Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Bubonic plague

Index Bubonic plague

Bubonic plague is one of three types of plague caused by bacterium Yersinia pestis. [1]

95 relations: Albert Camus, Aminoglycoside, Animal, Antibiotic, Antigen, Bacilli, Biological warfare, Black Death, Black Death in medieval culture, Black Death migration, Bleeding, Bubo, Byzantine Empire, Changde, Chester A. Arthur, Chills, Chinese Exclusion Act, Ciprofloxacin, Coma, Crimea, Dipstick, Doxycycline, East Asia, Epileptic seizure, Existentialism, Feodosia, Fever, Flea, Frame story, Gangrene, Geary Act, Gentamicin, Geoffrey Chaucer, Giovanni Boccaccio, Guangzhou, Headache, Hematemesis, Hong Kong, Imperial Japanese Army, Imperial Japanese Army Air Service, Infection, Infectious disease (medical specialty), Influenza-like illness, Ingmar Bergman, Justinian I, Khabarovsk War Crime Trials, Late Middle Ages, List of cutaneous conditions, List of epidemics, Lymph node, ..., Lymphatic system, Lymphatic vessel, Malaise, Medical diagnosis, Mediterranean Sea, Miasma theory, Microbiological culture, Mongolia under Yuan rule, Mongols, Natural reservoir, Necrosis, Ningbo, Oakland, California, Oriental rat flea, Petrarch, Phagocyte, Plague (disease), Plague doctor, Plague of Justinian, Pneumonic plague, Procopius, Quinolone antibiotic, Royal Asiatic Society Hong Kong Branch, Second Sino-Japanese War, Septicemic plague, Serum (blood), Shirō Ishii, Siege, Silk Road, Southwest China, Sputum, Streptomycin, Tetracycline antibiotics, The Decameron, The New York Times, The Plague, The Seventh Seal, Third plague pandemic, Unit 731, Vaccine, Western canon, World Health Organization, Yersinia pestis, 1994 plague in India, 2017 Madagascar plague outbreak. Expand index (45 more) »

Albert Camus

Albert Camus (7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French philosopher, author, and journalist.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Albert Camus · See more »

Aminoglycoside

Aminoglycoside is a medicinal and bacteriologic category of traditional Gram-negative antibacterial therapeutic agents that inhibit protein synthesis and contain as a portion of the molecule an amino-modified glycoside (sugar); the term can also refer more generally to any organic molecule that contains aminosugar substructures.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Aminoglycoside · See more »

Animal

Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Animal · See more »

Antibiotic

An antibiotic (from ancient Greek αντιβιοτικά, antibiotiká), also called an antibacterial, is a type of antimicrobial drug used in the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Antibiotic · See more »

Antigen

In immunology, an antigen is a molecule capable of inducing an immune response (to produce an antibody) in the host organism.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Antigen · See more »

Bacilli

Bacilli refers to a taxonomic class of bacteria.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Bacilli · See more »

Biological warfare

Biological warfare (BW)—also known as germ warfare—is the use of biological toxins or infectious agents such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi with the intent to kill or incapacitate humans, animals or plants as an act of war.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Biological warfare · See more »

Black Death

The Black Death, also known as the Great Plague, the Black Plague, or simply the Plague, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated people in Eurasia and peaking in Europe from 1347 to 1351.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Black Death · See more »

Black Death in medieval culture

The Black Death in medieval culture includes the impact of the Black Death (1347-1350) on art and literature throughout the generation that experienced it.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Black Death in medieval culture · See more »

Black Death migration

The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people in Eurasia and peaking in Europe from 1346 to 1353.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Black Death migration · See more »

Bleeding

Bleeding, also known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging, is blood escaping from the circulatory system.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Bleeding · See more »

Bubo

A bubo (Greek βουβών, boubôn, "groin") (plural form: boubônes) is the swelling of the lymph nodes.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Bubo · See more »

Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium).

New!!: Bubonic plague and Byzantine Empire · See more »

Changde

Changde is a prefecture-level city in the northwest of Hunan province, People's Republic of China, with a population of 5,717,218 as of the 2010 census, of which 1,232,182 reside in the urban districts of Dingcheng and Wuling.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Changde · See more »

Chester A. Arthur

Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American attorney and politician who served as the 21st President of the United States from 1881 to 1885; he succeeded James A. Garfield upon the latter's assassination.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Chester A. Arthur · See more »

Chills

Chills is a feeling of coldness occurring during a high fever, but sometimes is also a common symptom which occurs alone in specific people.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Chills · See more »

Chinese Exclusion Act

The Chinese Exclusion Act was a United States federal law signed by President Chester A. Arthur on May 6, 1882, prohibiting all immigration of Chinese laborers.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Chinese Exclusion Act · See more »

Ciprofloxacin

Ciprofloxacin is an antibiotic used to treat a number of bacterial infections.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Ciprofloxacin · See more »

Coma

Coma is a state of unconsciousness in which a person cannot be awaken; fails to respond normally to painful stimuli, light, or sound; lacks a normal wake-sleep cycle; and does not initiate voluntary actions.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Coma · See more »

Crimea

Crimea (Крым, Крим, Krym; Krym; translit;; translit) is a peninsula on the northern coast of the Black Sea in Eastern Europe that is almost completely surrounded by both the Black Sea and the smaller Sea of Azov to the northeast.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Crimea · See more »

Dipstick

A dipstick is one of several measurement devices.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Dipstick · See more »

Doxycycline

Doxycycline is an antibiotic that is used in the treatment of a number of types of infections caused by bacteria and protozoa.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Doxycycline · See more »

East Asia

East Asia is the eastern subregion of the Asian continent, which can be defined in either geographical or ethno-cultural "The East Asian cultural sphere evolves when Japan, Korea, and what is today Vietnam all share adapted elements of Chinese civilization of this period (that of the Tang dynasty), in particular Buddhism, Confucian social and political values, and literary Chinese and its writing system." terms.

New!!: Bubonic plague and East Asia · See more »

Epileptic seizure

An epileptic seizure is a brief episode of signs or symptoms due to abnormally excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Epileptic seizure · See more »

Existentialism

Existentialism is a tradition of philosophical inquiry associated mainly with certain 19th and 20th-century European philosophers who, despite profound doctrinal differences,Oxford Companion to Philosophy, ed.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Existentialism · See more »

Feodosia

Feodosia (Феодо́сия, Feodosiya; Феодо́сія, Feodosiia; Crimean Tatar and Turkish: Kefe), also called Theodosia (from), is a port and resort, a town of regional significance in Crimea on the Black Sea coast.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Feodosia · See more »

Fever

Fever, also known as pyrexia and febrile response, is defined as having a temperature above the normal range due to an increase in the body's temperature set-point.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Fever · See more »

Flea

Fleas are small flightless insects that form the order Siphonaptera.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Flea · See more »

Frame story

A frame story (also known as a frame tale or frame narrative) is a literary technique that sometimes serves as a companion piece to a story within a story, whereby an introductory or main narrative is presented, at least in part, for the purpose of setting the stage either for a more emphasized second narrative or for a set of shorter stories.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Frame story · See more »

Gangrene

Gangrene is a type of tissue death caused by a lack of blood supply.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Gangrene · See more »

Geary Act

The Geary Act was a United States law that extended the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 by adding onerous new requirements.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Geary Act · See more »

Gentamicin

Gentamicin, sold under brand names Garamycin among others, is an antibiotic used to treat several types of bacterial infections.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Gentamicin · See more »

Geoffrey Chaucer

Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343 – 25 October 1400), known as the Father of English literature, is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Geoffrey Chaucer · See more »

Giovanni Boccaccio

Giovanni Boccaccio (16 June 1313 – 21 December 1375) was an Italian writer, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and an important Renaissance humanist.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Giovanni Boccaccio · See more »

Guangzhou

Guangzhou, also known as Canton, is the capital and most populous city of the province of Guangdong.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Guangzhou · See more »

Headache

Headache is the symptom of pain anywhere in the region of the head or neck.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Headache · See more »

Hematemesis

Hematemesis or haematemesis is the vomiting of blood.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Hematemesis · See more »

Hong Kong

Hong Kong (Chinese: 香港), officially the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is an autonomous territory of China on the eastern side of the Pearl River estuary in East Asia.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Hong Kong · See more »

Imperial Japanese Army

The Imperial Japanese Army (IJA; Dai-Nippon Teikoku Rikugun; "Army of the Greater Japanese Empire") was the official ground-based armed force of the Empire of Japan from 1868 to 1945.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Imperial Japanese Army · See more »

Imperial Japanese Army Air Service

The or, more literally, the Greater Japan Empire Army Air Corps, was the aviation force of the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA).

New!!: Bubonic plague and Imperial Japanese Army Air Service · See more »

Infection

Infection is the invasion of an organism's body tissues by disease-causing agents, their multiplication, and the reaction of host tissues to the infectious agents and the toxins they produce.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Infection · See more »

Infectious disease (medical specialty)

Infectious disease, also known as infectious diseases, infectious medicine, infectious disease medicine or infectiology, is a medical specialty dealing with the diagnosis, control and treatment of infections.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Infectious disease (medical specialty) · See more »

Influenza-like illness

Influenza-like illness (ILI), also known as acute respiratory infection (ARI) and flu-like syndrome/symptoms, is a medical diagnosis of possible influenza or other illness causing a set of common symptoms.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Influenza-like illness · See more »

Ingmar Bergman

Ernst Ingmar Bergman (14 July 1918 – 30 July 2007) was a Swedish director, writer, and producer who worked in film, television, theatre and radio.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Ingmar Bergman · See more »

Justinian I

Justinian I (Flavius Petrus Sabbatius Iustinianus Augustus; Flávios Pétros Sabbátios Ioustinianós; 482 14 November 565), traditionally known as Justinian the Great and also Saint Justinian the Great in the Eastern Orthodox Church, was the Eastern Roman emperor from 527 to 565.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Justinian I · See more »

Khabarovsk War Crime Trials

The Khabarovsk War Crime Trials were hearings held between 25–31 December 1949, in the Soviet Union's industrial city of Khabarovsk (Хаба́ровск), the largest city within the Russian Far East (Дáльний Востóк) adjacent to Japan.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Khabarovsk War Crime Trials · See more »

Late Middle Ages

The Late Middle Ages or Late Medieval Period was the period of European history lasting from 1250 to 1500 AD.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Late Middle Ages · See more »

List of cutaneous conditions

Many conditions affect the human integumentary system—the organ system covering the entire surface of the body and composed of skin, hair, nails, and related muscle and glands.

New!!: Bubonic plague and List of cutaneous conditions · See more »

List of epidemics

This article is a list of epidemics of infectious disease.

New!!: Bubonic plague and List of epidemics · See more »

Lymph node

A lymph node or lymph gland is an ovoid or kidney-shaped organ of the lymphatic system, and of the adaptive immune system, that is widely present throughout the body.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Lymph node · See more »

Lymphatic system

The lymphatic system is part of the vascular system and an important part of the immune system, comprising a network of lymphatic vessels that carry a clear fluid called lymph (from Latin, lympha meaning "water") directionally towards the heart.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Lymphatic system · See more »

Lymphatic vessel

The lymphatic vessels (or lymph vessels or lymphatics) are thin-walled vessels structured like blood vessels, that carry lymph.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Lymphatic vessel · See more »

Malaise

Malaise is a feeling of general discomfort, uneasiness or pain, often the first indication of an infection or other disease.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Malaise · See more »

Medical diagnosis

Medical diagnosis (abbreviated Dx or DS) is the process of determining which disease or condition explains a person's symptoms and signs.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Medical diagnosis · See more »

Mediterranean Sea

The Mediterranean Sea is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa and on the east by the Levant.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Mediterranean Sea · See more »

Miasma theory

The miasma theory (also called the miasmatic theory) is an obsolete medical theory that held that diseases—such as cholera, chlamydia, or the Black Death—were caused by a miasma (μίασμα, ancient Greek: "pollution"), a noxious form of "bad air", also known as night air.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Miasma theory · See more »

Microbiological culture

A microbiological culture, or microbial culture, is a method of multiplying microbial organisms by letting them reproduce in predetermined culture medium under controlled laboratory conditions.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Microbiological culture · See more »

Mongolia under Yuan rule

The Yuan dynasty ruled over the Mongolian steppe, including both Inner and Outer Mongolia as well as part of southern Siberia, for roughly a century between 1271 and 1368.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Mongolia under Yuan rule · See more »

Mongols

The Mongols (ᠮᠣᠩᠭᠣᠯᠴᠤᠳ, Mongolchuud) are an East-Central Asian ethnic group native to Mongolia and China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Mongols · See more »

Natural reservoir

In infectious disease ecology and epidemiology, a natural reservoir, also known as a disease reservoir or a reservoir of infection, is the population of organisms or the specific environment in which an infectious pathogen naturally lives and reproduces, or upon which the pathogen primarily depends for its survival.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Natural reservoir · See more »

Necrosis

Necrosis (from the Greek νέκρωσις "death, the stage of dying, the act of killing" from νεκρός "dead") is a form of cell injury which results in the premature death of cells in living tissue by autolysis.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Necrosis · See more »

Ningbo

Ningbo, formerly written Ningpo, is a sub-provincial city in northeast Zhejiang province in China. It comprises the urban districts of Ningbo proper, three satellite cities, and a number of rural counties including islands in Hangzhou Bay and the East China Sea. Its port, spread across several locations, is among the busiest in the world and the municipality possesses a separate state-planning status. As of the 2010 census, the entire administrated area had a population of 7.6 million, with 3.5 million in the six urban districts of Ningbo proper. To the north, Hangzhou Bay separates Ningbo from Shanghai; to the east lies Zhoushan in the East China Sea; on the west and south, Ningbo borders Shaoxing and Taizhou respectively.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Ningbo · See more »

Oakland, California

Oakland is the largest city and the county seat of Alameda County, California, United States.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Oakland, California · See more »

Oriental rat flea

The Oriental rat flea (Xenopsylla cheopis), also known as the tropical rat flea, is a parasite of rodents, primarily of the genus Rattus, and is a primary vector for bubonic plague and murine typhus.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Oriental rat flea · See more »

Petrarch

Francesco Petrarca (July 20, 1304 – July 18/19, 1374), commonly anglicized as Petrarch, was a scholar and poet of Renaissance Italy who was one of the earliest humanists.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Petrarch · See more »

Phagocyte

Phagocytes are cells that protect the body by ingesting harmful foreign particles, bacteria, and dead or dying cells.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Phagocyte · See more »

Plague (disease)

Plague is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Plague (disease) · See more »

Plague doctor

A plague doctor was a medical physician who treated victims of the bubonic plague.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Plague doctor · See more »

Plague of Justinian

The Plague of Justinian (541–542) was a pandemic that afflicted the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, especially its capital Constantinople, the Sassanid Empire, and port cities around the entire Mediterranean Sea.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Plague of Justinian · See more »

Pneumonic plague

Pneumonic plague is a severe lung infection caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Pneumonic plague · See more »

Procopius

Procopius of Caesarea (Προκόπιος ὁ Καισαρεύς Prokopios ho Kaisareus, Procopius Caesariensis; 500 – 554 AD) was a prominent late antique Greek scholar from Palaestina Prima.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Procopius · See more »

Quinolone antibiotic

A quinolone antibiotic is any member of a large group of broad-spectrum bactericides that share a bicyclic core structure related to the compound 4-quinolone.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Quinolone antibiotic · See more »

Royal Asiatic Society Hong Kong Branch

Royal Asiatic Society Hong Kong Branch was founded in 1847, but ceased to exist at the end of 1859.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Royal Asiatic Society Hong Kong Branch · See more »

Second Sino-Japanese War

The Second Sino-Japanese War was a military conflict fought primarily between the Republic of China and the Empire of Japan from July 7, 1937, to September 2, 1945.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Second Sino-Japanese War · See more »

Septicemic plague

Septicemic plague is one of the three main forms of plague.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Septicemic plague · See more »

Serum (blood)

In blood, the serum is the component that is neither a blood cell (serum does not contain white or red blood cells) nor a clotting factor; it is the blood plasma not including the fibrinogens.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Serum (blood) · See more »

Shirō Ishii

Surgeon General was a Japanese army medical officer, microbiologist and the director of Unit 731, a biological warfare unit of the Imperial Japanese Army involved in forced and frequently lethal human experimentation during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945).

New!!: Bubonic plague and Shirō Ishii · See more »

Siege

A siege is a military blockade of a city, or fortress, with the intent of conquering by attrition, or a well-prepared assault.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Siege · See more »

Silk Road

The Silk Road was an ancient network of trade routes that connected the East and West.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Silk Road · See more »

Southwest China

Southwest China is a region of the People's Republic of China defined by governmental bureaus that includes the municipality of Chongqing, the provinces of Sichuan, Yunnan and Guizhou, and the Tibet Autonomous Region.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Southwest China · See more »

Sputum

Sputum is mucus and is the name used for the coughed-up material (phlegm) from the lower airways (trachea and bronchi).

New!!: Bubonic plague and Sputum · See more »

Streptomycin

Streptomycin is an antibiotic used to treat a number of bacterial infections.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Streptomycin · See more »

Tetracycline antibiotics

Tetracyclines are broad-spectrum antibiotics whose general usefulness has been reduced with the onset of antibiotic resistance.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Tetracycline antibiotics · See more »

The Decameron

The Decameron (Italian title: "Decameron" or "Decamerone"), subtitled "Prince Galehaut" (Old Prencipe Galeotto and sometimes nicknamed "Umana commedia", "Human comedy"), is a collection of novellas by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375).

New!!: Bubonic plague and The Decameron · See more »

The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

New!!: Bubonic plague and The New York Times · See more »

The Plague

The Plague (French: La Peste) is a novel by Albert Camus, published in 1947, that tells the story of a plague sweeping the French Algerian city of Oran.

New!!: Bubonic plague and The Plague · See more »

The Seventh Seal

The Seventh Seal (Det sjunde inseglet) is a 1957 Swedish epic historical fantasy film written and directed by Ingmar Bergman.

New!!: Bubonic plague and The Seventh Seal · See more »

Third plague pandemic

Third Pandemic is the designation of a major bubonic plague pandemic that began in Yunnan province in China in 1855.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Third plague pandemic · See more »

Unit 731

was a covert biological and chemical warfare research and development unit of the Imperial Japanese Army that undertook lethal human experimentation during the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937–1945) of World War II.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Unit 731 · See more »

Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that provides active acquired immunity to a particular disease.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Vaccine · See more »

Western canon

The Western canon is the body of Western literature, European classical music, philosophy, and works of art that represents the high culture of Europe and North America: "a certain Western intellectual tradition that goes from, say, Socrates to Wittgenstein in philosophy, and from Homer to James Joyce in literature".

New!!: Bubonic plague and Western canon · See more »

World Health Organization

The World Health Organization (WHO; French: Organisation mondiale de la santé) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health.

New!!: Bubonic plague and World Health Organization · See more »

Yersinia pestis

Yersinia pestis (formerly Pasteurella pestis) is a Gram-negative, non-motile rod-shaped coccobacillus, with no spores.

New!!: Bubonic plague and Yersinia pestis · See more »

1994 plague in India

The 1994 plague in India was an outbreak of bubonic and pneumonic plague in south-central and southwestern India from 26 August to 18 October 1994.

New!!: Bubonic plague and 1994 plague in India · See more »

2017 Madagascar plague outbreak

An outbreak of plague in Madagascar began in August 2017 and expanded rapidly, with about two-thirds of cases transmitted person-to-person as pneumonic plague, the most dangerous form of the disease.

New!!: Bubonic plague and 2017 Madagascar plague outbreak · See more »

Redirects here:

Bubonic Plague, How the black plague got to europe, Lenticulae, The Bubonic Plague.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubonic_plague

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »