Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Chemical weapons in World War I

+ Save concept

The use of toxic chemicals as weapons dates back thousands of years, but the first large scale use of chemical weapons was during World War I. They were primarily used to demoralize, injure, and kill entrenched defenders, against whom the indiscriminate and generally very slow-moving or static nature of gas clouds would be most effective. [1]

192 relations: Acrolein, Adamsite, Adjutant, Air filter, Air raid on Bari, Alleged British use of chemical weapons in Mesopotamia in 1920, Allies of World War I, American Expeditionary Forces, Armistice of 11 November 1918, Arras, Artillery, Artillery battery, Asphyxia, Asphyxiant gas, Austria-Hungary, Autopsy, Avonmouth Docks, BASF, Battle of Bolimów, Battle of Hill 60 (Western Front), Battle of Loos, Battle of Neuve Chapelle, Battle of Passchendaele, Bayer, Benzyl bromide, Benzyl chloride, Berlin, Bis(chloromethyl) ether, Blister, Blister agent, Blue Cross (chemical warfare), British Empire, Bromine, Bromoacetone, Bronchus, Cambrai, Camp American University, Carbon dioxide, Central Powers, Charles Wilson, 1st Baron Moran, Chemical warfare, Chemical weapon, Chlorine, Chloroacetone, Chloromethyl chloroformate, Chloropicrin, Civilian, Cluny Macpherson (physician), Conjunctiva, Corrosive substance, ..., CRC Press, Daily Mail, Diphosgene, Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, Dulce et Decorum est, Eastern Front (World War I), Ethyl bromoacetate, Ethyldichloroarsine, Explosive material, Extermination camp, Field marshal (United Kingdom), Flanders, Flesquières, Fragmentation (weaponry), Fritz Haber, Gas cylinder, Gas mask, Gassed (painting), Geneva Protocol, Grenade, Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907, Halabja chemical attack, Hexamethylenetetramine, Hindenburg Line, Hoechst AG, Hundred Days Offensive, Hydrochloric acid, Hydrogen cyanide, Hydrogen sulfide, Hypo helmet, IG Farben, II Corps (United Kingdom), Imperial Russian Army, Indiana University Press, Iran–Iraq War, Iron harvest, Irritation, Italian Front (World War I), John Singer Sargent, Kaiser Wilhelm Society, Langemark-Poelkapelle, Larynx, Lens, Pas-de-Calais, Lewisite, Little, Brown and Company, Livens Projector, London Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter, London Regiment (1908–1938), Martinique, Meuse-Argonne Offensive, Military personnel, Mortar (weapon), Mucous membrane, Nerve agent, Nieuwpoort, Belgium, No man's land, Operation Downfall, Operation Michael, Operation Sea Lion, Oslo Dumping Convention, Osowiec Fortress, Oxford University Press, Palestine (region), Paris, Parts-per notation, PH helmet, Phenol, Phosgene, Pneumonia, Poperinge, Propellant, Rawka (river), Rawka, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, Rif, Royal Newfoundland Regiment, Russian Civil War, Russian Empire, Salient (military), Sarin, Scrotum, Second Battle of Gaza, Second Battle of Ypres, Second Italo-Ethiopian War, Shell (projectile), Shell shock, Shenyang, Shrapnel shell, Silicon carbide, Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet, Sneeze, Sodium bicarbonate, Sodium phenoxide, Sodium thiosulfate, Soman, Spring Offensive, Suippes, Sulfonamide (medicine), Sulfur mustard, Tabun (nerve agent), Talc, Tambov Rebellion, Tear gas, Tin(IV) chloride, Tirailleur, Tissue (biology), Ton, Total war, Trachea, Trench, Trench warfare, Tuberculosis, United States Senate, University of Washington Press, Urea, Urine, Vera Brittain, Victor Grignard, Vimy, War crime, Warlord, Warsaw, Washington Naval Conference, Weapon of mass destruction, Western Front (World War I), Wiley-VCH, Wilfred Owen, William Howard Livens, Willoughby, Ohio, Wind, Winston Churchill, World Disarmament Conference, World war, World War I, World War II, Xylyl bromide, Ypres, Zhang Zuolin, Zone Rouge, Zouave, Zyklon B, 1st Canadian Division, 28th Division (United Kingdom). Expand index (142 more) »

Acrolein

Acrolein (systematic name: propenal) is the simplest unsaturated aldehyde.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Acrolein · See more »

Adamsite

Adamsite or DM is an organic compound; technically, an arsenical diphenylaminechlorarsine, that can be used as a riot control agent.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Adamsite · See more »

Adjutant

Adjutant is a military appointment given to an officer who assists the commanding officer with unit administration.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Adjutant · See more »

Air filter

A particulate air filter is a device composed of fibrous or porous materials which removes solid particulates such as dust, pollen, mold, and bacteria from the air.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Air filter · See more »

Air raid on Bari

The air raid on Bari was an air attack by German bombers on Allied forces and shipping in Bari, Italy on 2 December 1943 during World War II.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Air raid on Bari · See more »

Alleged British use of chemical weapons in Mesopotamia in 1920

It has been alleged that the British used chemical weapons in Mesopotamia in 1920, during the Iraqi revolt (Ath Thawra al Iraqiyya al Kubra), in the period of the British Mandate.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Alleged British use of chemical weapons in Mesopotamia in 1920 · See more »

Allies of World War I

The Allies of World War I, or Entente Powers, were the countries that opposed the Central Powers in the First World War.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Allies of World War I · See more »

American Expeditionary Forces

The American Expeditionary Forces (A. E. F., A.E.F. or AEF) was a formation of the United States Army on the Western Front of World War I. The AEF was established on July 5, 1917, in France under the command of Gen.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and American Expeditionary Forces · See more »

Armistice of 11 November 1918

The Armistice of 11 November 1918 was the armistice that ended fighting on land, sea and air in World War I between the Allies and their last opponent, Germany.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Armistice of 11 November 1918 · See more »

Arras

Arras (Atrecht) is the capital (chef-lieu/préfecture) of the Pas-de-Calais department, which forms part of the region of Hauts-de-France; prior to the reorganization of 2014 it was located in Nord-Pas-de-Calais.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Arras · See more »

Artillery

Artillery is a class of large military weapons built to fire munitions far beyond the range and power of infantry's small arms.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Artillery · See more »

Artillery battery

In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles etc, so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Artillery battery · See more »

Asphyxia

Asphyxia or asphyxiation is a condition of severely deficient supply of oxygen to the body that arises from abnormal breathing.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Asphyxia · See more »

Asphyxiant gas

An asphyxiant gas is a nontoxic or minimally toxic gas which reduces or displaces the normal oxygen concentration in breathing air.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Asphyxiant gas · See more »

Austria-Hungary

Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Dual Monarchy in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire (the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary (Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Austria-Hungary · See more »

Autopsy

An autopsy (post-mortem examination, obduction, necropsy, or autopsia cadaverum) is a highly specialized surgical procedure that consists of a thorough examination of a corpse by dissection to determine the cause and manner of death or to evaluate any disease or injury that may be present for research or educational purposes.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Autopsy · See more »

Avonmouth Docks

The Avonmouth Docks are part of the Port of Bristol, in England.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Avonmouth Docks · See more »

BASF

BASF SE is a German chemical company and the largest chemical producer in the world.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and BASF · See more »

Battle of Bolimów

The Battle of Bolimów was an inconclusive battle of World War I fought on January 31, 1915 between Germany and Russia and considered a preliminary to the Second Battle of the Masurian Lakes.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Battle of Bolimów · See more »

Battle of Hill 60 (Western Front)

The Battle of Hill 60 took place near Hill 60 south of Ypres on the Western Front, during the First World War.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Battle of Hill 60 (Western Front) · See more »

Battle of Loos

The Battle of Loos was a battle that took place from 1915 in France on the Western Front, during the First World War.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Battle of Loos · See more »

Battle of Neuve Chapelle

The Battle of Neuve Chapelle (10–13 March 1915) took place in the First World War.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Battle of Neuve Chapelle · See more »

Battle of Passchendaele

The Battle of Passchendaele (Flandernschlacht, Deuxième Bataille des Flandres), also known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was a campaign of the First World War, fought by the Allies against the German Empire.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Battle of Passchendaele · See more »

Bayer

Bayer AG is a German multinational, pharmaceutical and life sciences company.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Bayer · See more »

Benzyl bromide

Benzyl bromide is an organic compound with the formula C6H5CH2Br.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Benzyl bromide · See more »

Benzyl chloride

Benzyl chloride, or α-chlorotoluene, is an organic compound with the formula C6H5CH2Cl.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Benzyl chloride · See more »

Berlin

Berlin is the capital and the largest city of Germany, as well as one of its 16 constituent states.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Berlin · See more »

Bis(chloromethyl) ether

Bis(chloromethyl) ether is an organic compound with the chemical formula (CH2Cl)2O.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Bis(chloromethyl) ether · See more »

Blister

A blister is a small pocket of body fluid (lymph, serum, plasma, blood, or pus) within the upper layers of the skin, typically caused by forceful rubbing (friction), burning, freezing, chemical exposure or infection.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Blister · See more »

Blister agent

A blister agent, or vesicant, is a chemical compound that causes severe skin, eye and mucosal pain and irritation.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Blister agent · See more »

Blue Cross (chemical warfare)

Blue Cross (Blaukreuz) is a World War I chemical warfare agent consisting of diphenylchloroarsine (DA, Clark I), diphenylcyanoarsine (CDA, Clark II), ethyldichloroarsine (Dick), and/or methyldichloroarsine (Methyldick).

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Blue Cross (chemical warfare) · See more »

British Empire

The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and British Empire · See more »

Bromine

Bromine is a chemical element with symbol Br and atomic number 35.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Bromine · See more »

Bromoacetone

Bromoacetone is an organic compound with the formula 3CCH2.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Bromoacetone · See more »

Bronchus

A bronchus, is a passage of airway in the respiratory system that conducts air into the lungs.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Bronchus · See more »

Cambrai

Cambrai (Kimbré; Kamerijk; historically in English Camerick and Camericke) is a commune in the Nord department and in the Hauts-de-France region of France on the Scheldt river, which is known locally as the Escaut river.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Cambrai · See more »

Camp American University

Camp American University was the name the U.S. military used for the segment of the Washington, DC main campus of American University during World War I and World War II.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Camp American University · See more »

Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide (chemical formula) is a colorless gas with a density about 60% higher than that of dry air.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Carbon dioxide · See more »

Central Powers

The Central Powers (Mittelmächte; Központi hatalmak; İttifak Devletleri / Bağlaşma Devletleri; translit), consisting of Germany,, the Ottoman Empire and Bulgaria – hence also known as the Quadruple Alliance (Vierbund) – was one of the two main factions during World War I (1914–18).

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Central Powers · See more »

Charles Wilson, 1st Baron Moran

Charles McMoran Wilson, 1st Baron Moran, MC, PRCP (10 November 1882 – 12 April 1977) was personal physician to Sir Winston Churchill from 1940 until the latter’s death in 1965.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Charles Wilson, 1st Baron Moran · See more »

Chemical warfare

Chemical warfare (CW) involves using the toxic properties of chemical substances as weapons.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Chemical warfare · See more »

Chemical weapon

A chemical weapon (CW) is a specialized munition that uses chemicals formulated to inflict death or harm on humans.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Chemical weapon · See more »

Chlorine

Chlorine is a chemical element with symbol Cl and atomic number 17.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Chlorine · See more »

Chloroacetone

Chloroacetone is a chemical compound with the formula 3CCH2.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Chloroacetone · See more »

Chloromethyl chloroformate

Chloromethyl chloroformate (CClO2CH2Cl) is a chemical compound developed for use in chemical warfare in World War I. It is a tearing agent designed to cause temporary blindness.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Chloromethyl chloroformate · See more »

Chloropicrin

Chloropicrin, also known as PS and nitrochloroform, is a chemical compound currently used as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial, fungicide, herbicide, insecticide, and nematicide.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Chloropicrin · See more »

Civilian

A civilian is "a person who is not a member of the military or of a police or firefighting force".

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Civilian · See more »

Cluny Macpherson (physician)

Cluny Macpherson (March 18, 1879 – November 16, 1966) was a physician and the inventor of an early gas mask.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Cluny Macpherson (physician) · See more »

Conjunctiva

The conjunctiva lines the inside of the eyelids and covers the sclera (the white of the eye).

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Conjunctiva · See more »

Corrosive substance

A corrosive substance is one that will destroy and damage other substances with which it comes into contact.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Corrosive substance · See more »

CRC Press

The CRC Press, LLC is a publishing group based in the United States that specializes in producing technical books.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and CRC Press · See more »

Daily Mail

The Daily Mail is a British daily middle-marketPeter Wilby, New Statesman, 19 December 2013 (online version: 2 January 2014) tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust and published in London.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Daily Mail · See more »

Diphosgene

Diphosgene is a chemical compound with the formula ClCO2CCl3.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Diphosgene · See more »

Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig

Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, (19 June 1861 – 29 January 1928), was a senior officer of the British Army.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig · See more »

Dulce et Decorum est

"Dulce et Decorum est" (read here) is a poem written by Wilfred Owen during World War I, and published posthumously in 1920.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Dulce et Decorum est · See more »

Eastern Front (World War I)

The Eastern Front or Eastern Theater of World War I (Восточный фронт, Vostochnıy front, sometimes called the Second Fatherland War or Second Patriotic War (Вторая Отечественная война, Vtoraya Otechestvennaya voyna) in Russian sources) was a theatre of operations that encompassed at its greatest extent the entire frontier between the Russian Empire and Romania on one side and the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Bulgaria, the Ottoman Empire and the German Empire on the other. It stretched from the Baltic Sea in the north to the Black Sea in the south, included most of Eastern Europe and stretched deep into Central Europe as well. The term contrasts with "Western Front", which was being fought in Belgium and France. During 1910, Russian General Yuri Danilov developed "Plan 19" under which four armies would invade East Prussia. This plan was criticised as Austria-Hungary could be a greater threat than the German Empire. So instead of four armies invading East Prussia, the Russians planned to send two armies to East Prussia, and two Armies to defend against Austro-Hungarian forces invading from Galicia. In the opening months of the war, the Imperial Russian Army attempted an invasion of eastern Prussia in the northwestern theater, only to be beaten back by the Germans after some initial success. At the same time, in the south, they successfully invaded Galicia, defeating the Austro-Hungarian forces there. In Russian Poland, the Germans failed to take Warsaw. But by 1915, the German and Austro-Hungarian armies were on the advance, dealing the Russians heavy casualties in Galicia and in Poland, forcing it to retreat. Grand Duke Nicholas was sacked from his position as the commander-in-chief and replaced by the Tsar himself. Several offensives against the Germans in 1916 failed, including Lake Naroch Offensive and the Baranovichi Offensive. However, General Aleksei Brusilov oversaw a highly successful operation against Austria-Hungary that became known as the Brusilov Offensive, which saw the Russian Army make large gains. The Kingdom of Romania entered the war in August 1916. The Entente promised the region of Transylvania (which was part of Austria-Hungary) in return for Romanian support. The Romanian Army invaded Transylvania and had initial successes, but was forced to stop and was pushed back by the Germans and Austro-Hungarians when Bulgaria attacked them in the south. Meanwhile, a revolution occurred in Russia in February 1917 (one of the several causes being the hardships of the war). Tsar Nicholas II was forced to abdicate and a Russian Provisional Government was founded, with Georgy Lvov as its first leader, who was eventually replaced by Alexander Kerensky. The newly formed Russian Republic continued to fight the war alongside Romania and the rest of the Entente until it was overthrown by the Bolsheviks in October 1917. Kerensky oversaw the July Offensive, which was largely a failure and caused a collapse in the Russian Army. The new government established by the Bolsheviks signed the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk with the Central Powers, taking it out of the war and making large territorial concessions. Romania was also forced to surrender and signed a similar treaty, though both of the treaties were nullified with the surrender of the Central Powers in November 1918.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Eastern Front (World War I) · See more »

Ethyl bromoacetate

Ethyl bromoacetate is the chemical compound with the formula CH2BrCO2C2H5.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Ethyl bromoacetate · See more »

Ethyldichloroarsine

Ethyldichloroarsine, sometimes abbreviated "ED", is an organoarsenic compound with the formula CH3CH2AsCl2.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Ethyldichloroarsine · See more »

Explosive material

An explosive material, also called an explosive, is a reactive substance that contains a great amount of potential energy that can produce an explosion if released suddenly, usually accompanied by the production of light, heat, sound, and pressure.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Explosive material · See more »

Extermination camp

Nazi Germany built extermination camps (also called death camps or killing centers) during the Holocaust in World War II, to systematically kill millions of Jews, Slavs, Communists, and others whom the Nazis considered "Untermenschen" ("subhumans").

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Extermination camp · See more »

Field marshal (United Kingdom)

Field Marshal has been the highest rank in the British Army since 1736.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Field marshal (United Kingdom) · See more »

Flanders

Flanders (Vlaanderen, Flandre, Flandern) is the Dutch-speaking northern portion of Belgium, although there are several overlapping definitions, including ones related to culture, language, politics and history.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Flanders · See more »

Flesquières

Flesquières is a commune in the Nord department in northern France.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Flesquières · See more »

Fragmentation (weaponry)

Fragmentation is the process by which the casing of an artillery or mortar shell, rocket, missile, bomb, grenade, etc.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Fragmentation (weaponry) · See more »

Fritz Haber

Fritz Haber (9 December 1868 – 29 January 1934) was a German chemist who received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1918 for his invention of the Haber–Bosch process, a method used in industry to synthesize ammonia from nitrogen gas and hydrogen gas.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Fritz Haber · See more »

Gas cylinder

A gas cylinder or tank is a pressure vessel used to store gases at above atmospheric pressure.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Gas cylinder · See more »

Gas mask

The gas mask is a mask used to protect the user from inhaling airborne pollutants and toxic gases.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Gas mask · See more »

Gassed (painting)

Gassed is a very large oil painting completed in March 1919 by John Singer Sargent.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Gassed (painting) · See more »

Geneva Protocol

The Protocol for the Prohibition of the Use in War of Asphyxiating, Poisonous or other Gases, and of Bacteriological Methods of Warfare, usually called the Geneva Protocol, is a treaty prohibiting the use of chemical and biological weapons in international armed conflicts.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Geneva Protocol · See more »

Grenade

A grenade is a small weapon typically thrown by hand.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Grenade · See more »

Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907

The Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907 are a series of international treaties and declarations negotiated at two international peace conferences at The Hague in the Netherlands.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907 · See more »

Halabja chemical attack

The Halabja chemical attack (Kurdish: Kîmyabarana Helebce کیمیابارانی ھەڵەبجە), also known as the Halabja Massacre or Bloody Friday, was a massacre against the Kurdish people that took place on March 16, 1988, during the closing days of the Iran–Iraq War in the Kurdish city of Halabja in Iraq.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Halabja chemical attack · See more »

Hexamethylenetetramine

Hexamethylenetetramine or methenamine is a heterocyclic organic compound with the formula (CH2)6N4.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Hexamethylenetetramine · See more »

Hindenburg Line

The Hindenburg Line (Siegfriedstellung or Siegfried Position) was a German defensive position of World War I, built during the winter of 1916–1917 on the Western Front, from Arras to Laffaux, near Soissons on the Aisne.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Hindenburg Line · See more »

Hoechst AG

Hoechst AG was a German chemicals then life-sciences company that became Aventis Deutschland after its merger with France's Rhône-Poulenc S.A. in 1999.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Hoechst AG · See more »

Hundred Days Offensive

The Hundred Days Offensive was the final period of the First World War, during which the Allies launched a series of offensives against the Central Powers on the Western Front from 8 August to 11 November 1918, beginning with the Battle of Amiens.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Hundred Days Offensive · See more »

Hydrochloric acid

Hydrochloric acid is a colorless inorganic chemical system with the formula.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Hydrochloric acid · See more »

Hydrogen cyanide

Hydrogen cyanide (HCN), sometimes called prussic acid, is a chemical compound with the chemical formula HCN.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Hydrogen cyanide · See more »

Hydrogen sulfide

Hydrogen sulfide is the chemical compound with the chemical formula H2S.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Hydrogen sulfide · See more »

Hypo helmet

The Hypo helmet, or British Smoke Hood (its official name), was an early British World War I gas mask, designed by Cluny MacPherson.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Hypo helmet · See more »

IG Farben

IG Farben was a German chemical and pharmaceutical industry conglomerate.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and IG Farben · See more »

II Corps (United Kingdom)

II Corps was an army corps of the British Army formed in both the First World War and the Second World War.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and II Corps (United Kingdom) · See more »

Imperial Russian Army

The Imperial Russian Army (Ру́сская импера́торская а́рмия) was the land armed force of the Russian Empire, active from around 1721 to the Russian Revolution of 1917.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Imperial Russian Army · See more »

Indiana University Press

Indiana University Press, also known as IU Press, is an academic publisher founded in 1950 at Indiana University that specializes in the humanities and social sciences.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Indiana University Press · See more »

Iran–Iraq War

The Iran–Iraq War was an armed conflict between Iran and Iraq, beginning on 22 September 1980, when Iraq invaded Iran, and ending on 20 August 1988, when Iran accepted the UN-brokered ceasefire.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Iran–Iraq War · See more »

Iron harvest

The iron harvest is the annual "harvest" of unexploded ordnance, barbed wire, shrapnel, bullets and congruent trench support collected by Belgian and French farmers after plowing their fields.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Iron harvest · See more »

Irritation

Irritation, in biology and physiology, is a state of inflammation or painful reaction to allergy or cell-lining damage.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Irritation · See more »

Italian Front (World War I)

The Italian Front (Fronte italiano; in Gebirgskrieg, "Mountain war") was a series of battles at the border between Austria-Hungary and Italy, fought between 1915 and 1918 in World War I. Following the secret promises made by the Allies in the Treaty of London, Italy entered the war in order to annex the Austrian Littoral and northern Dalmatia, and the territories of present-day Trentino and South Tyrol.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Italian Front (World War I) · See more »

John Singer Sargent

John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925) was an American artist, considered the "leading portrait painter of his generation" for his evocations of Edwardian era luxury.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and John Singer Sargent · See more »

Kaiser Wilhelm Society

The Kaiser Wilhelm Society for the Advancement of Science (German Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften) was a German scientific institution established in the German Empire in 1911.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Kaiser Wilhelm Society · See more »

Langemark-Poelkapelle

Langemark-Poelkapelle is a municipality located in the Belgian province of West Flanders.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Langemark-Poelkapelle · See more »

Larynx

The larynx, commonly called the voice box, is an organ in the top of the neck of tetrapods involved in breathing, producing sound, and protecting the trachea against food aspiration.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Larynx · See more »

Lens, Pas-de-Calais

Lens (Linse) is a commune in the Pas-de-Calais department in northern France.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Lens, Pas-de-Calais · See more »

Lewisite

Lewisite (L) is an organoarsenic compound.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Lewisite · See more »

Little, Brown and Company

Little, Brown and Company is an American publisher founded in 1837 by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown, and for close to two centuries has published fiction and nonfiction by American authors.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Little, Brown and Company · See more »

Livens Projector

The Livens Projector was a simple mortar-like weapon that could throw large drums filled with flammable or toxic chemicals.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Livens Projector · See more »

London Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter

The Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter 1972, commonly called the "London Convention" or "LC '72" and also abbreviated as Marine Dumping, is an agreement to control pollution of the sea by dumping and to encourage regional agreements supplementary to the Convention.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and London Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter · See more »

London Regiment (1908–1938)

The London Regiment was an infantry regiment in the British Army, part of the Territorial Force (later renamed the Territorial Army).

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and London Regiment (1908–1938) · See more »

Martinique

Martinique is an insular region of France located in the Lesser Antilles of the West Indies in the eastern Caribbean Sea, with a land area of and a population of 385,551 inhabitants as of January 2013.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Martinique · See more »

Meuse-Argonne Offensive

The Meuse-Argonne Offensive (also known as Battles of the Meuse-Argonne and the Meuse-Argonne Campaign) was a major part of the final Allied offensive of World War I that stretched along the entire Western Front.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Meuse-Argonne Offensive · See more »

Military personnel

Military personnel are members of the state's armed forces.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Military personnel · See more »

Mortar (weapon)

A mortar is usually a simple, lightweight, man portable, muzzle-loaded weapon, consisting of a smooth-bore metal tube fixed to a base plate (to absorb recoil) with a lightweight bipod mount.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Mortar (weapon) · See more »

Mucous membrane

A mucous membrane or mucosa is a membrane that lines various cavities in the body and covers the surface of internal organs.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Mucous membrane · See more »

Nerve agent

Nerve agents, sometimes also called nerve gases, are a class of organic chemicals that disrupt the mechanisms by which nerves transfer messages to organs.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Nerve agent · See more »

Nieuwpoort, Belgium

Nieuwpoort (West Flemish: Nieuwpôort) (French: Nieuport) is a municipality located in Flanders, one of the three regions of Belgium, and in the Flemish province of West Flanders.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Nieuwpoort, Belgium · See more »

No man's land

No man's land is land that is unoccupied or is under dispute between parties who leave it unoccupied due to fear or uncertainty.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and No man's land · See more »

Operation Downfall

Operation Downfall was the proposed Allied plan for the invasion of Japan near the end of World War II.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Operation Downfall · See more »

Operation Michael

Operation Michael was a major German military offensive during the First World War that began the Spring Offensive on 21 March 1918.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Operation Michael · See more »

Operation Sea Lion

Operation Sea Lion, also written as Operation Sealion (Unternehmen Seelöwe), was Nazi Germany's code name for the plan for an invasion of the United Kingdom during the Battle of Britain in the Second World War.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Operation Sea Lion · See more »

Oslo Dumping Convention

The Convention for the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping from Ships and Aircraft also called the Oslo Convention was an international agreement designed to control the dumping of harmful substances from ships and aircraft into the sea.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Oslo Dumping Convention · See more »

Osowiec Fortress

Osowiec Fortress (Polish Twierdza Osowiec) is a 19th-century fortress located in north-eastern Poland, built by the Russian Empire.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Osowiec Fortress · See more »

Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Oxford University Press · See more »

Palestine (region)

Palestine (فلسطين,,; Παλαιστίνη, Palaistinē; Palaestina; פלשתינה. Palestina) is a geographic region in Western Asia.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Palestine (region) · See more »

Paris

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of and a population of 2,206,488.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Paris · See more »

Parts-per notation

In science and engineering, the parts-per notation is a set of pseudo-units to describe small values of miscellaneous dimensionless quantities, e.g. mole fraction or mass fraction.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Parts-per notation · See more »

PH helmet

The P helmet, PH helmet and PHG helmet were early types of gas mask issued by the British Army in the First World War, to protect troops against chlorine, phosgene and tear gases.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and PH helmet · See more »

Phenol

Phenol, also known as phenolic acid, is an aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C6H5OH.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Phenol · See more »

Phosgene

Phosgene is the chemical compound with the formula COCl2.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Phosgene · See more »

Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an inflammatory condition of the lung affecting primarily the small air sacs known as alveoli.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Pneumonia · See more »

Poperinge

Poperinge (also spelled Poperinghe in the past) is a municipality located in the Belgian province of West Flanders, Flemish Region, and has a history going back to medieval times.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Poperinge · See more »

Propellant

A propellant or propellent is a chemical substance used in the production of energy or pressurized gas that is subsequently used to create movement of a fluid or to generate propulsion of a vehicle, projectile, or other object.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Propellant · See more »

Rawka (river)

The Rawka River is a river in central Poland, a right tributary of the Bzura river (which is meets between Łowicz and Sochaczew), with a length of 97 kilometres and the basin area of 1,192 km2.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Rawka (river) · See more »

Rawka, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship

Rawka is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Słupia, within Jędrzejów County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, in south-central Poland.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Rawka, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship · See more »

Rif

The Rif or Riff (Berber: ⴰⵔⵉⴼ Arif or ⴰⵔⵔⵉⴼ Arrif or ⵏⴽⵔ Nkor) is a mainly mountainous region in the northern part of the Kingdom of Morocco.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Rif · See more »

Royal Newfoundland Regiment

The Royal Newfoundland Regiment (R NFLD R) is a Primary Reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Army.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Royal Newfoundland Regiment · See more »

Russian Civil War

The Russian Civil War (Grazhdanskaya voyna v Rossiyi; November 1917 – October 1922) was a multi-party war in the former Russian Empire immediately after the Russian Revolutions of 1917, as many factions vied to determine Russia's political future.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Russian Civil War · See more »

Russian Empire

The Russian Empire (Российская Империя) or Russia was an empire that existed across Eurasia and North America from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Russian Empire · See more »

Salient (military)

A salient, also known as a bulge, is a battlefield feature that projects into enemy territory.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Salient (military) · See more »

Sarin

Sarin, or NATO designation GB (G-series, 'B'), is a highly toxic synthetic organophosphorus compound.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Sarin · See more »

Scrotum

The scrotum is an anatomical male reproductive structure that consists of a suspended dual-chambered sack of skin and smooth muscle that is present in most terrestrial male mammals and located under the penis.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Scrotum · See more »

Second Battle of Gaza

The Second Battle of Gaza was fought between 17 and 19 April 1917, following the defeat of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) at the First Battle of Gaza in March, during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign of the First World War.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Second Battle of Gaza · See more »

Second Battle of Ypres

During World War I, the Second Battle of Ypres was fought from for control of the strategic Flemish town of Ypres in western Belgium after the First Battle of Ypres the previous autumn.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Second Battle of Ypres · See more »

Second Italo-Ethiopian War

The Second Italo-Ethiopian War, also referred to as the Second Italo-Abyssinian War, was a colonial war from 3 October 1935 until 1939, despite the Italian claim to have defeated Ethiopia by 5 May 1936, the date of the capture of Addis Ababa.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Second Italo-Ethiopian War · See more »

Shell (projectile)

A shell is a payload-carrying projectile that, as opposed to shot, contains an explosive or other filling, though modern usage sometimes includes large solid projectiles properly termed shot.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Shell (projectile) · See more »

Shell shock

Shell shock is a term coined in World War I to describe the type of posttraumatic stress disorder many soldiers were afflicted with during the war (before PTSD itself was a term).

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Shell shock · See more »

Shenyang

Shenyang, formerly known by its Manchu name Mukden or Fengtian, is the provincial capital and the largest city of Liaoning Province, People's Republic of China, as well as the largest city in Northeast China by urban population.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Shenyang · See more »

Shrapnel shell

Shrapnel shells were anti-personnel artillery munitions which carried a large number of individual bullets close to the target and then ejected them to allow them to continue along the shell's trajectory and strike the target individually.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Shrapnel shell · See more »

Silicon carbide

Silicon carbide (SiC), also known as carborundum, is a semiconductor containing silicon and carbon.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Silicon carbide · See more »

Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet

General Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet (17 January 1865 – 20 February 1951) was a British Army officer and the third Governor-General of New Zealand.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Sir Charles Fergusson, 7th Baronet · See more »

Sneeze

A sneeze, or sternutation, is a semi-autonomous, convulsive expulsion of air from the lungs through the nose and mouth, usually caused by foreign particles irritating the nasal mucosa.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Sneeze · See more »

Sodium bicarbonate

Sodium bicarbonate (IUPAC name: sodium hydrogen carbonate), commonly known as baking soda, is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Sodium bicarbonate · See more »

Sodium phenoxide

Sodium phenoxide is an organic compound with the formula NaOC6H5.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Sodium phenoxide · See more »

Sodium thiosulfate

Sodium thiosulfate (sodium thiosulphate) is a chemical and medication.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Sodium thiosulfate · See more »

Soman

Soman (or GD, EA 1210, Zoman, PFMP, systematic name: O-Pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate), is an extremely toxic chemical substance.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Soman · See more »

Spring Offensive

The 1918 Spring Offensive, or Kaiserschlacht (Kaiser's Battle), also known as the Ludendorff Offensive, was a series of German attacks along the Western Front during the First World War, beginning on 21 March 1918, which marked the deepest advances by either side since 1914.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Spring Offensive · See more »

Suippes

Suippes is a commune in the Marne department in north-eastern France.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Suippes · See more »

Sulfonamide (medicine)

Sulfonamide (also called sulphonamide, sulfa drugs or sulpha drugs) is the basis of several groups of drugs.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Sulfonamide (medicine) · See more »

Sulfur mustard

Sulfur mustard, commonly known as mustard gas, is the prototypical substance of the sulfur-based family of cytotoxic and vesicant chemical warfare agents known as the sulfur mustards which have the ability to form large blisters on exposed skin and in the lungs.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Sulfur mustard · See more »

Tabun (nerve agent)

Tabun or GA is an extremely toxic chemical substance.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Tabun (nerve agent) · See more »

Talc

Talc or talcum is a clay mineral composed of hydrated magnesium silicate with the chemical formula H2Mg3(SiO3)4 or Mg3Si4O10(OH)2.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Talc · See more »

Tambov Rebellion

The Tambov Rebellion (historically referred to in the Soviet Union as Antonovshchina), which occurred between 1920 and 1921, was one of the largest and best-organized peasant rebellions challenging the Bolshevik regime during the Russian Civil War.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Tambov Rebellion · See more »

Tear gas

Tear gas, formally known as a lachrymator agent or lachrymator (from the Latin lacrima, meaning "tear"), sometimes colloquially known as mace,"Mace" is a brand name for a tear gas spray is a chemical weapon that causes severe eye and respiratory pain, skin irritation, bleeding, and even blindness.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Tear gas · See more »

Tin(IV) chloride

Tin(IV) chloride, also known as tin tetrachloride or stannic chloride, is an inorganic compound with the formula SnCl4.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Tin(IV) chloride · See more »

Tirailleur

A tirailleur, in the Napoleonic era, was a type of light infantry trained to skirmish ahead of the main columns.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Tirailleur · See more »

Tissue (biology)

In biology, tissue is a cellular organizational level between cells and a complete organ.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Tissue (biology) · See more »

Ton

The ton is a unit of measure.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Ton · See more »

Total war

Total war is warfare that includes any and all civilian-associated resources and infrastructure as legitimate military targets, mobilizes all of the resources of society to fight the war, and gives priority to warfare over non-combatant needs.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Total war · See more »

Trachea

The trachea, colloquially called the windpipe, is a cartilaginous tube that connects the pharynx and larynx to the lungs, allowing the passage of air, and so is present in almost all air-breathing animals with lungs.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Trachea · See more »

Trench

A trench is a type of excavation or depression in the ground that is generally deeper than it is wide (as opposed to a wider gully, or ditch), and narrow compared with its length (as opposed to a simple hole).

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Trench · See more »

Trench warfare

Trench warfare is a type of land warfare using occupied fighting lines consisting largely of military trenches, in which troops are well-protected from the enemy's small arms fire and are substantially sheltered from artillery.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Trench warfare · See more »

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB).

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Tuberculosis · See more »

United States Senate

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprise the legislature of the United States.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and United States Senate · See more »

University of Washington Press

The University of Washington Press is an American academic publishing house.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and University of Washington Press · See more »

Urea

Urea, also known as carbamide, is an organic compound with chemical formula CO(NH2)2.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Urea · See more »

Urine

Urine is a liquid by-product of metabolism in humans and in many animals.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Urine · See more »

Vera Brittain

Vera Mary Brittain (29 December 1893 – 29 March 1970) was an English Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) nurse, writer, feminist, and pacifist.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Vera Brittain · See more »

Victor Grignard

François Auguste Victor Grignard (6 May 1871 in Cherbourg – 13 December 1935 in Lyon) was a Nobel Prize-winning French chemist.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Victor Grignard · See more »

Vimy

Vimy is a commune in the Pas-de-Calais department in the Hauts-de-France region of France.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Vimy · See more »

War crime

A war crime is an act that constitutes a serious violation of the laws of war that gives rise to individual criminal responsibility.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and War crime · See more »

Warlord

A warlord is a leader able to exercise military, economic, and political control over a subnational territory within a sovereign state due to their ability to mobilize loyal armed forces.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Warlord · See more »

Warsaw

Warsaw (Warszawa; see also other names) is the capital and largest city of Poland.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Warsaw · See more »

Washington Naval Conference

The Washington Naval Conference, also called the Washington Arms Conference or the Washington Disarmament Conference, was a military conference called by U.S. President Warren G. Harding and held in Washington, D.C., from 12 November 1921 to 6 February 1922.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Washington Naval Conference · See more »

Weapon of mass destruction

A weapon of mass destruction (WMD) is a nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological or other weapon that can kill and bring significant harm to a large number of humans or cause great damage to human-made structures (e.g., buildings), natural structures (e.g., mountains), or the biosphere.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Weapon of mass destruction · See more »

Western Front (World War I)

The Western Front was the main theatre of war during the First World War.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Western Front (World War I) · See more »

Wiley-VCH

Wiley-VCH is a German publisher owned by John Wiley & Sons.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Wiley-VCH · See more »

Wilfred Owen

Wilfred Edward Salter Owen, MC (18 March 1893 – 4 November 1918) was an English poet and soldier.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Wilfred Owen · See more »

William Howard Livens

William Howard Livens DSO MC (28 March 1889 – 1 February 1964) was an engineer, a soldier in the British Army and an inventor particularly known for the design of chemical warfare and flame warfare weapons.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and William Howard Livens · See more »

Willoughby, Ohio

Willoughby is a city in Lake County, Ohio, United States and is a suburb of Cleveland.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Willoughby, Ohio · See more »

Wind

Wind is the flow of gases on a large scale.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Wind · See more »

Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill (30 November 187424 January 1965) was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Winston Churchill · See more »

World Disarmament Conference

The Conference for the Reduction and Limitation of Armaments of 1932–1934 (sometimes World Disarmament Conference or Geneva Disarmament Conference) was an effort by member states of the League of Nations, together with the U.S., to actualize the ideology of disarmament.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and World Disarmament Conference · See more »

World war

A world war, is a large-scale war involving many of the countries of the world or many of the most powerful and populous ones.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and World war · See more »

World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and World War I · See more »

World War II

World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and World War II · See more »

Xylyl bromide

Xylyl bromide, also known as methylbenzyl bromide or T-stoff ("T stuff"), is any member or a mixture of organic chemical compounds with the molecular formula C6H4(CH3)(CH2Br).

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Xylyl bromide · See more »

Ypres

Ypres (Ieper) is a Belgian municipality in the province of West Flanders.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Ypres · See more »

Zhang Zuolin

Zhang Zuolin (19 March 1875Xiao, Lin, and Li 1184 June 1928) was the warlord of Manchuria from 1916–28, during the Warlord Era in China.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Zhang Zuolin · See more »

Zone Rouge

Zone Rouge (English: Red Zone) is a chain of non-contiguous areas throughout northeastern France that the French government isolated after the First World War.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Zone Rouge · See more »

Zouave

The Zouaves were a class of light infantry regiments of the French Army serving between 1830 and 1962 and linked to French North Africa, as well as some units of other countries modelled upon them.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Zouave · See more »

Zyklon B

Zyklon B (translated Cyclone B) was the trade name of a cyanide-based pesticide invented in Germany in the early 1920s.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and Zyklon B · See more »

1st Canadian Division

The 1st Canadian Division is an operational command and control formation of the Canadian Joint Operations Command, based at CFB Kingston.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and 1st Canadian Division · See more »

28th Division (United Kingdom)

The 28th Division was an infantry division of the British Army raised for service in World War I.

New!!: Chemical weapons in World War I and 28th Division (United Kingdom) · See more »

Redirects here:

Chemical weapons in ww1, Chemical weapons in wwi, Gas warfare in World War One, Poison Gas in World War I, Poison Gas in World war I, Poison gas in WWI, Poison gas in World War I, Poison gas in world war i, Use of poison gas in World War I.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_weapons_in_World_War_I

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »