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Camber thrust

Index Camber thrust

Camber thrust and camber force are terms used to describe the force generated perpendicular to the direction of travel of a rolling tire due to its camber angle and finite contact patch. [1]

15 relations: Bicycle, Bicycle and motorcycle dynamics, Camber angle, Car, Centripetal force, Contact patch, Cornering force, Friction, Motorcycle, Motorcycle tyre, Radial tire, Relaxation length, Slip angle, Tire, Vehicle dynamics.

Bicycle

A bicycle, also called a cycle or bike, is a human-powered, pedal-driven, single-track vehicle, having two wheels attached to a frame, one behind the other.

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Bicycle and motorcycle dynamics

Bicycle and motorcycle dynamics is the science of the motion of bicycles and motorcycles and their components, due to the forces acting on them.

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Camber angle

From the front of the car, a right wheel with a negative camber angle Camber angle is the angle made by the wheels of a vehicle; specifically, it is the angle between the vertical axis of the wheels used for steering and the vertical axis of the vehicle when viewed from the front or rear.

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Car

A car (or automobile) is a wheeled motor vehicle used for transportation.

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Centripetal force

A centripetal force (from Latin centrum, "center" and petere, "to seek") is a force that makes a body follow a curved path.

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Contact patch

Contact patch is the portion of a vehicle's tire that is in actual contact with the road surface.

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Cornering force

Cornering force or side force is the lateral (i.e., parallel to the road surface) force produced by a vehicle tire during cornering.

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Friction

Friction is the force resisting the relative motion of solid surfaces, fluid layers, and material elements sliding against each other.

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Motorcycle

A motorcycle, often called a bike, motorbike, or cycle, is a two-> or three-wheeled motor vehicle.

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Motorcycle tyre

Motorcycle tyres (tires in American English) are the outer part of motorcycle wheels, attached to the rims, providing traction, resisting wear, absorbing surface irregularities, and allowing the motorcycle to turn via countersteering.

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Radial tire

A radial tire (more properly, a radial-ply tire) is a particular design of vehicular tire.

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Relaxation length

Relaxation length is a property of pneumatic tires that describes the delay between when a slip angle is introduced and when the cornering force reaches its steady-state value.

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Slip angle

In vehicle dynamics, slip angle or sideslip angle is the angle between a rolling wheel's actual direction of travel and the direction towards which it is pointing (i.e., the angle of the vector sum of wheel forward velocity v_x and lateral velocity v_y).

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Tire

A tire (American English) or tyre (British English; see spelling differences) is a ring-shaped component that surrounds a wheel's rim to transfer a vehicle's load from the axle through the wheel to the ground and to provide traction on the surface traveled over.

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Vehicle dynamics

For vehicles such as cars, vehicle dynamics is the study of how the vehicle will react to driver inputs on a given road.

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References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camber_thrust

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