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Bicarbonate

Index Bicarbonate

In inorganic chemistry, bicarbonate (IUPAC-recommended nomenclature: hydrogencarbonate) is an intermediate form in the deprotonation of carbonic acid. [1]

71 relations: Acetic acid, Acid, Acid–base homeostasis, Acidosis, Alkali, Alkalosis, Ammonia, Ammonium bicarbonate, Aqueous solution, Arterial blood gas test, Atom, Baking, Base (chemistry), Buffer solution, Caesium bicarbonate, Calcium bicarbonate, Carbon, Carbon cycle, Carbon dioxide, Carbonate, Carbonic acid, Carbonic anhydrase, Central nervous system, Chemical equilibrium, Chemical species, Chloride, Chyme, Conjugate acid, Current Procedural Terminology, Deprotonation, Digestive biscuit, Electrolyte, Empirical formula, Formal charge, Hard water, Hydrogen, Hydronium, Inorganic chemistry, International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Ion, Ionic compound, Isoelectronicity, Leavening agent, Magnesium bicarbonate, Medical diagnosis, Nitric acid, Oxygen, Pancreas, PCO2, PH, ..., Photosynthesis, Polyatomic ion, Potassium, Potassium bicarbonate, Reaction intermediate, Reference ranges for blood tests, Secretin, Sodium, Sodium bicarbonate, Sodium carbonate, Solubility, Standard conditions for temperature and pressure, Tissue (biology), Total dissolved solids, Total inorganic carbon, Trigonal planar molecular geometry, Trivial name, Unified atomic mass unit, Vinegar, Water quality, William Hyde Wollaston. Expand index (21 more) »

Acetic acid

Acetic acid, systematically named ethanoic acid, is a colourless liquid organic compound with the chemical formula CH3COOH (also written as CH3CO2H or C2H4O2).

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Acid

An acid is a molecule or ion capable of donating a hydron (proton or hydrogen ion H+), or, alternatively, capable of forming a covalent bond with an electron pair (a Lewis acid).

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Acid–base homeostasis

Acid–base homeostasis is the homeostatic regulation of the pH of the body's extracellular fluid (ECF).

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Acidosis

Acidosis is a process causing increased acidity in the blood and other body tissues (i.e., an increased hydrogen ion concentration).

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Alkali

In chemistry, an alkali (from Arabic: al-qaly “ashes of the saltwort”) is a basic, ionic salt of an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal chemical element.

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Alkalosis

Alkalosis is the result of a process reducing hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood plasma (alkalemia).

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Ammonia

Ammonia is a compound of nitrogen and hydrogen with the formula NH3.

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Ammonium bicarbonate

Ammonium bicarbonate is an inorganic compound with formula (NH4)HCO3, simplified to NH5CO3.

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Aqueous solution

An aqueous solution is a solution in which the solvent is water.

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Arterial blood gas test

An arterial-blood gas (ABG) test measures the amounts of arterial gases, such as oxygen and carbon dioxide.

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Atom

An atom is the smallest constituent unit of ordinary matter that has the properties of a chemical element.

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Baking

Baking is a method of cooking food that uses prolonged dry heat, normally in an oven, but also in hot ashes, or on hot stones.

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Base (chemistry)

In chemistry, bases are substances that, in aqueous solution, release hydroxide (OH−) ions, are slippery to the touch, can taste bitter if an alkali, change the color of indicators (e.g., turn red litmus paper blue), react with acids to form salts, promote certain chemical reactions (base catalysis), accept protons from any proton donor, and/or contain completely or partially displaceable OH− ions.

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Buffer solution

A buffer solution (more precisely, pH buffer or hydrogen ion buffer) is an aqueous solution consisting of a mixture of a weak acid and its conjugate base, or vice versa.

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Caesium bicarbonate

Caesium bicarbonate or cesium bicarbonate is a chemical compound with the chemical formula CsHCO3.

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Calcium bicarbonate

Calcium bicarbonate, also called calcium hydrogen carbonate, has a chemical formula Ca(HCO3)2.

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Carbon

Carbon (from carbo "coal") is a chemical element with symbol C and atomic number 6.

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Carbon cycle

The carbon cycle is the biogeochemical cycle by which carbon is exchanged among the biosphere, pedosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth.

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Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide (chemical formula) is a colorless gas with a density about 60% higher than that of dry air.

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Carbonate

In chemistry, a carbonate is a salt of carbonic acid (H2CO3), characterized by the presence of the carbonate ion, a polyatomic ion with the formula of.

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Carbonic acid

Carbonic acid is a chemical compound with the chemical formula H2CO3 (equivalently OC(OH)2).

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Carbonic anhydrase

The carbonic anhydrases (or carbonate dehydratases) form a family of enzymes that catalyze the interconversion between carbon dioxide and water and the dissociated ions of carbonic acid (i.e. bicarbonate and protons).

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Central nervous system

The central nervous system (CNS) is the part of the nervous system consisting of the brain and spinal cord.

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Chemical equilibrium

In a chemical reaction, chemical equilibrium is the state in which both reactants and products are present in concentrations which have no further tendency to change with time, so that there is no observable change in the properties of the system.

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Chemical species

A chemical species is a chemical substance or ensemble composed of chemically identical molecular entities that can explore the same set of molecular energy levels on a characteristic or delineated time scale.

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Chloride

The chloride ion is the anion (negatively charged ion) Cl−.

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Chyme

Chyme or chymus (from Greek χυμός khymos, "juice") is the semi-fluid mass of partly digested food that is expelled by the stomach, through the pyloric valve, into the duodenum (the beginning of the small intestine).

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Conjugate acid

A conjugate acid, within the Brønsted–Lowry acid–base theory, is a species formed by the reception of a proton (H+) by a base—in other words, it is a base with a hydrogen ion added to it.

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Current Procedural Terminology

The Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code set is a medical code set maintained by the American Medical Association through the CPT Editorial Panel.

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Deprotonation

Deprotonation is the removal (transfer) of a proton (a hydrogen cation, H+) from a Brønsted–Lowry acid in an acid-base reaction.

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Digestive biscuit

A digestive biscuit, sometimes described as a sweet-meal biscuit, is a semi-sweet biscuit that originated in Scotland, and is popular worldwide.

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Electrolyte

An electrolyte is a substance that produces an electrically conducting solution when dissolved in a polar solvent, such as water.

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Empirical formula

In chemistry, the empirical formula of a chemical compound is the simplest positive integer ratio of atoms present in a compound.

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Formal charge

In chemistry, a formal charge (FC) is the charge assigned to an atom in a molecule, assuming that electrons in all chemical bonds are shared equally between atoms, regardless of relative electronegativity.

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Hard water

Hard water is water that has high mineral content (in contrast with "soft water").

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Hydrogen

Hydrogen is a chemical element with symbol H and atomic number 1.

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Hydronium

In chemistry, hydronium is the common name for the aqueous cation, the type of oxonium ion produced by protonation of water.

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Inorganic chemistry

Inorganic chemistry deals with the synthesis and behavior of inorganic and organometallic compounds.

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International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) is an international federation of National Adhering Organizations that represents chemists in individual countries.

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Ion

An ion is an atom or molecule that has a non-zero net electrical charge (its total number of electrons is not equal to its total number of protons).

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Ionic compound

In chemistry, an ionic compound is a chemical compound composed of ions held together by electrostatic forces termed ionic bonding.

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Isoelectronicity

Isoelectronicity is the phenomenon of two or more chemical species (atoms, molecules, radicals, ions etc.) differing in the atoms that comprise them but having the same number of valence electrons and the same structure (that is, the same number of atoms with the same connectivity).

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Leavening agent

A leaven, often called a leavening agent (and also known as a raising agent), is any one of a number of substances used in doughs and batters that cause a foaming action (gas bubbles) that lightens and softens the mixture.

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Magnesium bicarbonate

Magnesium bicarbonate or magnesium hydrogen carbonate, Mg(HCO3)2, is the bicarbonate salt of magnesium.

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Medical diagnosis

Medical diagnosis (abbreviated Dx or DS) is the process of determining which disease or condition explains a person's symptoms and signs.

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Nitric acid

Nitric acid (HNO3), also known as aqua fortis (Latin for "strong water") and spirit of niter, is a highly corrosive mineral acid.

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Oxygen

Oxygen is a chemical element with symbol O and atomic number 8.

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Pancreas

The pancreas is a glandular organ in the digestive system and endocrine system of vertebrates.

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PCO2

The pCO2, PCO2, p_\ceor P_\ce is the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (CO2), often used in reference to blood, but also used in oceanography to describe the partial pressure of CO2 in the Ocean, and in life support systems engineering and underwater diving to describe the partial pressure in a breathing gas.

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PH

In chemistry, pH is a logarithmic scale used to specify the acidity or basicity of an aqueous solution.

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Photosynthesis

Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy into chemical energy that can later be released to fuel the organisms' activities (energy transformation).

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Polyatomic ion

A polyatomic ion, also known as a molecular ion, is a charged chemical species (ion) composed of two or more atoms covalently bonded or of a metal complex that can be considered to be acting as a single unit.

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Potassium

Potassium is a chemical element with symbol K (from Neo-Latin kalium) and atomic number 19.

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Potassium bicarbonate

Potassium bicarbonate (also known as potassium hydrogen carbonate or potassium acid carbonate) is a colorless, odorless, slightly basic, salty substance.

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Reaction intermediate

A reaction intermediate or an intermediate is a molecular entity that is formed from the reactants (or preceding intermediates) and reacts further to give the directly observed products of a chemical reaction.

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Reference ranges for blood tests

Reference ranges for blood tests are sets of values used by a health professional to interpret a set of medical test results from blood samples.

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Secretin

Secretin is a hormone that regulates water homeostasis throughout the body and influences the environment of the duodenum by regulating secretions in the stomach, pancreas, and liver.

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Sodium

Sodium is a chemical element with symbol Na (from Latin natrium) and atomic number 11.

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Sodium bicarbonate

Sodium bicarbonate (IUPAC name: sodium hydrogen carbonate), commonly known as baking soda, is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3.

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Sodium carbonate

Sodium carbonate, Na2CO3, (also known as washing soda, soda ash and soda crystals, and in the monohydrate form as crystal carbonate) is the water-soluble sodium salt of carbonic acid.

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Solubility

Solubility is the property of a solid, liquid or gaseous chemical substance called solute to dissolve in a solid, liquid or gaseous solvent.

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Standard conditions for temperature and pressure

Standard conditions for temperature and pressure are standard sets of conditions for experimental measurements to be established to allow comparisons to be made between different sets of data.

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Tissue (biology)

In biology, tissue is a cellular organizational level between cells and a complete organ.

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Total dissolved solids

Total dissolved solids (TDS) is a measure of the combined content of all inorganic and organic substances contained in a liquid in molecular, ionized or micro-granular (colloidal sol) suspended form.

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Total inorganic carbon

The total inorganic carbon (CT, or TIC) or dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is the sum of inorganic carbon species in a solution.

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Trigonal planar molecular geometry

In chemistry, trigonal planar is a molecular geometry model with one atom at the center and three atoms at the corners of an equilateral triangle, called peripheral atoms, all in one plane.

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Trivial name

In chemistry, a trivial name is a nonsystematic name for a chemical substance.

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Unified atomic mass unit

The unified atomic mass unit or dalton (symbol: u, or Da) is a standard unit of mass that quantifies mass on an atomic or molecular scale (atomic mass).

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Vinegar

Vinegar is a liquid consisting of about 5–20% acetic acid (CH3COOH), water (H2O), and trace chemicals that may include flavorings.

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Water quality

Water quality refers to the chemical, physical, biological, and radiological characteristics of water.

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William Hyde Wollaston

William Hyde Wollaston (6 August 1766 – 22 December 1828) was an English chemist and physicist who is famous for discovering the chemical elements palladium and rhodium.

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Redirects here:

Bicarb, Bicarbonate ion, Bicarbonates, HCO(3)(-), HCO-3, HCO3, HCO3-, Hco3, Hydrocarbonate, Hydrogen Carbonate, Hydrogen carbonate, Hydrogen carbonate ion, Hydrogen-carbonate, Hydrogencarbonate, Hydrogencarbonates, Sbce, Standard bicarbonate concentration.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicarbonate

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