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Battle of Guilford Court House

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The Battle of Guilford Court House was a battle fought on March 15, 1781, at a site which is now in Greensboro, the county seat of Guilford County, North Carolina, during the American Revolutionary War. [1]

69 relations: American Revolutionary War, Army National Guard and Active Regular Army Units with Colonial Roots, Banastre Tarleton, Battle, Battle of Camden, Battle of Cowpens, Bayonet, Benedict Arnold, Benjamin Williams, British Army during the American Revolutionary War, British Legion (American Revolution), Camden, South Carolina, Cannon, Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis, Charles James Fox, Charleston, South Carolina, County seat, Dan River, Daniel Morgan, Deep River (North Carolina), Delaware, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, Flanking maneuver, Francis Rawdon-Hastings, 1st Marquess of Hastings, Friendly fire, George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville, George Washington, Georgia (U.S. state), Greensboro, North Carolina, Guilford County, North Carolina, Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, Henry Clinton (British Army officer, born 1730), Henry Lee III, Hessian (soldier), Hillsborough, North Carolina, Hoskins House Historic District, Jamaica, Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, Kingdom of Great Britain, Lee's Legion, Lieutenant general, Loyalist (American Revolution), Major general, Maryland, Maryland Line, Militia, Nathanael Greene, Nova Scotia, Plutarch, Province of Georgia, ..., Province of North Carolina, Province of South Carolina, Pyle's Massacre, Pyrrhic victory, Quakers, Royal Welch Fusiliers, Siege of Yorktown, Slavery, Snow Camp Outdoor Theater, Snow Camp, North Carolina, Southern Colonies, Southern theater of the American Revolutionary War, Theodore P. Savas, Virginia, Whigs (British political party), William Washington, Wilmington, North Carolina, 1st Maryland Regiment, 3rd Continental Light Dragoons. Expand index (19 more) »

American Revolutionary War

The American Revolutionary War (17751783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a global war that began as a conflict between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America. After 1765, growing philosophical and political differences strained the relationship between Great Britain and its colonies. Patriot protests against taxation without representation followed the Stamp Act and escalated into boycotts, which culminated in 1773 with the Sons of Liberty destroying a shipment of tea in Boston Harbor. Britain responded by closing Boston Harbor and passing a series of punitive measures against Massachusetts Bay Colony. Massachusetts colonists responded with the Suffolk Resolves, and they established a shadow government which wrested control of the countryside from the Crown. Twelve colonies formed a Continental Congress to coordinate their resistance, establishing committees and conventions that effectively seized power. British attempts to disarm the Massachusetts militia at Concord, Massachusetts in April 1775 led to open combat. Militia forces then besieged Boston, forcing a British evacuation in March 1776, and Congress appointed George Washington to command the Continental Army. Concurrently, an American attempt to invade Quebec and raise rebellion against the British failed decisively. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted for independence, issuing its declaration on July 4. Sir William Howe launched a British counter-offensive, capturing New York City and leaving American morale at a low ebb. However, victories at Trenton and Princeton restored American confidence. In 1777, the British launched an invasion from Quebec under John Burgoyne, intending to isolate the New England Colonies. Instead of assisting this effort, Howe took his army on a separate campaign against Philadelphia, and Burgoyne was decisively defeated at Saratoga in October 1777. Burgoyne's defeat had drastic consequences. France formally allied with the Americans and entered the war in 1778, and Spain joined the war the following year as an ally of France but not as an ally of the United States. In 1780, the Kingdom of Mysore attacked the British in India, and tensions between Great Britain and the Netherlands erupted into open war. In North America, the British mounted a "Southern strategy" led by Charles Cornwallis which hinged upon a Loyalist uprising, but too few came forward. Cornwallis suffered reversals at King's Mountain and Cowpens. He retreated to Yorktown, Virginia, intending an evacuation, but a decisive French naval victory deprived him of an escape. A Franco-American army led by the Comte de Rochambeau and Washington then besieged Cornwallis' army and, with no sign of relief, he surrendered in October 1781. Whigs in Britain had long opposed the pro-war Tories in Parliament, and the surrender gave them the upper hand. In early 1782, Parliament voted to end all offensive operations in North America, but the war continued in Europe and India. Britain remained under siege in Gibraltar but scored a major victory over the French navy. On September 3, 1783, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Paris in which Great Britain agreed to recognize the sovereignty of the United States and formally end the war. French involvement had proven decisive,Brooks, Richard (editor). Atlas of World Military History. HarperCollins, 2000, p. 101 "Washington's success in keeping the army together deprived the British of victory, but French intervention won the war." but France made few gains and incurred crippling debts. Spain made some minor territorial gains but failed in its primary aim of recovering Gibraltar. The Dutch were defeated on all counts and were compelled to cede territory to Great Britain. In India, the war against Mysore and its allies concluded in 1784 without any territorial changes.

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Army National Guard and Active Regular Army Units with Colonial Roots

Thirty federally recognized units in the U.S. Army have lineages that go back to the colonial era.

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Banastre Tarleton

Sir Banastre Tarleton, 1st Baronet, GCB (21 August 175415 January 1833) was a British soldier and politician.

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Battle

A battle is a combat in warfare between two or more armed forces, or combatants.

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Battle of Camden

The Battle of Camden was a major victory for the British in the Southern theater of the American Revolutionary War (American War of Independence).

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Battle of Cowpens

The Battle of Cowpens, fought on January 17, 1781, was an engagement between American Colonial forces under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan and British forces under Sir Banastre Tarleton, as part of the campaign in the Carolinas (North and South).

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Bayonet

A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife, sword, or spike-shaped weapon designed to fit on the end of a rifles muzzle, allowing it to be used as a pike.

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Benedict Arnold

Benedict Arnold (Brandt (1994), p. 4June 14, 1801) was a general during the American Revolutionary War who fought heroically for the American Continental Army—then defected to the enemy in 1780.

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Benjamin Williams

Benjamin Williams (January 1, 1751July 20, 1814) was the 11th and 14th Governor of the U.S. state of North Carolina, from 1799 to 1802 and from 1807 to 1808.

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British Army during the American Revolutionary War

The British Army during the American Revolutionary War served for eight years in campaigns fought around the globe.

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British Legion (American Revolution)

The British Legion was the name of a British provincial regiment established during the American Revolutionary War, composed of British Loyalist American infantry and dragoons.

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Camden, South Carolina

Camden is a city in Kershaw County, South Carolina, United States.

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Cannon

A cannon (plural: cannon or cannons) is a type of gun classified as artillery that launches a projectile using propellant.

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Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis

Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis KG, PC (31 December 1738 – 5 October 1805), styled Viscount Brome between 1753 and 1762 and known as The Earl Cornwallis between 1762 and 1792, was a British Army general and official.

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Charles James Fox

Charles James Fox (24 January 1749 – 13 September 1806), styled The Honourable from 1762, was a prominent British Whig statesman whose parliamentary career spanned 38 years of the late 18th and early 19th centuries and who was the arch-rival of William Pitt the Younger.

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Charleston, South Carolina

Charleston is the oldest and largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina, the county seat of Charleston County, and the principal city in the Charleston–North Charleston–Summerville Metropolitan Statistical Area.

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County seat

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish.

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Dan River

The Dan River flows in the U.S. states of North Carolina and Virginia.

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Daniel Morgan

Daniel Morgan (July 6, 1736 – July 6, 1802) was an American pioneer, soldier, and politician from Virginia.

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Deep River (North Carolina)

Deep River is a tributary of the Cape Fear River, approximately 125 miles (200 km) long, in north central North Carolina in the United States.

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Delaware

Delaware is one of the 50 states of the United States, in the Mid-Atlantic or Northeastern region.

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Duke of Wellington's Regiment

The Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding) was a line infantry regiment of the British Army, forming part of the King's Division.

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Flanking maneuver

In military tactics, a flanking maneuver, or flanking manoeuvre is a movement of an armed force around a flank to achieve an advantageous position over an enemy.

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Francis Rawdon-Hastings, 1st Marquess of Hastings

Francis Edward Rawdon-Hastings, 1st Marquess of Hastings, KG, PC (9 December 1754 – 28 November 1826), styled The Honourable Francis Rawdon from birth until 1762, as The Lord Rawdon between 1762 and 1783, and known as The Earl of Moira between 1793 and 1816, was an Anglo-Irish British politician and military officer who served as Governor-General of India from 1813 to 1823.

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Friendly fire

Friendly fire is an attack by a military force on non-enemy, own, allied or neutral, forces while attempting to attack the enemy, either by misidentifying the target as hostile, or due to errors or inaccuracy.

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George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville

George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville PC (26 January 1716 – 26 August 1785), styled The Honourable George Sackville until 1720, Lord George Sackville from 1720 to 1770 and Lord George Germain from 1770 to 1782, was a British soldier and politician who was Secretary of State for America in Lord North's cabinet during the American War of Independence.

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George Washington

George Washington (February 22, 1732 –, 1799), known as the "Father of His Country," was an American soldier and statesman who served from 1789 to 1797 as the first President of the United States.

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Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgia is a state in the Southeastern United States.

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Greensboro, North Carolina

Greensboro (formerly Greensborough) is a city in the U.S. state of North Carolina.

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Guilford County, North Carolina

Guilford County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina.

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Guilford Courthouse National Military Park

Guilford Courthouse National Military Park, at 2332 New Garden Road in Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina, commemorates the Battle of Guilford Court House, fought on March 15, 1781.

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Henry Clinton (British Army officer, born 1730)

General Sir Henry Clinton, KB, MP (16 April 1730 – 23 December 1795) was a British army officer and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1772 and 1795.

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Henry Lee III

Major-General Henry "Light-Horse Harry" Lee III (January 29, 1756March 25, 1818) was an early American Patriot and politician who served as the ninth Governor of Virginia and as the Virginia Representative to the United States Congress.

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Hessian (soldier)

Hessians were German soldiers who served as auxiliaries to the British Army during the American Revolutionary War.

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Hillsborough, North Carolina

The town of Hillsborough is the county seat of Orange County, North Carolina.

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Hoskins House Historic District

Hoskins House Historic District, also known as Tannenbaum Park, is a historic log cabin and national historic district located at Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina.

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Jamaica

Jamaica is an island country situated in the Caribbean Sea.

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Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau

Marshal Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (1 July 1725 – 10 May 1807) was a French nobleman and general who played a major role in helping the Thirteen Colonies win independence during the American Revolution.

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Kingdom of Great Britain

The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called simply Great Britain,Parliament of the Kingdom of England.

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Lee's Legion

Lee's Legion (also known as the 2nd Partisan Corps) was a military unit within the Continental Army during the American Revolution.

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Lieutenant general

Lieutenant general, lieutenant-general and similar (abbrev Lt Gen, LTG and similar) is a three-star military rank (NATO code OF-8) used in many countries.

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Loyalist (American Revolution)

Loyalists were American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War, often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men at the time.

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Major general

Major general (abbreviated MG, Maj. Gen. and similar) is a military rank used in many countries.

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Maryland

Maryland is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C. to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware to its east.

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Maryland Line

The "Maryland Line" was a formation within the Continental Army, formed and authorized by the Second Continental Congress, meeting in the "Old Pennsylvania State House" (later known as "Independence Hall") in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in June 1775.

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Militia

A militia is generally an army or some other fighting organization of non-professional soldiers, citizens of a nation, or subjects of a state, who can be called upon for military service during a time of need, as opposed to a professional force of regular, full-time military personnel, or historically, members of a warrior nobility class (e.g., knights or samurai).

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Nathanael Greene

Nathanael Greene (June 19, 1786, sometimes misspelled Nathaniel) was a major general of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783).

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Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia (Latin for "New Scotland"; Nouvelle-Écosse; Scottish Gaelic: Alba Nuadh) is one of Canada's three maritime provinces, and one of the four provinces that form Atlantic Canada.

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Plutarch

Plutarch (Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos,; c. CE 46 – CE 120), later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος) was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives and Moralia.

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Province of Georgia

The Province of Georgia (also Georgia Colony) was one of the Southern colonies in British America.

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Province of North Carolina

For history prior to 1712, see Province of Carolina. King Charles II of England granted the Carolina charter in 1663 for land south of Virginia Colony and north of Spanish Florida.

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Province of South Carolina

The Province of South Carolina (also known as the South Carolina Colony) was originally part of the Province of Carolina in British America, which was chartered by eight Lords Proprietor in 1663.

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Pyle's Massacre

Pyle's Massacre, also known as Pyle's Hacking Match or the Battle of Haw River, was fought during the American Revolutionary War in Orange County, North Carolina (present-day Alamance County, North Carolina), on February 24, 1781, between Patriot and Loyalist North Carolina militia troops.

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Pyrrhic victory

A Pyrrhic victory is a victory that inflicts such a devastating toll on the victor that it is tantamount to defeat.

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Quakers

Quakers (or Friends) are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements formally known as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church.

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Royal Welch Fusiliers

The Royal Welch Fusiliers was a line infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Prince of Wales' Division.

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Siege of Yorktown

The Siege of Yorktown, also known as the Battle of Yorktown, the Surrender at Yorktown, German Battle or the Siege of Little York, ending on October 19, 1781, at Yorktown, Virginia, was a decisive victory by a combined force of American Continental Army troops led by General George Washington and French Army troops led by the Comte de Rochambeau over a British Army commanded by British peer and Lieutenant General Charles Cornwallis.

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Slavery

Slavery is any system in which principles of property law are applied to people, allowing individuals to own, buy and sell other individuals, as a de jure form of property.

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Snow Camp Outdoor Theater

The Snow Camp Theatre is an outdoor repertory theater company presenting several dramas each summer in Snow Camp, an unincorporated community in southern Alamance County, North Carolina.

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Snow Camp, North Carolina

Snow Camp is an unincorporated community in southern Alamance County, North Carolina noted for its rich history and as the site of the Snow Camp Outdoor Theater.

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Southern Colonies

The Southern Colonies within British America consisted of the Province of Maryland, the Colony of Virginia, the Province of Carolina (in 1712 split into North and South Carolina) and the Province of Georgia.

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Southern theater of the American Revolutionary War

The Southern theater of the American Revolutionary War was the central area of operations in North America in the second half of the American Revolutionary War.

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Theodore P. Savas

Theodore P. Savas is an attorney, former adjunct college instructor, award-winning author, publishing consultant and agent, and majority partner and managing director of Savas Beatie LLC, a Nevada limited liability company.

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Virginia

Virginia (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains.

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Whigs (British political party)

The Whigs were a political faction and then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom.

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William Washington

William Augustine Washington (February 28, 1752 – March 6, 1810) was a cavalry officer of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, who held a final rank of Brigadier General in the newly created United States after the war.

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Wilmington, North Carolina

Wilmington is a port city and the county seat of New Hanover County in coastal southeastern North Carolina, United States.

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1st Maryland Regiment

The 1st Maryland Regiment (Smallwood's Regiment) originated with the authorization of a Maryland Battalion of the Maryland State Troops on 14 January 1776.

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3rd Continental Light Dragoons

The 3rd Continental Light Dragoons, also known as Baylor's Horse or Lady Washington's Horse, was a mounted regiment of the Continental Army raised on January 1, 1777, at Morristown, New Jersey.

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Redirects here:

Battle of Guildford Court House, Battle of Guilford, Battle of Guilford Courthouse, Battle of guilford court house, Guilford Courthouse.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Guilford_Court_House

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