Reed Entertainments were founded in 1855 and operated by Thomas German Reed (1817–1888) together with his wife, Priscilla German Reed (née Horton) (1818–1895).

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Gervase Hughes

Gervase Alfred Booth Hughes (1 September 1905 – July 1984) was an English composer, conductor and writer on music.

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Gilbert and Sullivan

Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian-era theatrical partnership of the dramatist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and the composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900) and to the works they jointly created.

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Gilbert and Sullivan for All

Gilbert and Sullivan for All was a touring concert and opera company, formed in 1963 by D'Oyly Carte Opera Company performers Thomas Round and Donald Adams and former director Norman Meadmore, and which exclusively performed the works of Gilbert and Sullivan, usually in concert, but sometimes giving full productions.

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Gioachino Rossini

Gioachino Antonio Rossini (29 February 1792 – 13 November 1868) was an Italian composer who wrote 39 operas as well as some sacred music, songs, chamber music, and piano pieces.

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Giuseppe Verdi

Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (9 or 10 October 1813 – 27 January 1901) was an Italian opera composer.

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Glasgow

Glasgow (Glesga; Glaschu) is the largest city in Scotland, and third most populous in the United Kingdom.

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Glee (music)

A glee is an English type of part song spanning the late baroque, classical and early romantic periods.

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Gramophone (magazine)

Gramophone is a magazine published monthly in London devoted to classical music, particularly to reviews of recordings.

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Gramophone Company

The Gramophone Company, based in the United Kingdom and founded on behalf of Emil Berliner, was one of the early recording companies, the parent organisation for the His Master's Voice (HMV) label, and the European affiliate of the American Victor Talking Machine Company.

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Grand opera

Grand opera is a genre of 19th-century opera generally in four or five acts, characterized by large-scale casts and orchestras, and (in their original productions) lavish and spectacular design and stage effects, normally with plots based on or around dramatic historic events.

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Great Fantasia and Fugue in G minor, BWV 542

The Great Fantasia and Fugue in G minor, BWV 542, is an organ prelude and fugue by Johann Sebastian Bach.

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H.M.S. Pinafore

H.M.S. Pinafore; or, The Lass That Loved a Sailor is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and a libretto by W. S. Gilbert.

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Haddon Hall (opera)

Haddon Hall is an English light opera with music by Arthur Sullivan and a libretto by Sydney Grundy.

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Henry Chorley

Henry Fothergill Chorley (15 December 1808 – 16 February 1872) was an English literary, art and music critic, writer and editor.

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Henry Hart Milman

Henry Hart Milman (10 February 1791 – 24 September 1868) was an English historian and ecclesiastic.

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Henry Irving

Sir Henry Irving (6 February 1838 – 13 October 1905), born John Henry Brodribb, sometimes known as J. H. Irving, was an English stage actor in the Victorian era, known as an actor-manager because he took complete responsibility (supervision of sets, lighting, direction, casting, as well as playing the leading roles) for season after season at the Lyceum Theatre, establishing himself and his company as representative of English classical theatre.

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Henry Lytton

Sir Henry Lytton (3 January 1865 – 15 August 1936) was an English actor and singer who was the leading exponent of the comic patter-baritone roles in Gilbert and Sullivan operas in the early part of the twentieth century.

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Henry Pleasants (music critic)

Henry Pleasants (May 12, 1910 – January 4, 2000) was an American music critic and intelligence officer.

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Henry Purcell

Henry Purcell (or; c. 10 September 1659According to Holman and Thompson (Grove Music Online, see References) there is uncertainty regarding the year and day of birth. No record of baptism has been found. The year 1659 is based on Purcell's memorial tablet in Westminster Abbey and the frontispiece of his Sonnata's of III. Parts (London, 1683). The day 10 September is based on vague inscriptions in the manuscript GB-Cfm 88. It may also be relevant that he was appointed to his first salaried post on 10 September 1677, which would have been his eighteenth birthday. – 21 November 1695) was an English composer.

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Henry VIII (play)

Henry VIII is a collaborative history play, written by William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, based on the life of King Henry VIII of England.

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet and educator whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline.

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Henry Wood

Sir Henry Joseph Wood (3 March 186919 August 1944) was an English conductor best known for his association with London's annual series of promenade concerts, known as the Proms.

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Herbert Sullivan

Herbert ('Bertie') Thomas Sullivan (13 May 1868 – 26 November 1928) was the nephew, heir and biographer of the British composer Arthur Sullivan.

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Herman Klein

Herman Klein (born Hermann Klein; 23 July 1856 – 10 March 1934) was an English music critic, author and teacher of singing.

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Hollywood Pinafore

Hollywood Pinafore, or The Lad Who Loved a Salary is a musical comedy in two acts by George S. Kaufman, with music by Arthur Sullivan, based on Gilbert and Sullivan's H.M.S. Pinafore.

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Hot Mikado

Hot Mikado is a musical comedy, based on Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado, adapted by David H. Bell (book and lyrics) and Rob Bowman (orchestrations and arrangements).

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Hubert Parry

Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry, 1st Baronet (27 February 18487 October 1918) was an English composer, teacher and historian of music.

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Hymn

A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to a prominent figure or personification.

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Ignaz Moscheles

(Isaac) Ignaz Moscheles (23 May 1794 – 10 March 1870) was a Bohemian composer and piano virtuoso, whose career after his early years was based initially in London, and later at Leipzig, where he joined his friend and sometime pupil Felix Mendelssohn as Professor of Piano at the Conservatoire.

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Il trovatore

(Italian for "The Troubadour") is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto largely written by Salvadore Cammarano, based on the play El trovador (1836) by Antonio García Gutiérrez.

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Impresario

An impresario (from the Italian impresa, "an enterprise or undertaking") is a person who organizes and often finances concerts, plays, or operas, performing a role similar to that of an artist manager or a film or television producer.

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Incidental music

Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program, video game, film, or some other presentation form that is not primarily musical.

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International Gilbert and Sullivan Festival

The International Gilbert and Sullivan Festival was founded in 1994 by Ian Smith and his son Neil and is held every summer in England.

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Iolanthe

Iolanthe; or, The Peer and the Peri is a comic opera with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert.

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Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe is an historical novel by Sir Walter Scott, first published in 1820 in three volumes and subtitled A Romance.

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Ivanhoe (opera)

Ivanhoe is a romantic opera in three acts based on the novel by Sir Walter Scott, with music by Sir Arthur Sullivan and a libretto by Julian Sturgis.

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J. Comyns Carr

Joseph William Comyns Carr (1 March 1849 – 12 December 1916) was an English drama and art critic, gallery director, author, poet, playwright and theatre manager.

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Jacques Offenbach

Jacques Offenbach (20 June 1819 – 5 October 1880) was a German-born French composer, cellist and impresario of the romantic period.

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Jenny Lind

Johanna Maria "Jenny" Lind (6 October 18202 November 1887) was a Swedish opera singer, often known as the "Swedish Nightingale".

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Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach (28 July 1750) was a composer and musician of the Baroque period, born in the Duchy of Saxe-Eisenach.

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John Alexander Fuller Maitland

John Alexander Fuller Maitland (7 April 1856 – 30 March 1936) was an influential British music critic and scholar from the 1880s to the 1920s.

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John Goss (composer)

Sir John Goss (27 December 1800 – 10 May 1880) was an English organist, composer and teacher.

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John Hollingshead

John Hollingshead (9 September 1827 – 9 October 1904) was an English theatrical impresario, journalist and writer during the latter half of the 19th century.

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John Scott Russell

John Scott Russell FRSE FRS (9 May 1808, Parkhead, Glasgow – 8 June 1882, Ventnor, Isle of Wight) was a Scottish civil engineer, naval architect and shipbuilder who built the Great Eastern in collaboration with Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

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Joseph Haydn

(Franz) Joseph HaydnSee Haydn's name.

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Joseph Joachim

Joseph Joachim (Joachim József, 28 June 1831 – 15 August 1907) was a Hungarian violinist, conductor, composer and teacher.

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Julian Lloyd Webber

Julian Lloyd Webber (born 14 April 1951) is a British cellist, conductor and the principal of the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire.

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Julian Sturgis

Julian Russell Sturgis (21 October 1848 – 13 April 1904) was a novelist, poet, librettist and lyricist.

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Julius Rietz

August Wilhelm Julius Rietz (28 December 1812 in Berlin – 12 September 1877 in Dresden) was a German composer, conductor and cellist.

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Kensington

Kensington is a district in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, West London, England.

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Key (music)

In music theory, the key of a piece is the group of pitches, or scale, that forms the basis of a music composition in classical, Western art, and Western pop music.

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Knight Bachelor

The dignity of Knight Bachelor is the most basic and lowest rank of a man who has been knighted by the monarch but not as a member of one of the organised orders of chivalry; it is a part of the British honours system.

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L'Île Enchantée

L'Île Enchantée (literally, The Enchanted Island) is an 1864 ballet by Arthur Sullivan written as a divertissement at the end of Vincenzo Bellini's La Sonnambula at Covent Garden.

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La belle Hélène

La belle Hélène (The Beautiful Helen), is an opéra bouffe in three acts by Jacques Offenbach to an original French libretto by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy.

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La Périchole

La Périchole is an opéra bouffe in three acts by Jacques Offenbach.

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Lambeth

Lambeth is a district in Central London, England, in the London Borough of Lambeth.

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Leeds Festival (classical music)

The Leeds Festival, officially known as the Leeds Triennial Musical Festival, was a classical music festival which took place between 1858 and 1985 in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England.

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Legion of Honour

The Legion of Honour, with its full name National Order of the Legion of Honour (Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur), is the highest French order of merit for military and civil merits, established in 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte and retained by all the divergent governments and regimes later holding power in France, up to the present.

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Leitmotif

A leitmotif or leitmotiv is a "short, constantly recurring musical phrase"Kennedy (1987), Leitmotiv associated with a particular person, place, or idea.

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Les cloches de Corneville

Les cloches de Corneville (known in English as The Chimes of Normandy or The Bells of Corneville) is an opera-comique in three acts, composed by Robert Planquette to a French libretto by Louis Clairville and Charles Gabet based on a play by Gabet.

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List of Cambridge Companions to Music

The Cambridge Companions to Music form a book series published by Cambridge University Press.

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List of compositions by Arthur Sullivan

The following is a list of musical works by the English composer Arthur Sullivan, best known for his operatic collaborations with W. S. Gilbert.

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London Figaro

The London Figaro was a London periodical devoted to politics, literature, art, criticism and satire during the Victorian era.

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Los Angeles

Los Angeles (Spanish for "The Angels";; officially: the City of Los Angeles; colloquially: by its initials L.A.) is the second-most populous city in the United States, after New York City.

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Louis Plaidy

Louis Plaidy (28 November 1810 in Hubertusburg, Saxony3 March 1874 in Grimma, Saxony) was a celebrated German piano pedagogue and compiler of books of technical music studies.

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Louis Spohr

Louis Spohr (5 April 178422 October 1859), baptized Ludewig Spohr, later often in the modern German form of the name Ludwig, was a German composer, violinist and conductor.

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Ludwig van Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven (baptised 17 December 1770Beethoven was baptised on 17 December. His date of birth was often given as 16 December and his family and associates celebrated his birthday on that date, and most scholars accept that he was born on 16 December; however there is no documentary record of his birth.26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist.

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Lyceum Theatre, London

The Lyceum Theatre (pronounced ly-CEE-um) is a 2,100-seat West End theatre located in the City of Westminster, on Wellington Street, just off the Strand.

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Macbeth

Macbeth (full title The Tragedy of Macbeth) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare; it is thought to have been first performed in 1606.

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Madrigal

A madrigal is a secular vocal music composition of the Renaissance and early Baroque eras.

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Malcolm Sargent

Sir Harold Malcolm Watts Sargent (29 April 1895 – 3 October 1967) was an English conductor, organist and composer widely regarded as Britain's leading conductor of choral works.

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Margaret the Virgin

Margaret, known as Margaret of Antioch in the West, and as (Ἁγία Μαρίνα) in the East, is celebrated as a saint on July 20 in the Western Rite Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Anglican Churches, on July 17 (Julian calendar) by the Eastern-Rite Orthodox Church and on Epip 23 and Hathor 23 in the Coptic Churchs.

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Memphis Bound

Memphis Bound (usually styled Memphis Bound!) is a 1945 American musical based on the Gilbert and Sullivan opera H.M.S. Pinafore.

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Mendelssohn Scholarship

The Mendelssohn Scholarship (Mendelssohn-Stipendium) refers to two scholarships awarded in Germany and in the United Kingdom.

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Messiah (Handel)

Messiah (HWV 56) is an English-language oratorio composed in 1741 by George Frideric Handel, with a scriptural text compiled by Charles Jennens from the King James Bible, and from the version of the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer.

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Michael Arne

Michael Arne (c.171014 January 1786) was an English composer, harpsichordist, organist, singer, and actor.

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Michael William Balfe

Michael William Balfe (15 May 1808 – 20 October 1870) was an Irish composer, best-remembered for his opera The Bohemian Girl.

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Military band

A military band is a group of personnel that performs musical duties for military functions, usually for the armed forces.

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Morality play

The morality play is a genre of Medieval and early Tudor theatrical entertainment.

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Moritz Hauptmann

Moritz Hauptmann (13 October 1792 – 3 January 1868), was a German music theorist, teacher and composer.

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Muses

The Muses (/ˈmjuːzɪz/; Ancient Greek: Μοῦσαι, Moũsai) are the inspirational goddesses of literature, science, and the arts in Greek mythology.

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Musikdrama

is a German word that means a unity of prose and music.

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Nancy McIntosh

Nancy McIntosh (1866 – February 20, 1954) was an American-born singer and actress who performed mostly on the London stage.

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Nearer, My God, to Thee

"Nearer, My God, to Thee" is a 19th-century Christian hymn by Sarah Flower Adams, which retells the story of Jacob's dream.

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Neue Zeitschrift für Musik

Die Neue Zeitschrift für Musik (New Journal of Music) is a music magazine, co-founded in Leipzig by Robert Schumann, his teacher and future father-in law Friedrich Wieck, and his close friend Ludwig Schuncke.

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Norfolk and Norwich Festival

Norfolk & Norwich Festival is an arts festival held annually in Norwich, England.

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Ogg

Ogg is a free, open container format maintained by the Xiph.Org Foundation.

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Ohio Light Opera

The Ohio Light Opera is a professional opera company based in Wooster, Ohio that performs the light opera repertory, including Gilbert and Sullivan, American, British and continental operettas, and other musical theatre works, especially of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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On Shore and Sea

On Shore and Sea is a "dramatic cantata" composed by Arthur Sullivan, with words by Tom Taylor.

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One Thousand and One Nights

One Thousand and One Nights (ʾAlf layla wa-layla) is a collection of Middle Eastern folk tales compiled in Arabic during the Islamic Golden Age.

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Onward, Christian Soldiers

"Onward, Christian Soldiers" is a 19th-century English hymn.

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Opéra comique

Opéra comique (plural: opéras comiques) is a genre of French opera that contains spoken dialogue and arias.

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Opera (magazine)

Opera is a monthly British magazine devoted to covering all things related to opera.

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Opera Australia

Opera Australia is the principal opera company in Australia.

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Opera Comique

The Opera Comique was a 19th-century theatre constructed in Westminster, London, between Wych Street and Holywell Street with entrances on the East Strand.

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Operetta

Operetta is a genre of light opera, light in terms both of music and subject matter.

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Oratorio

An oratorio is a large musical composition for orchestra, choir, and soloists.

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Order of the Medjidie

Medjidie or Mejidie (Mecidiye Nişanı, August 29, 1852 – 1922) is the name of a military and knightly order of the Ottoman Empire.

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Orpheus in the Underworld

Orphée aux enfers, whose title translates from the French as Orpheus in the Underworld, is an opéra bouffe (a form of operetta), or opéra féerie in its revised version.

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Ottoman Empire

The Ottoman Empire (دولت عليه عثمانیه,, literally The Exalted Ottoman State; Modern Turkish: Osmanlı İmparatorluğu or Osmanlı Devleti), also historically known in Western Europe as the Turkish Empire"The Ottoman Empire-also known in Europe as the Turkish Empire" or simply Turkey, was a state that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries.

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Overture di Ballo

The Overture di Ballo is a concert overture by Arthur Sullivan.

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Overture in C, "In Memoriam"

The Overture in C, "In Memoriam", by Arthur Sullivan, premiered on 30 October 1866 at the Norwich Festival, in honour of his father, who died just before composition began.

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Palace Theatre, London

The Palace Theatre is a West End theatre in the City of Westminster in London.

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Parlour music

Parlour music is a type of popular music which, as the name suggests, is intended to be performed in the parlours of middle-class homes by amateur singers and pianists.

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Parody

A parody (also called a spoof, send-up, take-off, lampoon, play on something, caricature, or joke) is a work created to imitate, make fun of, or comment on an original work—its subject, author, style, or some other target—by means of satiric or ironic imitation.

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Part song

A part song, or part-song or partsong, is a form of choral music that consists of a secular song having been written or arranged for several vocal parts, commonly SATB choir but sometimes for an all-male or all-female ensemble.

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Pastiche

A pastiche is a work of visual art, literature, theatre, or music that imitates the style or character of the work of one or more other artists.

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Patience (opera)

Patience; or, Bunthorne's Bride, is a comic opera in two acts with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert.

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Pedal point

In music, a pedal point (also pedal tone, pedal note, organ point, or pedal) is a sustained tone, typically in the bass, during which at least one foreign, i.e., dissonant harmony is sounded in the other parts.

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Peter Gammond

Peter Gammond (born 30 September 1925) is a British music critic, writer, journalist, musician, poet, and artist.

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Piccolo

The piccolo (Italian for "small", but named ottavino in Italy) is a half-size flute, and a member of the woodwind family of musical instruments.

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Pimlico

Pimlico is a small area within central London in the City of Westminster.

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Pineapple Poll

Pineapple Poll is a Gilbert and Sullivan-inspired comic ballet, created by choreographer John Cranko with arranger Sir Charles Mackerras.

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Pirates of Penzance – The Ballet!

Pirates of Penzance – The Ballet! is a comic ballet adapted from Gilbert and Sullivan's Savoy Opera The Pirates of Penzance.

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Pizzicato

Pizzicato (pizzicato, translated as pinched, and sometimes roughly as plucked) is a playing technique that involves plucking the strings of a string instrument.

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Potpourri (music)

Potpourri or Pot-Pourri (French, literally "putrid pot") is a kind of musical form structured as ABCDEF..., the same as medley or, sometimes, fantasia.

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Princess Ida

Princess Ida; or, Castle Adamant is a comic opera with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert.

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Processional hymn

A processional hymn is a chant, hymn or other music sung during the Procession, usually at the start of a Christian service, although occasionally during the service itself.

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Pygmalion and Galatea (play)

Pygmalion and Galatea, an Original Mythological Comedy is a blank verse play by W. S. Gilbert in three acts based on the Pygmalion story.

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Queen Victoria

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death.

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Reed Miller

James Reed Miller (February 29, 1880 – December 29, 1923), who recorded as Reed Miller and as James Reed, was an American tenor who had an active career as a concert and oratorio singer during the first quarter of the 20th century.

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Richard Bonynge

Richard Alan Bonynge (born 29 September 1930) is an Australian conductor and pianist.

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Richard D'Oyly Carte

Richard D'Oyly Carte (3 May 1844 – 3 April 1901) was an English talent agent, theatrical impresario, composer and hotelier during the latter half of the Victorian era.

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Richard Wagner

Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 181313 February 1883) was a German composer, theatre director, polemicist, and conductor who is chiefly known for his operas (or, as some of his later works were later known, "music dramas").

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Rigoletto

Rigoletto is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi.

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Robert Planquette

Jean Robert Planquette (31 July 1848 – 28 January 1903) was a French composer of songs and operettas.

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Robert Schumann

Robert Schumann (8 June 181029 July 1856) was a German composer and an influential music critic.

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Robert the Devil (Gilbert)

Robert the Devil, or The Nun, the Dun, and the Son of a Gun is an operatic parody by W. S. Gilbert of Giacomo Meyerbeer's grand opera Robert le diable, which was named after, but bears little resemblance to, the medieval French legend of the same name.

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Robin Wilson (mathematician)

Robin James Wilson (born 5 December 1943) is an emeritus professor in the Department of Mathematics at the Open University, having previously been Head of the Pure Mathematics Department and Dean of the Faculty.

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Rodney Milnes

Rodney Milnes Blumer OBE (26 July 1936 – 5 December 2015) was an English music critic, musicologist, writer, translator and broadcaster, with a particular interest in opera.

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Ronald Corp

Ronald Geoffrey Corp, (born 4 January 1951) is a composer, conductor and Church of England priest.

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Rosamunde

Rosamunde, Fürstin von Zypern (Rosamunde, Princess of Cyprus) is a play by Helmina von Chézy, which is primarily remembered for the incidental music which Franz Schubert composed for it.

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Royal Academy of Music

The Royal Academy of Music in London, England, is the oldest conservatoire in the UK, founded in 1822 by John Fane and Nicolas Bochsa.

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Royal Albert Hall

The Royal Albert Hall is a concert hall on the northern edge of South Kensington, London, which has held the Proms concerts annually each summer since 1941.

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Royal Aquarium

The Royal Aquarium and Winter Garden was a place of amusement in Westminster, London, opened in 1876.

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Royal Gallery of Illustration

The Royal Gallery of Illustration was a performance venue located at 14 Regent Street near Waterloo Place in London, in what had been the home of John Nash, designer of Regent Street, Regent's Park, and other urban improvements undertaken at the commission of George IV.

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Royal Military College, Sandhurst

The Royal Military College (RMC), founded in 1801 and established in 1802 at Great Marlow and High Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England, but moved in October 1812 to Sandhurst, Berkshire, was a British Army military academy for training infantry and cavalry officers of the British and Indian Armies.

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Royal Philharmonic Society

The Royal Philharmonic Society is a British music society, formed in 1813.

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Royal Victorian Order

The Royal Victorian Order (Ordre royal de Victoria) is a dynastic order of knighthood established in 1896 by Queen Victoria.

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Royalty Theatre

The Royalty Theatre was a small London theatre situated at 73 Dean Street, Soho, which opened in 1840 as Miss Kelly's Theatre and Dramatic School and finally closed to the public in 1938.

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Ruddigore

Ruddigore; or, The Witch's Curse, originally called Ruddygore, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert.

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Rudyard Kipling

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936)The Times, (London) 18 January 1936, p. 12 was an English journalist, short-story writer, poet, and novelist.

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Rule, Britannia!

"Rule, Britannia!" is a British patriotic song, originating from the poem "Rule, Britannia" by James Thomson and set to music by Thomas Arne in 1740.

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Rupert D'Oyly Carte

Rupert D'Oyly Carte (3 November 1876 – 12 September 1948) was an English hotelier, theatre owner and impresario, best known as proprietor of the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company and Savoy Hotel from 1913 to 1948.

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Sabine Baring-Gould

The Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould (28 January 1834 – 2 January 1924) of Lew Trenchard in Devon, England, was an Anglican priest, hagiographer, antiquarian, novelist, folk song collector and eclectic scholar.

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Saltarello

The saltarello is a musical dance form originally from Italy.

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San Francisco Chronicle

The San Francisco Chronicle is a newspaper serving primarily the San Francisco Bay Area of the U.S. state of California.

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Savoy opera

Savoy opera was a style of comic opera that developed in Victorian England in the late 19th century, with W. S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan as the original and most successful practitioners.

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Savoy Theatre

The Savoy Theatre is a West End theatre in the Strand in the City of Westminster, London, England.

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Second Boer War

The Second Boer War (11 October 1899 – 31 May 1902) was fought between the British Empire and two Boer states, the South African Republic (Republic of Transvaal) and the Orange Free State, over the Empire's influence in South Africa.

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Sonata form

Sonata form (also sonata-allegro form or first movement form) is a musical structure consisting of three main sections: an exposition, a development, and a recapitulation.

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Song cycle

A song cycle (Liederkreis or Liederzyklus) is a group, or cycle, of individually complete songs designed to be performed in a sequence as a unit.

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St James's Palace

St James's Palace is the most senior royal palace in the United Kingdom.

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St Paul's Cathedral

St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London.

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Stephen Hudson

Stephen Hudson (1868 – 29 October 1944) is a pseudonym of the British novelist and translator Sydney Schiff, whose work was published in the 1910s, 1920s, and 1930s.

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Sydney Grundy

Sydney Grundy (23 March 1848 – 4 July 1914) was an English dramatist.

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Symphony in E (Sullivan)

The Symphony in E, first performed on March 10, 1866, was the only symphony composed by Arthur Sullivan.

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Symphony No. 1 (Schubert)

The Symphony No.

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Symphony No. 2 (Schubert)

The Symphony No.

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Symphony No. 3 (Schubert)

Franz Schubert's Symphony No.

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Symphony No. 4 (Schubert)

Franz Schubert's Symphony No.

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Symphony No. 5 (Schubert)

Franz Schubert's Symphony No.

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Symphony No. 6 (Schubert)

The Symphony No.

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Symphony No. 8 (Schubert)

Franz Schubert's Symphony No.

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Synagogue

A synagogue, also spelled synagog (pronounced; from Greek συναγωγή,, 'assembly', בית כנסת, 'house of assembly' or, "house of prayer", Yiddish: שול shul, Ladino: אסנוגה or קהל), is a Jewish house of prayer.

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Tarantella

Tarantella is a group of various folk dances characterized by a fast upbeat tempo, usually in 8 time (sometimes or), accompanied by tambourines.

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Te Deum Laudamus (Sullivan)

Arthur Sullivan's Te Deum Laudamus—A Thanksgiving for Victory, usually known as the Boer War Te Deum, is a choral work composed by Sullivan in the last few months of his life.

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The Absent-Minded Beggar

"The Absent-Minded Beggar" is an 1899 poem by Rudyard Kipling, set to music by Sir Arthur Sullivan and often accompanied by an illustration of a wounded but defiant British soldier, "A Gentleman in Kharki", by Richard Caton Woodville.

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The Athenaeum (British magazine)

The Athenaeum was a literary magazine published in London, England from 1828 to 1921.

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The Beauty Stone

The Beauty Stone is an opera, billed as a "romantic musical drama" in three acts, composed by Arthur Sullivan to a libretto by Arthur Wing Pinero and J. Comyns Carr.

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The Black Mikado

The Black Mikado is a musical comedy, based on Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado, adapted by Janos Bajtala, George Larnyoh and Eddie Quansah from W. S. Gilbert's original 1885 libretto and Arthur Sullivan's score.

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The Chieftain

The Chieftain is a two-act comic opera by Arthur Sullivan and F. C. Burnand based on their 1867 opera, The Contrabandista.

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The Contrabandista

The Contrabandista, or The Law of the Ladrones, is a two-act comic opera by Arthur Sullivan and F. C. Burnand.

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The Crystal Palace

The Crystal Palace was a cast-iron and plate-glass structure originally built in Hyde Park, London, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851.

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The Daily Telegraph

The Daily Telegraph, commonly referred to simply as The Telegraph, is a national British daily broadsheet newspaper published in London by Telegraph Media Group and distributed across the United Kingdom and internationally.

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The Dream of Gerontius

The Dream of Gerontius, Op.

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The Emerald Isle

The Emerald Isle; or, The Caves of Carrig-Cleena, is a two-act comic opera, with music by Arthur Sullivan and Edward German, and a libretto by Basil Hood.

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The Foresters

The Foresters or, Robin Hood and Maid Marian is a play written by Alfred Tennyson and first produced with success in New York in 1892.

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The Golden Legend (cantata)

The Golden Legend is a cantata by Arthur Sullivan with libretto by Joseph Bennett, based on the 1851 poem of the same name by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

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The Gondoliers

The Gondoliers; or, The King of Barataria is a Savoy Opera, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert.

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The Grand Duke

The Grand Duke; or, The Statutory Duel, is the final Savoy Opera written by librettist W. S. Gilbert and composer Arthur Sullivan, their fourteenth and last opera together.

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The Hot Mikado (1939 production)

The Hot Mikado was a musical theatre adaptation of Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado with an African-American cast.

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The Light of the World (Sullivan)

The Light of the World is an oratorio composed in 1873 by Arthur Sullivan.

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The Long Day Closes (song)

The Long Day Closes is a part song by Henry Fothergill Chorley and Arthur Sullivan published in 1868.

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The Lost Chord

"The Lost Chord" is a song composed by Arthur Sullivan in 1877 at the bedside of his brother Fred during Fred's last illness.

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The Martyr of Antioch

The Martyr of Antioch is an oratorio (originally described as "A Sacred Musical Drama") by the English composer Arthur Sullivan.

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The Masque at Kenilworth

Kenilworth, A Masque of the Days of Queen Elizabeth (commonly referred to as "The Masque at Kenilworth"), is a cantata with music by Arthur Sullivan and words by Henry Fothergill Chorley (with an extended Shakespeare quotation) that premiered at the Birmingham Festival on 8 September 1864.

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The Merchant of Venice

The Merchant of Venice is a 16th-century play written by William Shakespeare in which a merchant in Venice must default on a large loan provided by a Jewish moneylender.

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The Merry Wives of Windsor

The Merry Wives of Windsor is a comedy by William Shakespeare first published in 1602, though believed to have been written in or before 1597.

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The Mikado

The Mikado; or, The Town of Titipu is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert, their ninth of fourteen operatic collaborations.

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The Musical Times

The Musical Times is an academic journal of classical music edited and produced in the United Kingdom and currently the oldest such journal still being published in that country.

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The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians

The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians is an encyclopedic dictionary of music and musicians.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The Observer

The Observer is a British newspaper published on Sundays.

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The Palace of Truth

The Palace of Truth is a three-act blank verse "Fairy Comedy" by W. S. Gilbert first produced at the Haymarket Theatre in London on 19 November 1870, partly adapted from Madame de Genlis's fairy story, Le Palais de Vérite.

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The Pirates of Penzance

The Pirates of Penzance; or, The Slave of Duty is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert.

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The Prodigal Son (Sullivan)

The Prodigal Son is an oratorio by Arthur Sullivan with text taken from the parable of the same name in the Gospel of Luke.

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The Rose of Persia

The Rose of Persia; or, The Story-Teller and the Slave, is a two-act comic opera, with music by Arthur Sullivan and a libretto by Basil Hood.

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The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army is a Protestant Christian church and an international charitable organisation structured in a quasi-military fashion.

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The Sapphire Necklace

The Sapphire Necklace, or the False Heiress (completed by 1867, and at least mostly completed by 1864), was the first opera composed by Arthur Sullivan.

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The Sorcerer

The Sorcerer is a two-act comic opera, with a libretto by W. S. Gilbert and music by Arthur Sullivan.

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The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan

The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan is a 1953 British technicolor film that dramatises the story of the collaboration between W. S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan.

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The Swing Mikado

The Swing Mikado is a musical theatre adaptation, in two acts, of Gilbert and Sullivan's comic opera, The Mikado, with music arranged by Gentry Warden.

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The Tempest (Sullivan)

The Tempest incidental music, Op.

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The Times

The Times is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England.

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The Window (song cycle)

The Window; or, The Songs of the Wrens is a song cycle by Arthur Sullivan with words by Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

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The World (journal)

The World was a British weekly paper, published from 1874 to 1920.

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The Yeomen of the Guard

The Yeomen of the Guard; or, The Merryman and His Maid, is a Savoy Opera, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert.

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The Zoo

The Zoo is a one-act comic opera, with music by Arthur Sullivan and a libretto by B. C. Stephenson, writing under the pen name of Bolton Rowe.

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Thespis (opera)

Thespis, or The Gods Grown Old, is an operatic extravaganza that was the first collaboration between dramatist W. S. Gilbert and composer Arthur Sullivan.

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Thomas Attwood (composer)

Thomas Attwood (23 November 1765 – 24 March 1838) was an English composer and organist.

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Thomas Dunhill

Thomas Frederick Dunhill (1 February 187713 March 1946) was an English composer and writer on musical subjects.

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Thomas Edison

Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor.

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Thomas German Reed

While acting as organist and chapel-master at chapels in London, and also as musical director and performer at West End theatres in the 1830s and 1840s, Reed tried his hand at producing opera.

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Thomas Helmore

Thomas Helmore (7 May 1811 in Kidderminster – 6 July 1890 in Westminster) was a choirmaster, writer about singing and author and editor of hymns and carols.

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Three Choirs Festival

Worcester cathedral Gloucester cathedral The Three Choirs Festival is a music festival held annually at the end of July, rotating among the cathedrals of the Three Counties (Hereford, Gloucester and Worcester) and originally featuring their three choirs, which remain central to the week-long programme.

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Timpani

Timpani or kettledrums (also informally called timps) are musical instruments in the percussion family.

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Tonic (music)

In music, the tonic is the first scale degree of a diatonic scale (the first note of a scale) and the tonal center or final resolution tone that is commonly used in the final cadence in tonal (musical key-based) classical music, popular music and traditional music.

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Topsy-Turvy

Topsy-Turvy is a 1999 British musical drama film written and directed by Mike Leigh, starring Allan Corduner as Sir Arthur Sullivan and Jim Broadbent as W. S. Gilbert, along with Timothy Spall and Lesley Manville.

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Tower of London

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London.

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Trial by Jury

Trial by Jury is a comic opera in one act, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert.

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Tritone

In music theory, the tritone is defined as a musical interval composed of three adjacent whole tones.

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United Grand Lodge of England

The United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE) is the governing body for the majority of freemasons within England and Wales with lodges in other, predominantly ex-British Empire and Commonwealth countries outside the United Kingdom.

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United States Marine Band

The United States Marine Band is the premier band of the United States Marine Corps.

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University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge (informally Cambridge University)The corporate title of the university is The Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge.

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University of Kansas

The University of Kansas, also referred to as KU or Kansas, is a public research university in the U.S. state of Kansas.

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University of Music and Theatre Leipzig

The University of Music and Theatre "Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy" Leipzig (Hochschule für Musik und Theater "Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy" Leipzig) is a public university in Leipzig (Saxony, Germany).

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University of Oxford

The University of Oxford (formally The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

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Utopia, Limited

Utopia, Limited; or, The Flowers of Progress, is a Savoy opera, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert.

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Venice

Venice (Venezia,; Venesia) is a city in northeastern Italy and the capital of the Veneto region.

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Victor Talking Machine Company

The Victor Talking Machine Company was an American record company and phonograph manufacturer headquartered in Camden, New Jersey.

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Victoria and Merrie England

Victoria and Merrie England, billed as a "Grand National Ballet in Eight Tableaux" is an 1897 ballet by the choreographer Carlo Coppi with music by Arthur Sullivan, written to commemorate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee, commemorating her sixty years on the throne.

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Victoria Embankment

Victoria Embankment is part of the Thames Embankment, a road and river-walk along the north bank of the River Thames in London.

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Victorian burlesque

Victorian burlesque, sometimes known as travesty or extravaganza, is a genre of theatrical entertainment that was popular in Victorian England and in the New York theatre of the mid 19th century.

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Vincenzo Bellini

Vincenzo Salvatore Carmelo Francesco Bellini (3 November 1801 – 23 September 1835) was an Italian opera composer,Lippmann and McGuire 1998, in Sadie, p. 389 who was known for his long-flowing melodic lines for which he was named "the Swan of Catania".

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W. S. Gilbert

Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (18 November 1836 – 29 May 1911) was an English dramatist, librettist, poet and illustrator best known for his collaboration with composer Arthur Sullivan, which produced fourteen comic operas.

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Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright, poet and historian.

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West End theatre

West End theatre is a common term for mainstream professional theatre staged in the large theatres of "Theatreland" in and near the West End of London.

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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised)—23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as both the greatest writer in the English language, and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.

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William Sterndale Bennett

Sir William Sterndale Bennett (13 April 18161 February 1875) was an English composer, pianist, conductor and music educator.

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William Walton

Sir William Turner Walton, OM (29 March 19028 March 1983) was an English composer.

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27 January 1756 – 5 December 1791), baptised as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart, was a prolific and influential composer of the classical era.

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Worcester Cathedral

Worcester Cathedral, is an Anglican cathedral in Worcester, England, situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn.

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Redirects here:

A. S. Sullivan, AS Sullivan, Arthur S. Sullivan, Arthur Seymour Sullivan, Sir Arthur S. Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan MVO, Sir Arthur Sullivan.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Sullivan

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