Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Block (programming)

Index Block (programming)

In computer programming, a block or code block is a lexical structure of source code which is grouped together. [1]

30 relations: ALGOL, ALGOL 58, ALGOL 60, ALGOL 68, Autocode, BASIC, Basic block, Batch file, C (programming language), Closure (computer programming), Computer programming, Control flow, Declaration (computer programming), Edsger W. Dijkstra, Fortran, Goto, JavaScript syntax, Lisp (programming language), Loop-invariant code motion, Nested function, Off-side rule, Pascal (programming language), Python (programming language), S-expression, Scheme (programming language), Scope (computer science), Source code, Statement (computer science), Structured programming, Variable shadowing.

ALGOL

ALGOL (short for "Algorithmic Language") is a family of imperative computer programming languages, originally developed in the mid-1950s, which greatly influenced many other languages and was the standard method for algorithm description used by the ACM in textbooks and academic sources for more than thirty years.

New!!: Block (programming) and ALGOL · See more »

ALGOL 58

ALGOL 58, originally known as IAL, is one of the family of ALGOL computer programming languages.

New!!: Block (programming) and ALGOL 58 · See more »

ALGOL 60

ALGOL 60 (short for Algorithmic Language 1960) is a member of the ALGOL family of computer programming languages.

New!!: Block (programming) and ALGOL 60 · See more »

ALGOL 68

ALGOL 68 (short for Algorithmic Language 1968) is an imperative computer programming language that was conceived as a successor to the ALGOL 60 programming language, designed with the goal of a much wider scope of application and more rigorously defined syntax and semantics.

New!!: Block (programming) and ALGOL 68 · See more »

Autocode

Autocode is the name of a family of "simplified coding systems", later called programming languages, devised in the 1950s and 1960s for a series of digital computers at the Universities of Manchester, Cambridge and London.

New!!: Block (programming) and Autocode · See more »

BASIC

BASIC (an acronym for Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) is a family of general-purpose, high-level programming languages whose design philosophy emphasizes ease of use.

New!!: Block (programming) and BASIC · See more »

Basic block

In compiler construction, a basic block is a straight-line code sequence with no branches in except to the entry and no branches out except at the exit.

New!!: Block (programming) and Basic block · See more »

Batch file

A batch file is a kind of script file in DOS, OS/2 and Microsoft Windows.

New!!: Block (programming) and Batch file · See more »

C (programming language)

C (as in the letter ''c'') is a general-purpose, imperative computer programming language, supporting structured programming, lexical variable scope and recursion, while a static type system prevents many unintended operations.

New!!: Block (programming) and C (programming language) · See more »

Closure (computer programming)

In programming languages, a closure (also lexical closure or function closure) is a technique for implementing lexically scoped name binding in a language with first-class functions.

New!!: Block (programming) and Closure (computer programming) · See more »

Computer programming

Computer programming is the process of building and designing an executable computer program for accomplishing a specific computing task.

New!!: Block (programming) and Computer programming · See more »

Control flow

In computer science, control flow (or flow of control) is the order in which individual statements, instructions or function calls of an imperative program are executed or evaluated.

New!!: Block (programming) and Control flow · See more »

Declaration (computer programming)

In computer programming, a declaration is a language construct that specifies properties of an identifier: it declares what a word (identifier) "means".

New!!: Block (programming) and Declaration (computer programming) · See more »

Edsger W. Dijkstra

Edsger Wybe Dijkstra (11 May 1930 – 6 August 2002) was a Dutch systems scientist, programmer, software engineer, science essayist, and early pioneer in computing science.

New!!: Block (programming) and Edsger W. Dijkstra · See more »

Fortran

Fortran (formerly FORTRAN, derived from Formula Translation) is a general-purpose, compiled imperative programming language that is especially suited to numeric computation and scientific computing.

New!!: Block (programming) and Fortran · See more »

Goto

GoTo (goto, GOTO, GO TO or other case combinations, depending on the programming language) is a statement found in many computer programming languages.

New!!: Block (programming) and Goto · See more »

JavaScript syntax

The syntax of JavaScript is the set of rules that define a correctly structured JavaScript program.

New!!: Block (programming) and JavaScript syntax · See more »

Lisp (programming language)

Lisp (historically, LISP) is a family of computer programming languages with a long history and a distinctive, fully parenthesized prefix notation.

New!!: Block (programming) and Lisp (programming language) · See more »

Loop-invariant code motion

In computer programming, loop-invariant code consists of statements or expressions (in an imperative programming language) which can be moved outside the body of a loop without affecting the semantics of the program.

New!!: Block (programming) and Loop-invariant code motion · See more »

Nested function

In computer programming, a nested function (or nested procedure or subroutine) is a function which is defined within another function, the enclosing function.

New!!: Block (programming) and Nested function · See more »

Off-side rule

A computer programming language is said to adhere to the off-side rule if blocks in that language are expressed by their indentation.

New!!: Block (programming) and Off-side rule · See more »

Pascal (programming language)

Pascal is an imperative and procedural programming language, which Niklaus Wirth designed in 1968–69 and published in 1970, as a small, efficient language intended to encourage good programming practices using structured programming and data structuring. It is named in honor of the French mathematician, philosopher and physicist Blaise Pascal. Pascal was developed on the pattern of the ALGOL 60 language. Wirth had already developed several improvements to this language as part of the ALGOL X proposals, but these were not accepted and Pascal was developed separately and released in 1970. A derivative known as Object Pascal designed for object-oriented programming was developed in 1985; this was used by Apple Computer and Borland in the late 1980s and later developed into Delphi on the Microsoft Windows platform. Extensions to the Pascal concepts led to the Pascal-like languages Modula-2 and Oberon.

New!!: Block (programming) and Pascal (programming language) · See more »

Python (programming language)

Python is an interpreted high-level programming language for general-purpose programming.

New!!: Block (programming) and Python (programming language) · See more »

S-expression

In computing, s-expressions, sexprs or sexps (for "symbolic expression") are a notation for nested list (tree-structured) data, invented for and popularized by the programming language Lisp, which uses them for source code as well as data.

New!!: Block (programming) and S-expression · See more »

Scheme (programming language)

Scheme is a programming language that supports multiple paradigms, including functional programming and imperative programming, and is one of the two main dialects of Lisp.

New!!: Block (programming) and Scheme (programming language) · See more »

Scope (computer science)

In computer programming, the scope of a name binding – an association of a name to an entity, such as a variable – is the region of a computer program where the binding is valid: where the name can be used to refer to the entity.

New!!: Block (programming) and Scope (computer science) · See more »

Source code

In computing, source code is any collection of code, possibly with comments, written using a human-readable programming language, usually as plain text.

New!!: Block (programming) and Source code · See more »

Statement (computer science)

In computer programming, a statement is a syntactic unit of an imperative programming language that expresses some action to be carried out.

New!!: Block (programming) and Statement (computer science) · See more »

Structured programming

Structured programming is a programming paradigm aimed at improving the clarity, quality, and development time of a computer program by making extensive use of the structured control flow constructs of selection (if/then/else) and repetition (while and for), block structures, and subroutines in contrast to using simple tests and jumps such as the go to statement, which can lead to "spaghetti code" that is potentially difficult to follow and maintain.

New!!: Block (programming) and Structured programming · See more »

Variable shadowing

In computer programming, variable shadowing occurs when a variable declared within a certain scope (decision block, method, or inner class) has the same name as a variable declared in an outer scope.

New!!: Block (programming) and Variable shadowing · See more »

Redirects here:

Block of statements, Blocks of statements, Code block, Statement block.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Block_(programming)

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »