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Bowling Green (New York City)

Index Bowling Green (New York City)

Bowling Green is a small public park in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City, at the southern end of Broadway, next to the site of the original Dutch fort of New Amsterdam. [1]

98 relations: Advertising Age, Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House, Alexander Macomb House, American Revolutionary War, Ancient Rome, Arturo Di Modica, Benjamin Wistar Morris (architect), Black pepper, Black Watch, Bowling green, Bowling Green (IRT Lexington Avenue Line), Bowls, Broadway (Manhattan), Bronze sculpture, Bull, Business Insider, Carrère and Hastings, Charging Bull, City council, CNN, CNNMoney, Connecticut, Continental Army, Cunard Building (New York City), Desecration, Elite, Emery Roth, Equestrian statue, Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius, Fearless Girl, Federal architecture, Fifth Avenue, Financial District, Manhattan, Finial, Fort Amsterdam, George Ashdown Audsley, George B. Post, George Gustav Heye Center, George III of the United Kingdom, George Washington, Government House (New York City), Graffiti, Great Britain, International Mercantile Marine Company Building, IRT Lexington Avenue Line, Johannes Adam Simon Oertel, John Jay, John Stevens (New Jersey), John Trumbull, Joseph Wilton, ..., Kristen Visbal, Lafayette Street, London, Lower Manhattan, Loyalist (American Revolution), Manhattan, Market trend, Military parade, Museum of the City of New York, National Museum of the American Indian, National Register of Historic Places, NBC News, New Amsterdam, New York City, New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, New York City Hall, New York City Subway, New York Post, New York Stock Exchange, New-York Historical Society, Oliver Wolcott, Panama Pacific Line, Philadelphia, Robert R. Livingston (chancellor), Rose Hill, Manhattan, Seven Years' War, Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Skyscraper, Smithsonian Institution, Sons of Liberty, Stamp act, Stephen Whitney, The Battery (Manhattan), The Sorcerer's Apprentice (2010 film), United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York, United States Custom House (New York City), United States Declaration of Independence, Urbanism, Wall Street, Washington Square Park, White Star Line, Whitehall Street, William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, William Walcutt, World War II, 2 Broadway, 26 Broadway. Expand index (48 more) »

Advertising Age

Ad Age (or Advertising Age) is a global media brand publishing analysis, news and data on marketing and media.

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Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House

The Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House is a building in New York City built in 1902–07 by the federal government to house the duty collection operations for the Port of New York.

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Alexander Macomb House

The Alexander Macomb House (demolished) at 39–41 Broadway in Manhattan served as the second Presidential Mansion.

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American Revolutionary War

The American Revolutionary War (17751783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a global war that began as a conflict between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America. After 1765, growing philosophical and political differences strained the relationship between Great Britain and its colonies. Patriot protests against taxation without representation followed the Stamp Act and escalated into boycotts, which culminated in 1773 with the Sons of Liberty destroying a shipment of tea in Boston Harbor. Britain responded by closing Boston Harbor and passing a series of punitive measures against Massachusetts Bay Colony. Massachusetts colonists responded with the Suffolk Resolves, and they established a shadow government which wrested control of the countryside from the Crown. Twelve colonies formed a Continental Congress to coordinate their resistance, establishing committees and conventions that effectively seized power. British attempts to disarm the Massachusetts militia at Concord, Massachusetts in April 1775 led to open combat. Militia forces then besieged Boston, forcing a British evacuation in March 1776, and Congress appointed George Washington to command the Continental Army. Concurrently, an American attempt to invade Quebec and raise rebellion against the British failed decisively. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted for independence, issuing its declaration on July 4. Sir William Howe launched a British counter-offensive, capturing New York City and leaving American morale at a low ebb. However, victories at Trenton and Princeton restored American confidence. In 1777, the British launched an invasion from Quebec under John Burgoyne, intending to isolate the New England Colonies. Instead of assisting this effort, Howe took his army on a separate campaign against Philadelphia, and Burgoyne was decisively defeated at Saratoga in October 1777. Burgoyne's defeat had drastic consequences. France formally allied with the Americans and entered the war in 1778, and Spain joined the war the following year as an ally of France but not as an ally of the United States. In 1780, the Kingdom of Mysore attacked the British in India, and tensions between Great Britain and the Netherlands erupted into open war. In North America, the British mounted a "Southern strategy" led by Charles Cornwallis which hinged upon a Loyalist uprising, but too few came forward. Cornwallis suffered reversals at King's Mountain and Cowpens. He retreated to Yorktown, Virginia, intending an evacuation, but a decisive French naval victory deprived him of an escape. A Franco-American army led by the Comte de Rochambeau and Washington then besieged Cornwallis' army and, with no sign of relief, he surrendered in October 1781. Whigs in Britain had long opposed the pro-war Tories in Parliament, and the surrender gave them the upper hand. In early 1782, Parliament voted to end all offensive operations in North America, but the war continued in Europe and India. Britain remained under siege in Gibraltar but scored a major victory over the French navy. On September 3, 1783, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Paris in which Great Britain agreed to recognize the sovereignty of the United States and formally end the war. French involvement had proven decisive,Brooks, Richard (editor). Atlas of World Military History. HarperCollins, 2000, p. 101 "Washington's success in keeping the army together deprived the British of victory, but French intervention won the war." but France made few gains and incurred crippling debts. Spain made some minor territorial gains but failed in its primary aim of recovering Gibraltar. The Dutch were defeated on all counts and were compelled to cede territory to Great Britain. In India, the war against Mysore and its allies concluded in 1784 without any territorial changes.

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Ancient Rome

In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire until the fall of the western empire.

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Arturo Di Modica

Arturo Di Modica (born January 26, 1941) is an Italian artist, born in Vittoria, Sicily who became a naturalized U.S. citizen.

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Benjamin Wistar Morris (architect)

Benjamin Wistar Morris (sometimes III or Jr.; October 23, 1870 – December 4, 1944) was an American architect from Oregon who worked primarily in New York City.

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Black pepper

Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning, known as a peppercorn.

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Black Watch

The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland (3 SCOTS) is an infantry battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

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Bowling green

A bowling green is a finely-laid, close-mown and rolled stretch of turf for playing the game of bowls.

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Bowling Green (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)

Bowling Green is a station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line of the New York City Subway, located at Broadway and Battery Place (at the Bowling Green), in the Financial District of Manhattan.

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Bowls

Bowls or lawn bowls is a sport in which the objective is to roll biased balls called woods so that they stop close to a smaller ball called a "jack" or "kitty".

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Broadway (Manhattan)

Broadway is a road in the U.S. state of New York.

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Bronze sculpture

Bronze is the most popular metal for cast metal sculptures; a cast bronze sculpture is often called simply a "bronze".

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Bull

A bull is an intact (i.e., not castrated) adult male of the species Bos taurus (cattle).

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Business Insider

Business Insider is an American financial and business news website that also operates international editions in the UK, Australia, China, Germany, France, South Africa, India, Italy, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Netherlands, Nordics, Poland, Spanish and Singapore.

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Carrère and Hastings

Carrère and Hastings, the firm of John Merven Carrère (November 9, 1858 – March 1, 1911) and Thomas Hastings (March 11, 1860 – October 22, 1929), was one of the outstanding Beaux-Arts architecture firms in the United States.

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Charging Bull

Charging Bull, which is sometimes referred to as the Wall Street Bull or the Bowling Green Bull, is a bronze sculpture that stands in Bowling Green in the Financial District in Manhattan, New York City.

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City council

A city council, town council, town board, or board of aldermen is the legislative body that governs a city, town, municipality, or local government area.

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CNN

Cable News Network (CNN) is an American basic cable and satellite television news channel and an independent subsidiary of AT&T's WarnerMedia.

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CNNMoney

CNNMoney.com is a financial news and information website, operated by CNN.

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Connecticut

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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Continental Army

The Continental Army was formed by the Second Continental Congress after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the colonies that became the United States of America.

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Cunard Building (New York City)

The Cunard Building, also known as the Standard & Poors Building, is located at 25 Broadway in Lower Manhattan's Financial District.

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Desecration

Desecration is the act of depriving something of its sacred character, or the disrespectful, contemptuous, or destructive treatment of that which is held to be sacred or holy by a group or individual.

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Elite

In political and sociological theory, the elite (French élite, from Latin eligere) are a small group of powerful people who hold a disproportionate amount of wealth, privilege, political power, or skill in a society.

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Emery Roth

Emery Roth (Róth Imre, 1871 – August 20, 1948) was an American architect of Jewish descent who designed many of the definitive New York City hotels and apartment buildings of the 1920s and 1930s, incorporating Beaux-Arts and Art Deco details.

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Equestrian statue

An equestrian statue is a statue of a rider mounted on a horse, from the Latin "eques", meaning "knight", deriving from "equus", meaning "horse".

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Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius

The Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius is an ancient Roman statue in the Capitoline Hill, Rome, Italy.

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Fearless Girl

Fearless Girl is a bronze sculpture by Kristen Visbal, commissioned by State Street Global Advisors via McCann New York, depicting a girl facing the Charging Bull (or Wall Street Bull) statue.

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Federal architecture

Federal-style architecture is the name for the classicizing architecture built in the newly founded United States between c. 1780 and 1830, and particularly from 1785 to 1815.

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Fifth Avenue

Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, United States.

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Financial District, Manhattan

The Financial District of Lower Manhattan, also known as FiDi, is a neighborhood located on the southern tip of Manhattan Island, where the City of New York itself originated in 1624.

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Finial

A finial or hip-knob is an element marking the top or end of some object, often formed to be a decorative feature.

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Fort Amsterdam

Fort Amsterdam (subsequently named Fort James, Fort Willem Hendrick, Fort James (again), Fort William Henry, Fort Anne and Fort George) was a fort on the southern tip of Manhattan that was the administrative headquarters for the Dutch and then English/British rule of New York from 1625 or 1626 until being torn down in 1790 after the American Revolution.

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George Ashdown Audsley

George Ashdown Audsley (September 6, 1838 – June 21, 1925) was an accomplished architect, artist, illustrator, writer, decorator and pipe organ designer who excelled in many artistic fields but is perhaps best known today for having designed the Wanamaker Organ in Philadelphia.

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George B. Post

George Browne Post (December 15, 1837 – November 28, 1913) was an American architect trained in the Beaux-Arts tradition.

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George Gustav Heye Center

The George Gustav Heye Center is a branch of the National Museum of the American Indian in Manhattan, New York City.

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George III of the United Kingdom

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820.

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George Washington

George Washington (February 22, 1732 –, 1799), known as the "Father of His Country," was an American soldier and statesman who served from 1789 to 1797 as the first President of the United States.

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Government House (New York City)

The Government House was a mansion at the foot of Broadway, south of Bowling Green, on the site previously occupied by Fort George in Manhattan, New York City.

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Graffiti

Graffiti (plural of graffito: "a graffito", but "these graffiti") are writing or drawings that have been scribbled, scratched, or painted, typically illicitly, on a wall or other surface, often within public view.

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Great Britain

Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe.

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International Mercantile Marine Company Building

The International Mercantile Marine Company Building, also known as One Broadway and the "United States Lines-Panama Pacific Lines Building", is a historic office building located on Broadway in New York, New York.

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IRT Lexington Avenue Line

The IRT Lexington Avenue Line (also known as the IRT East Side Line and the IRT Lexington–Fourth Avenue Line) is one of the lines of the A Division of the New York City Subway, stretching from Lower Manhattan north to 125th Street in East Harlem.

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Johannes Adam Simon Oertel

Johannes Adam Simon Oertel (3 November 1823 in Fürth, Bavaria – 9 December 1909) was a German-American Episcopal clergyman and artist.

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John Jay

John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, Patriot, diplomat, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795).

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John Stevens (New Jersey)

John Stevens Jr. (c. 1715 – May 10, 1792) was a prominent colonial American landowner, merchant, and politician.

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John Trumbull

John Trumbull (June 6, 1756November 10, 1843) was an American artist during the period of the American Revolutionary War and was notable for his historical paintings.

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Joseph Wilton

Joseph Wilton (16 July 1722 – 25 November 1803) was an English sculptor.

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Kristen Visbal

Kristen Visbal (born December 3, 1962 in Montevideo, Uruguay) is an American sculptor living and working in Lewes, Delaware.

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Lafayette Street

Lafayette Street is a major north-south street in New York City's Lower Manhattan.

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London

London is the capital and most populous city of England and the United Kingdom.

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Lower Manhattan

Lower Manhattan, also known as Downtown Manhattan or Downtown New York, is the southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in the City of New York, which itself originated at the southern tip of Manhattan Island in 1624, at a point which now constitutes the present-day Financial District.

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Loyalist (American Revolution)

Loyalists were American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War, often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men at the time.

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Manhattan

Manhattan is the most densely populated borough of New York City, its economic and administrative center, and its historical birthplace.

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Market trend

A market trend is a perceived tendency of financial markets to move in a particular direction over time.

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Military parade

A military parade is a formation of soldiers whose movement is restricted by close-order manouvering known as drilling or marching.

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Museum of the City of New York

The Museum of the City of New York (MCNY) is a history and art museum in New York City, New York.

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National Museum of the American Indian

The National Museum of the American Indian is part of the Smithsonian Institution and is committed to advancing knowledge and understanding of the Native cultures of the Western Hemisphere—past, present, and future—through partnership with Native people and others.

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National Register of Historic Places

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance.

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NBC News

NBC News is the news division of the American broadcast television network NBC, formerly known as the National Broadcasting Company when it was founded on radio.

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New Amsterdam

New Amsterdam (Nieuw Amsterdam, or) was a 17th-century Dutch settlement established at the southern tip of Manhattan Island that served as the seat of the colonial government in New Netherland.

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New York City

The City of New York, often called New York City (NYC) or simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States.

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New York City Department of Parks and Recreation

The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, also called Parks Department and NYC Parks, is the department of the government of New York City responsible for maintaining the city's parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the city's natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for city's residents and visitors.

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New York City Hall

New York City Hall, the seat of New York City government, is located at the center of City Hall Park in the Civic Center area of Lower Manhattan, between Broadway, Park Row, and Chambers Street.

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New York City Subway

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, a subsidiary agency of the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA).

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New York Post

The New York Post is the fourth-largest newspaper in the United States and a leading digital media publisher that reached more than 57 million unique visitors in the U.S. in January 2017.

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New York Stock Exchange

The New York Stock Exchange (abbreviated as NYSE, and nicknamed "The Big Board"), is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York.

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New-York Historical Society

The New-York Historical Society is an American history museum and library located in New York City at the corner of 77th Street and Central Park West in Manhattan, founded in 1804 as New York's first museum.

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Oliver Wolcott

Oliver Wolcott Sr. (November 20, 1726December 1, 1797) was an American politician.

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Panama Pacific Line

Panama Pacific Line was a subsidiary of International Mercantile Marine (IMM) established to carry passengers and freight between the US East and West Coasts via the Panama Canal.

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Philadelphia

Philadelphia is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2017 census-estimated population of 1,580,863.

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Robert R. Livingston (chancellor)

Robert Robert Livingston (November 27, 1746 (Old Style November 16) – February 26, 1813) was an American lawyer, politician, diplomat from New York, and a Founding Father of the United States.

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Rose Hill, Manhattan

Rose Hill is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, between the neighborhoods of Murray Hill to the north and Gramercy Park to the south, Kips Bay to the east, the Flatiron District to the southwest, and NoMad to the northwest.

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Seven Years' War

The Seven Years' War was a global conflict fought between 1756 and 1763.

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Shreve, Lamb & Harmon

Shreve, Lamb, and Harmon, founded as Shreve & Lamb, was an architectural firm, best known for designing the Empire State Building, the tallest building in the world at the time of its completion in 1931.

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Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM) is an American architectural, urban planning, and engineering firm.

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Skyscraper

A skyscraper is a continuously habitable high-rise building that has over 40 floors and is taller than approximately.

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Smithsonian Institution

The Smithsonian Institution, established on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States.

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Sons of Liberty

The Sons of Liberty was an organization that was created in the Thirteen American Colonies.

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Stamp act

A stamp act is any legislation that requires a tax to be paid on the transfer of certain documents.

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Stephen Whitney

Stephen Whitney (1776–1860) was one of the wealthiest merchants in New York City in the first half of the 19th century.

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The Battery (Manhattan)

The Battery (also commonly known as Battery Park) is a public park located at the southern tip of Manhattan Island in New York City facing New York Harbor.

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The Sorcerer's Apprentice (2010 film)

The Sorcerer's Apprentice is a 2010 American action-fantasy film produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, directed by Jon Turteltaub, and released by Walt Disney Pictures, the team behind the ''National Treasure'' franchise.

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United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York

The United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York is the United States bankruptcy court within the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.

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United States Custom House (New York City)

The United States Custom House, sometimes referred to as the New York Custom House, was the place where federal customs duties on imported goods were collected in New York City.

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United States Declaration of Independence

The United States Declaration of Independence is the statement adopted by the Second Continental Congress meeting at the Pennsylvania State House (now known as Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776.

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Urbanism

Urbanism is the study of how inhabitants of urban areas, such as towns and cities, interact with the built environment.

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Wall Street

Wall Street is an eight-block-long street running roughly northwest to southeast from Broadway to South Street, at the East River, in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City.

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Washington Square Park

Washington Square Park is a public park in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City.

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White Star Line

The Oceanic Steam Navigation Company, more commonly known as the White Star Line, was a prominent British shipping company.

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Whitehall Street

Whitehall Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan, about four blocks long.

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William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham

William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, (15 November 1708 – 11 May 1778) was a British statesman of the Whig group who led the government of Great Britain twice in the middle of the 18th century.

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William Walcutt

William Walcutt (April 28, 1819, Columbus, Ohio – April 22, 1882, New York City) was an American painter and sculptor, best remembered for the Perry Monument (Cleveland) in Cleveland, Ohio.

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World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

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2 Broadway

2 Broadway is an office building at the south end of Broadway, near Bowling Green Park in New York City.

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26 Broadway

26 Broadway, also known as the Standard Oil Building, is a 31-story, landmarked office building located at Bowling Green in the Financial District of New York City.

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Redirects here:

Bowling Green (Manhattan), Bowling Green Fence and Park, Bowling Green Park, Bowling Green, Manhattan.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowling_Green_(New_York_City)

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