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Carbonic acid

Index Carbonic acid

Carbonic acid is a chemical compound with the chemical formula H2CO3 (equivalently OC(OH)2). [1]

66 relations: Acetone, Acid dissociation constant, Acid strength, Acid–base homeostasis, Angewandte Chemie, Base (chemistry), Bicarbonate, Bicarbonate buffer system, Bjerrum plot, Blood plasma, Buffer solution, Calcium bicarbonate, Carbon dioxide, Carbonate, Carbonated water, Carbonic anhydrase, Carbonyl fluoride, Catalysis, Chemical compound, Chemical equilibrium, Chemical formula, Cryogenics, Dihydroxymethylidene, Diprotic acid, Dry ice, Equilibrium constant, Ester, Gas exchange, Goddard Space Flight Center, Half-life, Henry's law, Hydrate, Hydrogen chloride, Ionic strength, Journal of Physical Chemistry A, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Journal of the Chemical Society, Faraday Transactions, Limestone, Mars, Methanol, NASA, Nonvolatile acid, Ocean acidification, Orthocarbonic acid, Partial pressure, PH, Phenol, Physiology, Polymorphism (materials science), Potassium bicarbonate, ..., Properties of water, Reaction rate constant, Red blood cell, Royal Society of Chemistry, Salt (chemistry), Science (journal), Seawater, Soft drink, Solution, Spectrochimica Acta Part A, Stalactite, Stalagmite, Sulfur dioxide, Sulfurous acid, Total inorganic carbon, Urea. Expand index (16 more) »

Acetone

Acetone (systematically named propanone) is the organic compound with the formula (CH3)2CO.

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Acid dissociation constant

An acid dissociation constant, Ka, (also known as acidity constant, or acid-ionization constant) is a quantitative measure of the strength of an acid in solution.

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Acid strength

The strength of an acid refers to its ability or tendency to lose a proton (H+).

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Acid–base homeostasis

Acid–base homeostasis is the homeostatic regulation of the pH of the body's extracellular fluid (ECF).

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Angewandte Chemie

Angewandte Chemie (meaning "Applied Chemistry") is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal that is published by Wiley-VCH on behalf of the German Chemical Society (Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker).

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Base (chemistry)

In chemistry, bases are substances that, in aqueous solution, release hydroxide (OH−) ions, are slippery to the touch, can taste bitter if an alkali, change the color of indicators (e.g., turn red litmus paper blue), react with acids to form salts, promote certain chemical reactions (base catalysis), accept protons from any proton donor, and/or contain completely or partially displaceable OH− ions.

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Bicarbonate

In inorganic chemistry, bicarbonate (IUPAC-recommended nomenclature: hydrogencarbonate) is an intermediate form in the deprotonation of carbonic acid.

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Bicarbonate buffer system

The bicarbonate buffer system is an acid-base homeostatic mechanism involving the balance of carbonic acid (H2CO3), bicarbonate ion (HCO), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to maintain pH in the blood and duodenum, among other tissues, to support proper metabolic function.

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Bjerrum plot

A Bjerrum plot (named after Niels Bjerrum) is a graph of the concentrations of the different species of a polyprotic acid in a solution, as functions of the solution's pH, when the solution is at equilibrium.

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Blood plasma

Blood plasma is a yellowish coloured liquid component of blood that normally holds the blood cells in whole blood in suspension; this makes plasma the extracellular matrix of blood cells.

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Buffer solution

A buffer solution (more precisely, pH buffer or hydrogen ion buffer) is an aqueous solution consisting of a mixture of a weak acid and its conjugate base, or vice versa.

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Calcium bicarbonate

Calcium bicarbonate, also called calcium hydrogen carbonate, has a chemical formula Ca(HCO3)2.

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Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide (chemical formula) is a colorless gas with a density about 60% higher than that of dry air.

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Carbonate

In chemistry, a carbonate is a salt of carbonic acid (H2CO3), characterized by the presence of the carbonate ion, a polyatomic ion with the formula of.

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Carbonated water

Carbonated water (bubbly water, fizzy water) is water into which carbon dioxide gas under pressure has been dissolved, either by technology or by a natural geologic source.

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Carbonic anhydrase

The carbonic anhydrases (or carbonate dehydratases) form a family of enzymes that catalyze the interconversion between carbon dioxide and water and the dissociated ions of carbonic acid (i.e. bicarbonate and protons).

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Carbonyl fluoride

Carbonyl fluoride is a chemical compound with the formula COF2.

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Catalysis

Catalysis is the increase in the rate of a chemical reaction due to the participation of an additional substance called a catalysthttp://goldbook.iupac.org/C00876.html, which is not consumed in the catalyzed reaction and can continue to act repeatedly.

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Chemical compound

A chemical compound is a chemical substance composed of many identical molecules (or molecular entities) composed of atoms from more than one element held together by chemical bonds.

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Chemical equilibrium

In a chemical reaction, chemical equilibrium is the state in which both reactants and products are present in concentrations which have no further tendency to change with time, so that there is no observable change in the properties of the system.

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Chemical formula

A chemical formula is a way of presenting information about the chemical proportions of atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound or molecule, using chemical element symbols, numbers, and sometimes also other symbols, such as parentheses, dashes, brackets, commas and plus (+) and minus (−) signs.

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Cryogenics

In physics, cryogenics is the production and behaviour of materials at very low temperatures.

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Dihydroxymethylidene

Dihydroxymethylidene is a chemical compound with formula C(OH)2.

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Diprotic acid

In chemistry, diprotic acid is a class of Arrhenius acids which are capable of donating two protons or hydrogen cations per molecule when dissociating in aqueous solutions.

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Dry ice

Dry ice, sometimes referred to as "cardice" (chiefly by British chemists), is the solid form of carbon dioxide.

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Equilibrium constant

The equilibrium constant of a chemical reaction is the value of its reaction quotient at chemical equilibrium, a state approached by a dynamic chemical system after sufficient time has elapsed at which its composition has no measurable tendency towards further change.

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Ester

In chemistry, an ester is a chemical compound derived from an acid (organic or inorganic) in which at least one –OH (hydroxyl) group is replaced by an –O–alkyl (alkoxy) group.

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Gas exchange

Gas exchange is the physical process by which gases move passively by diffusion across a surface.

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Goddard Space Flight Center

The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is a major NASA space research laboratory located approximately northeast of Washington, D.C. in Greenbelt, Maryland, United States.

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Half-life

Half-life (symbol t1⁄2) is the time required for a quantity to reduce to half its initial value.

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Henry's law

In chemistry, Henry's law is a gas law that states that the amount of dissolved gas is proportional to its partial pressure in the gas phase.

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Hydrate

In chemistry, a hydrate is a substance that contains water or its constituent elements.

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Hydrogen chloride

The compound hydrogen chloride has the chemical formula and as such is a hydrogen halide.

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Ionic strength

The concept of ionic strength was first introduced by Lewis and Randall in 1921 while describing the activity coefficients of strong electrolytes.

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Journal of Physical Chemistry A

The Journal of Physical Chemistry A is a scientific journal which reports research on the chemistry of molecules - including their dynamics, spectroscopy, kinetics, structure, bonding, and quantum chemistry.

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Journal of the American Chemical Society

The Journal of the American Chemical Society (also known as JACS) is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1879 by the American Chemical Society.

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Journal of the Chemical Society, Faraday Transactions

The Journal of the Chemical Society, Faraday Transactions was a peer-reviewed scientific journal published from 1905 until 1998.

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Limestone

Limestone is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs.

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Mars

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury.

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Methanol

Methanol, also known as methyl alcohol among others, is a chemical with the formula CH3OH (a methyl group linked to a hydroxyl group, often abbreviated MeOH).

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NASA

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent agency of the executive branch of the United States federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.

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Nonvolatile acid

A nonvolatile acid (also known as a fixed acid or metabolic acid) is an acid produced in the body from sources other than carbon dioxide, and is not excreted by the lungs.

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Ocean acidification

Ocean acidification is the ongoing decrease in the pH of the Earth's oceans, caused by the uptake of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

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Orthocarbonic acid

Orthocarbonic acid (methanetetrol) is the name given to a hypothetical compound with the chemical formula H4CO4 or C(OH)4.

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Partial pressure

In a mixture of gases, each gas has a partial pressure which is the hypothetical pressure of that gas if it alone occupied the entire volume of the original mixture at the same temperature.

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PH

In chemistry, pH is a logarithmic scale used to specify the acidity or basicity of an aqueous solution.

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Phenol

Phenol, also known as phenolic acid, is an aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C6H5OH.

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Physiology

Physiology is the scientific study of normal mechanisms, and their interactions, which work within a living system.

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Polymorphism (materials science)

In materials science, polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one form or crystal structure.

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Potassium bicarbonate

Potassium bicarbonate (also known as potassium hydrogen carbonate or potassium acid carbonate) is a colorless, odorless, slightly basic, salty substance.

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Properties of water

Water is a polar inorganic compound that is at room temperature a tasteless and odorless liquid, which is nearly colorless apart from an inherent hint of blue. It is by far the most studied chemical compound and is described as the "universal solvent" and the "solvent of life". It is the most abundant substance on Earth and the only common substance to exist as a solid, liquid, and gas on Earth's surface. It is also the third most abundant molecule in the universe. Water molecules form hydrogen bonds with each other and are strongly polar. This polarity allows it to separate ions in salts and strongly bond to other polar substances such as alcohols and acids, thus dissolving them. Its hydrogen bonding causes its many unique properties, such as having a solid form less dense than its liquid form, a relatively high boiling point of 100 °C for its molar mass, and a high heat capacity. Water is amphoteric, meaning that it is both an acid and a base—it produces + and - ions by self-ionization.

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Reaction rate constant

In chemical kinetics a reaction rate constant or reaction rate coefficient, k, quantifies the rate of a chemical reaction.

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Red blood cell

Red blood cells-- also known as RBCs, red cells, red blood corpuscles, haematids, erythroid cells or erythrocytes (from Greek erythros for "red" and kytos for "hollow vessel", with -cyte translated as "cell" in modern usage), are the most common type of blood cell and the vertebrate's principal means of delivering oxygen (O2) to the body tissues—via blood flow through the circulatory system.

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Royal Society of Chemistry

The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) is a learned society (professional association) in the United Kingdom with the goal of "advancing the chemical sciences".

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Salt (chemistry)

In chemistry, a salt is an ionic compound that can be formed by the neutralization reaction of an acid and a base.

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Science (journal)

Science, also widely referred to as Science Magazine, is the peer-reviewed academic journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and one of the world's top academic journals.

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Seawater

Seawater, or salt water, is water from a sea or ocean.

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Soft drink

A soft drink (see terminology for other names) typically contains carbonated water (although some lemonades are not carbonated), a sweetener, and a natural or artificial flavoring.

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Solution

In chemistry, a solution is a special type of homogeneous mixture composed of two or more substances.

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Spectrochimica Acta Part A

Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal covering spectroscopy.

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Stalactite

A stalactite (from the Greek stalasso, (σταλάσσω), "to drip", and meaning "that which drips") is a type of formation that hangs from the ceiling of caves, hot springs, or manmade structures such as bridges and mines.

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Stalagmite

A stalagmite (or; from the Greek σταλαγμίτης -, from σταλαγμίας -, "dropping, trickling") is a type of rock formation that rises from the floor of a cave due to the accumulation of material deposited on the floor from ceiling drippings.

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Sulfur dioxide

Sulfur dioxide (also sulphur dioxide in British English) is the chemical compound with the formula.

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Sulfurous acid

Sulfurous acid (also sulphurous acid) is the chemical compound with the formula H2SO3.

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Total inorganic carbon

The total inorganic carbon (CT, or TIC) or dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is the sum of inorganic carbon species in a solution.

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Urea

Urea, also known as carbamide, is an organic compound with chemical formula CO(NH2)2.

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Redirects here:

Acid of air, Aerial acid, Aqueous dihydrogen carbonate, CH2O3, Carbon dioxide solution, Carboni acid, Carbonic (acid), Carbonic Acid, Carbonic acids, Dihydrogen carbonate, H2CO3, H2co3, Hydrogen bicarbonate, Hydroxymethanoic acid, H₂CO₃, Respiratory acid, Volatile (acid), Volatile acid, Volatile acids.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonic_acid

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