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Cermna Finn

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Cermna Finn, son of Ebric and a great, great grandson of Míl Espáine, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, joint High King of Ireland with his brother Sobairce. [1]

22 relations: Annals of the Four Masters, Assyria, Conmáel, County Antrim, County Cork, Drogheda, Dunseverick, Eochaid Étgudach, Eochaid Faebar Glas, Fomorians, Geoffrey Keating, High King of Ireland, Hill of Tara, Kingdom of Judah, Kinsale, Lebor Gabála Érenn, Limerick, List of High Kings of Ireland, Míl Espáine, Rehoboam, Sobairce, Ulaid.

Annals of the Four Masters

The Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland (Annála Ríoghachta Éireann) or the Annals of the Four Masters (Annála na gCeithre Máistrí) are chronicles of medieval Irish history.

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Assyria

Assyria, also called the Assyrian Empire, was a major Semitic speaking Mesopotamian kingdom and empire of the ancient Near East and the Levant.

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Conmáel

Conmáel, son of Éber Finn, according to medieval Irish legend and historical traditions, became High King of Ireland when he killed Ethriel, son of Íriel Fáid, in the Battle of Rairiu.

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County Antrim

County Antrim (named after the town of Antrim)) is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the north-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of and has a population of about 618,000. County Antrim has a population density of 203 people per square kilometre or 526 people per square mile. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, as well as part of the historic province of Ulster. The Glens of Antrim offer isolated rugged landscapes, the Giant's Causeway is a unique landscape and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Bushmills produces whiskey, and Portrush is a popular seaside resort and night-life area. The majority of Belfast, the capital city of Northern Ireland, is in County Antrim, with the remainder being in County Down. It is currently one of only two counties of Ireland to have a majority of the population from a Protestant background, according to the 2001 census. The other is County Down to the south.

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County Cork

County Cork (Contae Chorcaí) is a county in Ireland.

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Drogheda

Drogheda is one of the oldest towns in Ireland.

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Dunseverick

Dunseverick is a hamlet near the Giant's Causeway in County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

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Eochaid Étgudach

Eochaid or Eochu Étgudach ("possessing clothes") or Etgedach ("negligent"?), son of Daire Doimthech, son of Conghal, son of Eadaman, son of Mal, son of Lugaid, son of Íth, son of Breogán, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

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Eochaid Faebar Glas

Eochaid Faebar Glas, son of Conmáel, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, a High King of Ireland.

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Fomorians

The Fomorians (Fomoire, Modern Fomhóraigh) are a supernatural race in Irish mythology.

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Geoffrey Keating

Seathrún Céitinn (c. 1569 – c. 1644; known in English as Geoffrey Keating) was a 17th-century historian.

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High King of Ireland

The High Kings of Ireland (Ard-Rí na hÉireann) were sometimes historical and sometimes legendary figures who had, or who are claimed to have had, lordship over the whole of Ireland.

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Hill of Tara

The Hill of Tara (Teamhair or Teamhair na Rí), located near the River Boyne, is an archaeological complex that runs between Navan and Dunshaughlin in County Meath, Ireland.

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Kingdom of Judah

The Kingdom of Judah (מַמְלֶכֶת יְהוּדָה, Mamlekhet Yehudāh) was an Iron Age kingdom of the Southern Levant.

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Kinsale

Kinsale (meaning "Tide Head") is a historic port and fishing town in County Cork, Ireland, which also has significant military history.

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Lebor Gabála Érenn

Lebor Gabála Érenn (The Book of the Taking of Ireland) is a collection of poems and prose narratives that purports to be a history of Ireland and the Irish from the creation of the world to the Middle Ages.

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Limerick

Limerick (Luimneach) is a city in County Limerick, Ireland.

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List of High Kings of Ireland

Medieval Irish historical tradition held that Ireland had been ruled by an Ard Rí or High King since ancient times, and compilations like the 11th-century Lebor Gabála Érenn, followed by early modern works like the Annals of the Four Masters and Geoffrey Keating's Foras Feasa ar Éirinn, purported to trace the line of High Kings.

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Míl Espáine

In Irish origin legends, Míl Espáine or Míl Espáne (later Latinized as Milesius; also Miled/Miledh) is the mythical ancestor of the final inhabitants of Ireland, the "sons of Míl" or Milesians, who represent the vast majority of the Irish Gaels.

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Rehoboam

Rehoboam was the fourth king of Israel according to the Hebrew Bible.

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Sobairce

Sobairce, son of Ebric and a great great grandson of Míl Espáine, was, according to medieval Irish legend and historical tradition, joint High King of Ireland with his brother Cermna Finn.

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Ulaid

Ulaid (Old Irish) or Ulaidh (modern Irish)) was a Gaelic over-kingdom in north-eastern Ireland during the Middle Ages, made up of a confederation of dynastic groups. Alternative names include Ulidia, which is the Latin form of Ulaid, as well as in Chóicid, which in Irish means "the Fifth". The king of Ulaid was called the rí Ulad or rí in Chóicid. Ulaid also refers to a people of early Ireland, and it is from them that the province derives its name. Some of the dynasties within the over-kingdom claimed descent from the Ulaid, whilst others are cited as being of Cruithin descent. In historical documents, the term Ulaid was used to refer to the population-group, of which the Dál Fiatach was the ruling dynasty. As such the title Rí Ulad held two meanings: over-king of Ulaid; and king of the Ulaid, as in the Dál Fiatach. The Ulaid feature prominently in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. According to legend, the ancient territory of Ulaid spanned the whole of the modern province of Ulster, excluding County Cavan, but including County Louth. Its southern border was said to stretch from the River Drowes in the west to the River Boyne in the east. At the onset of the historic period of Irish history in the 6th century, the territory of Ulaid was largely confined to east of the River Bann, as it is said to have lost land to the Airgíalla and the Northern Uí Néill. Ulaid ceased to exist after its conquest in the late 12th century by the Anglo-Norman knight John de Courcy, and was replaced with the Earldom of Ulster. An individual from Ulaid was known in Irish as an Ultach, the nominative plural being Ultaigh. This name lives on in the surname McAnulty or McNulty, from Mac an Ultaigh ("son of the Ulsterman").

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Cearmna Finn.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cermna_Finn

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