Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Ballistics

Index Ballistics

Ballistics is the field of mechanics that deals with the launching, flight, behavior, and effects of projectiles, especially bullets, unguided bombs, rockets, or the like; the science or art of designing and accelerating projectiles so as to achieve a desired performance. [1]

101 relations: Aerodynamics, Aircraft, Ancient Greece, Ancient Greek, Apollo 11, Archery, Arctic small tool tradition, Armour, Arrow, Artillery, Ball, Ballistic conduction, Ballistic limit, Ballistic missile, Baseball (ball), BBC News, Bloodstain pattern analysis, Bullet, Celestial mechanics, Chimpanzee, China, Circular error probable, Classical mechanics, Cruise missile, Designer, Ejection seat, Elasticity (physics), Electron, Equations of motion, Escape velocity, External ballistics, Firearm, Fireworks, Flight, Force, Forensic firearm examination, Galileo Galilei, Gravity, Gun, Gun barrel, Gunshot residue, Gunshot wound, Hamburg, History of China, Holmegaard, Human spaceflight, Hydrostatic shock (firearms), Internal ballistics, Isaac Newton, L.T.E. Thompson, ..., Latin, Launch vehicle, Lyn Wadley, Marshall Space Flight Center, Mechanics, Missile, Muscle, Newton's law of universal gravitation, Newton's laws of motion, Niccolò Fontana Tartaglia, Peter Bielkowicz, Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, Physics of firearms, Pistol, Projectile, Propellant, Propelling nozzle, Propulsion, Ranged weapon, Reaction (physics), Rifle, Rifling, Rocket, Rocket engine, Rocket propellant, Satellite, Shell (projectile), Shoulder, Sibudu Cave, Siege engine, South Africa, Space, Space Age, Space exploration, Spacecraft, Spear-thrower, Stopping power, Taser, Tendon, Terminal ballistics, Throwing stick, Thrust, Trajectory, Transitional ballistics, Two New Sciences, Unguided bomb, University of the Witwatersrand, Vaporific effect, Vehicle, Weapon, Wolfram Demonstrations Project. Expand index (51 more) »

Aerodynamics

Aerodynamics, from Greek ἀήρ aer (air) + δυναμική (dynamics), is the study of the motion of air, particularly its interaction with a solid object, such as an airplane wing.

New!!: Ballistics and Aerodynamics · See more »

Aircraft

An aircraft is a machine that is able to fly by gaining support from the air.

New!!: Ballistics and Aircraft · See more »

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (AD 600).

New!!: Ballistics and Ancient Greece · See more »

Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

New!!: Ballistics and Ancient Greek · See more »

Apollo 11

Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two humans on the Moon.

New!!: Ballistics and Apollo 11 · See more »

Archery

Archery is the art, sport, practice or skill of using a bow to shoot arrows.

New!!: Ballistics and Archery · See more »

Arctic small tool tradition

The Arctic Small Tool tradition (ASTt) was a broad cultural entity that developed along the Alaska Peninsula, around Bristol Bay, and on the eastern shores of the Bering Strait around 2500 BC.

New!!: Ballistics and Arctic small tool tradition · See more »

Armour

Armour (British English or Canadian English) or armor (American English; see spelling differences) is a protective covering that is used to prevent damage from being inflicted to an object, individual or vehicle by direct contact weapons or projectiles, usually during combat, or from damage caused by a potentially dangerous environment or activity (e.g., cycling, construction sites, etc.). Personal armour is used to protect soldiers and war animals.

New!!: Ballistics and Armour · See more »

Arrow

An arrow is a fin-stabilized projectile that is launched via a bow, and usually consists of a long straight stiff shaft with stabilizers called fletchings, as well as a weighty (and usually sharp and pointed) arrowhead attached to the front end, and a slot at the rear end called nock for engaging bowstring.

New!!: Ballistics and Arrow · See more »

Artillery

Artillery is a class of large military weapons built to fire munitions far beyond the range and power of infantry's small arms.

New!!: Ballistics and Artillery · See more »

Ball

A ball is a round object (usually spherical but sometimes ovoid) with various uses.

New!!: Ballistics and Ball · See more »

Ballistic conduction

Ballistic conduction (ballistic transport) is the transport of electrons in a medium having negligible electrical resistivity caused by scattering.

New!!: Ballistics and Ballistic conduction · See more »

Ballistic limit

The ballistic limit or limit velocity is the velocity required for a particular projectile to reliably (at least 50% of the time) penetrate a particular piece of material.

New!!: Ballistics and Ballistic limit · See more »

Ballistic missile

A ballistic missile follows a ballistic trajectory to deliver one or more warheads on a predetermined target.

New!!: Ballistics and Ballistic missile · See more »

Baseball (ball)

A baseball is a ball used in the sport of the same name.

New!!: Ballistics and Baseball (ball) · See more »

BBC News

BBC News is an operational business division of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) responsible for the gathering and broadcasting of news and current affairs.

New!!: Ballistics and BBC News · See more »

Bloodstain pattern analysis

Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA), one of several specialties in the field of forensic science, involves the study and analysis of bloodstains at a known or suspected violent crime scene with the goal of helping investigators draw conclusions about the nature, timing and other details of the crime.

New!!: Ballistics and Bloodstain pattern analysis · See more »

Bullet

A bullet is a kinetic projectile and the component of firearm ammunition that is expelled from the gun barrel during shooting.

New!!: Ballistics and Bullet · See more »

Celestial mechanics

Celestial mechanics is the branch of astronomy that deals with the motions of celestial objects.

New!!: Ballistics and Celestial mechanics · See more »

Chimpanzee

The taxonomical genus Pan (often referred to as chimpanzees or chimps) consists of two extant species: the common chimpanzee and the bonobo.

New!!: Ballistics and Chimpanzee · See more »

China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a unitary one-party sovereign state in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around /1e9 round 3 billion.

New!!: Ballistics and China · See more »

Circular error probable

In the military science of ballistics, circular error probable (CEP) (also circular error probability or circle of equal probability) is a measure of a weapon system's precision.

New!!: Ballistics and Circular error probable · See more »

Classical mechanics

Classical mechanics describes the motion of macroscopic objects, from projectiles to parts of machinery, and astronomical objects, such as spacecraft, planets, stars and galaxies.

New!!: Ballistics and Classical mechanics · See more »

Cruise missile

A cruise missile is a guided missile used against terrestrial targets that remains in the atmosphere and flies the major portion of its flight path at approximately constant speed.

New!!: Ballistics and Cruise missile · See more »

Designer

A designer is a person who designs.

New!!: Ballistics and Designer · See more »

Ejection seat

In aircraft, an ejection seat or ejector seat is a system designed to rescue the pilot or other crew of an aircraft (usually military) in an emergency.

New!!: Ballistics and Ejection seat · See more »

Elasticity (physics)

In physics, elasticity (from Greek ἐλαστός "ductible") is the ability of a body to resist a distorting influence and to return to its original size and shape when that influence or force is removed.

New!!: Ballistics and Elasticity (physics) · See more »

Electron

The electron is a subatomic particle, symbol or, whose electric charge is negative one elementary charge.

New!!: Ballistics and Electron · See more »

Equations of motion

In physics, equations of motion are equations that describe the behavior of a physical system in terms of its motion as a function of time.

New!!: Ballistics and Equations of motion · See more »

Escape velocity

In physics, escape velocity is the minimum speed needed for an object to escape from the gravitational influence of a massive body.

New!!: Ballistics and Escape velocity · See more »

External ballistics

External ballistics or exterior ballistics is the part of ballistics that deals with the behavior of a projectile in flight.

New!!: Ballistics and External ballistics · See more »

Firearm

A firearm is a portable gun (a barreled ranged weapon) that inflicts damage on targets by launching one or more projectiles driven by rapidly expanding high-pressure gas produced by exothermic combustion (deflagration) of propellant within an ammunition cartridge.

New!!: Ballistics and Firearm · See more »

Fireworks

Fireworks are a class of low explosive pyrotechnic devices used for aesthetic and entertainment purposes.

New!!: Ballistics and Fireworks · See more »

Flight

Flight is the process by which an object moves through an atmosphere (or beyond it, as in the case of spaceflight) without contact with the surface.

New!!: Ballistics and Flight · See more »

Force

In physics, a force is any interaction that, when unopposed, will change the motion of an object.

New!!: Ballistics and Force · See more »

Forensic firearm examination

Forensic firearm examination is the forensic process of examining the characteristics of firearms as well as any cartridges or bullets left behind at a crime scene.

New!!: Ballistics and Forensic firearm examination · See more »

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (15 February 1564Drake (1978, p. 1). The date of Galileo's birth is given according to the Julian calendar, which was then in force throughout Christendom. In 1582 it was replaced in Italy and several other Catholic countries with the Gregorian calendar. Unless otherwise indicated, dates in this article are given according to the Gregorian calendar. – 8 January 1642) was an Italian polymath.

New!!: Ballistics and Galileo Galilei · See more »

Gravity

Gravity, or gravitation, is a natural phenomenon by which all things with mass or energy—including planets, stars, galaxies, and even light—are brought toward (or gravitate toward) one another.

New!!: Ballistics and Gravity · See more »

Gun

A gun is a tubular ranged weapon typically designed to pneumatically discharge projectiles that are solid (most guns) but can also be liquid (as in water guns/cannons and projected water disruptors) or even charged particles (as in a plasma gun) and may be free-flying (as with bullets and artillery shells) or tethered (as with Taser guns, spearguns and harpoon guns).

New!!: Ballistics and Gun · See more »

Gun barrel

A gun barrel is a crucial part of gun-type ranged weapons such as small firearms, artillery pieces and air guns.

New!!: Ballistics and Gun barrel · See more »

Gunshot residue

Gunshot residue (GSR), also known as cartridge discharge residue (CDR), "gunfire residue" (GFR), or firearm discharge residue (FDR), is residue deposited on the hands and clothes of someone who discharges a firearm.

New!!: Ballistics and Gunshot residue · See more »

Gunshot wound

A gunshot wound (GSW), also known as ballistic trauma, is a form of physical trauma sustained from the discharge of arms or munitions.

New!!: Ballistics and Gunshot wound · See more »

Hamburg

Hamburg (locally), Hamborg, officially the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg (Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg, Friee un Hansestadt Hamborg),Constitution of Hamburg), is the second-largest city of Germany as well as one of the country's 16 constituent states, with a population of roughly 1.8 million people. The city lies at the core of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region which spreads across four German federal states and is home to more than five million people. The official name reflects Hamburg's history as a member of the medieval Hanseatic League, a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire, a city-state and one of the 16 states of Germany. Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, it was a fully sovereign state. Prior to the constitutional changes in 1919 it formed a civic republic headed constitutionally by a class of hereditary grand burghers or Hanseaten. The city has repeatedly been beset by disasters such as the Great Fire of Hamburg, exceptional coastal flooding and military conflicts including World War II bombing raids. Historians remark that the city has managed to recover and emerge wealthier after each catastrophe. Situated on the river Elbe, Hamburg is home to Europe's second-largest port and a broad corporate base. In media, the major regional broadcasting firm NDR, the printing and publishing firm italic and the newspapers italic and italic are based in the city. Hamburg remains an important financial center, the seat of Germany's oldest stock exchange and the world's oldest merchant bank, Berenberg Bank. Media, commercial, logistical, and industrial firms with significant locations in the city include multinationals Airbus, italic, italic, italic, and Unilever. The city is a forum for and has specialists in world economics and international law with such consular and diplomatic missions as the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, the EU-LAC Foundation, and the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning. In recent years, the city has played host to multipartite international political conferences and summits such as Europe and China and the G20. Former German Chancellor italic, who governed Germany for eight years, and Angela Merkel, German chancellor since 2005, come from Hamburg. The city is a major international and domestic tourist destination. It ranked 18th in the world for livability in 2016. The Speicherstadt and Kontorhausviertel were declared World Heritage Sites by UNESCO in 2015. Hamburg is a major European science, research, and education hub, with several universities and institutions. Among its most notable cultural venues are the italic and italic concert halls. It gave birth to movements like Hamburger Schule and paved the way for bands including The Beatles. Hamburg is also known for several theatres and a variety of musical shows. St. Pauli's italic is among the best-known European entertainment districts.

New!!: Ballistics and Hamburg · See more »

History of China

The earliest known written records of the history of China date from as early as 1250 BC,William G. Boltz, Early Chinese Writing, World Archaeology, Vol.

New!!: Ballistics and History of China · See more »

Holmegaard

Until January 1, 2007, Holmegaard was a municipality (Danish, kommune) in Storstrøm County in the southern part of the island of Zealand (Sjælland) in south Denmark.

New!!: Ballistics and Holmegaard · See more »

Human spaceflight

Human spaceflight (also referred to as crewed spaceflight or manned spaceflight) is space travel with a crew or passengers aboard the spacecraft.

New!!: Ballistics and Human spaceflight · See more »

Hydrostatic shock (firearms)

Hydrostatic shock is the controversial concept that a penetrating projectile (such as a bullet) can produce a pressure wave that causes "remote neural damage", "subtle damage in neural tissues" and/or "rapid incapacitating effects" in living targets.

New!!: Ballistics and Hydrostatic shock (firearms) · See more »

Internal ballistics

Internal ballistics (also interior ballistics), a subfield of ballistics, is the study of the propulsion of a projectile.

New!!: Ballistics and Internal ballistics · See more »

Isaac Newton

Sir Isaac Newton (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726/27) was an English mathematician, astronomer, theologian, author and physicist (described in his own day as a "natural philosopher") who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time, and a key figure in the scientific revolution.

New!!: Ballistics and Isaac Newton · See more »

L.T.E. Thompson

Dr.

New!!: Ballistics and L.T.E. Thompson · See more »

Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

New!!: Ballistics and Latin · See more »

Launch vehicle

A launch vehicle or carrier rocket is a rocket used to carry a payload from Earth's surface through outer space, either to another surface point (suborbital), or into space (Earth orbit or beyond).

New!!: Ballistics and Launch vehicle · See more »

Lyn Wadley

Lyn Wadley is an honorary professor of archaeology, and also affiliated jointly with the Archaeology Department and the Institute for Evolution at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa.

New!!: Ballistics and Lyn Wadley · See more »

Marshall Space Flight Center

The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is the U.S. government's civilian rocketry and spacecraft propulsion research center.

New!!: Ballistics and Marshall Space Flight Center · See more »

Mechanics

Mechanics (Greek μηχανική) is that area of science concerned with the behaviour of physical bodies when subjected to forces or displacements, and the subsequent effects of the bodies on their environment.

New!!: Ballistics and Mechanics · See more »

Missile

In modern language, a missile is a guided self-propelled system, as opposed to an unguided self-propelled munition, referred to as a rocket (although these too can also be guided).

New!!: Ballistics and Missile · See more »

Muscle

Muscle is a soft tissue found in most animals.

New!!: Ballistics and Muscle · See more »

Newton's law of universal gravitation

Newton's law of universal gravitation states that a particle attracts every other particle in the universe with a force which is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between their centers.

New!!: Ballistics and Newton's law of universal gravitation · See more »

Newton's laws of motion

Newton's laws of motion are three physical laws that, together, laid the foundation for classical mechanics.

New!!: Ballistics and Newton's laws of motion · See more »

Niccolò Fontana Tartaglia

Niccolò Fontana Tartaglia (1499/1500, Brescia – 13 December 1557, Venice) was a Venetian mathematician, engineer (designing fortifications), a surveyor (of topography, seeking the best means of defense or offense) and a bookkeeper from the then-Republic of Venice (now part of Italy).

New!!: Ballistics and Niccolò Fontana Tartaglia · See more »

Peter Bielkowicz

Peter Bielkowicz (1 February 1902 – 30 September 1993) was a physicist.

New!!: Ballistics and Peter Bielkowicz · See more »

Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica

Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Latin for Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy), often referred to as simply the Principia, is a work in three books by Isaac Newton, in Latin, first published 5 July 1687.

New!!: Ballistics and Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica · See more »

Physics of firearms

From the viewpoint of physics (dynamics, to be exact), a firearm, as for most weapons, is a system for delivering maximum destructive energy to the target with minimum delivery of energy on the shooter.

New!!: Ballistics and Physics of firearms · See more »

Pistol

A pistol is a type of handgun.

New!!: Ballistics and Pistol · See more »

Projectile

A projectile is any object thrown into space (empty or not) by the exertion of a force.

New!!: Ballistics and Projectile · See more »

Propellant

A propellant or propellent is a chemical substance used in the production of energy or pressurized gas that is subsequently used to create movement of a fluid or to generate propulsion of a vehicle, projectile, or other object.

New!!: Ballistics and Propellant · See more »

Propelling nozzle

A propelling nozzle is a nozzle that converts a gas turbine or gas generator into a jet engine.

New!!: Ballistics and Propelling nozzle · See more »

Propulsion

Propulsion means to push forward or drive an object forward.

New!!: Ballistics and Propulsion · See more »

Ranged weapon

A ranged weapon is any weapon that can engage targets beyond hand-to-hand distance, i.e. at distances greater than the physical reach of the weapon itself.

New!!: Ballistics and Ranged weapon · See more »

Reaction (physics)

As described by the third of Newton's laws of motion of classical mechanics, all forces occur in pairs such that if one object exerts a force on another object, then the second object exerts an equal and opposite reaction force on the first.

New!!: Ballistics and Reaction (physics) · See more »

Rifle

A rifle is a portable long-barrelled firearm designed for precision shooting, to be held with both hands and braced against the shoulder for stability during firing, and with a barrel that has a helical pattern of grooves ("rifling") cut into the bore walls.

New!!: Ballistics and Rifle · See more »

Rifling

In firearms, rifling is the helical groove pattern that is machined into the internal (bore) surface of a gun's barrel, for the purpose of exerting torque and thus imparting a spin to a projectile around its longitudinal axis during shooting.

New!!: Ballistics and Rifling · See more »

Rocket

A rocket (from Italian rocchetto "bobbin") is a missile, spacecraft, aircraft or other vehicle that obtains thrust from a rocket engine.

New!!: Ballistics and Rocket · See more »

Rocket engine

A rocket engine uses stored rocket propellant mass for forming its high-speed propulsive jet.

New!!: Ballistics and Rocket engine · See more »

Rocket propellant

Rocket propellant is a material used either directly by a rocket as the reaction mass (propulsive mass) that is ejected, typically with very high speed, from a rocket engine to produce thrust, and thus provide spacecraft propulsion, or indirectly to produce the reaction mass in a chemical reaction.

New!!: Ballistics and Rocket propellant · See more »

Satellite

In the context of spaceflight, a satellite is an artificial object which has been intentionally placed into orbit.

New!!: Ballistics and Satellite · See more »

Shell (projectile)

A shell is a payload-carrying projectile that, as opposed to shot, contains an explosive or other filling, though modern usage sometimes includes large solid projectiles properly termed shot.

New!!: Ballistics and Shell (projectile) · See more »

Shoulder

The human shoulder is made up of three bones: the clavicle (collarbone), the scapula (shoulder blade), and the humerus (upper arm bone) as well as associated muscles, ligaments and tendons.

New!!: Ballistics and Shoulder · See more »

Sibudu Cave

Sibudu Cave is a rock shelter in a sandstone cliff in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

New!!: Ballistics and Sibudu Cave · See more »

Siege engine

A siege engine is a device that is designed to break or circumvent heavy castle doors, thick city walls and other fortifications in siege warfare.

New!!: Ballistics and Siege engine · See more »

South Africa

South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa (RSA), is the southernmost country in Africa.

New!!: Ballistics and South Africa · See more »

Space

Space is the boundless three-dimensional extent in which objects and events have relative position and direction.

New!!: Ballistics and Space · See more »

Space Age

The Space Age is a time period encompassing the activities related to the Space Race, space exploration, space technology, and the cultural developments influenced by these events.

New!!: Ballistics and Space Age · See more »

Space exploration

Space exploration is the discovery and exploration of celestial structures in outer space by means of evolving and growing space technology.

New!!: Ballistics and Space exploration · See more »

Spacecraft

A spacecraft is a vehicle or machine designed to fly in outer space.

New!!: Ballistics and Spacecraft · See more »

Spear-thrower

A spear-thrower or atlatl (or; ahtlatl) is a tool that uses leverage to achieve greater velocity in dart-throwing, and includes a bearing surface which allows the user to store energy during the throw.

New!!: Ballistics and Spear-thrower · See more »

Stopping power

Stopping power is the ability of a firearm or other weapon to cause enough ballistic trauma to a target (human or animal) to immediately incapacitate (and thus stop) the target.

New!!: Ballistics and Stopping power · See more »

Taser

A Taser is a brand of electroshock weapon sold by Axon.

New!!: Ballistics and Taser · See more »

Tendon

A tendon or sinew is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue that usually connects muscle to bone and is capable of withstanding tension.

New!!: Ballistics and Tendon · See more »

Terminal ballistics

Terminal ballistics (also known as wound ballistics), a sub-field of ballistics, is the study of the behavior and effects of a projectile when it hits and transfers its energy to a target.

New!!: Ballistics and Terminal ballistics · See more »

Throwing stick

The throwing stick, or throwing club, is one of the first weapons used by early humans and cultures all around the world.

New!!: Ballistics and Throwing stick · See more »

Thrust

Thrust is a reaction force described quantitatively by Newton's third law.

New!!: Ballistics and Thrust · See more »

Trajectory

A trajectory or flight path is the path that a massive object in motion follows through space as a function of time.

New!!: Ballistics and Trajectory · See more »

Transitional ballistics

Transitional ballistics, also known as intermediate ballistics, at Encyclopædia Britannica Online, Accessed April 27, 2009 is the study of a projectile's behavior from the time it leaves the muzzle until the pressure behind the projectile is equalized, so it lies between internal ballistics and external ballistics.

New!!: Ballistics and Transitional ballistics · See more »

Two New Sciences

The Discourses and Mathematical Demonstrations Relating to Two New Sciences (Discorsi e Dimostrazioni Matematiche Intorno a Due Nuove Scienze), published in 1638 was Galileo's final book and a scientific testament covering much of his work in physics over the preceding thirty years.

New!!: Ballistics and Two New Sciences · See more »

Unguided bomb

An unguided bomb, also known as a free-fall bomb, gravity bomb, dumb bomb, or iron bomb, is a conventional aircraft-delivered bomb that does not contain a guidance system and hence, simply follows a ballistic trajectory.

New!!: Ballistics and Unguided bomb · See more »

University of the Witwatersrand

The University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, is a multi-campus South African public research university situated in the northern areas of central Johannesburg.

New!!: Ballistics and University of the Witwatersrand · See more »

Vaporific effect

Vaporific effect is a flash fire resulting from the impact of high velocity projectiles with metallic objects.

New!!: Ballistics and Vaporific effect · See more »

Vehicle

A vehicle (from vehiculum) is a machine that transports people or cargo.

New!!: Ballistics and Vehicle · See more »

Weapon

A weapon, arm or armament is any device used with intent to inflict damage or harm.

New!!: Ballistics and Weapon · See more »

Wolfram Demonstrations Project

The Wolfram Demonstrations Project is an organized, open-source collection of small (or medium-size) interactive programs called Demonstrations, which are meant to visually and interactively represent ideas from a range of fields.

New!!: Ballistics and Wolfram Demonstrations Project · See more »

Redirects here:

Ballistic Trajectories, Ballistic body, Ballistic trajectories, Ballistic vehicle, Ballistically, Ballistics test, Criminal ballistics, Firearm and Tool Mark Examiners, Forensic ballistics, Science of a bullet.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballistics

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »