Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Christianity

+ Save concept

ChristianityFrom Ancient Greek Χριστός Khristós (Latinized as Christus), translating Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ, Māšîăḥ, meaning "the anointed one", with the Latin suffixes -ian and -itas. [1]

757 relations: A cappella, A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years, A History of the University in Europe, Abbasid Caliphate, Ablution in Christianity, Abrahamic religions, Acts of Supremacy, Adoptionism, Adventism, Affusion, Age of Discovery, Age of Enlightenment, Alberta, Alessandro Volta, Alexandria, Alexios I Komnenos, Alister McGrath, Allegory, Amen, American Political Science Association, Americas, Amish, Amsterdam University Press, Anabaptism, Anagoge, Anatolia, Ancient Greece, Ancient Greek, Ancient Greek philosophy, Andreas Karlstadt, Anglican Communion, Anglican sacraments, Anglicanism, Aniconism in Christianity, Annihilationism, Annual cycle, Annuario Pontificio, Anointing, Anointing of the sick, Anthroposophical Society, Anti-clericalism, Antioch, Antoninus Pius, Apocalypse, Apostles, Apostles' Creed, Apostolic Age, Apostolic Christian Church, Apostolic succession, Arab Christians, ..., Arabic, Arabs, Architecture, Arianism, Armenia, Armenian Apostolic Church, Arminianism, Art, Ascension of Jesus, Aspersion, Assyrian Church of the East, Athanasian Creed, Athanasius of Alexandria, Atheism, Attila, Augustine of Hippo, Austria, Autocephaly, Balts, Banister Fletcher (junior), Baptism, Baptism of Jesus, Baptismal regeneration, Baptists, BBC, Belgium, Believer's baptism, Benedict of Nursia, Bertrand Russell, Bible, Bible prophecy, Biblical apocrypha, Biblical canon, Biblical hermeneutics, Biblical inerrancy, Biblical infallibility, Biblical inspiration, Bishop, Book of Common Prayer, Books of the Bible, Born again, Bowing in the Eastern Orthodox Church, Branch theory, British Columbia, British Orthodox Church, Bruderhof Communities, Burial of Jesus, Business, Byzantine art, Byzantine Empire, Byzantium, Calendar of saints, Calvinism, Cambridge University Press, Canon Press, Carolingian dynasty, Carolingian Renaissance, Carthage, Catechesis, Catechism of the Catholic Church, Catharism, Cathedral school, Catholic (term), Catholic Church, Catholic Encyclopedia, Catholic particular churches and liturgical rites, Celsus, Celts, Central Intelligence Agency, Chalcedonian Definition, Chaldean Catholic Church, Charismatic Movement, Charles Spurgeon, Chi Rho, Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy, Chrismation, Christ (title), Christadelphians, Christendom, Christian, Christian art, Christian Church, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Christian churches and churches of Christ, Christian contemplation, Christian cross, Christian culture, Christian denomination, Christian emigration, Christian eschatology, Christian History, Christian literature, Christian messianic prophecies, Christian mission, Christian mortalism, Christian music, Christian mythology, Christian pacifism, Christian philosophy, Christian rock, Christian state, Christian theology, Christian views on marriage, Christian views on sin, Christianity and politics, Christianity and science, Christianity and Theosophy, Christianity by country, Christianity in Africa, Christianity in Australia, Christianity in Europe, Christianity in Korea, Christianity in Sudan, Christmas, Christology, Christopher Columbus, Church architecture, Church attendance, Church Fathers, Church History (Eusebius), Church of England, Church of South India, Church of the East, Church service, Churches of Christ, Churchmanship, Cistercians, Clement of Alexandria, Closed communion, Cluny Abbey, Colonialism, Columbia Encyclopedia, Columbidae, Commendation ceremony, Communion of saints, Confession (religion), Confessionalism (religion), Confirmation, Congregational church, Consecrated life, Constantine the Great, Constantinople, Consubstantiality, Contra Celsum, Conversion to Christianity, Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, Correlation and dependence, Council of Chalcedon, Council of Ephesus, Council of Florence, Council of Trent, Counter-Reformation, Creed, Crossing the Red Sea, Crucifix, Crucifixion, Crucifixion of Jesus, Crusades, Cultural Christian, Cyprian, Czech Republic, David Bentley Hart, Debate, Dechristianization of France during the French Revolution, Decius, Deuterocanonical books, Development of the Christian biblical canon, Diarmaid MacCulloch, Diocese of Rome, Diocletian, Disciple (Christianity), Dissolution of the Monasteries, Divine grace, Doctrine, Dominican Order, Doukhobors, Early centers of Christianity, Early Christian art and architecture, Early Christianity, East Asia, East Timor, East–West Schism, Easter, Eastern Catholic Churches, Eastern Christianity, Eastern Orthodox Church, Ecclesiastical polity, Ecclesiology, Economics, Ecumenical council, Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, Ecumenism, Edict of Milan, Education, Egypt, Egypt (Roman province), Elijah, Encyclopædia Britannica, England, English Civil War, English Reformation, Episcopal polity, Episcopal see, Epistle of James, Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, Eschatology, Esoteric Christianity, Estonia, Eternal life (Christianity), Eternity, Ethiopia, Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church, Eucharist, Europe, Eusebius, Evangelical Anglicanism, Evangelical Christian Church in Canada, Evangelical Dictionary of Theology, Evangelicalism, Evangelism, Exegesis, Existence of God, Experiment, Family, Fasting, Filioque, First Apology of Justin Martyr, First Council of Constantinople, First Council of Nicaea, First Vatican Council, Four Marks of the Church, Fourth Crusade, France, Francia, Francis of Assisi, Franciscans, Free will, French Revolution, French Wars of Religion, Friedrich Nietzsche, Frisia, Full communion, G. K. Chesterton, Galileo Galilei, Garden of Eden, Garry Wills, Gaul, Genuflection, Georgia (country), Germanic peoples, Germany, Ghana, Gnosticism, God in Christianity, God in Judaism, God the Father, Godhead in Christianity, Good Friday, Gospel, Gospel of John, Gospel of Luke, Gospel of Mark, Gospel of Matthew, Gospel of Thomas, Gothic architecture, Great Apostasy, Great Church, Great Divergence, Great Fire of Rome, Great Tribulation, Greece, Greek scholars in the Renaissance, Greenwood Publishing Group, Greg Bahnsen, H. Richard Niebuhr, Halo (religious iconography), Harper (publisher), Harrowing of Hell, Harvard University, Heaven in Christianity, Hebrew language, Hell, Helvetic Republic, Henry S. Bettenson, Henry VIII of England, Heresy, High church, Historical Jesus, Historical-grammatical method, History of Christian thought on persecution and tolerance, History of Christianity, History of colonialism, History of Western civilization, Holiness movement, Holy Land, Holy Leaven, Holy orders, Holy See, Holy Spirit, Holy Spirit in Christianity, Holy Week, Horn of Africa, Hospital, House of Wisdom, Huldrych Zwingli, Hungarians, Hungary, Hutterites, Hypostatic union, Ichthys, Iconoclasm, Ideology, Idolatry, Iglesia ni Cristo, Ignatius of Antioch, Immersion baptism, Immortality, Incarnation (Christianity), Independent Catholicism, Indian subcontinent, Indigenous peoples of the Americas, Indulgence, Infant baptism, Inquisition, Intercession of saints, Interfaith dialogue, Iran, Ireland, Irenaeus, Irresistible grace, Isaac Newton, Islam, Islamic Golden Age, Italy, Jacobus Arminius, James Clerk Maxwell, James, son of Zebedee, Jehovah's Witnesses, Jerusalem, Jesus, Jesus in Christianity, Jesus Seminar, Jewish Christian, Jews, Johannes Kepler, Johannes Oecolampadius, John Calvin, John Knox, John Lennox, John McManners, John Polkinghorne, John Wesley, Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification, Judaism, Judea (Roman province), Justin Martyr, Keith Mathison, King James Version, Kingdom of God (Christianity), Kingship and kingdom of God, Kneeling, Koine Greek, Kulturkampf, Last Judgment, Late Latin, Latin, Latin America, Latin Church, Latter Day Saint movement, Law, Lectionary, Lent, Levant, Liberal Christianity, Liberalism, Life of Jesus in the New Testament, List of Catholic authors, List of Catholic Church artists, List of Catholic clergy scientists, List of Christian denominations, List of Christian Nobel laureates, List of Christians in science and technology, Lists of Christians, Literature, Liturgical year, Liturgy, Livonia, Lord's Prayer, Low church, Lutheran World Federation, Lutheranism, Macau, Magisterial Reformation, Maimonides, Major religious groups, Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church, Manichaeism, Mark the Evangelist, Marriage, Martin Luther, Martinism, Marxism, Mary Magdalene, Mary, mother of Jesus, Massacre of Verden, Matthew Henry, Medicine, Medieval university, Memoria, Mendicant orders, Mennonites, Merton thesis, Mesopotamia, Messiah, Messiah in Judaism, Messianic Judaism, Methodism, Miaphysitism, Michael Faraday, Millennialism, Minister (Christianity), Ministry of Jesus, Miracles of Jesus, Mishneh Torah, Modalistic Monarchianism, Molokan, Monastery, Monastic school, Monasticism, Monk, Monotheism, Moral, Mormonism, Mortal sin, Music, Muslim, Muslim conquest of the Levant, Mythology, Nag Hammadi, Nag Hammadi library, Napoleonic era, Nation state, National Council of Churches in Australia, National Geographic Society, Nativity of Jesus, Nazareth, Neo-charismatic movement, Neoplatonism, Nero, Nestorianism, Netherlands, New Testament, New Testament apocrypha, Nicene Creed, Nicolaus Copernicus, Nigeria, Ninety-five Theses, Nobel Prize, Nondenominational Christianity, North Africa, North America, Northern United States, Nun, Oceania, Old Catholic Church, Old Testament, Omnipotence, One true church, Ontario, Open communion, Orans, Ordinance (Christianity), Ordination, Oriental Orthodoxy, Origen, Original sin, Orthodoxy, Otto von Bismarck, Outline of Christianity, Oxford University Press, Paganism, Pan-European identity, Papal primacy, Parament, Particular judgment, Passion of Jesus, Pastor, Patriarch, Patristics, Paul the Apostle, Paulist Fathers, Peace churches, Penance, Pentecost, Pentecostalism, Perichoresis, Persecution of Christians, Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire, Persecution of Christians in the Soviet Union, Pew Research Center, Pharisees, Philippines, Philosophy, Pietism, Plotinus, Poland, Politics, Polycarp, Pope, Pope Benedict XVI, Pope Gregory I, Pope Leo I, Pope Urban II, Porphyry (philosopher), Post-Resurrection appearances of Jesus, Postchristianity, Postmodernism, Prayer, Preacher, Presbyter, Presbyterianism, Princeton University Press, Profession, Profession (religious), Progress (history), Prophet, Prostration, Protestant work ethic, Protestantism, Purgatory, Puritans, Quakers, Quebec, Questions of Truth, Rabbi, Radical Reformation, Rapture, Ravi Zacharias, Reason, Reformation, Reginald H. Fuller, Relationship between religion and science, Religion, Religion in Canada, Religious conversion, Religious denomination, Religious images in Christian theology, Religious interpretations of the Big Bang theory, Religious violence, Religious war, Renaissance, Republic of Ireland, Restoration Movement, Restorationism, Resurrection of Jesus, Resurrection of the dead, Revelation, Rite, Robert Boyle, Robert M. Price, Roel van den Broek, Roger E. Olson, Role of Christianity in civilization, Roman Empire, Roman Rite, Roman Syria, Romanesque architecture, Romanization of Greek, Rosicrucian Fellowship, Russian Orthodox Church, Russian Revolution, Rwanda, Sabbath School, Sacrament of Penance, Sacramental bread, Sacramental wine, Sacraments of the Catholic Church, Sacred mysteries, Sacred tradition, Saint, Saint Dominic, Saint Peter, Salvation, Salvation in Christianity, Sarcophagus, Schism, School, School of Antioch, Schwarzenau Brethren, Science, Scientific Revolution, Scotland, Scribe, Season, Second Coming, Second Council of Lyon, Second Council of Nicaea, Second Great Awakening, Second Temple Judaism, Second Vatican Council, Septuagint, Sermon, Sermon on the Mount, Seventh-day Adventist Church, Sign of the cross, Skepticism, Slavs, Socialism, Sola scriptura, Solemnity, Son of God, Son of God (Christianity), South Africa, Southern Africa, Southern Cone, Southern United States, Spain, Spanish Civil War, Spiritual Christianity, Split of early Christianity and Judaism, State atheism, State church of the Roman Empire, State religion, Stephen, Sub-Saharan Africa, Subsistit in, Substitutionary atonement, Summa contra Gentiles, Summa Theologica, Sunday school, Switzerland, Sydney E. Ahlstrom, Syriac language, Syriac Orthodox Church, Syro-Malabar Catholic Church, Taiwan, Taizé Community, Taizé, Saône-et-Loire, Tanakh, Ten Commandments, Tertullian, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The gospel, The New York Review of Books, The Shape of Sola Scriptura, The True Word, Theodosius I, Theology, Theophilus of Antioch, Thirty Years' War, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas Müntzer, Tonga, Total depravity, Tradition, Transcaucasia, Trinitarian formula, Trinity, Tritheism, Turkish people, Tuvalu, Typology (theology), Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, Ultramontanism, Umayyad Caliphate, Unitarian Universalism, Unitarianism, United and uniting churches, United Church of Canada, Uniting Church in Australia, University, University of Bologna, University of Fribourg, University of Oxford, University of Paris, Value (ethics), Vandals, Vatican City, Vestment, Vine, Vision hypothesis, Welfare, Western Christianity, Western culture, Western esotericism, Western Rite Orthodoxy, Western United States, Western world, Westport, Connecticut, Why I Am Not a Christian, William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, William F. Albright, William H. Brackney, William Lane Craig, William Miller (preacher), William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, World Council of Churches, World Evangelical Alliance, World Methodist Council, World population, World Values Survey, World view, Yale University Press, Zimbabwe, Zoroastrianism, 1 Corinthians 15, 1910 World Missionary Conference. Expand index (707 more) »

A cappella

A cappella (Italian for "in the manner of the chapel") music is specifically group or solo singing without instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way.

New!!: Christianity and A cappella · See more »

A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years

A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years is a 2009 book by the British ecclesiastical historian Diarmaid MacCulloch.

New!!: Christianity and A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years · See more »

A History of the University in Europe

A History of the University in Europe is a four-volume book series on the history and development of the European university from the medieval origins of the institution until the present day.

New!!: Christianity and A History of the University in Europe · See more »

Abbasid Caliphate

The Abbasid Caliphate (or ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلْعَبَّاسِيَّة) was the third of the Islamic caliphates to succeed the Islamic prophet Muhammad.

New!!: Christianity and Abbasid Caliphate · See more »

Ablution in Christianity

Ablution, in religion, is a prescribed washing of part or all of the body of possessions, such as clothing or ceremonial objects, with the intent of purification or dedication.

New!!: Christianity and Ablution in Christianity · See more »

Abrahamic religions

The Abrahamic religions, also referred to collectively as Abrahamism, are a group of Semitic-originated religious communities of faith that claim descent from the practices of the ancient Israelites and the worship of the God of Abraham.

New!!: Christianity and Abrahamic religions · See more »

Acts of Supremacy

The Acts of Supremacy are two acts of the Parliament of England passed in 1534 and 1559 which established King Henry VIII of England and subsequent monarchs as the supreme head of the Church of England.

New!!: Christianity and Acts of Supremacy · See more »

Adoptionism

Adoptionism, sometimes called dynamic monarchianism, is a nontrinitarian theological doctrine which holds that Jesus was adopted as the Son of God at his baptism, his resurrection, or his ascension.

New!!: Christianity and Adoptionism · See more »

Adventism

Adventism is a branch of Protestant Christianity which was started in the United States during the Second Great Awakening when Baptist preacher William Miller first publicly shared his belief that the Second Coming of Jesus Christ would occur at some point between 1843 and 1844.

New!!: Christianity and Adventism · See more »

Affusion

Affusion (la. affusio) is a method of baptism where water is poured on the head of the person being baptized.

New!!: Christianity and Affusion · See more »

Age of Discovery

The Age of Discovery, or the Age of Exploration (approximately from the beginning of the 15th century until the end of the 18th century) is an informal and loosely defined term for the period in European history in which extensive overseas exploration emerged as a powerful factor in European culture and was the beginning of globalization.

New!!: Christianity and Age of Discovery · See more »

Age of Enlightenment

The Enlightenment (also known as the Age of Enlightenment or the Age of Reason; in lit in Aufklärung, "Enlightenment", in L’Illuminismo, “Enlightenment” and in Spanish: La Ilustración, "Enlightenment") was an intellectual and philosophical movement that dominated the world of ideas in Europe during the 18th century, "The Century of Philosophy".

New!!: Christianity and Age of Enlightenment · See more »

Alberta

Alberta is a western province of Canada.

New!!: Christianity and Alberta · See more »

Alessandro Volta

Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Volta (18 February 1745 – 5 March 1827) was an Italian physicist, chemist, and a pioneer of electricity and power,Giuliano Pancaldi, "Volta: Science and culture in the age of enlightenment", Princeton University Press, 2003.

New!!: Christianity and Alessandro Volta · See more »

Alexandria

Alexandria (or; Arabic: الإسكندرية; Egyptian Arabic: إسكندرية; Ⲁⲗⲉⲝⲁⲛⲇⲣⲓⲁ; Ⲣⲁⲕⲟⲧⲉ) is the second-largest city in Egypt and a major economic centre, extending about along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in the north central part of the country.

New!!: Christianity and Alexandria · See more »

Alexios I Komnenos

Alexios I Komnenos (Ἀλέξιος Αʹ Κομνηνός., c. 1048 – 15 August 1118) was Byzantine emperor from 1081 to 1118.

New!!: Christianity and Alexios I Komnenos · See more »

Alister McGrath

Alister Edgar McGrath (born 23 January 1953) is a Northern Irish theologian, priest, intellectual historian, scientist, Christian apologist and public intellectual.

New!!: Christianity and Alister McGrath · See more »

Allegory

As a literary device, an allegory is a metaphor in which a character, place or event is used to deliver a broader message about real-world issues and occurrences.

New!!: Christianity and Allegory · See more »

Amen

The word amen (Hebrew אָמֵן, Greek ἀμήν, Arabic آمِينَ) is a declaration of affirmation found in the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament.

New!!: Christianity and Amen · See more »

American Political Science Association

The American Political Science Association (APSA) is a professional association of political science students and scholars in the United States.

New!!: Christianity and American Political Science Association · See more »

Americas

The Americas (also collectively called America)"America." The Oxford Companion to the English Language.

New!!: Christianity and Americas · See more »

Amish

The Amish (Pennsylvania German: Amisch, Amische) are a group of traditionalist Christian church fellowships with Swiss German Anabaptist origins.

New!!: Christianity and Amish · See more »

Amsterdam University Press

Amsterdam University Press (AUP) is a university press that was founded in 1992 by the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands.

New!!: Christianity and Amsterdam University Press · See more »

Anabaptism

Anabaptism (from Neo-Latin anabaptista, from the Greek ἀναβαπτισμός: ἀνά- "re-" and βαπτισμός "baptism", Täufer, earlier also WiedertäuferSince the middle of the 20th century, the German-speaking world no longer uses the term "Wiedertäufer" (translation: "Re-baptizers"), considering it biased. The term Täufer (translation: "Baptizers") is now used, which is considered more impartial. From the perspective of their persecutors, the "Baptizers" baptized for the second time those "who as infants had already been baptized". The denigrative term Anabaptist signifies rebaptizing and is considered a polemical term, so it has been dropped from use in modern German. However, in the English-speaking world, it is still used to distinguish the Baptizers more clearly from the Baptists, a Protestant sect that developed later in England. Cf. their self-designation as "Brethren in Christ" or "Church of God":.) is a Christian movement which traces its origins to the Radical Reformation.

New!!: Christianity and Anabaptism · See more »

Anagoge

Anagoge (ἀναγωγή), sometimes spelled anagogy, is a Greek word suggesting a "climb" or "ascent" upwards.

New!!: Christianity and Anagoge · See more »

Anatolia

Anatolia (Modern Greek: Ανατολία Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή Anatolḗ,; "east" or "rise"), also known as Asia Minor (Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία Mikrá Asía, "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey.

New!!: Christianity and Anatolia · See more »

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (AD 600).

New!!: Christianity and Ancient Greece · See more »

Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

New!!: Christianity and Ancient Greek · See more »

Ancient Greek philosophy

Ancient Greek philosophy arose in the 6th century BC and continued throughout the Hellenistic period and the period in which Ancient Greece was part of the Roman Empire.

New!!: Christianity and Ancient Greek philosophy · See more »

Andreas Karlstadt

Andreas Rudolph Bodenstein von Karlstadt (1486 in Karlstadt, Bishopric of Würzburg in the Holy Roman Empire24 December 1541 in Basel, Canton of Basel in the Old Swiss Confederacy), better known as Andreas Karlstadt or Andreas Carlstadt or Karolostadt, or simply as Andreas Bodenstein, was a German Protestant theologian, University of Wittenberg chancellor, a contemporary of Martin Luther and a reformer of the early Reformation.

New!!: Christianity and Andreas Karlstadt · See more »

Anglican Communion

The Anglican Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members, founded in 1867 in London, England.

New!!: Christianity and Anglican Communion · See more »

Anglican sacraments

In keeping with its prevailing self-identity as a via media or "middle path" of Western Christianity, Anglican sacramental theology expresses elements in keeping with its status as a church in the Catholic tradition and a church of the Reformation.

New!!: Christianity and Anglican sacraments · See more »

Anglicanism

Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation.

New!!: Christianity and Anglicanism · See more »

Aniconism in Christianity

Christianity has not generally practised aniconism, or the avoidance or prohibition of types of images, but has had an active tradition of making and venerating images of God and other religious figures.

New!!: Christianity and Aniconism in Christianity · See more »

Annihilationism

Annihilationism (also known as extinctionism or destructionism) is a belief that after the final judgment some human beings and all fallen angels (all of the damned) will be totally destroyed so as to not exist, or that their consciousness will be extinguished, rather than suffer everlasting torment in hell (often synonymized with the lake of fire).

New!!: Christianity and Annihilationism · See more »

Annual cycle

An annual cycle refers to a set of changes or events that uniformly, or consistently, take place at the same time of year.

New!!: Christianity and Annual cycle · See more »

Annuario Pontificio

The Annuario Pontificio (Italian for Pontifical Yearbook) is the annual directory of the Holy See of the Catholic Church.

New!!: Christianity and Annuario Pontificio · See more »

Anointing

Anointing is the ritual act of pouring aromatic oil over a person's head or entire body.

New!!: Christianity and Anointing · See more »

Anointing of the sick

Anointing of the sick, known also by other names, is a form of religious anointing or "unction" (an older term with the same meaning) for the benefit of a sick person.

New!!: Christianity and Anointing of the sick · See more »

Anthroposophical Society

The General Anthroposophical Society is an "association of people whose will it is to nurture the life of the soul, both in the individual and in human society, on the basis of a true knowledge of the spiritual world." As an organization, it is dedicated to supporting the community of those interested in the inner path of schooling known as anthroposophy, developed by Rudolf Steiner.

New!!: Christianity and Anthroposophical Society · See more »

Anti-clericalism

Anti-clericalism is opposition to religious authority, typically in social or political matters.

New!!: Christianity and Anti-clericalism · See more »

Antioch

Antioch on the Orontes (Antiókheia je epi Oróntou; also Syrian Antioch)Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Ὀρόντου; or Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Δάφνῃ, "Antioch on Daphne"; or Ἀντιόχεια ἡ Μεγάλη, "Antioch the Great"; Antiochia ad Orontem; Անտիոք Antiok; ܐܢܛܝܘܟܝܐ Anṭiokya; Hebrew: אנטיוכיה, Antiyokhya; Arabic: انطاكية, Anṭākiya; انطاکیه; Antakya.

New!!: Christianity and Antioch · See more »

Antoninus Pius

Antoninus Pius (Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius; 19 September 867 March 161 AD), also known as Antoninus, was Roman emperor from 138 to 161.

New!!: Christianity and Antoninus Pius · See more »

Apocalypse

An apocalypse (Ancient Greek: ἀποκάλυψις apokálypsis, from ἀπό and καλύπτω, literally meaning "an uncovering") is a disclosure of knowledge or revelation.

New!!: Christianity and Apocalypse · See more »

Apostles

In Christian theology and ecclesiology, the apostles, particularly the Twelve Apostles (also known as the Twelve Disciples or simply the Twelve), were the primary disciples of Jesus, the central figure in Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Apostles · See more »

Apostles' Creed

The Apostles' Creed (Latin: Symbolum Apostolorum or Symbolum Apostolicum), sometimes entitled Symbol of the Apostles, is an early statement of Christian belief—a creed or "symbol".

New!!: Christianity and Apostles' Creed · See more »

Apostolic Age

The Apostolic Age of the history of Christianity is traditionally regarded as the period of the Twelve Apostles, dating from the Great Commission of the Apostles by the risen Jesus in Jerusalem around 33 AD until the death of the last Apostle, believed to be John the Apostle in Anatolia c. 100.

New!!: Christianity and Apostolic Age · See more »

Apostolic Christian Church

The Apostolic Christian Church (ACC) is a worldwide Christian denomination in the Anabaptist tradition.

New!!: Christianity and Apostolic Christian Church · See more »

Apostolic succession

Apostolic succession is the method whereby the ministry of the Christian Church is held to be derived from the apostles by a continuous succession, which has usually been associated with a claim that the succession is through a series of bishops.

New!!: Christianity and Apostolic succession · See more »

Arab Christians

Arab Christians (مسيحيون عرب Masīḥiyyūn ʿArab) are Arabs of the Christian faith.

New!!: Christianity and Arab Christians · See more »

Arabic

Arabic (العَرَبِيَّة) or (عَرَبِيّ) or) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia in the east to the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form, Modern Standard Arabic, which is derived from Classical Arabic. As the modern written language, Modern Standard Arabic is widely taught in schools and universities, and is used to varying degrees in workplaces, government, and the media. The two formal varieties are grouped together as Literary Arabic (fuṣḥā), which is the official language of 26 states and the liturgical language of Islam. Modern Standard Arabic largely follows the grammatical standards of Classical Arabic and uses much of the same vocabulary. However, it has discarded some grammatical constructions and vocabulary that no longer have any counterpart in the spoken varieties, and has adopted certain new constructions and vocabulary from the spoken varieties. Much of the new vocabulary is used to denote concepts that have arisen in the post-classical era, especially in modern times. During the Middle Ages, Literary Arabic was a major vehicle of culture in Europe, especially in science, mathematics and philosophy. As a result, many European languages have also borrowed many words from it. Arabic influence, mainly in vocabulary, is seen in European languages, mainly Spanish and to a lesser extent Portuguese, Valencian and Catalan, owing to both the proximity of Christian European and Muslim Arab civilizations and 800 years of Arabic culture and language in the Iberian Peninsula, referred to in Arabic as al-Andalus. Sicilian has about 500 Arabic words as result of Sicily being progressively conquered by Arabs from North Africa, from the mid 9th to mid 10th centuries. Many of these words relate to agriculture and related activities (Hull and Ruffino). Balkan languages, including Greek and Bulgarian, have also acquired a significant number of Arabic words through contact with Ottoman Turkish. Arabic has influenced many languages around the globe throughout its history. Some of the most influenced languages are Persian, Turkish, Spanish, Urdu, Kashmiri, Kurdish, Bosnian, Kazakh, Bengali, Hindi, Malay, Maldivian, Indonesian, Pashto, Punjabi, Tagalog, Sindhi, and Hausa, and some languages in parts of Africa. Conversely, Arabic has borrowed words from other languages, including Greek and Persian in medieval times, and contemporary European languages such as English and French in modern times. Classical Arabic is the liturgical language of 1.8 billion Muslims and Modern Standard Arabic is one of six official languages of the United Nations. All varieties of Arabic combined are spoken by perhaps as many as 422 million speakers (native and non-native) in the Arab world, making it the fifth most spoken language in the world. Arabic is written with the Arabic alphabet, which is an abjad script and is written from right to left, although the spoken varieties are sometimes written in ASCII Latin from left to right with no standardized orthography.

New!!: Christianity and Arabic · See more »

Arabs

Arabs (عَرَب ISO 233, Arabic pronunciation) are a population inhabiting the Arab world.

New!!: Christianity and Arabs · See more »

Architecture

Architecture is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures.

New!!: Christianity and Architecture · See more »

Arianism

Arianism is a nontrinitarian Christological doctrine which asserts the belief that Jesus Christ is the Son of God who was begotten by God the Father at a point in time, a creature distinct from the Father and is therefore subordinate to him, but the Son is also God (i.e. God the Son).

New!!: Christianity and Arianism · See more »

Armenia

Armenia (translit), officially the Republic of Armenia (translit), is a country in the South Caucasus region of Eurasia.

New!!: Christianity and Armenia · See more »

Armenian Apostolic Church

The Armenian Apostolic Church (translit) is the national church of the Armenian people.

New!!: Christianity and Armenian Apostolic Church · See more »

Arminianism

Arminianism is based on theological ideas of the Dutch Reformed theologian Jacobus Arminius (1560–1609) and his historic supporters known as Remonstrants.

New!!: Christianity and Arminianism · See more »

Art

Art is a diverse range of human activities in creating visual, auditory or performing artifacts (artworks), expressing the author's imaginative, conceptual idea, or technical skill, intended to be appreciated for their beauty or emotional power.

New!!: Christianity and Art · See more »

Ascension of Jesus

The ascension of Jesus (anglicized from the Vulgate Latin Acts 1:9-11 section title: Ascensio Iesu) is the departure of Christ from Earth into the presence of God.

New!!: Christianity and Ascension of Jesus · See more »

Aspersion

Aspersion (la. aspergere/aspersio), in a religious context, is the act of sprinkling with water, especially holy water.

New!!: Christianity and Aspersion · See more »

Assyrian Church of the East

The Assyrian Church of the East (ܥܕܬܐ ܕܡܕܢܚܐ ܕܐܬܘܖ̈ܝܐ ʻĒdtā d-Madenḥā d-Ātorāyē), officially the Holy Apostolic Catholic Assyrian Church of the East (ʻEdtā Qaddīštā wa-Šlīḥāitā Qātolīqī d-Madenḥā d-Ātorāyē), is an Eastern Christian Church that follows the traditional christology and ecclesiology of the historical Church of the East.

New!!: Christianity and Assyrian Church of the East · See more »

Athanasian Creed

The Athanasian Creed, also known as Pseudo-Athanasian Creed or Quicunque Vult (also Quicumque Vult), is a Christian statement of belief focused on Trinitarian doctrine and Christology.

New!!: Christianity and Athanasian Creed · See more »

Athanasius of Alexandria

Athanasius of Alexandria (Ἀθανάσιος Ἀλεξανδρείας; ⲡⲓⲁⲅⲓⲟⲥ ⲁⲑⲁⲛⲁⲥⲓⲟⲩ ⲡⲓⲁⲡⲟⲥⲧⲟⲗⲓⲕⲟⲥ or Ⲡⲁⲡⲁ ⲁⲑⲁⲛⲁⲥⲓⲟⲩ ⲁ̅; c. 296–298 – 2 May 373), also called Athanasius the Great, Athanasius the Confessor or, primarily in the Coptic Orthodox Church, Athanasius the Apostolic, was the 20th bishop of Alexandria (as Athanasius I).

New!!: Christianity and Athanasius of Alexandria · See more »

Atheism

Atheism is, in the broadest sense, the absence of belief in the existence of deities.

New!!: Christianity and Atheism · See more »

Attila

Attila (fl. circa 406–453), frequently called Attila the Hun, was the ruler of the Huns from 434 until his death in March 453.

New!!: Christianity and Attila · See more »

Augustine of Hippo

Saint Augustine of Hippo (13 November 354 – 28 August 430) was a Roman African, early Christian theologian and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity and Western philosophy.

New!!: Christianity and Augustine of Hippo · See more »

Austria

Austria (Österreich), officially the Republic of Austria (Republik Österreich), is a federal republic and a landlocked country of over 8.8 million people in Central Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Austria · See more »

Autocephaly

Autocephaly (from αὐτοκεφαλία, meaning "property of being self-headed") is the status of a hierarchical Christian Church whose head bishop does not report to any higher-ranking bishop (used especially in Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Independent Catholic churches).

New!!: Christianity and Autocephaly · See more »

Balts

The Balts or Baltic people (baltai, balti) are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group who speak the Baltic languages, a branch of the Indo-European language family, which was originally spoken by tribes living in the area east of Jutland peninsula in the west and in the Moscow, Oka and Volga rivers basins in the east.

New!!: Christianity and Balts · See more »

Banister Fletcher (junior)

Sir Banister Flight Fletcher (15 February 1866, London – 17 August 1953, London) was an English architect and architectural historian, as was his father, also named Banister Fletcher.

New!!: Christianity and Banister Fletcher (junior) · See more »

Baptism

Baptism (from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian sacrament of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Baptism · See more »

Baptism of Jesus

The baptism of Jesus is described in the gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke.

New!!: Christianity and Baptism of Jesus · See more »

Baptismal regeneration

Baptismal regeneration is the name given to doctrines held by major Christian denominations which maintain that salvation is intimately linked to the act of baptism, and that salvation is impossible apart from it.

New!!: Christianity and Baptismal regeneration · See more »

Baptists

Baptists are Christians distinguished by baptizing professing believers only (believer's baptism, as opposed to infant baptism), and doing so by complete immersion (as opposed to affusion or sprinkling).

New!!: Christianity and Baptists · See more »

BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster.

New!!: Christianity and BBC · See more »

Belgium

Belgium, officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a country in Western Europe bordered by France, the Netherlands, Germany and Luxembourg.

New!!: Christianity and Belgium · See more »

Believer's baptism

Believer's baptism (occasionally called credobaptism, from the Latin word credo meaning "I believe") is the Christian practice of baptism as this is understood by many evangelical denominations, particularly those that descend from the Anabaptist and English Baptist tradition.

New!!: Christianity and Believer's baptism · See more »

Benedict of Nursia

Benedict of Nursia (Benedictus Nursiae; Benedetto da Norcia; Vulgar Latin: *Benedecto; Benedikt; 2 March 480 – 543 or 547 AD) is a Christian saint, who is venerated in the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Anglican Communion and Old Catholic Churches.

New!!: Christianity and Benedict of Nursia · See more »

Bertrand Russell

Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, writer, social critic, political activist, and Nobel laureate.

New!!: Christianity and Bertrand Russell · See more »

Bible

The Bible (from Koine Greek τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books") is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans.

New!!: Christianity and Bible · See more »

Bible prophecy

Bible prophecy or biblical prophecy comprises the passages of the Bible that reflect communications from God to humans through prophets.

New!!: Christianity and Bible prophecy · See more »

Biblical apocrypha

The Biblical apocrypha (from the Greek ἀπόκρυφος, apókruphos, meaning "hidden") denotes the collection of apocryphal ancient books found in some editions of Christian Bibles in a separate section between the Old and New Testaments or as an appendix after the New Testament.

New!!: Christianity and Biblical apocrypha · See more »

Biblical canon

A biblical canon or canon of scripture is a set of texts (or "books") which a particular religious community regards as authoritative scripture.

New!!: Christianity and Biblical canon · See more »

Biblical hermeneutics

Biblical hermeneutics is the study of the principles of interpretation concerning the books of the Bible.

New!!: Christianity and Biblical hermeneutics · See more »

Biblical inerrancy

Biblical inerrancy, as formulated in the "Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy", is the doctrine that the Protestant Bible "is without error or fault in all its teaching"; or, at least, that "Scripture in the original manuscripts does not affirm anything that is contrary to fact".

New!!: Christianity and Biblical inerrancy · See more »

Biblical infallibility

Biblical infallibility is the belief that what the Bible says regarding matters of faith and Christian practice is wholly useful and true.

New!!: Christianity and Biblical infallibility · See more »

Biblical inspiration

Biblical inspiration is the doctrine in Christian theology that the authors and editors of the Bible were led or influenced by God with the result that their writings may be designated in some sense the word of God.

New!!: Christianity and Biblical inspiration · See more »

Bishop

A bishop (English derivation from the New Testament of the Christian Bible Greek επίσκοπος, epískopos, "overseer", "guardian") is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight.

New!!: Christianity and Bishop · See more »

Book of Common Prayer

The Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the short title of a number of related prayer books used in the Anglican Communion, as well as by the Continuing Anglican, Anglican realignment and other Anglican Christian churches.

New!!: Christianity and Book of Common Prayer · See more »

Books of the Bible

Different religious groups include different books in their biblical canons, in varying orders, and sometimes divide or combine books.

New!!: Christianity and Books of the Bible · See more »

Born again

In some Christian movements, particularly in Evangelicalism, to be born again, or to experience the new birth, is a popular phrase referring to "spiritual rebirth", or a regeneration of the human spirit from the Holy Spirit, contrasted with physical birth.

New!!: Christianity and Born again · See more »

Bowing in the Eastern Orthodox Church

Poyasny ("little bow", literally belt bow) and zemnoy poklon ("great bow", literally "ground bow") are different kinds of bows used in an Eastern Orthodox worship service.

New!!: Christianity and Bowing in the Eastern Orthodox Church · See more »

Branch theory

Branch theory is a Protestant ecclesiological proposition that the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church includes various Christian denominations whether in formal communion or not.

New!!: Christianity and Branch theory · See more »

British Columbia

British Columbia (BC; Colombie-Britannique) is the westernmost province of Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean and the Rocky Mountains.

New!!: Christianity and British Columbia · See more »

British Orthodox Church

The British Orthodox Church, formerly known as the Orthodox Church of the British Isles, is a small independent Oriental Orthodox church defining its mission to the people of the British Isles.

New!!: Christianity and British Orthodox Church · See more »

Bruderhof Communities

The Bruderhof (place of brothers) is a Christian movement that practices community of goods after the example of the first church described in Acts 2 and Acts 4.

New!!: Christianity and Bruderhof Communities · See more »

Burial of Jesus

The burial of Jesus refers to the burial of the body of Jesus after crucifixion, described in the New Testament.

New!!: Christianity and Burial of Jesus · See more »

Business

Business is the activity of making one's living or making money by producing or buying and selling products (goods and services).

New!!: Christianity and Business · See more »

Byzantine art

Byzantine art is the name for the artistic products of the Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, as well as the nations and states that inherited culturally from the empire.

New!!: Christianity and Byzantine art · See more »

Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium).

New!!: Christianity and Byzantine Empire · See more »

Byzantium

Byzantium or Byzantion (Ancient Greek: Βυζάντιον, Byzántion) was an ancient Greek colony in early antiquity that later became Constantinople, and later Istanbul.

New!!: Christianity and Byzantium · See more »

Calendar of saints

The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint.

New!!: Christianity and Calendar of saints · See more »

Calvinism

Calvinism (also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin and other Reformation-era theologians.

New!!: Christianity and Calvinism · See more »

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

New!!: Christianity and Cambridge University Press · See more »

Canon Press

Canon Press is a Christian publishing house in Moscow, Idaho.

New!!: Christianity and Canon Press · See more »

Carolingian dynasty

The Carolingian dynasty (known variously as the Carlovingians, Carolingus, Carolings or Karlings) was a Frankish noble family founded by Charles Martel with origins in the Arnulfing and Pippinid clans of the 7th century AD.

New!!: Christianity and Carolingian dynasty · See more »

Carolingian Renaissance

The Carolingian Renaissance was the first of three medieval renaissances, a period of cultural activity in the Carolingian Empire.

New!!: Christianity and Carolingian Renaissance · See more »

Carthage

Carthage (from Carthago; Punic:, Qart-ḥadašt, "New City") was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis in what is now the Tunis Governorate in Tunisia.

New!!: Christianity and Carthage · See more »

Catechesis

Catechesis (from Greek: κατήχησις, "instruction by word of mouth", generally "instruction") is basic Christian religious education of children and adults.

New!!: Christianity and Catechesis · See more »

Catechism of the Catholic Church

The Catechism of the Catholic Church (Catechismus Catholicae Ecclesiae; commonly called the Catechism or the CCC) is a catechism promulgated for the Catholic Church by Pope John Paul II in 1992.

New!!: Christianity and Catechism of the Catholic Church · See more »

Catharism

Catharism (from the Greek: καθαροί, katharoi, "the pure ") was a Christian dualist or Gnostic revival movement that thrived in some areas of Southern Europe, particularly northern Italy and what is now southern France, between the 12th and 14th centuries.

New!!: Christianity and Catharism · See more »

Cathedral school

Cathedral schools began in the Early Middle Ages as centers of advanced education, some of them ultimately evolving into medieval universities.

New!!: Christianity and Cathedral school · See more »

Catholic (term)

The word catholic (with lowercase c; derived via Late Latin catholicus, from the Greek adjective καθολικός (katholikos), meaning "universal") comes from the Greek phrase καθόλου (katholou), meaning "on the whole", "according to the whole" or "in general", and is a combination of the Greek words κατά meaning "about" and ὅλος meaning "whole".

New!!: Christianity and Catholic (term) · See more »

Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.299 billion members worldwide.

New!!: Christianity and Catholic Church · See more »

Catholic Encyclopedia

The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church, also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church.

New!!: Christianity and Catholic Encyclopedia · See more »

Catholic particular churches and liturgical rites

A particular church (ecclesia particularis) is a hierarchically ordered ecclesiastical community of faithful headed by a bishop (or equivalent), as defined by Catholic canon law and ecclesiology.

New!!: Christianity and Catholic particular churches and liturgical rites · See more »

Celsus

Celsus (Κέλσος. Kélsos) was a 2nd-century Greek philosopher and opponent of early Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Celsus · See more »

Celts

The Celts (see pronunciation of ''Celt'' for different usages) were an Indo-European people in Iron Age and Medieval Europe who spoke Celtic languages and had cultural similarities, although the relationship between ethnic, linguistic and cultural factors in the Celtic world remains uncertain and controversial.

New!!: Christianity and Celts · See more »

Central Intelligence Agency

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is a civilian foreign intelligence service of the United States federal government, tasked with gathering, processing, and analyzing national security information from around the world, primarily through the use of human intelligence (HUMINT).

New!!: Christianity and Central Intelligence Agency · See more »

Chalcedonian Definition

The Chalcedonian Definition (also called the Chalcedonian Creed) was adopted at the Council of Chalcedon in AD 451.

New!!: Christianity and Chalcedonian Definition · See more »

Chaldean Catholic Church

The Chaldean Catholic Church (ܥܕܬܐ ܟܠܕܝܬܐ ܩܬܘܠܝܩܝܬܐ, ʿīdtha kaldetha qāthuliqetha; Arabic: الكنيسة الكلدانية al-Kanīsa al-kaldāniyya; translation) is an Eastern Catholic particular church (sui juris) in full communion with the Holy See and the rest of the Catholic Church, with the Chaldean Patriarchate having been originally formed out of the Church of the East in 1552.

New!!: Christianity and Chaldean Catholic Church · See more »

Charismatic Movement

The Charismatic Movement is the international trend of historically mainstream Christian congregations adopting beliefs and practices similar to Pentecostalism.

New!!: Christianity and Charismatic Movement · See more »

Charles Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was an English Particular Baptist preacher.

New!!: Christianity and Charles Spurgeon · See more »

Chi Rho

The Chi Rho (also known as chrismon or sigla) is one of the earliest forms of christogram, formed by superimposing the first two (capital) letters—chi and rho (ΧΡ)—of the Greek word ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ (Christos) in such a way that the vertical stroke of the rho intersects the center of the chi.

New!!: Christianity and Chi Rho · See more »

Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy

The Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy was formulated by more than 200 evangelical leaders at a conference sponsored by the International Council on Biblical Inerrancy (ICBI), that was held in Chicago in October 1978.

New!!: Christianity and Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy · See more »

Chrismation

Chrismation consists of the sacrament or mystery in the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches, as well as in the Assyrian Church of the East initiation rites.

New!!: Christianity and Chrismation · See more »

Christ (title)

In Christianity, Christ (Greek Χριστός, Christós, meaning "the anointed one") is a title for the saviour and redeemer who would bring salvation to the Jewish people and humanity.

New!!: Christianity and Christ (title) · See more »

Christadelphians

The Christadelphians are a millenarian Christian group who hold a view of Biblical Unitarianism.

New!!: Christianity and Christadelphians · See more »

Christendom

Christendom has several meanings.

New!!: Christianity and Christendom · See more »

Christian

A Christian is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.

New!!: Christianity and Christian · See more »

Christian art

Christian art is sacred art which uses themes and imagery from Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Christian art · See more »

Christian Church

"Christian Church" is an ecclesiological term generally used by Protestants to refer to the whole group of people belonging to Christianity throughout the history of Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Christian Church · See more »

Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States in the Reformed tradition with close ties to the Restoration Movement.

New!!: Christianity and Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) · See more »

Christian churches and churches of Christ

The group of Christians known as the Christian Churches or Churches of Christ are congregations within the Restoration Movement, aka the Stone-Campbell Movement and the Reformation of the 19th Century, that have no formal denominational affiliation with other congregations, but still share many characteristics of belief and worship.

New!!: Christianity and Christian churches and churches of Christ · See more »

Christian contemplation

Christian contemplation, from contemplatio (Latin; Greek θεωρία, Theoria), refers to several Christian practices which aim at "looking at", "gazing at", "being aware of" God or the Divine.

New!!: Christianity and Christian contemplation · See more »

Christian cross

The Christian cross, seen as a representation of the instrument of the crucifixion of Jesus, is the best-known symbol of Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Christian cross · See more »

Christian culture

Christian culture is the cultural practices common to Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Christian culture · See more »

Christian denomination

A Christian denomination is a distinct religious body within Christianity, identified by traits such as a name, organisation, leadership and doctrine.

New!!: Christianity and Christian denomination · See more »

Christian emigration

The phenomenon of large-scale migration of Christians is the main reason why Christians' share of the population has been declining in many countries.

New!!: Christianity and Christian emigration · See more »

Christian eschatology

Christian eschatology is a major branch of study within Christian theology dealing with the "last things." Eschatology, from two Greek words meaning "last" (ἔσχατος) and "study" (-λογία), is the study of 'end things', whether the end of an individual life, the end of the age, the end of the world and the nature of the Kingdom of God.

New!!: Christianity and Christian eschatology · See more »

Christian History

Christian History is a magazine on the history of Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Christian History · See more »

Christian literature

Christian literature is writing that deals with Christian themes and incorporates the Christian world view.

New!!: Christianity and Christian literature · See more »

Christian messianic prophecies

The New Testament frequently cites Jewish scripture to support the claim of the Early Christians that Jesus of Nazareth is the Messiah, and faith in Jesus as the Christos and his imminent expected Second Coming.

New!!: Christianity and Christian messianic prophecies · See more »

Christian mission

A Christian mission is an organized effort to spread Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Christian mission · See more »

Christian mortalism

Christian mortalism incorporates the belief that the human soul is not naturally immortal;.

New!!: Christianity and Christian mortalism · See more »

Christian music

Christian music is music that has been written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life and faith.

New!!: Christianity and Christian music · See more »

Christian mythology

Christian mythology is the body of myths associated with Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Christian mythology · See more »

Christian pacifism

Christian pacifism is the theological and ethical position that any form of violence is incompatible with the Christian faith.

New!!: Christianity and Christian pacifism · See more »

Christian philosophy

Christian philosophy is a development in philosophy that is characterised by coming from a Christian tradition.

New!!: Christianity and Christian philosophy · See more »

Christian rock

Christian rock is a form of rock music that features lyrics focusing on matters of Christian faith, often with an emphasis on Jesus, typically performed by self-proclaimed Christian individuals.

New!!: Christianity and Christian rock · See more »

Christian state

A Christian state is a country that recognizes a form of Christianity as its official religion and often has a state church, which is a Christian denomination that supports the government and is supported by the government.

New!!: Christianity and Christian state · See more »

Christian theology

Christian theology is the theology of Christian belief and practice.

New!!: Christianity and Christian theology · See more »

Christian views on marriage

Marriage is the legally or formally recognized intimate and complementing union of two people as spousal partners in a personal relationship (historically and in most jurisdictions specifically a union between a man and a woman).

New!!: Christianity and Christian views on marriage · See more »

Christian views on sin

The doctrine of sin is central to Christianity, since its basic message is about redemption in Christ.

New!!: Christianity and Christian views on sin · See more »

Christianity and politics

The relationship between Christianity and politics is a historically complex subject and a frequent source of disagreement throughout the history of Christianity, as well as in modern politics between the Christian right and Christian left.

New!!: Christianity and Christianity and politics · See more »

Christianity and science

Most sources of knowledge available to early Christians were connected to pagan world-views.

New!!: Christianity and Christianity and science · See more »

Christianity and Theosophy

Christianity and Theosophy, for more than a hundred years, have a difficult and occasionally poor relationship.

New!!: Christianity and Christianity and Theosophy · See more »

Christianity by country

 As of the year 2015, Christianity has more than 2.3 billion adherents, out of about 7.5 billion people.

New!!: Christianity and Christianity by country · See more »

Christianity in Africa

Christianity in Africa began in Egypt in the middle of the 1st century.

New!!: Christianity and Christianity in Africa · See more »

Christianity in Australia

Christianity is the largest Australian religion according to the national census.

New!!: Christianity and Christianity in Australia · See more »

Christianity in Europe

Christianity is the largest religion in Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Christianity in Europe · See more »

Christianity in Korea

The practice of Christianity in Korea revolves around two of its largest branches, Protestantism and Catholicism, accounting for 8.6 millionAccording to figures compiled by the South Korean National Statistical Office.

New!!: Christianity and Christianity in Korea · See more »

Christianity in Sudan

Christianity has a long history in the region that is now Sudan and South Sudan.

New!!: Christianity and Christianity in Sudan · See more »

Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

New!!: Christianity and Christmas · See more »

Christology

Christology (from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology which is primarily concerned with the ontology and person of Jesus as recorded in the canonical Gospels and the epistles of the New Testament.

New!!: Christianity and Christology · See more »

Christopher Columbus

Christopher Columbus (before 31 October 145120 May 1506) was an Italian explorer, navigator, and colonizer.

New!!: Christianity and Christopher Columbus · See more »

Church architecture

Church architecture refers to the architecture of buildings of Christian churches.

New!!: Christianity and Church architecture · See more »

Church attendance

Church attendance is a central religious practice for many Christians; some Christian denominations, such as the Catholic Church require church attendance on the Lord's Day (Sunday); the Westminster Confession of Faith is held by the Reformed Churches and teaches first-day Sabbatarianism, thus proclaiming the duty of public worship in keeping with the Ten Commandments.

New!!: Christianity and Church attendance · See more »

Church Fathers

The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and influential Christian theologians and writers.

New!!: Christianity and Church Fathers · See more »

Church History (Eusebius)

The Church History (Ἐκκλησιαστικὴ ἱστορία; Historia Ecclesiastica or Historia Ecclesiae) of Eusebius, the bishop of Caesarea was a 4th-century pioneer work giving a chronological account of the development of Early Christianity from the 1st century to the 4th century.

New!!: Christianity and Church History (Eusebius) · See more »

Church of England

The Church of England (C of E) is the state church of England.

New!!: Christianity and Church of England · See more »

Church of South India

The Church of South India (CSI) is the second largest Christian church in India based on the population of members, and claims to be the largest Protestant denomination in the country.

New!!: Christianity and Church of South India · See more »

Church of the East

The Church of the East (ܥܕܬܐ ܕܡܕܢܚܐ Ēdṯāʾ d-Maḏenḥā), also known as the Nestorian Church, was an Eastern Christian Church with independent hierarchy from the Nestorian Schism (431–544), while tracing its history to the late 1st century AD in Assyria, then the satrapy of Assuristan in the Parthian Empire.

New!!: Christianity and Church of the East · See more »

Church service

A church service (also called a service of worship, or simply a service) is a formalized period of communal worship in Christian tradition.

New!!: Christianity and Church service · See more »

Churches of Christ

Churches of Christ are autonomous Christian congregations associated with one another through distinct beliefs and practices.

New!!: Christianity and Churches of Christ · See more »

Churchmanship

Churchmanship (or churchpersonship; or tradition in most official contexts) is a way of talking about and labelling different tendencies, parties, or schools of thought within the Church of England and the sister churches of the Anglican Communion.

New!!: Christianity and Churchmanship · See more »

Cistercians

A Cistercian is a member of the Cistercian Order (abbreviated as OCist, SOCist ((Sacer) Ordo Cisterciensis), or ‘’’OCSO’’’ (Ordo Cisterciensis Strictioris Observantiae), which are religious orders of monks and nuns. They are also known as “Trappists”; as Bernardines, after the highly influential St. Bernard of Clairvaux (though that term is also used of the Franciscan Order in Poland and Lithuania); or as White Monks, in reference to the colour of the "cuccula" or white choir robe worn by the Cistercians over their habits, as opposed to the black cuccula worn by Benedictine monks. The original emphasis of Cistercian life was on manual labour and self-sufficiency, and many abbeys have traditionally supported themselves through activities such as agriculture and brewing ales. Over the centuries, however, education and academic pursuits came to dominate the life of many monasteries. A reform movement seeking to restore the simpler lifestyle of the original Cistercians began in 17th-century France at La Trappe Abbey, leading eventually to the Holy See’s reorganization in 1892 of reformed houses into a single order Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (OCSO), commonly called the Trappists. Cistercians who did not observe these reforms became known as the Cistercians of the Original Observance. The term Cistercian (French Cistercien), derives from Cistercium, the Latin name for the village of Cîteaux, near Dijon in eastern France. It was in this village that a group of Benedictine monks from the monastery of Molesme founded Cîteaux Abbey in 1098, with the goal of following more closely the Rule of Saint Benedict. The best known of them were Robert of Molesme, Alberic of Cîteaux and the English monk Stephen Harding, who were the first three abbots. Bernard of Clairvaux entered the monastery in the early 1110s with 30 companions and helped the rapid proliferation of the order. By the end of the 12th century, the order had spread throughout France and into England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Italy, and Eastern Europe. The keynote of Cistercian life was a return to literal observance of the Rule of St Benedict. Rejecting the developments the Benedictines had undergone, the monks tried to replicate monastic life exactly as it had been in Saint Benedict's time; indeed in various points they went beyond it in austerity. The most striking feature in the reform was the return to manual labour, especially agricultural work in the fields, a special characteristic of Cistercian life. Cistercian architecture is considered one of the most beautiful styles of medieval architecture. Additionally, in relation to fields such as agriculture, hydraulic engineering and metallurgy, the Cistercians became the main force of technological diffusion in medieval Europe. The Cistercians were adversely affected in England by the Protestant Reformation, the Dissolution of the Monasteries under King Henry VIII, the French Revolution in continental Europe, and the revolutions of the 18th century, but some survived and the order recovered in the 19th century.

New!!: Christianity and Cistercians · See more »

Clement of Alexandria

Titus Flavius Clemens, also known as Clement of Alexandria (Κλήμης ὁ Ἀλεξανδρεύς; c. 150 – c. 215), was a Christian theologian who taught at the Catechetical School of Alexandria.

New!!: Christianity and Clement of Alexandria · See more »

Closed communion

Closed communion is the practice of restricting the serving of the elements of Holy Communion (also called Eucharist, The Lord's Supper) to those who are members in good standing of a particular church, denomination, sect, or congregation.

New!!: Christianity and Closed communion · See more »

Cluny Abbey

Cluny Abbey (formerly also Cluni, or Clugny) is a former Benedictine monastery in Cluny, Saône-et-Loire, France.

New!!: Christianity and Cluny Abbey · See more »

Colonialism

Colonialism is the policy of a polity seeking to extend or retain its authority over other people or territories, generally with the aim of developing or exploiting them to the benefit of the colonizing country and of helping the colonies modernize in terms defined by the colonizers, especially in economics, religion and health.

New!!: Christianity and Colonialism · See more »

Columbia Encyclopedia

The Columbia Encyclopedia is a one-volume encyclopedia produced by Columbia University Press and in the last edition, sold by the Gale Group.

New!!: Christianity and Columbia Encyclopedia · See more »

Columbidae

Pigeons and doves constitute the animal family Columbidae and the order Columbiformes, which includes about 42 genera and 310 species.

New!!: Christianity and Columbidae · See more »

Commendation ceremony

A commendation ceremony (commendatio) is a formal ceremony that evolved during the Early Medieval period to create a bond between a lord and his fighting man, called his vassal.

New!!: Christianity and Commendation ceremony · See more »

Communion of saints

The communion of saints (Latin, communio sanctorum), when referred to persons, is the spiritual union of the members of the Christian Church, living and the dead, those on earth, in heaven, and, for those who believe in purgatory, those also who are in that state of purification.

New!!: Christianity and Communion of saints · See more »

Confession (religion)

Confession, in many religions, is the acknowledgment of one's sins (sinfulness) or wrongs.

New!!: Christianity and Confession (religion) · See more »

Confessionalism (religion)

Confessionalism, in a religious (and particularly Christian) sense, is a belief in the importance of full and unambiguous assent to the whole of a religious teaching.

New!!: Christianity and Confessionalism (religion) · See more »

Confirmation

In Christianity, confirmation is seen as the sealing of Christianity created in baptism.

New!!: Christianity and Confirmation · See more »

Congregational church

Congregational churches (also Congregationalist churches; Congregationalism) are Protestant churches in the Reformed tradition practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs.

New!!: Christianity and Congregational church · See more »

Consecrated life

Consecrated life, in the canon law of the Catholic Church, is a stable form of Christian living by those faithful who are called to follow Jesus Christ in a more exacting way recognized by the Church.

New!!: Christianity and Consecrated life · See more »

Constantine the Great

Constantine the Great (Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus; Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February 272 ADBirth dates vary but most modern historians use 272". Lenski, "Reign of Constantine" (CC), 59. – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine, was a Roman Emperor of Illyrian and Greek origin from 306 to 337 AD.

New!!: Christianity and Constantine the Great · See more »

Constantinople

Constantinople (Κωνσταντινούπολις Konstantinoúpolis; Constantinopolis) was the capital city of the Roman/Byzantine Empire (330–1204 and 1261–1453), and also of the brief Latin (1204–1261), and the later Ottoman (1453–1923) empires.

New!!: Christianity and Constantinople · See more »

Consubstantiality

Consubstantial (Latin: consubstantialis) is an adjective used in Latin Christian christology, coined by Tertullian in Against Hermogenes 44, used to translate the Greek term homoousios.

New!!: Christianity and Consubstantiality · See more »

Contra Celsum

Against Celsus (Greek: Κατὰ Κέλσου; Latin: Contra Celsum), preserved entirely in Greek, is a major apologetics work by the Church Father Origen of Alexandria, written in around 248 AD, countering the writings of Celsus, a pagan philosopher and controversialist who had written a scathing attack on Christianity in his treatise The True Word.

New!!: Christianity and Contra Celsum · See more »

Conversion to Christianity

Conversion to Christianity is a process of religious conversion in which a previously non-Christian person converts to Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Conversion to Christianity · See more »

Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria

The Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria (Coptic: Ϯⲉⲕ̀ⲕⲗⲏⲥⲓⲁ ̀ⲛⲣⲉⲙ̀ⲛⲭⲏⲙⲓ ⲛⲟⲣⲑⲟⲇⲟⲝⲟⲥ, ti.eklyseya en.remenkimi en.orthodoxos, literally: the Egyptian Orthodox Church) is an Oriental Orthodox Christian church based in Egypt, Northeast Africa and the Middle East.

New!!: Christianity and Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria · See more »

Correlation and dependence

In statistics, dependence or association is any statistical relationship, whether causal or not, between two random variables or bivariate data.

New!!: Christianity and Correlation and dependence · See more »

Council of Chalcedon

The Council of Chalcedon was a church council held from October 8 to November 1, AD 451, at Chalcedon.

New!!: Christianity and Council of Chalcedon · See more »

Council of Ephesus

The Council of Ephesus was a council of Christian bishops convened in Ephesus (near present-day Selçuk in Turkey) in AD 431 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius II.

New!!: Christianity and Council of Ephesus · See more »

Council of Florence

The Seventeenth Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church was convoked as the Council of Basel by Pope Martin V shortly before his death in February 1431 and took place in the context of the Hussite wars in Bohemia and the rise of the Ottoman Empire.

New!!: Christianity and Council of Florence · See more »

Council of Trent

The Council of Trent (Concilium Tridentinum), held between 1545 and 1563 in Trent (or Trento, in northern Italy), was an ecumenical council of the Catholic Church.

New!!: Christianity and Council of Trent · See more »

Counter-Reformation

The Counter-Reformation, also called the Catholic Reformation or the Catholic Revival, was the period of Catholic resurgence initiated in response to the Protestant Reformation, beginning with the Council of Trent (1545–1563) and ending at the close of the Thirty Years' War (1648).

New!!: Christianity and Counter-Reformation · See more »

Creed

A creed (also known as a confession, symbol, or statement of faith) is a statement of the shared beliefs of a religious community in the form of a fixed formula summarizing core tenets.

New!!: Christianity and Creed · See more »

Crossing the Red Sea

The Crossing of the Red Sea (Hebrew: קריעת ים סוף Kriat Yam Suph - Crossing of the Red Sea or Sea of Reeds) is part of the biblical narrative of the Exodus, the escape of the Israelites, led by Moses, from the pursuing Egyptians in the Book of Exodus.

New!!: Christianity and Crossing the Red Sea · See more »

Crucifix

A crucifix (from Latin cruci fixus meaning "(one) fixed to a cross") is an image of Jesus on the cross, as distinct from a bare cross.

New!!: Christianity and Crucifix · See more »

Crucifixion

Crucifixion is a method of capital punishment in which the victim is tied or nailed to a large wooden beam and left to hang for several days until eventual death from exhaustion and asphyxiation.

New!!: Christianity and Crucifixion · See more »

Crucifixion of Jesus

The crucifixion of Jesus occurred in 1st-century Judea, most likely between AD 30 and 33.

New!!: Christianity and Crucifixion of Jesus · See more »

Crusades

The Crusades were a series of religious wars sanctioned by the Latin Church in the medieval period.

New!!: Christianity and Crusades · See more »

Cultural Christian

Cultural Christians are referred to those deists, pantheists, agnostics, atheists, and antitheists who are not Christians but adhere to Christian values and appreciate Christian culture.

New!!: Christianity and Cultural Christian · See more »

Cyprian

Saint Cyprian (Thaschus Cæcilius Cyprianus; 200 – September 14, 258 AD) was bishop of Carthage and a notable Early Christian writer of Berber descent, many of whose Latin works are extant.

New!!: Christianity and Cyprian · See more »

Czech Republic

The Czech Republic (Česká republika), also known by its short-form name Czechia (Česko), is a landlocked country in Central Europe bordered by Germany to the west, Austria to the south, Slovakia to the east and Poland to the northeast.

New!!: Christianity and Czech Republic · See more »

David Bentley Hart

David Bentley Hart (born 1965) is an American Orthodox Christian philosophical theologian, cultural commentator and polemicist.

New!!: Christianity and David Bentley Hart · See more »

Debate

Debate is a process that involves formal discussion on a particular topic.

New!!: Christianity and Debate · See more »

Dechristianization of France during the French Revolution

The dechristianization of France during the French Revolution is a conventional description of the results of a number of separate policies conducted by various governments of France between the start of the French Revolution in 1789 and the Concordat of 1801, forming the basis of the later and less radical laïcité policies.

New!!: Christianity and Dechristianization of France during the French Revolution · See more »

Decius

Trajan Decius (Caesar Gaius Messius Quintus Trajanus Decius Augustus; c. 201June 251) was Roman Emperor from 249 to 251.

New!!: Christianity and Decius · See more »

Deuterocanonical books

The deuterocanonical books (from the Greek meaning "belonging to the second canon") is a term adopted in the 16th century by the Roman Catholic Church to denote those books and passages of the Christian Old Testament, as defined in 1546 by the Council of Trent, that were not found in the Hebrew Bible.

New!!: Christianity and Deuterocanonical books · See more »

Development of the Christian biblical canon

The Christian biblical canons are the books Christians regard as divinely inspired and which constitute a Christian Bible.

New!!: Christianity and Development of the Christian biblical canon · See more »

Diarmaid MacCulloch

Diarmaid Ninian John MacCulloch (born 31 October 1951) is a British historian and academic, specialising in ecclesiastical history and the history of Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Diarmaid MacCulloch · See more »

Diocese of Rome

The Diocese of Rome (Dioecesis Urbis seu Romana, Diocesi di Roma) is a diocese of the Catholic Church in Rome.

New!!: Christianity and Diocese of Rome · See more »

Diocletian

Diocletian (Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus Augustus), born Diocles (22 December 244–3 December 311), was a Roman emperor from 284 to 305.

New!!: Christianity and Diocletian · See more »

Disciple (Christianity)

In Christianity, the term disciple primarily refers to dedicated followers of Jesus.

New!!: Christianity and Disciple (Christianity) · See more »

Dissolution of the Monasteries

The Dissolution of the Monasteries, sometimes referred to as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the set of administrative and legal processes between 1536 and 1541 by which Henry VIII disbanded monasteries, priories, convents and friaries in England and Wales and Ireland, appropriated their income, disposed of their assets, and provided for their former personnel and functions.

New!!: Christianity and Dissolution of the Monasteries · See more »

Divine grace

Divine grace is a theological term present in many religions.

New!!: Christianity and Divine grace · See more »

Doctrine

Doctrine (from doctrina, meaning "teaching", "instruction" or "doctrine") is a codification of beliefs or a body of teachings or instructions, taught principles or positions, as the essence of teachings in a given branch of knowledge or in a belief system.

New!!: Christianity and Doctrine · See more »

Dominican Order

The Order of Preachers (Ordo Praedicatorum, postnominal abbreviation OP), also known as the Dominican Order, is a mendicant Catholic religious order founded by the Spanish priest Dominic of Caleruega in France, approved by Pope Honorius III via the Papal bull Religiosam vitam on 22 December 1216.

New!!: Christianity and Dominican Order · See more »

Doukhobors

The Doukhobors or Dukhobors (Духоборы, Dukhobory, also Dukhobortsy, Духоборцы; literally "Spirit-Warriors / Wrestlers") are a Spiritual Christian religious group of Russian origin.

New!!: Christianity and Doukhobors · See more »

Early centers of Christianity

Early Christianity (generally considered the time period from its origin to the First Council of Nicaea in 325) spread from the Eastern Mediterranean throughout the Roman Empire and beyond.

New!!: Christianity and Early centers of Christianity · See more »

Early Christian art and architecture

Early Christian art and architecture or Paleochristian art is the art produced by Christians or under Christian patronage from the earliest period of Christianity to, depending on the definition used, sometime between 260 and 525.

New!!: Christianity and Early Christian art and architecture · See more »

Early Christianity

Early Christianity, defined as the period of Christianity preceding the First Council of Nicaea in 325, typically divides historically into the Apostolic Age and the Ante-Nicene Period (from the Apostolic Age until Nicea).

New!!: Christianity and Early Christianity · See more »

East Asia

East Asia is the eastern subregion of the Asian continent, which can be defined in either geographical or ethno-cultural "The East Asian cultural sphere evolves when Japan, Korea, and what is today Vietnam all share adapted elements of Chinese civilization of this period (that of the Tang dynasty), in particular Buddhism, Confucian social and political values, and literary Chinese and its writing system." terms.

New!!: Christianity and East Asia · See more »

East Timor

East Timor or Timor-Leste (Tetum: Timór Lorosa'e), officially the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste (República Democrática de Timor-Leste, Repúblika Demokrátika Timór-Leste), is a sovereign state in Maritime Southeast Asia.

New!!: Christianity and East Timor · See more »

East–West Schism

The East–West Schism, also called the Great Schism and the Schism of 1054, was the break of communion between what are now the Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox churches, which has lasted since the 11th century.

New!!: Christianity and East–West Schism · See more »

Easter

Easter,Traditional names for the feast in English are "Easter Day", as in the Book of Common Prayer, "Easter Sunday", used by James Ussher and Samuel Pepys and plain "Easter", as in books printed in,, also called Pascha (Greek, Latin) or Resurrection Sunday, is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, described in the New Testament as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary 30 AD.

New!!: Christianity and Easter · See more »

Eastern Catholic Churches

The Eastern Catholic Churches or Oriental Catholic Churches, also called the Eastern-rite Catholic Churches, and in some historical cases Uniate Churches, are twenty-three Eastern Christian particular churches sui iuris in full communion with the Pope in Rome, as part of the worldwide Catholic Church.

New!!: Christianity and Eastern Catholic Churches · See more »

Eastern Christianity

Eastern Christianity consists of four main church families: the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox churches, the Eastern Catholic churches (that are in communion with Rome but still maintain Eastern liturgies), and the denominations descended from the Church of the East.

New!!: Christianity and Eastern Christianity · See more »

Eastern Orthodox Church

The Eastern Orthodox Church, also known as the Orthodox Church, or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church, is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.

New!!: Christianity and Eastern Orthodox Church · See more »

Ecclesiastical polity

Ecclesiastical polity is the operational and governance structure of a church or of a Christian denomination.

New!!: Christianity and Ecclesiastical polity · See more »

Ecclesiology

In Christian theology, ecclesiology is the study of the Christian Church, the origins of Christianity, its relationship to Jesus, its role in salvation, its polity, its discipline, its destiny, and its leadership.

New!!: Christianity and Ecclesiology · See more »

Economics

Economics is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

New!!: Christianity and Economics · See more »

Ecumenical council

An ecumenical council (or oecumenical council; also general council) is a conference of ecclesiastical dignitaries and theological experts convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice in which those entitled to vote are convoked from the whole world (oikoumene) and which secures the approbation of the whole Church.

New!!: Christianity and Ecumenical council · See more »

Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople

The Ecumenical Patriarch (Η Αυτού Θειοτάτη Παναγιότης, ο Αρχιεπίσκοπος Κωνσταντινουπόλεως, Νέας Ρώμης και Οικουμενικός Πατριάρχης, "His Most Divine All-Holiness the Archbishop of Constantinople, New Rome, and Ecumenical Patriarch") is the Archbishop of Constantinople–New Rome and ranks as primus inter pares (first among equals) among the heads of the several autocephalous churches that make up the Eastern Orthodox Church.

New!!: Christianity and Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople · See more »

Ecumenism

Ecumenism refers to efforts by Christians of different Church traditions to develop closer relationships and better understandings.

New!!: Christianity and Ecumenism · See more »

Edict of Milan

The Edict of Milan (Edictum Mediolanense) was the February 313 AD agreement to treat Christians benevolently within the Roman Empire.

New!!: Christianity and Edict of Milan · See more »

Education

Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits.

New!!: Christianity and Education · See more »

Egypt

Egypt (مِصر, مَصر, Khēmi), officially the Arab Republic of Egypt, is a transcontinental country spanning the northeast corner of Africa and southwest corner of Asia by a land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula.

New!!: Christianity and Egypt · See more »

Egypt (Roman province)

The Roman province of Egypt (Aigyptos) was established in 30 BC after Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) defeated his rival Mark Antony, deposed Queen Cleopatra VII, and annexed the Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt to the Roman Empire.

New!!: Christianity and Egypt (Roman province) · See more »

Elijah

Elijah (meaning "My God is Yahu/Jah") or latinized form Elias (Ἡλίας, Elías; ܐܸܠܝܼܵܐ, Elyāe; Arabic: إلياس or إليا, Ilyās or Ilyā) was, according to the Books of Kings in the Hebrew Bible, a prophet and a miracle worker who lived in the northern kingdom of Israel during the reign of King Ahab (9th century BC).

New!!: Christianity and Elijah · See more »

Encyclopædia Britannica

The Encyclopædia Britannica (Latin for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language encyclopaedia.

New!!: Christianity and Encyclopædia Britannica · See more »

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.

New!!: Christianity and England · See more »

English Civil War

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance.

New!!: Christianity and English Civil War · See more »

English Reformation

The English Reformation was a series of events in 16th century England by which the Church of England broke away from the authority of the Pope and the Roman Catholic Church.

New!!: Christianity and English Reformation · See more »

Episcopal polity

An episcopal polity is a hierarchical form of church governance ("ecclesiastical polity") in which the chief local authorities are called bishops.

New!!: Christianity and Episcopal polity · See more »

Episcopal see

The seat or cathedra of the Bishop of Rome in the Basilica of San Giovanni in Laterano An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction.

New!!: Christianity and Episcopal see · See more »

Epistle of James

The Epistle of James (Iakōbos), the Book of James, or simply James, is one of the 21 epistles (didactic letters) in the New Testament.

New!!: Christianity and Epistle of James · See more »

Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church

The Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church is an Oriental Orthodox church with its headquarters in Asmara, Eritrea.

New!!: Christianity and Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church · See more »

Eschatology

Eschatology is a part of theology concerned with the final events of history, or the ultimate destiny of humanity.

New!!: Christianity and Eschatology · See more »

Esoteric Christianity

Esoteric Christianity (also known as Hermetic Christianity or Mystic Christianity) is an ensemble of spiritual currents which regard Christianity as a mystery religion, and profess the existence and possession of certain esoteric doctrines or practices of which the public is unaware (or even to which they may be denied access) but which are understood by a small group of people.

New!!: Christianity and Esoteric Christianity · See more »

Estonia

Estonia (Eesti), officially the Republic of Estonia (Eesti Vabariik), is a sovereign state in Northern Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Estonia · See more »

Eternal life (Christianity)

Eternal life traditionally refers to continued life after death, as outlined in Christian eschatology.

New!!: Christianity and Eternal life (Christianity) · See more »

Eternity

Eternity in common parlance is an infinitely long period of time.

New!!: Christianity and Eternity · See more »

Ethiopia

Ethiopia (ኢትዮጵያ), officially the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (የኢትዮጵያ ፌዴራላዊ ዲሞክራሲያዊ ሪፐብሊክ, yeʾĪtiyoṗṗya Fēdēralawī Dēmokirasīyawī Rīpebilīk), is a country located in the Horn of Africa.

New!!: Christianity and Ethiopia · See more »

Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church

The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church (የኢትዮጵያ:ኦርቶዶክስ:ተዋሕዶ:ቤተ:ክርስቲያን; Yäityop'ya ortodoks täwahedo bétäkrestyan) is the largest of the Oriental Orthodox Christian Churches.

New!!: Christianity and Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church · See more »

Eucharist

The Eucharist (also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others.

New!!: Christianity and Eucharist · See more »

Europe

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

New!!: Christianity and Europe · See more »

Eusebius

Eusebius of Caesarea (Εὐσέβιος τῆς Καισαρείας, Eusébios tés Kaisareías; 260/265 – 339/340), also known as Eusebius Pamphili (from the Εὐσέβιος τοῦ Παμϕίλου), was a historian of Christianity, exegete, and Christian polemicist. He became the bishop of Caesarea Maritima about 314 AD. Together with Pamphilus, he was a scholar of the Biblical canon and is regarded as an extremely learned Christian of his time. He wrote Demonstrations of the Gospel, Preparations for the Gospel, and On Discrepancies between the Gospels, studies of the Biblical text. As "Father of Church History" (not to be confused with the title of Church Father), he produced the Ecclesiastical History, On the Life of Pamphilus, the Chronicle and On the Martyrs. During the Council of Antiochia (325) he was excommunicated for subscribing to the heresy of Arius, and thus withdrawn during the First Council of Nicaea where he accepted that the Homoousion referred to the Logos. Never recognized as a Saint, he became counselor of Constantine the Great, and with the bishop of Nicomedia he continued to polemicize against Saint Athanasius of Alexandria, Church Fathers, since he was condemned in the First Council of Tyre in 335.

New!!: Christianity and Eusebius · See more »

Evangelical Anglicanism

Evangelical Anglicanism or evangelical Episcopalianism is a tradition or church party within Anglicanism that shares affinity with broader evangelicalism.

New!!: Christianity and Evangelical Anglicanism · See more »

Evangelical Christian Church in Canada

The Evangelical Christian Church (Christian Disciples) as an evangelical Protestant Canadian church bodyhttp://www.cmp-cpm.forces.gc.ca/pub/rc/rel/eccc-ecec-eng.asp Religions in Canada (2009) Retrieved on 17/10/09 in North America (2004) can be traced to the formal organization of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) in 1804, in Bourbon County, Kentucky under the leadership of Barton Warren Stone (1772–1844).

New!!: Christianity and Evangelical Christian Church in Canada · See more »

Evangelical Dictionary of Theology

The Evangelical Dictionary of Theology is a Christian reference work published by Baker Books.

New!!: Christianity and Evangelical Dictionary of Theology · See more »

Evangelicalism

Evangelicalism, evangelical Christianity, or evangelical Protestantism, is a worldwide, crossdenominational movement within Protestant Christianity which maintains the belief that the essence of the Gospel consists of the doctrine of salvation by grace through faith in Jesus Christ's atonement.

New!!: Christianity and Evangelicalism · See more »

Evangelism

In Christianity, Evangelism is the commitment to or act of publicly preaching of the Gospel with the intention of spreading the message and teachings of Jesus Christ.

New!!: Christianity and Evangelism · See more »

Exegesis

Exegesis (from the Greek ἐξήγησις from ἐξηγεῖσθαι, "to lead out") is a critical explanation or interpretation of a text, particularly a religious text.

New!!: Christianity and Exegesis · See more »

Existence of God

The existence of God is a subject of debate in the philosophy of religion and popular culture.

New!!: Christianity and Existence of God · See more »

Experiment

An experiment is a procedure carried out to support, refute, or validate a hypothesis.

New!!: Christianity and Experiment · See more »

Family

Every person has his/her own family.mother reproduces with husband for children.In the context of human society, a family (from familia) is a group of people related either by consanguinity (by recognized birth), affinity (by marriage or other relationship), or co-residence (as implied by the etymology of the English word "family" from Latin familia 'family servants, domestics collectively, the servants in a household,' thus also 'members of a household, the estate, property; the household, including relatives and servants,' abstract noun formed from famulus 'servant, slave ') or some combination of these.

New!!: Christianity and Family · See more »

Fasting

Fasting is the willing abstinence or reduction from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time.

New!!: Christianity and Fasting · See more »

Filioque

Filioque is a Latin term added to the original Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed (commonly known as the Nicene Creed), and which has been the subject of great controversy between Eastern and Western Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Filioque · See more »

First Apology of Justin Martyr

The First Apology was an early work of Christian apologetics addressed by Justin Martyr to the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius.

New!!: Christianity and First Apology of Justin Martyr · See more »

First Council of Constantinople

The First Council of Constantinople (Πρώτη σύνοδος της Κωνσταντινουπόλεως commonly known as Β΄ Οικουμενική, "Second Ecumenical"; Concilium Constantinopolitanum Primum or Concilium Constantinopolitanum A) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Constantinople in AD 381 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius I. This second ecumenical council, an effort to attain consensus in the church through an assembly representing all of Christendom, except for the Western Church,Richard Kieckhefer (1989).

New!!: Christianity and First Council of Constantinople · See more »

First Council of Nicaea

The First Council of Nicaea (Νίκαια) was a council of Christian bishops convened in the Bithynian city of Nicaea (now İznik, Bursa province, Turkey) by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325.

New!!: Christianity and First Council of Nicaea · See more »

First Vatican Council

The First Vatican Council (Concilium Vaticanum Primum) was convoked by Pope Pius IX on 29 June 1868, after a period of planning and preparation that began on 6 December 1864.

New!!: Christianity and First Vatican Council · See more »

Four Marks of the Church

The Four Marks of the Church, also known as the Attributes of the Church, is a term describing four distinctive adjectives — "One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic" — of traditional Christian ecclesiology as expressed in the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed completed at the First Council of Constantinople in AD 381: " in one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church." This ecumenical creed is today recited in the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church (both Latin and Eastern Rites), the Eastern Orthodox Churches, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Church of the East, the Moravian Church, the Lutheran Churches, the Methodist Churches, the Anglican Communion, the Reformed Churches, and other Christian denominations.

New!!: Christianity and Four Marks of the Church · See more »

Fourth Crusade

The Fourth Crusade (1202–1204) was a Latin Christian armed expedition called by Pope Innocent III.

New!!: Christianity and Fourth Crusade · See more »

France

France, officially the French Republic (République française), is a sovereign state whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.

New!!: Christianity and France · See more »

Francia

Francia, also called the Kingdom of the Franks (Regnum Francorum), or Frankish Empire was the largest post-Roman Barbarian kingdom in Western Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Francia · See more »

Francis of Assisi

Saint Francis of Assisi (San Francesco d'Assisi), born Giovanni di Pietro di Bernardone, informally named as Francesco (1181/11823 October 1226), was an Italian Catholic friar, deacon and preacher.

New!!: Christianity and Francis of Assisi · See more »

Franciscans

The Franciscans are a group of related mendicant religious orders within the Catholic Church, founded in 1209 by Saint Francis of Assisi.

New!!: Christianity and Franciscans · See more »

Free will

Free will is the ability to choose between different possible courses of action unimpeded.

New!!: Christianity and Free will · See more »

French Revolution

The French Revolution (Révolution française) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799.

New!!: Christianity and French Revolution · See more »

French Wars of Religion

The French Wars of Religion refers to a prolonged period of war and popular unrest between Roman Catholics and Huguenots (Reformed/Calvinist Protestants) in the Kingdom of France between 1562 and 1598.

New!!: Christianity and French Wars of Religion · See more »

Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (15 October 1844 – 25 August 1900) was a German philosopher, cultural critic, composer, poet, philologist and a Latin and Greek scholar whose work has exerted a profound influence on Western philosophy and modern intellectual history.

New!!: Christianity and Friedrich Nietzsche · See more »

Frisia

Frisia (Fryslân, Dutch and Friesland) is a coastal region along the southeastern corner of the North Sea in what today is mostly a large part of the Netherlands, including modern Friesland, and smaller parts of northern Germany.

New!!: Christianity and Frisia · See more »

Full communion

Full communion is a communion or relationship of full understanding among different Christian denominations that they share certain essential principles of Christian theology.

New!!: Christianity and Full communion · See more »

G. K. Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton, KC*SG (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936), was an English writer, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, lay theologian, biographer, and literary and art critic.

New!!: Christianity and G. K. Chesterton · See more »

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei (15 February 1564Drake (1978, p. 1). The date of Galileo's birth is given according to the Julian calendar, which was then in force throughout Christendom. In 1582 it was replaced in Italy and several other Catholic countries with the Gregorian calendar. Unless otherwise indicated, dates in this article are given according to the Gregorian calendar. – 8 January 1642) was an Italian polymath.

New!!: Christianity and Galileo Galilei · See more »

Garden of Eden

The Garden of Eden (Hebrew גַּן עֵדֶן, Gan ʿEḏen) or (often) Paradise, is the biblical "garden of God", described most notably in the Book of Genesis chapters 2 and 3, and also in the Book of Ezekiel.

New!!: Christianity and Garden of Eden · See more »

Garry Wills

Garry Wills (born May 22, 1934) is an American author, journalist, and historian, specializing in American history, politics, and religion, especially the history of the Catholic Church.

New!!: Christianity and Garry Wills · See more »

Gaul

Gaul (Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe during the Iron Age that was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine.

New!!: Christianity and Gaul · See more »

Genuflection

Genuflection or genuflexion is the act of bending at least one knee to the ground.

New!!: Christianity and Genuflection · See more »

Georgia (country)

Georgia (tr) is a country in the Caucasus region of Eurasia.

New!!: Christianity and Georgia (country) · See more »

Germanic peoples

The Germanic peoples (also called Teutonic, Suebian, or Gothic in older literature) are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group of Northern European origin.

New!!: Christianity and Germanic peoples · See more »

Germany

Germany (Deutschland), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (Bundesrepublik Deutschland), is a sovereign state in central-western Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Germany · See more »

Ghana

Ghana, officially the Republic of Ghana, is a unitary presidential constitutional democracy, located along the Gulf of Guinea and Atlantic Ocean, in the subregion of West Africa.

New!!: Christianity and Ghana · See more »

Gnosticism

Gnosticism (from γνωστικός gnostikos, "having knowledge", from γνῶσις, knowledge) is a modern name for a variety of ancient religious ideas and systems, originating in Jewish-Christian milieus in the first and second century AD.

New!!: Christianity and Gnosticism · See more »

God in Christianity

God in Christianity is the eternal being who created and preserves all things.

New!!: Christianity and God in Christianity · See more »

God in Judaism

In Judaism, God has been conceived in a variety of ways.

New!!: Christianity and God in Judaism · See more »

God the Father

God the Father is a title given to God in various religions, most prominently in Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and God the Father · See more »

Godhead in Christianity

Godhead (or godhood), is the divinity or substance (ousia) of the Christian God, the substantial impersonal being of God, as opposed to the individual persons or hypostases of the Trinity; in other words, the Godhead refers to the "what" of God, and God refers to the "who" of God.

New!!: Christianity and Godhead in Christianity · See more »

Good Friday

Good Friday is a Christian holiday celebrating the crucifixion of Jesus and his death at Calvary.

New!!: Christianity and Good Friday · See more »

Gospel

Gospel is the Old English translation of Greek εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, meaning "good news".

New!!: Christianity and Gospel · See more »

Gospel of John

The Gospel According to John is the fourth of the canonical gospels.

New!!: Christianity and Gospel of John · See more »

Gospel of Luke

The Gospel According to Luke (Τὸ κατὰ Λουκᾶν εὐαγγέλιον, to kata Loukan evangelion), also called the Gospel of Luke, or simply Luke, is the third of the four canonical Gospels.

New!!: Christianity and Gospel of Luke · See more »

Gospel of Mark

The Gospel According to Mark (τὸ κατὰ Μᾶρκον εὐαγγέλιον, to kata Markon euangelion), is one of the four canonical gospels and one of the three synoptic gospels.

New!!: Christianity and Gospel of Mark · See more »

Gospel of Matthew

The Gospel According to Matthew (translit; also called the Gospel of Matthew or simply, Matthew) is the first book of the New Testament and one of the three synoptic gospels.

New!!: Christianity and Gospel of Matthew · See more »

Gospel of Thomas

The Gospel According to Thomas is an early Christian non-canonical sayings gospel that many scholars believe provides insight into the oral gospel traditions.

New!!: Christianity and Gospel of Thomas · See more »

Gothic architecture

Gothic architecture is an architectural style that flourished in Europe during the High and Late Middle Ages.

New!!: Christianity and Gothic architecture · See more »

Great Apostasy

In Protestant Christianity, the Great Apostasy is the perceived fallen state of traditional Christianity, especially the Catholic Church, because they claim it allowed traditional Greco-Roman culture (i.e.Greco-Roman mysteries, deities of solar monism such as Mithras and Sol Invictus, pagan festivals and Mithraic sun worship and idol worship) into the church.

New!!: Christianity and Great Apostasy · See more »

Great Church

The term "Great Church" (Latin ecclesia magna) is a concept in the historiography of early Christianity describing the rapid growth and structural development of the Church in 180-313 AD (around the time of the Ante-Nicene Period) and its claim to represent Christianity within the Roman Empire.

New!!: Christianity and Great Church · See more »

Great Divergence

The Great Divergence is a term made popular by Kenneth Pomeranz's book by that title, (also known as the European miracle, a term coined by Eric Jones in 1981) referring to the process by which the Western world (i.e. Western Europe and the parts of the New World where its people became the dominant populations) overcame pre-modern growth constraints and emerged during the 19th century as the most powerful and wealthy world civilization, eclipsing Medieval India, Qing China, the Islamic World, and Tokugawa Japan.

New!!: Christianity and Great Divergence · See more »

Great Fire of Rome

The Great Fire of Rome was an urban fire in the year AD 64.

New!!: Christianity and Great Fire of Rome · See more »

Great Tribulation

In Christian eschatology, the Great Tribulation (θλίψις μεγάλη, thlipsis megalē) is a period mentioned by Jesus in the Olivet discourse as a sign that would occur in the time of the end.

New!!: Christianity and Great Tribulation · See more »

Greece

No description.

New!!: Christianity and Greece · See more »

Greek scholars in the Renaissance

The migration waves of Byzantine scholars and émigrés in the period following the Crusader sacking of Constantinople and the end of the Byzantine Empire in 1453, is considered by many scholars key to the revival of Greek and Roman studies that led to the development of the Renaissance humanism and science.

New!!: Christianity and Greek scholars in the Renaissance · See more »

Greenwood Publishing Group

ABC-CLIO/Greenwood is an educational and academic publisher (middle school through university level) which is today part of ABC-CLIO.

New!!: Christianity and Greenwood Publishing Group · See more »

Greg Bahnsen

Greg L. Bahnsen (September 17, 1948 – December 11, 1995) was an American Calvinist philosopher, apologist, and debater.

New!!: Christianity and Greg Bahnsen · See more »

H. Richard Niebuhr

Helmut Richard Niebuhr (September 3, 1894 – July 5, 1962) is considered one of the most important Christian theological ethicists in 20th century America, most known for his 1951 book Christ and Culture and his posthumously published book The Responsible Self.

New!!: Christianity and H. Richard Niebuhr · See more »

Halo (religious iconography)

A halo (from Greek ἅλως, halōs; also known as a nimbus, aureole, glory, or gloriole) is a crown of light rays, circle or disk of light that surrounds a person in art.

New!!: Christianity and Halo (religious iconography) · See more »

Harper (publisher)

Harper is an American publishing house, currently the flagship imprint of global publisher HarperCollins.

New!!: Christianity and Harper (publisher) · See more »

Harrowing of Hell

In Christian theology, the Harrowing of Hell (Latin: Descensus Christi ad Inferos, "the descent of Christ into hell") is the triumphant descent of Christ into Hell (or Hades) between the time of his Crucifixion and his Resurrection when he brought salvation to all of the righteous who had died since the beginning of the world.

New!!: Christianity and Harrowing of Hell · See more »

Harvard University

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

New!!: Christianity and Harvard University · See more »

Heaven in Christianity

In Christianity, heaven is traditionally the location of the throne of God as well as the holy angelsEhrman, Bart.

New!!: Christianity and Heaven in Christianity · See more »

Hebrew language

No description.

New!!: Christianity and Hebrew language · See more »

Hell

Hell, in many religious and folkloric traditions, is a place of torment and punishment in the afterlife.

New!!: Christianity and Hell · See more »

Helvetic Republic

In Swiss history, the Helvetic Republic (1798–1803) represented an early attempt to impose a central authority over Switzerland, which until then had consisted of self-governing cantons united by a loose military alliance (and ruling over subject territories such as Vaud).

New!!: Christianity and Helvetic Republic · See more »

Henry S. Bettenson

Henry Scowcroft Bettenson (1908, Bolton, Lancashire – 1979) was an English Classical scholar, translator and author.

New!!: Christianity and Henry S. Bettenson · See more »

Henry VIII of England

Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England from 1509 until his death.

New!!: Christianity and Henry VIII of England · See more »

Heresy

Heresy is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization.

New!!: Christianity and Heresy · See more »

High church

The term "high church" refers to beliefs and practices of ecclesiology, liturgy, and theology, generally with an emphasis on formality and resistance to "modernisation." Although used in connection with various Christian traditions, the term originated in and has been principally associated with the Anglican/Episcopal tradition, where it describes Anglican churches using a number of ritual practices associated in the popular mind with Roman Catholicism.

New!!: Christianity and High church · See more »

Historical Jesus

The term historical Jesus refers to attempts to "reconstruct the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth by critical historical methods", in "contrast to Christological definitions ('the dogmatic Christ') and other Christian accounts of Jesus ('the Christ of faith')." It also considers the historical and cultural context in which Jesus lived.

New!!: Christianity and Historical Jesus · See more »

Historical-grammatical method

The historical-grammatical method is a Christian hermeneutical method that strives to discover the biblical authors' original intended meaning in the text.

New!!: Christianity and Historical-grammatical method · See more »

History of Christian thought on persecution and tolerance

This article gives a historical overview of Christian positions on Persecution of Christians, persecutions by Christians, religious persecution and toleration.

New!!: Christianity and History of Christian thought on persecution and tolerance · See more »

History of Christianity

The history of Christianity concerns the Christian religion, Christendom, and the Church with its various denominations, from the 1st century to the present.

New!!: Christianity and History of Christianity · See more »

History of colonialism

The historical phenomenon of colonization is one that stretches around the globe and across time.

New!!: Christianity and History of colonialism · See more »

History of Western civilization

Western civilization traces its roots back to Europe and the Mediterranean.

New!!: Christianity and History of Western civilization · See more »

Holiness movement

The Holiness movement involves a set of beliefs and practices which emerged within 19th-century Methodism.

New!!: Christianity and Holiness movement · See more »

Holy Land

The Holy Land (Hebrew: אֶרֶץ הַקּוֹדֶשׁ, Terra Sancta; Arabic: الأرض المقدسة) is an area roughly located between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea that also includes the Eastern Bank of the Jordan River.

New!!: Christianity and Holy Land · See more »

Holy Leaven

Holy Leaven, also known as Malka (ܡܲܠܟܵܐ), is a powder added to the sacramental bread used in the Eucharist of the Assyrian Church of the East and historically in the Church of the East.

New!!: Christianity and Holy Leaven · See more »

Holy orders

In the Christian churches, Holy Orders are ordained ministries such as bishop, priest or deacon.

New!!: Christianity and Holy orders · See more »

Holy See

The Holy See (Santa Sede; Sancta Sedes), also called the See of Rome, is the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Catholic Church in Rome, the episcopal see of the Pope, and an independent sovereign entity.

New!!: Christianity and Holy See · See more »

Holy Spirit

Holy Spirit (also called Holy Ghost) is a term found in English translations of the Bible that is understood differently among the Abrahamic religions.

New!!: Christianity and Holy Spirit · See more »

Holy Spirit in Christianity

For the majority of Christian denominations, the Holy Spirit or Holy Ghost is the third person (hypostasis) of the Trinity: the Triune God manifested as God the Father, God the Son, and the Holy Spirit; each person itself being God.

New!!: Christianity and Holy Spirit in Christianity · See more »

Holy Week

Holy Week (Latin: Hebdomas Sancta or Hebdomas Maior, "Greater Week"; Greek: Ἁγία καὶ Μεγάλη Ἑβδομάς, Hagia kai Megale Hebdomas, "Holy and Great Week") in Christianity is the week just before Easter.

New!!: Christianity and Holy Week · See more »

Horn of Africa

The Horn of Africa is a peninsula in East Africa that juts into the Guardafui Channel, lying along the southern side of the Gulf of Aden and the southwest Red Sea.

New!!: Christianity and Horn of Africa · See more »

Hospital

A hospital is a health care institution providing patient treatment with specialized medical and nursing staff and medical equipment.

New!!: Christianity and Hospital · See more »

House of Wisdom

The House of Wisdom (بيت الحكمة; Bayt al-Hikma) refers either to a major Abbasid public academy and intellectual center in Baghdad or to a large private library belonging to the Abbasid Caliphs during the Islamic Golden Age.

New!!: Christianity and House of Wisdom · See more »

Huldrych Zwingli

Huldrych Zwingli or Ulrich Zwingli (1 January 1484 – 11 October 1531) was a leader of the Reformation in Switzerland.

New!!: Christianity and Huldrych Zwingli · See more »

Hungarians

Hungarians, also known as Magyars (magyarok), are a nation and ethnic group native to Hungary (Magyarország) and historical Hungarian lands who share a common culture, history and speak the Hungarian language.

New!!: Christianity and Hungarians · See more »

Hungary

Hungary (Magyarország) is a country in Central Europe that covers an area of in the Carpathian Basin, bordered by Slovakia to the north, Ukraine to the northeast, Austria to the northwest, Romania to the east, Serbia to the south, Croatia to the southwest, and Slovenia to the west.

New!!: Christianity and Hungary · See more »

Hutterites

Hutterites (Hutterer) are an ethnoreligious group that is a communal branch of Anabaptists who, like the Amish and Mennonites, trace their roots to the Radical Reformation of the 16th century.

New!!: Christianity and Hutterites · See more »

Hypostatic union

Hypostatic union (from the Greek: ὑπόστασις hypóstasis, "sediment, foundation, substance, subsistence") is a technical term in Christian theology employed in mainstream Christology to describe the union of Christ's humanity and divinity in one hypostasis, or individual existence.

New!!: Christianity and Hypostatic union · See more »

Ichthys

The ichthys or ichthus, from the Greek ikhthýs (ἰχθύς 1st cent. AD Koine Greek, "fish") is a symbol consisting of two intersecting arcs, the ends of the right side extending beyond the meeting point so as to resemble the profile of a fish.

New!!: Christianity and Ichthys · See more »

Iconoclasm

IconoclasmLiterally, "image-breaking", from κλάω.

New!!: Christianity and Iconoclasm · See more »

Ideology

An Ideology is a collection of normative beliefs and values that an individual or group holds for other than purely epistemic reasons.

New!!: Christianity and Ideology · See more »

Idolatry

Idolatry literally means the worship of an "idol", also known as a cult image, in the form of a physical image, such as a statue or icon.

New!!: Christianity and Idolatry · See more »

Iglesia ni Cristo

Iglesia ni Cristo (abbreviated as INC English: Church of Christ) is an international church that originated in the Philippines.

New!!: Christianity and Iglesia ni Cristo · See more »

Ignatius of Antioch

Ignatius of Antioch (Greek: Ἰγνάτιος Ἀντιοχείας, Ignátios Antiokheías; c. 35 – c. 107), also known as Ignatius Theophorus (Ιγνάτιος ὁ Θεοφόρος, Ignátios ho Theophóros, lit. "the God-bearing") or Ignatius Nurono (lit. "The fire-bearer"), was an early Christian writer and bishop of Antioch.

New!!: Christianity and Ignatius of Antioch · See more »

Immersion baptism

Immersion baptism (also known as baptism by immersion or baptism by submersion) is a method of baptism that is distinguished from baptism by affusion (pouring) and by aspersion (sprinkling), sometimes without specifying whether the immersion is total or partial, but very commonly with the indication that the person baptized is immersed completely.

New!!: Christianity and Immersion baptism · See more »

Immortality

Immortality is eternal life, being exempt from death, unending existence.

New!!: Christianity and Immortality · See more »

Incarnation (Christianity)

In Christian theology, the doctrine of the Incarnation holds that Jesus, the preexistent divine Logos (Koine Greek for "Word") and the second hypostasis of the Trinity, God the Son and Son of the Father, taking on a human body and human nature, "was made flesh" and conceived in the womb of Mary the Theotokos (Greek for "God-bearer"). The doctrine of the Incarnation, then, entails that Jesus Christ is fully God and fully human, his two natures joined in hypostatic union.

New!!: Christianity and Incarnation (Christianity) · See more »

Independent Catholicism

Independent Catholicism is a movement comprising clergy and laity who self-identify as Catholic and who form "micro-churches claiming apostolic succession and valid sacraments," despite a lack of affiliation with the main Catholic Church itself.

New!!: Christianity and Independent Catholicism · See more »

Indian subcontinent

The Indian subcontinent is a southern region and peninsula of Asia, mostly situated on the Indian Plate and projecting southwards into the Indian Ocean from the Himalayas.

New!!: Christianity and Indian subcontinent · See more »

Indigenous peoples of the Americas

The indigenous peoples of the Americas are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas. Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering. In some regions the indigenous peoples created monumental architecture, large-scale organized cities, chiefdoms, states and empires. Many parts of the Americas are still populated by indigenous peoples; some countries have sizable populations, especially Belize, Bolivia, Canada, Chile, Ecuador, Greenland, Guatemala, Guyana, Mexico, Panama and Peru. At least a thousand different indigenous languages are spoken in the Americas. Some, such as the Quechuan languages, Aymara, Guaraní, Mayan languages and Nahuatl, count their speakers in millions. Many also maintain aspects of indigenous cultural practices to varying degrees, including religion, social organization and subsistence practices. Like most cultures, over time, cultures specific to many indigenous peoples have evolved to incorporate traditional aspects but also cater to modern needs. Some indigenous peoples still live in relative isolation from Western culture, and a few are still counted as uncontacted peoples.

New!!: Christianity and Indigenous peoples of the Americas · See more »

Indulgence

In the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church, an indulgence (from *dulgeō, "persist") is "a way to reduce the amount of punishment one has to undergo for sins." It may reduce the "temporal punishment for sin" after death (as opposed to the eternal punishment merited by mortal sin), in the state or process of purification called Purgatory.

New!!: Christianity and Indulgence · See more »

Infant baptism

Infant baptism is the practice of baptising infants or young children.

New!!: Christianity and Infant baptism · See more »

Inquisition

The Inquisition was a group of institutions within the government system of the Catholic Church whose aim was to combat public heresy committed by baptized Christians.

New!!: Christianity and Inquisition · See more »

Intercession of saints

Intercession of the saints is a doctrine held by the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches.

New!!: Christianity and Intercession of saints · See more »

Interfaith dialogue

Interfaith dialogue refers to cooperative, constructive, and positive interaction between people of different religious traditions (i.e., "faiths") and/or spiritual or humanistic beliefs, at both the individual and institutional levels.

New!!: Christianity and Interfaith dialogue · See more »

Iran

Iran (ایران), also known as Persia, officially the Islamic Republic of Iran (جمهوری اسلامی ایران), is a sovereign state in Western Asia. With over 81 million inhabitants, Iran is the world's 18th-most-populous country. Comprising a land area of, it is the second-largest country in the Middle East and the 17th-largest in the world. Iran is bordered to the northwest by Armenia and the Republic of Azerbaijan, to the north by the Caspian Sea, to the northeast by Turkmenistan, to the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan, to the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, and to the west by Turkey and Iraq. The country's central location in Eurasia and Western Asia, and its proximity to the Strait of Hormuz, give it geostrategic importance. Tehran is the country's capital and largest city, as well as its leading economic and cultural center. Iran is home to one of the world's oldest civilizations, beginning with the formation of the Elamite kingdoms in the fourth millennium BCE. It was first unified by the Iranian Medes in the seventh century BCE, reaching its greatest territorial size in the sixth century BCE, when Cyrus the Great founded the Achaemenid Empire, which stretched from Eastern Europe to the Indus Valley, becoming one of the largest empires in history. The Iranian realm fell to Alexander the Great in the fourth century BCE and was divided into several Hellenistic states. An Iranian rebellion culminated in the establishment of the Parthian Empire, which was succeeded in the third century CE by the Sasanian Empire, a leading world power for the next four centuries. Arab Muslims conquered the empire in the seventh century CE, displacing the indigenous faiths of Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism with Islam. Iran made major contributions to the Islamic Golden Age that followed, producing many influential figures in art and science. After two centuries, a period of various native Muslim dynasties began, which were later conquered by the Turks and the Mongols. The rise of the Safavids in the 15th century led to the reestablishment of a unified Iranian state and national identity, with the country's conversion to Shia Islam marking a turning point in Iranian and Muslim history. Under Nader Shah, Iran was one of the most powerful states in the 18th century, though by the 19th century, a series of conflicts with the Russian Empire led to significant territorial losses. Popular unrest led to the establishment of a constitutional monarchy and the country's first legislature. A 1953 coup instigated by the United Kingdom and the United States resulted in greater autocracy and growing anti-Western resentment. Subsequent unrest against foreign influence and political repression led to the 1979 Revolution and the establishment of an Islamic republic, a political system that includes elements of a parliamentary democracy vetted and supervised by a theocracy governed by an autocratic "Supreme Leader". During the 1980s, the country was engaged in a war with Iraq, which lasted for almost nine years and resulted in a high number of casualties and economic losses for both sides. According to international reports, Iran's human rights record is exceptionally poor. The regime in Iran is undemocratic, and has frequently persecuted and arrested critics of the government and its Supreme Leader. Women's rights in Iran are described as seriously inadequate, and children's rights have been severely violated, with more child offenders being executed in Iran than in any other country in the world. Since the 2000s, Iran's controversial nuclear program has raised concerns, which is part of the basis of the international sanctions against the country. The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, an agreement reached between Iran and the P5+1, was created on 14 July 2015, aimed to loosen the nuclear sanctions in exchange for Iran's restriction in producing enriched uranium. Iran is a founding member of the UN, ECO, NAM, OIC, and OPEC. It is a major regional and middle power, and its large reserves of fossil fuels – which include the world's largest natural gas supply and the fourth-largest proven oil reserves – exert considerable influence in international energy security and the world economy. The country's rich cultural legacy is reflected in part by its 22 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the third-largest number in Asia and eleventh-largest in the world. Iran is a multicultural country comprising numerous ethnic and linguistic groups, the largest being Persians (61%), Azeris (16%), Kurds (10%), and Lurs (6%).

New!!: Christianity and Iran · See more »

Ireland

Ireland (Éire; Ulster-Scots: Airlann) is an island in the North Atlantic.

New!!: Christianity and Ireland · See more »

Irenaeus

Irenaeus (Ειρηναίος Eirēnaíos) (died about 202) was a Greek cleric noted for his role in guiding and expanding Christian communities in what is now the south of France and, more widely, for the development of Christian theology by combatting heresy and defining orthodoxy.

New!!: Christianity and Irenaeus · See more »

Irresistible grace

Irresistible grace (or efficacious grace) is a doctrine in Christian theology particularly associated with Calvinism, which teaches that the saving grace of God is effectually applied to those whom he has determined to save (the elect) and, in God's timing, overcomes their resistance to obeying the call of the gospel, bringing them to faith in Christ.

New!!: Christianity and Irresistible grace · See more »

Isaac Newton

Sir Isaac Newton (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726/27) was an English mathematician, astronomer, theologian, author and physicist (described in his own day as a "natural philosopher") who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time, and a key figure in the scientific revolution.

New!!: Christianity and Isaac Newton · See more »

Islam

IslamThere are ten pronunciations of Islam in English, differing in whether the first or second syllable has the stress, whether the s is or, and whether the a is pronounced, or (when the stress is on the first syllable) (Merriam Webster).

New!!: Christianity and Islam · See more »

Islamic Golden Age

The Islamic Golden Age is the era in the history of Islam, traditionally dated from the 8th century to the 14th century, during which much of the historically Islamic world was ruled by various caliphates, and science, economic development and cultural works flourished.

New!!: Christianity and Islamic Golden Age · See more »

Italy

Italy (Italia), officially the Italian Republic (Repubblica Italiana), is a sovereign state in Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Italy · See more »

Jacobus Arminius

Jacobus Arminius, (October 10, 1560 – October 19, 1609), the Latinized name of Jakob Hermanszoon, was a Dutch theologian from the Protestant Reformation period whose views became the basis of Arminianism and the Dutch Remonstrant movement.

New!!: Christianity and Jacobus Arminius · See more »

James Clerk Maxwell

James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish scientist in the field of mathematical physics.

New!!: Christianity and James Clerk Maxwell · See more »

James, son of Zebedee

James, son of Zebedee (Hebrew:, Yaʿqob; Greek: Ἰάκωβος; ⲓⲁⲕⲱⲃⲟⲥ; died 44 AD) was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus, and traditionally considered the first apostle to be martyred.

New!!: Christianity and James, son of Zebedee · See more »

Jehovah's Witnesses

Jehovah's Witnesses is a millenarian restorationist Christian denomination with nontrinitarian beliefs distinct from mainstream Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Jehovah's Witnesses · See more »

Jerusalem

Jerusalem (יְרוּשָׁלַיִם; القُدس) is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea.

New!!: Christianity and Jerusalem · See more »

Jesus

Jesus, also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ, was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.

New!!: Christianity and Jesus · See more »

Jesus in Christianity

In Christianity, Jesus is believed to be the Messiah (Christ) and through his crucifixion and resurrection, humans can be reconciled to God and thereby are offered salvation and the promise of eternal life.

New!!: Christianity and Jesus in Christianity · See more »

Jesus Seminar

The Jesus Seminar was a group of about 50 critical Biblical scholars and 100 laymen founded in 1985 by Robert Funk that originated under the auspices of the Westar Institute.

New!!: Christianity and Jesus Seminar · See more »

Jewish Christian

Jewish Christians, also Hebrew Christians or Judeo-Christians, are the original members of the Jewish movement that later became Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Jewish Christian · See more »

Jews

Jews (יְהוּדִים ISO 259-3, Israeli pronunciation) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation, originating from the Israelites Israelite origins and kingdom: "The first act in the long drama of Jewish history is the age of the Israelites""The people of the Kingdom of Israel and the ethnic and religious group known as the Jewish people that descended from them have been subjected to a number of forced migrations in their history" and Hebrews of the Ancient Near East.

New!!: Christianity and Jews · See more »

Johannes Kepler

Johannes Kepler (December 27, 1571 – November 15, 1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer, and astrologer.

New!!: Christianity and Johannes Kepler · See more »

Johannes Oecolampadius

Johannes Oecolampadius (also Œcolampadius, in German also Oekolampadius, Oekolampad; 1482 in Weinsberg, Electoral Palatinate in the Holy Roman Empire – 24 November 1531 in Basel, Canton of Basel in the Old Swiss Confederacy) was a German Protestant reformer in the Reformed tradition from the Electoral Palatinate.

New!!: Christianity and Johannes Oecolampadius · See more »

John Calvin

John Calvin (Jean Calvin; born Jehan Cauvin; 10 July 150927 May 1564) was a French theologian, pastor and reformer in Geneva during the Protestant Reformation.

New!!: Christianity and John Calvin · See more »

John Knox

John Knox (– 24 November 1572) was a Scottish minister, theologian, and writer who was a leader of the country's Reformation.

New!!: Christianity and John Knox · See more »

John Lennox

John Carson Lennox (born 7 November 1943) is a Northern Irish mathematician specialising in group theory, a philosopher of science and a Christian apologist.

New!!: Christianity and John Lennox · See more »

John McManners

John "Jack" McManners CBE FBA (25 December 1916 – 4 November 2006) was a British clergyman and historian of religion who specialized in the history of the Church and other aspects of religious life in 18th century France.

New!!: Christianity and John McManners · See more »

John Polkinghorne

John Charlton Polkinghorne (born 16 October 1930) is an English theoretical physicist, theologian, writer and Anglican priest.

New!!: Christianity and John Polkinghorne · See more »

John Wesley

John Wesley (2 March 1791) was an English cleric and theologian who, with his brother Charles and fellow cleric George Whitefield, founded Methodism.

New!!: Christianity and John Wesley · See more »

Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification

The Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification (JDDJ) is a document created, and agreed to, by the Catholic Church's Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity (PCPCU) and the Lutheran World Federation in 1999, as a result of extensive ecumenical dialogue.

New!!: Christianity and Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification · See more »

Judaism

Judaism (originally from Hebrew, Yehudah, "Judah"; via Latin and Greek) is the religion of the Jewish people.

New!!: Christianity and Judaism · See more »

Judea (Roman province)

The Roman province of Judea (יהודה, Standard Tiberian; يهودا; Ἰουδαία; Iūdaea), sometimes spelled in its original Latin forms of Iudæa or Iudaea to distinguish it from the geographical region of Judea, incorporated the regions of Judea, Samaria and Idumea, and extended over parts of the former regions of the Hasmonean and Herodian kingdoms of Judea.

New!!: Christianity and Judea (Roman province) · See more »

Justin Martyr

Justin Martyr (Latin: Iustinus Martyr) was an early Christian apologist, and is regarded as the foremost interpreter of the theory of the Logos in the 2nd century.

New!!: Christianity and Justin Martyr · See more »

Keith Mathison

Keith A. Mathison (born 1967) is an American theologian.

New!!: Christianity and Keith Mathison · See more »

King James Version

The King James Version (KJV), also known as the King James Bible (KJB) or simply the Version (AV), is an English translation of the Christian Bible for the Church of England, begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.

New!!: Christianity and King James Version · See more »

Kingdom of God (Christianity)

The Kingdom of God (and its related form Kingdom of Heaven in the Gospel of Matthew) is one of the key elements of the teachings of Jesus in the New Testament.

New!!: Christianity and Kingdom of God (Christianity) · See more »

Kingship and kingdom of God

The concept of the kingship of God appears in all Abrahamic religions, where in some cases the terms Kingdom of God and Kingdom of Heaven are also used.

New!!: Christianity and Kingship and kingdom of God · See more »

Kneeling

Kneeling is a basic human position where one or both knees touch the ground.

New!!: Christianity and Kneeling · See more »

Koine Greek

Koine Greek,.

New!!: Christianity and Koine Greek · See more »

Kulturkampf

Kulturkampf ("culture struggle") is a German term referring to power struggles between emerging constitutional democratic nation states and the Roman Catholic Church over the place and role of religion in modern polity, usually in connection with secularization campaigns.

New!!: Christianity and Kulturkampf · See more »

Last Judgment

The Last Judgment, Final Judgment, Day of Judgment, Judgment Day, Doomsday, or The Day of the Lord (Hebrew Yom Ha Din) (יום הדין) or in Arabic Yawm al-Qiyāmah (یوم القيامة) or Yawm ad-Din (یوم الدین) is part of the eschatological world view of the Abrahamic religions and in the Frashokereti of Zoroastrianism.

New!!: Christianity and Last Judgment · See more »

Late Latin

Late Latin is the scholarly name for the written Latin of Late Antiquity.

New!!: Christianity and Late Latin · See more »

Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

New!!: Christianity and Latin · See more »

Latin America

Latin America is a group of countries and dependencies in the Western Hemisphere where Spanish, French and Portuguese are spoken; it is broader than the terms Ibero-America or Hispanic America.

New!!: Christianity and Latin America · See more »

Latin Church

The Latin Church, sometimes called the Western Church, is the largest particular church sui iuris in full communion with the Pope and the rest of the Catholic Church, tracing its history to the earliest days of Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Latin Church · See more »

Latter Day Saint movement

The Latter Day Saint movement (also called the LDS movement, LDS restorationist movement, or Smith–Rigdon movement) is the collection of independent church groups that trace their origins to a Christian primitivist movement founded by Joseph Smith in the late 1820s.

New!!: Christianity and Latter Day Saint movement · See more »

Law

Law is a system of rules that are created and enforced through social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior.

New!!: Christianity and Law · See more »

Lectionary

A lectionary (Lectionarium) is a book or listing that contains a collection of scripture readings appointed for Christian or Judaic worship on a given day or occasion.

New!!: Christianity and Lectionary · See more »

Lent

Lent (Latin: Quadragesima: Fortieth) is a solemn religious observance in the Christian liturgical calendar that begins on Ash Wednesday and ends approximately six weeks later, before Easter Sunday.

New!!: Christianity and Lent · See more »

Levant

The Levant is an approximate historical geographical term referring to a large area in the Eastern Mediterranean.

New!!: Christianity and Levant · See more »

Liberal Christianity

Liberal Christianity, also known as liberal theology, covers diverse philosophically and biblically informed religious movements and ideas within Christianity from the late 18th century onward.

New!!: Christianity and Liberal Christianity · See more »

Liberalism

Liberalism is a political and moral philosophy based on liberty and equality.

New!!: Christianity and Liberalism · See more »

Life of Jesus in the New Testament

The four canonical gospels of the New Testament are the primary sources of information for the narrative of the life of Jesus.

New!!: Christianity and Life of Jesus in the New Testament · See more »

List of Catholic authors

The authors listed on this page should be limited to those who identify as Catholic authors in some form.

New!!: Christianity and List of Catholic authors · See more »

List of Catholic Church artists

This list of Catholic artists concerns artists known, at least in part, for their works of religious Roman Catholic art.

New!!: Christianity and List of Catholic Church artists · See more »

List of Catholic clergy scientists

This is a list of Catholic churchmen throughout history who have made contributions to science.

New!!: Christianity and List of Catholic clergy scientists · See more »

List of Christian denominations

A Christian denomination is a distinct religious body within Christianity, identified by traits such as a name, organisation, leadership and doctrine.

New!!: Christianity and List of Christian denominations · See more »

List of Christian Nobel laureates

65% of Nobel prize winners have been Christians.

New!!: Christianity and List of Christian Nobel laureates · See more »

List of Christians in science and technology

This is a list of Christians in science and technology.

New!!: Christianity and List of Christians in science and technology · See more »

Lists of Christians

Christians have made myriad contributions in a broad and diverse range of fields, including the sciences, arts, politics, literatures and business.

New!!: Christianity and Lists of Christians · See more »

Literature

Literature, most generically, is any body of written works.

New!!: Christianity and Literature · See more »

Liturgical year

The liturgical year, also known as the church year or Christian year, as well as the kalendar, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in Christian churches that determines when feast days, including celebrations of saints, are to be observed, and which portions of Scripture are to be read either in an annual cycle or in a cycle of several years.

New!!: Christianity and Liturgical year · See more »

Liturgy

Liturgy is the customary public worship performed by a religious group, according to its beliefs, customs and traditions.

New!!: Christianity and Liturgy · See more »

Livonia

Livonia (Līvõmō, Liivimaa, German and Scandinavian languages: Livland, Latvian and Livonija, Inflanty, archaic English Livland, Liwlandia; Liflyandiya) is a historical region on the eastern shores of the Baltic Sea.

New!!: Christianity and Livonia · See more »

Lord's Prayer

The Lord's Prayer (also called the Our Father, Pater Noster, or the Model Prayer) is a venerated Christian prayer which, according to the New Testament, Jesus taught as the way to pray: Two versions of this prayer are recorded in the gospels: a longer form within the Sermon on the Mount in the Gospel of Matthew, and a shorter form in the Gospel of Luke when "one of his disciples said to him, 'Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.'" Lutheran theologian Harold Buls suggested that both were original, the Matthaen version spoken by Jesus early in his ministry in Galilee, and the Lucan version one year later, "very likely in Judea".

New!!: Christianity and Lord's Prayer · See more »

Low church

The term "low church" refers to churches which give relatively little emphasis to ritual, sacraments and the authority of clergy.

New!!: Christianity and Low church · See more »

Lutheran World Federation

The Lutheran World Federation (LWF; Lutherischer Weltbund) is a global communion of national and regional Lutheran churches headquartered in the Ecumenical Centre in Geneva, Switzerland.

New!!: Christianity and Lutheran World Federation · See more »

Lutheranism

Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity which identifies with the theology of Martin Luther (1483–1546), a German friar, ecclesiastical reformer and theologian.

New!!: Christianity and Lutheranism · See more »

Macau

Macau, officially the Macao Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is an autonomous territory on the western side of the Pearl River estuary in East Asia.

New!!: Christianity and Macau · See more »

Magisterial Reformation

The Magisterial Reformation is a phrase that "draws attention to the manner in which the Lutheran and Calvinist reformers related to secular authorities, such as princes, magistrates, or city councils", i.e. "the magistracy".

New!!: Christianity and Magisterial Reformation · See more »

Maimonides

Moses ben Maimon (Mōšeh bēn-Maymūn; موسى بن ميمون Mūsā bin Maymūn), commonly known as Maimonides (Μαϊμωνίδης Maïmōnídēs; Moses Maimonides), and also referred to by the acronym Rambam (for Rabbeinu Mōšeh bēn Maimun, "Our Rabbi Moses son of Maimon"), was a medieval Sephardic Jewish philosopher who became one of the most prolific and influential Torah scholars of the Middle Ages.

New!!: Christianity and Maimonides · See more »

Major religious groups

The world's principal religions and spiritual traditions may be classified into a small number of major groups, although this is by no means a uniform practice.

New!!: Christianity and Major religious groups · See more »

Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church

The Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church, also known as the Indian Orthodox Church, is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church centered in the Indian state of Kerala.

New!!: Christianity and Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church · See more »

Manichaeism

Manichaeism (in Modern Persian آیین مانی Āyin-e Māni) was a major religious movement that was founded by the Iranian prophet Mani (in مانی, Syriac: ܡܐܢܝ, Latin: Manichaeus or Manes from Μάνης; 216–276) in the Sasanian Empire.

New!!: Christianity and Manichaeism · See more »

Mark the Evangelist

Saint Mark the Evangelist (Mārcus; Μᾶρκος; Ⲙⲁⲣⲕⲟⲥ; מרקוס; مَرْقُس; ማርቆስ; ⵎⴰⵔⵇⵓⵙ) is the traditionally ascribed author of the Gospel of Mark.

New!!: Christianity and Mark the Evangelist · See more »

Marriage

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a socially or ritually recognised union between spouses that establishes rights and obligations between those spouses, as well as between them and any resulting biological or adopted children and affinity (in-laws and other family through marriage).

New!!: Christianity and Marriage · See more »

Martin Luther

Martin Luther, (10 November 1483 – 18 February 1546) was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, monk, and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation.

New!!: Christianity and Martin Luther · See more »

Martinism

Martinism is a form of Christian mysticism and esoteric Christianity concerned with the fall of the first man, his state of material privation from his divine source, and the process of his return, called 'Reintegration' or illumination.

New!!: Christianity and Martinism · See more »

Marxism

Marxism is a method of socioeconomic analysis that views class relations and social conflict using a materialist interpretation of historical development and takes a dialectical view of social transformation.

New!!: Christianity and Marxism · See more »

Mary Magdalene

Saint Mary Magdalene, sometimes called simply the Magdalene, was a Jewish woman who, according to the four canonical gospels, traveled with Jesus as one of his followers and was a witness to his crucifixion, burial, and resurrection.

New!!: Christianity and Mary Magdalene · See more »

Mary, mother of Jesus

Mary was a 1st-century BC Galilean Jewish woman of Nazareth, and the mother of Jesus, according to the New Testament and the Quran.

New!!: Christianity and Mary, mother of Jesus · See more »

Massacre of Verden

The Massacre of Verden was an event during the Saxon Wars where the Frankish king Charlemagne ordered the death of 4,500 Saxons in October 782.

New!!: Christianity and Massacre of Verden · See more »

Matthew Henry

Matthew Henry (18 October 166222 June 1714) was a Nonconformist minister and author, born in Wales but spending much of his life in England.

New!!: Christianity and Matthew Henry · See more »

Medicine

Medicine is the science and practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.

New!!: Christianity and Medicine · See more »

Medieval university

A medieval university is a corporation organized during the Middle Ages for the purposes of higher learning.

New!!: Christianity and Medieval university · See more »

Memoria

Memoria was the term for aspects involving memory in Western classical rhetoric.

New!!: Christianity and Memoria · See more »

Mendicant orders

Mendicant orders are, primarily, certain Christian religious orders that have adopted a lifestyle of poverty, traveling, and living in urban areas for purposes of preaching, evangelism, and ministry, especially to the poor.

New!!: Christianity and Mendicant orders · See more »

Mennonites

The Mennonites are members of certain Christian groups belonging to the church communities of Anabaptist denominations named after Menno Simons (1496–1561) of Friesland (which today is a province of the Netherlands).

New!!: Christianity and Mennonites · See more »

Merton thesis

The Merton thesis is an argument about the nature of early experimental science proposed by Robert K. Merton.

New!!: Christianity and Merton thesis · See more »

Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia is a historical region in West Asia situated within the Tigris–Euphrates river system, in modern days roughly corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, parts of Northern Saudi Arabia, the eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran–Iraq borders.

New!!: Christianity and Mesopotamia · See more »

Messiah

In Abrahamic religions, the messiah or messias is a saviour or liberator of a group of people.

New!!: Christianity and Messiah · See more »

Messiah in Judaism

The messiah in Judaism is a savior and liberator of the Jewish people.

New!!: Christianity and Messiah in Judaism · See more »

Messianic Judaism

Messianic Judaism is a modern syncretic religious movement that combines Christianity—most importantly, the belief that Jesus is the Messiah—with elements of Judaism and Jewish tradition, its current form emerging in the 1960s and 1970s.

New!!: Christianity and Messianic Judaism · See more »

Methodism

Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England.

New!!: Christianity and Methodism · See more »

Miaphysitism

Miaphysitism is a Christological formula holding that in the person of Jesus Christ, divine nature and human nature are united (μία, mia – "one" or "unity") in a compound nature ("physis"), the two being united without separation, without mixture, without confusion and without alteration.

New!!: Christianity and Miaphysitism · See more »

Michael Faraday

Michael Faraday FRS (22 September 1791 – 25 August 1867) was an English scientist who contributed to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry.

New!!: Christianity and Michael Faraday · See more »

Millennialism

Millennialism (from millennium, Latin for "a thousand years"), or chiliasm (from the Greek equivalent), is a belief advanced by some Christian denominations that a Golden Age or Paradise will occur on Earth in which Christ will reign for 1000 years prior to the final judgment and future eternal state (the "World to Come") of the New Heavens and New Earth.

New!!: Christianity and Millennialism · See more »

Minister (Christianity)

In Christianity, a minister is a person authorized by a church, or other religious organization, to perform functions such as teaching of beliefs; leading services such as weddings, baptisms or funerals; or otherwise providing spiritual guidance to the community.

New!!: Christianity and Minister (Christianity) · See more »

Ministry of Jesus

In the Christian gospels, the ministry of Jesus begins with his baptism in the countryside of Roman Judea and Transjordan, near the river Jordan, and ends in Jerusalem, following the Last Supper with his disciples.

New!!: Christianity and Ministry of Jesus · See more »

Miracles of Jesus

The miracles of Jesus are the supernatural deeds attributed to Jesus in Christian and Islamic texts.

New!!: Christianity and Miracles of Jesus · See more »

Mishneh Torah

The Mishneh Torah (מִשְׁנֵה תּוֹרָה, "Repetition of the Torah"), subtitled Sefer Yad ha-Hazaka (ספר יד החזקה "Book of the Strong Hand"), is a code of Jewish religious law (Halakha) authored by Maimonides (Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, also known as RaMBaM or "Rambam").

New!!: Christianity and Mishneh Torah · See more »

Modalistic Monarchianism

Modalistic Monarchianism (also known as Oneness Christology) is a Christian theology that upholds the oneness of God as well as the deity of Jesus Christ.

New!!: Christianity and Modalistic Monarchianism · See more »

Molokan

A Molokan (p or молоканин, "dairy-eater") is a member of various Spiritual Christian sects that evolved from Eastern Christianity in the East Slavic lands.

New!!: Christianity and Molokan · See more »

Monastery

A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits).

New!!: Christianity and Monastery · See more »

Monastic school

Monastic schools (Scholae monasticae) were, along with cathedral schools, the most important institutions of higher learning in the Latin West from the early Middle Ages until the 12th century.

New!!: Christianity and Monastic school · See more »

Monasticism

Monasticism (from Greek μοναχός, monachos, derived from μόνος, monos, "alone") or monkhood is a religious way of life in which one renounces worldly pursuits to devote oneself fully to spiritual work.

New!!: Christianity and Monasticism · See more »

Monk

A monk (from μοναχός, monachos, "single, solitary" via Latin monachus) is a person who practices religious asceticism by monastic living, either alone or with any number of other monks.

New!!: Christianity and Monk · See more »

Monotheism

Monotheism has been defined as the belief in the existence of only one god that created the world, is all-powerful and intervenes in the world.

New!!: Christianity and Monotheism · See more »

Moral

A moral (from Latin morālis) is a message that is conveyed or a lesson to be learned from a story or event.

New!!: Christianity and Moral · See more »

Mormonism

Mormonism is the predominant religious tradition of the Latter Day Saint movement of Restorationist Christianity started by Joseph Smith in Western New York in the 1820s and 30s.

New!!: Christianity and Mormonism · See more »

Mortal sin

A mortal sin (peccatum mortale), in Catholic theology, is a gravely sinful act, which can lead to damnation if a person does not repent of the sin before death.

New!!: Christianity and Mortal sin · See more »

Music

Music is an art form and cultural activity whose medium is sound organized in time.

New!!: Christianity and Music · See more »

Muslim

A Muslim (مُسلِم) is someone who follows or practices Islam, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion.

New!!: Christianity and Muslim · See more »

Muslim conquest of the Levant

The Muslim conquest of the Levant (اَلْـفَـتْـحُ الْإٍسْـلَامِيُّ لِـلـشَّـامِ, Al-Faṫṫḥul-Islāmiyyuash-Shām) or Arab conquest of the Levant (اَلْـفَـتْـحُ الْـعَـرَبِيُّ لِـلـشَّـامِ, Al-Faṫṫḥul-ʿArabiyyu Lish-Shām) occurred in the first half of the 7th century,"Syria." Encyclopædia Britannica.

New!!: Christianity and Muslim conquest of the Levant · See more »

Mythology

Mythology refers variously to the collected myths of a group of people or to the study of such myths.

New!!: Christianity and Mythology · See more »

Nag Hammadi

Nag Hammadi (نجع حمادى Najʿ Ḥammādī) is a city in Upper Egypt.

New!!: Christianity and Nag Hammadi · See more »

Nag Hammadi library

The Nag Hammadi library (also known as the "Chenoboskion Manuscripts" and the "Gnostic Gospels") is a collection of early Christian and Gnostic texts discovered near the Upper Egyptian town of Nag Hammadi in 1945.

New!!: Christianity and Nag Hammadi library · See more »

Napoleonic era

The Napoleonic era is a period in the history of France and Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Napoleonic era · See more »

Nation state

A nation state (or nation-state), in the most specific sense, is a country where a distinct cultural or ethnic group (a "nation" or "people") inhabits a territory and have formed a state (often a sovereign state) that they predominantly govern.

New!!: Christianity and Nation state · See more »

National Council of Churches in Australia

The National Council of Churches in Australia (NCCA) is an ecumenical organisation bringing together a number of Australia's Christian churches in dialogue and practical cooperation.

New!!: Christianity and National Council of Churches in Australia · See more »

National Geographic Society

The National Geographic Society (NGS), headquartered in Washington, D.C., United States, is one of the largest non-profit scientific and educational institutions in the world.

New!!: Christianity and National Geographic Society · See more »

Nativity of Jesus

The nativity of Jesus or birth of Jesus is described in the gospels of Luke and Matthew.

New!!: Christianity and Nativity of Jesus · See more »

Nazareth

Nazareth (נָצְרַת, Natzrat; النَّاصِرَة, an-Nāṣira; ܢܨܪܬ, Naṣrath) is the capital and the largest city in the Northern District of Israel.

New!!: Christianity and Nazareth · See more »

Neo-charismatic movement

The Neo-charismatic (also third-wave charismatic or hypercharismatic) movement is a movement within evangelical protestant Christianity which places emphasis on the use of charismata (or spiritual gifts) such as glossolalia, prophecy, divine healing, and divine revelation, which are believed to be given to them by the Holy Spirit.

New!!: Christianity and Neo-charismatic movement · See more »

Neoplatonism

Neoplatonism is a term used to designate a strand of Platonic philosophy that began with Plotinus in the third century AD against the background of Hellenistic philosophy and religion.

New!!: Christianity and Neoplatonism · See more »

Nero

Nero (Latin: Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus; 15 December 37 – 9 June 68 AD) was the last Roman emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

New!!: Christianity and Nero · See more »

Nestorianism

Nestorianism is a Christological doctrine that emphasizes a distinction between the human and divine natures of the divine person, Jesus.

New!!: Christianity and Nestorianism · See more »

Netherlands

The Netherlands (Nederland), often referred to as Holland, is a country located mostly in Western Europe with a population of seventeen million.

New!!: Christianity and Netherlands · See more »

New Testament

The New Testament (Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, trans. Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible.

New!!: Christianity and New Testament · See more »

New Testament apocrypha

The New Testament apocrypha are a number of writings by early Christians that give accounts of Jesus and his teachings, the nature of God, or the teachings of his apostles and of their lives.

New!!: Christianity and New Testament apocrypha · See more »

Nicene Creed

The Nicene Creed (Greek: or,, Latin: Symbolum Nicaenum) is a statement of belief widely used in Christian liturgy.

New!!: Christianity and Nicene Creed · See more »

Nicolaus Copernicus

Nicolaus Copernicus (Mikołaj Kopernik; Nikolaus Kopernikus; Niklas Koppernigk; 19 February 1473 – 24 May 1543) was a Renaissance-era mathematician and astronomer who formulated a model of the universe that placed the Sun rather than the Earth at the center of the universe, likely independently of Aristarchus of Samos, who had formulated such a model some eighteen centuries earlier.

New!!: Christianity and Nicolaus Copernicus · See more »

Nigeria

Nigeria, officially the Federal Republic of Nigeria is a federal republic in West Africa, bordering Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north.

New!!: Christianity and Nigeria · See more »

Ninety-five Theses

The Ninety-five Theses or Disputation on the Power of Indulgences is a list of propositions for an academic disputation written in 1517 by Martin Luther, professor of moral theology at the University of Wittenberg, Germany, that started the Reformation, a schism in the Catholic Church which profoundly changed Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Ninety-five Theses · See more »

Nobel Prize

The Nobel Prize (Swedish definite form, singular: Nobelpriset; Nobelprisen) is a set of six annual international awards bestowed in several categories by Swedish and Norwegian institutions in recognition of academic, cultural, or scientific advances.

New!!: Christianity and Nobel Prize · See more »

Nondenominational Christianity

Nondenominational (or non-denominational) Christianity consists of churches which typically distance themselves from the confessionalism or creedalism of other Christian communities by calling themselves non-denominational.

New!!: Christianity and Nondenominational Christianity · See more »

North Africa

North Africa is a collective term for a group of Mediterranean countries and territories situated in the northern-most region of the African continent.

New!!: Christianity and North Africa · See more »

North America

North America is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.

New!!: Christianity and North America · See more »

Northern United States

The Northern United States, commonly referred to as the American North or simply the North, can be a geographic or historical term and definition.

New!!: Christianity and Northern United States · See more »

Nun

A nun is a member of a religious community of women, typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience in the enclosure of a monastery.

New!!: Christianity and Nun · See more »

Oceania

Oceania is a geographic region comprising Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia and Australasia.

New!!: Christianity and Oceania · See more »

Old Catholic Church

The term Old Catholic Church was used from the 1850s, by groups which had separated from the Roman Catholic Church over certain doctrines, primarily concerned with papal authority; some of these groups, especially in the Netherlands, had already existed long before the term.

New!!: Christianity and Old Catholic Church · See more »

Old Testament

The Old Testament (abbreviated OT) is the first part of Christian Bibles, based primarily upon the Hebrew Bible (or Tanakh), a collection of ancient religious writings by the Israelites believed by most Christians and religious Jews to be the sacred Word of God.

New!!: Christianity and Old Testament · See more »

Omnipotence

Omnipotence is the quality of having unlimited power.

New!!: Christianity and Omnipotence · See more »

One true church

A number of Christian denominations assert that they alone represent the one true church – the church to which Jesus gave his authority in the Great Commission.

New!!: Christianity and One true church · See more »

Ontario

Ontario is one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada and is located in east-central Canada.

New!!: Christianity and Ontario · See more »

Open communion

Open communion is the practice of Protestant churches that allow individuals other than members of that church to receive the Eucharist (also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper).

New!!: Christianity and Open communion · See more »

Orans

Orans, a loanword from Medieval Latin ōrāns translated as one who is praying or pleading, also orant or orante, is a posture or bodily attitude of prayer, usually standing, with the elbows close to the sides of the body and with the hands outstretched sideways, palms up.

New!!: Christianity and Orans · See more »

Ordinance (Christianity)

This article is about the term "ordinance" as used by some Christians for religious rituals.

New!!: Christianity and Ordinance (Christianity) · See more »

Ordination

Ordination is the process by which individuals are consecrated, that is, set apart as clergy to perform various religious rites and ceremonies.

New!!: Christianity and Ordination · See more »

Oriental Orthodoxy

Oriental Orthodoxy is the fourth largest communion of Christian churches, with about 76 million members worldwide.

New!!: Christianity and Oriental Orthodoxy · See more »

Origen

Origen of Alexandria (184 – 253), also known as Origen Adamantius, was a Hellenistic scholar, ascetic, and early Christian theologian who was born and spent the first half of his career in Alexandria.

New!!: Christianity and Origen · See more »

Original sin

Original sin, also called "ancestral sin", is a Christian belief of the state of sin in which humanity exists since the fall of man, stemming from Adam and Eve's rebellion in Eden, namely the sin of disobedience in consuming the forbidden fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.

New!!: Christianity and Original sin · See more »

Orthodoxy

Orthodoxy (from Greek ὀρθοδοξία orthodoxía "right opinion") is adherence to correct or accepted creeds, especially in religion.

New!!: Christianity and Orthodoxy · See more »

Otto von Bismarck

Otto Eduard Leopold, Prince of Bismarck, Duke of Lauenburg (1 April 1815 – 30 July 1898), known as Otto von Bismarck, was a conservative Prussian statesman who dominated German and European affairs from the 1860s until 1890 and was the first Chancellor of the German Empire between 1871 and 1890.

New!!: Christianity and Otto von Bismarck · See more »

Outline of Christianity

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Christianity: Christianity – monotheistic religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament.

New!!: Christianity and Outline of Christianity · See more »

Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

New!!: Christianity and Oxford University Press · See more »

Paganism

Paganism is a term first used in the fourth century by early Christians for populations of the Roman Empire who practiced polytheism, either because they were increasingly rural and provincial relative to the Christian population or because they were not milites Christi (soldiers of Christ).

New!!: Christianity and Paganism · See more »

Pan-European identity

Pan-European identity is the sense of personal identification with Europe, in a cultural, racial or political sense.

New!!: Christianity and Pan-European identity · See more »

Papal primacy

Papal primacy, also known as the primacy of the Bishop of Rome, is an ecclesiastical doctrine concerning the respect and authority that is due to the pope from other bishops and their episcopal sees.

New!!: Christianity and Papal primacy · See more »

Parament

Paraments or Parements (from Late Latin paramentum, adornment, parare, to prepare, equip) are the hangings or ornaments of a room of state.

New!!: Christianity and Parament · See more »

Particular judgment

Particular judgment, according to Christian eschatology, is the Divine judgment that a departed person undergoes immediately after death, in contradistinction to the general judgment (or Last Judgment) of all people at the end of the world.

New!!: Christianity and Particular judgment · See more »

Passion of Jesus

In Christianity, the Passion (from Late Latin: passionem "suffering, enduring") is the short final period in the life of Jesus covering his entrance visit to Jerusalem and leading to his crucifixion on Mount Calvary, defining the climactic event central to Christian doctrine of salvation history.

New!!: Christianity and Passion of Jesus · See more »

Pastor

A pastor is an ordained leader of a Christian congregation.

New!!: Christianity and Pastor · See more »

Patriarch

The highest-ranking bishops in Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Catholic Church (above major archbishop and primate), and the Church of the East are termed patriarchs (and in certain cases also popes).

New!!: Christianity and Patriarch · See more »

Patristics

Patristics or patrology is the study of the early Christian writers who are designated Church Fathers.

New!!: Christianity and Patristics · See more »

Paul the Apostle

Paul the Apostle (Paulus; translit, ⲡⲁⲩⲗⲟⲥ; c. 5 – c. 64 or 67), commonly known as Saint Paul and also known by his Jewish name Saul of Tarsus (translit; Saũlos Tarseús), was an apostle (though not one of the Twelve Apostles) who taught the gospel of the Christ to the first century world.

New!!: Christianity and Paul the Apostle · See more »

Paulist Fathers

The Missionary Society of Saint Paul the Apostle, better known as the Paulist Fathers, is a Roman Catholic society of apostolic life for men founded in New York City in 1858 by Servant of God Isaac Thomas Hecker in collaboration with George Deshon, Augustine Hewit, and Francis A. Baker.

New!!: Christianity and Paulist Fathers · See more »

Peace churches

Peace churches are Christian churches, groups or communities advocating Christian pacifism or Biblical nonresistance.

New!!: Christianity and Peace churches · See more »

Penance

Penance is repentance of sins as well as an alternate name for the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Oriental Orthodox sacrament of Reconciliation or Confession.

New!!: Christianity and Penance · See more »

Pentecost

The Christian feast day of Pentecost is seven weeks after Easter Sunday: that is to say, the fiftieth day after Easter inclusive of Easter Sunday.

New!!: Christianity and Pentecost · See more »

Pentecostalism

Pentecostalism or Classical Pentecostalism is a renewal movement"Spirit and Power: A 10-Country Survey of Pentecostals",.

New!!: Christianity and Pentecostalism · See more »

Perichoresis

Perichoresis (from περιχώρησις perikhōrēsis, "rotation") is a term referring to the relationship of the three persons of the triune God (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit) to one another.

New!!: Christianity and Perichoresis · See more »

Persecution of Christians

The persecution of Christians can be historically traced from the first century of the Christian era to the present day.

New!!: Christianity and Persecution of Christians · See more »

Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire

Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire occurred intermittently over a period of over two centuries between the Great Fire of Rome in 64 AD under Nero Caesar and the Edict of Milan in 313 AD, in which the Roman Emperors Constantine the Great and Licinius legalised the Christian religion.

New!!: Christianity and Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire · See more »

Persecution of Christians in the Soviet Union

Throughout the history of the Soviet Union (1922–1991), there were periods where Soviet authorities suppressed and persecuted various forms of Christianity to different extents depending on State interests.

New!!: Christianity and Persecution of Christians in the Soviet Union · See more »

Pew Research Center

The Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan American fact tank based in Washington, D.C. It provides information on social issues, public opinion, and demographic trends shaping the United States and the world.

New!!: Christianity and Pew Research Center · See more »

Pharisees

The Pharisees were at various times a political party, a social movement, and a school of thought in the Holy Land during the time of Second Temple Judaism.

New!!: Christianity and Pharisees · See more »

Philippines

The Philippines (Pilipinas or Filipinas), officially the Republic of the Philippines (Republika ng Pilipinas), is a unitary sovereign and archipelagic country in Southeast Asia.

New!!: Christianity and Philippines · See more »

Philosophy

Philosophy (from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom") is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.

New!!: Christianity and Philosophy · See more »

Pietism

Pietism (from the word piety) was an influential movement in Lutheranism that combined its emphasis on Biblical doctrine with the Reformed emphasis on individual piety and living a vigorous Christian life.

New!!: Christianity and Pietism · See more »

Plotinus

Plotinus (Πλωτῖνος; – 270) was a major Greek-speaking philosopher of the ancient world.

New!!: Christianity and Plotinus · See more »

Poland

Poland (Polska), officially the Republic of Poland (Rzeczpospolita Polska), is a country located in Central Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Poland · See more »

Politics

Politics (from Politiká, meaning "affairs of the cities") is the process of making decisions that apply to members of a group.

New!!: Christianity and Politics · See more »

Polycarp

Polycarp (Πολύκαρπος, Polýkarpos; Polycarpus; AD 69 155) was a 2nd-century Christian bishop of Smyrna.

New!!: Christianity and Polycarp · See more »

Pope

The pope (papa from πάππας pappas, a child's word for "father"), also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest priest"), is the Bishop of Rome and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.

New!!: Christianity and Pope · See more »

Pope Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict XVI (Benedictus XVI; Benedetto XVI; Benedikt XVI; born Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger;; 16 April 1927) served as Pope and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 2005 until his resignation in 2013.

New!!: Christianity and Pope Benedict XVI · See more »

Pope Gregory I

Pope Saint Gregory I (Gregorius I; – 12 March 604), commonly known as Saint Gregory the Great, Gregory had come to be known as 'the Great' by the late ninth century, a title which is still applied to him.

New!!: Christianity and Pope Gregory I · See more »

Pope Leo I

Pope Saint Leo I (400 – 10 November 461), also known as Saint Leo the Great, was Pope from 29 September 440 and died in 461.

New!!: Christianity and Pope Leo I · See more »

Pope Urban II

Pope Urban II (Urbanus II; – 29 July 1099), born Odo of Châtillon or Otho de Lagery, was Pope from 12 March 1088 to his death in 1099.

New!!: Christianity and Pope Urban II · See more »

Porphyry (philosopher)

Porphyry of Tyre (Πορφύριος, Porphýrios; فرفوريوس, Furfūriyūs; c. 234 – c. 305 AD) was a Neoplatonic philosopher who was born in Tyre, in the Roman Empire.

New!!: Christianity and Porphyry (philosopher) · See more »

Post-Resurrection appearances of Jesus

The post-resurrection appearances of Jesus are the earthly appearances of Jesus to his followers after his death, burial and resurrection.

New!!: Christianity and Post-Resurrection appearances of Jesus · See more »

Postchristianity

Postchristianity is the loss of the primacy of the Christian worldview in political affairs, especially in the Global North where Christianity had previously flourished, in favor of alternative worldviews such as secularism or nationalism.

New!!: Christianity and Postchristianity · See more »

Postmodernism

Postmodernism is a broad movement that developed in the mid- to late-20th century across philosophy, the arts, architecture, and criticism and that marked a departure from modernism.

New!!: Christianity and Postmodernism · See more »

Prayer

Prayer is an invocation or act that seeks to activate a rapport with an object of worship, typically a deity, through deliberate communication.

New!!: Christianity and Prayer · See more »

Preacher

A preacher is a person who delivers sermons or homilies on religious topics to an assembly of people.

New!!: Christianity and Preacher · See more »

Presbyter

In the New Testament, a presbyter (Greek πρεσβύτερος: "elder") is a leader of a local Christian congregation.

New!!: Christianity and Presbyter · See more »

Presbyterianism

Presbyterianism is a part of the reformed tradition within Protestantism which traces its origins to Britain, particularly Scotland, and Ireland.

New!!: Christianity and Presbyterianism · See more »

Princeton University Press

Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University.

New!!: Christianity and Princeton University Press · See more »

Profession

A profession is a vocation founded upon specialized educational training, the purpose of which is to supply disinterested objective counsel and service to others, for a direct and definite compensation, wholly apart from expectation of other business gain.

New!!: Christianity and Profession · See more »

Profession (religious)

The term religious profession is used in many western-rite Christian denominations (including those of Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, and other traditions) to refer to the solemn admission of men or women into a religious order by means of public vows.

New!!: Christianity and Profession (religious) · See more »

Progress (history)

In historiography, progress (from Latin progressus, "advance", "(a) step onwards") is the study of how specific societies improved over time in terms of science, technology, modernization, liberty, democracy, longevity, quality of life, freedom from pollution and so on.

New!!: Christianity and Progress (history) · See more »

Prophet

In religion, a prophet is an individual regarded as being in contact with a divine being and said to speak on that entity's behalf, serving as an intermediary with humanity by delivering messages or teachings from the supernatural source to other people.

New!!: Christianity and Prophet · See more »

Prostration

Prostration is the placement of the body in a reverentially or submissively prone position as a gesture.

New!!: Christianity and Prostration · See more »

Protestant work ethic

The Protestant work ethic, the Calvinist work ethic or the Puritan work ethic is a concept in theology, sociology, economics and history which emphasizes that hard work, discipline and frugality are a result of a person's subscription to the values espoused by the Protestant faith, particularly Calvinism.

New!!: Christianity and Protestant work ethic · See more »

Protestantism

Protestantism is the second largest form of Christianity with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.

New!!: Christianity and Protestantism · See more »

Purgatory

In Roman Catholic theology, purgatory (via Anglo-Norman and Old French) is an intermediate state after physical death in which some of those ultimately destined for heaven must first "undergo purification, so as to achieve the holiness necessary to enter the joy of heaven," holding that "certain offenses can be forgiven in this age, but certain others in the age to come." And that entrance into Heaven requires the "remission before God of the temporal punishment due to sins whose guilt has already been forgiven," for which indulgences may be given which remove "either part or all of the temporal punishment due to sin," such as an "unhealthy attachment" to sin.

New!!: Christianity and Purgatory · See more »

Puritans

The Puritans were English Reformed Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries who sought to "purify" the Church of England from its "Catholic" practices, maintaining that the Church of England was only partially reformed.

New!!: Christianity and Puritans · See more »

Quakers

Quakers (or Friends) are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements formally known as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church.

New!!: Christianity and Quakers · See more »

Quebec

Quebec (Québec)According to the Canadian government, Québec (with the acute accent) is the official name in French and Quebec (without the accent) is the province's official name in English; the name is.

New!!: Christianity and Quebec · See more »

Questions of Truth

Questions of Truth is a book by John Polkinghorne and Nicholas Beale which offers their responses to 51 questions about science and religion.

New!!: Christianity and Questions of Truth · See more »

Rabbi

In Judaism, a rabbi is a teacher of Torah.

New!!: Christianity and Rabbi · See more »

Radical Reformation

The Radical Reformation was the response to what was believed to be the corruption in both the Roman Catholic Church and the expanding Magisterial Protestant movement led by Martin Luther and many others.

New!!: Christianity and Radical Reformation · See more »

Rapture

The rapture is an eschatological term used by certain Christians, particularly within branches of American evangelicalism, referring to a purported end time event when all Christian believers – living and dead – will rise into the sky and join Christ.

New!!: Christianity and Rapture · See more »

Ravi Zacharias

Ravi Zacharias (born 26 March 1946) is an Indian-born Canadian-American Christian apologist.

New!!: Christianity and Ravi Zacharias · See more »

Reason

Reason is the capacity for consciously making sense of things, establishing and verifying facts, applying logic, and changing or justifying practices, institutions, and beliefs based on new or existing information.

New!!: Christianity and Reason · See more »

Reformation

The Reformation (or, more fully, the Protestant Reformation; also, the European Reformation) was a schism in Western Christianity initiated by Martin Luther and continued by Huldrych Zwingli, John Calvin and other Protestant Reformers in 16th century Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Reformation · See more »

Reginald H. Fuller

Reginald Horace Fuller (March 24, 1915 – April 4, 2007) was an Anglo-American Biblical scholar, ecumenist, and Anglican priest.

New!!: Christianity and Reginald H. Fuller · See more »

Relationship between religion and science

Various aspects of the relationship between religion and science have been addressed by philosophers, theologians, scientists, and others.

New!!: Christianity and Relationship between religion and science · See more »

Religion

Religion may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophecies, ethics, or organizations, that relates humanity to supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual elements.

New!!: Christianity and Religion · See more »

Religion in Canada

Religion in Canada encompasses a wide range of groups and beliefs.

New!!: Christianity and Religion in Canada · See more »

Religious conversion

Religious conversion is the adoption of a set of beliefs identified with one particular religious denomination to the exclusion of others.

New!!: Christianity and Religious conversion · See more »

Religious denomination

A religious denomination is a subgroup within a religion that operates under a common name, tradition, and identity.

New!!: Christianity and Religious denomination · See more »

Religious images in Christian theology

Religious images in Christian theology have a role within the liturgical and devotional life of adherents of certain Christian denominations.

New!!: Christianity and Religious images in Christian theology · See more »

Religious interpretations of the Big Bang theory

Since the emergence of the Big Bang theory as the dominant physical cosmological paradigm, there have been a variety of reactions by religious groups regarding its implications for religious cosmologies.

New!!: Christianity and Religious interpretations of the Big Bang theory · See more »

Religious violence

Religious violence is a term that covers phenomena where religion is either the subject or the object of violent behavior.

New!!: Christianity and Religious violence · See more »

Religious war

A religious war or holy war (bellum sacrum) is a war primarily caused or justified by differences in religion.

New!!: Christianity and Religious war · See more »

Renaissance

The Renaissance is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries.

New!!: Christianity and Renaissance · See more »

Republic of Ireland

Ireland (Éire), also known as the Republic of Ireland (Poblacht na hÉireann), is a sovereign state in north-western Europe occupying 26 of 32 counties of the island of Ireland.

New!!: Christianity and Republic of Ireland · See more »

Restoration Movement

The Restoration Movement (also known as the American Restoration Movement or the Stone-Campbell Movement, and pejoratively as Campbellism) is a Christian movement that began on the United States frontier during the Second Great Awakening (1790–1840) of the early 19th century. The pioneers of this movement were seeking to reform the church from within and sought "the unification of all Christians in a single body patterned after the church of the New Testament."Rubel Shelly, I Just Want to Be a Christian, 20th Century Christian, Nashville, TN 1984, Especially since the mid-20th century, members of these churches do not identify as Protestant but simply as Christian.. Richard Thomas Hughes, Reviving the Ancient Faith: The Story of Churches of Christ in America, William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1996: "arguably the most widely distributed tract ever published by the Churches of Christ or anyone associated with that tradition."Samuel S Hill, Charles H Lippy, Charles Reagan Wilson, Encyclopedia of Religion in the South, Mercer University Press, 2005, pp. 854 The Restoration Movement developed from several independent strands of religious revival that idealized early Christianity. Two groups, which independently developed similar approaches to the Christian faith, were particularly important. The first, led by Barton W. Stone, began at Cane Ridge, Kentucky, and identified as "Christians". The second began in western Pennsylvania and Virginia (now West Virginia) and was led by Thomas Campbell and his son, Alexander Campbell, both educated in Scotland; they eventually used the name "Disciples of Christ". Both groups sought to restore the whole Christian church on the pattern set forth in the New Testament, and both believed that creeds kept Christianity divided. In 1832 they joined in fellowship with a handshake. Among other things, they were united in the belief that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; that Christians should celebrate the Lord's Supper on the first day of each week; and that baptism of adult believers by immersion in water is a necessary condition for salvation. Because the founders wanted to abandon all denominational labels, they used the biblical names for the followers of Jesus. Both groups promoted a return to the purposes of the 1st-century churches as described in the New Testament. One historian of the movement has argued that it was primarily a unity movement, with the restoration motif playing a subordinate role. The Restoration Movement has since divided into multiple separate groups. There are three main branches in the U.S.: the Churches of Christ, the unaffiliated Christian Church/Church of Christ congregations, and the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Some characterize the divisions in the movement as the result of the tension between the goals of restoration and ecumenism: the Churches of Christ and unaffiliated Christian Church/Church of Christ congregations resolved the tension by stressing restoration, while the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) resolved the tension by stressing ecumenism.Leroy Garrett, The Stone-Campbell Movement: The Story of the American Restoration Movement, College Press, 2002,, 573 pp. A number of groups outside the U.S. also have historical associations with this movement, such as the Evangelical Christian Church in Canada and the Churches of Christ in Australia. Because the Restoration Movement lacks any centralized structure, having originated in a variety of places with different leaders, there is no consistent nomenclature for the movement as a whole.. The term "Restoration Movement" became popular during the 19th century; this appears to be due to the influence of Alexander Campbell's essays on "A Restoration of the Ancient Order of Things" in the Christian Baptist. The term "Stone-Campbell Movement" emerged towards the end of the 20th century as a way to avoid the difficulties associated with some of the other names that have been used, and to maintain a sense of the collective history of the movement.

New!!: Christianity and Restoration Movement · See more »

Restorationism

Restorationism, also described as Christian Primitivism, is the belief that Christianity has been or should be restored along the lines of what is known about the apostolic early church, which restorationists see as the search for a more pure and more ancient form of the religion.

New!!: Christianity and Restorationism · See more »

Resurrection of Jesus

The resurrection of Jesus or resurrection of Christ is the Christian religious belief that, after being put to death, Jesus rose again from the dead: as the Nicene Creed expresses it, "On the third day he rose again in accordance with the Scriptures".

New!!: Christianity and Resurrection of Jesus · See more »

Resurrection of the dead

Resurrection of the dead, or resurrection from the dead (Koine: ἀνάστασις νεκρῶν, anastasis nekron; literally: "standing up again of the dead"; is a term frequently used in the New Testament and in the writings and doctrine and theology in other religions to describe an event by which a person, or people are resurrected (brought back to life). In the New Testament of the Christian Bible, the three common usages for this term pertain to (1) the Christ, rising from the dead; (2) the rising from the dead of all men, at the end of this present age and (3) the resurrection of certain ones in history, who were restored to life. Predominantly in Christian eschatology, the term is used to support the belief that the dead will be brought back to life in connection with end times. Various other forms of this concept can also be found in other eschatologies, namely: Islamic, Jewish and Zoroastrian eschatology. In some Neopagan views, this refers to reincarnation between the three realms: Life, Death, and the Realm of the Divine; e.g.: Christopaganism. See Christianity and Neopaganism.

New!!: Christianity and Resurrection of the dead · See more »

Revelation

In religion and theology, revelation is the revealing or disclosing of some form of truth or knowledge through communication with a deity or other supernatural entity or entities.

New!!: Christianity and Revelation · See more »

Rite

A rite is an established, ceremonial, usually religious, act.

New!!: Christianity and Rite · See more »

Robert Boyle

Robert Boyle (25 January 1627 – 31 December 1691) was an Anglo-Irish natural philosopher, chemist, physicist, and inventor.

New!!: Christianity and Robert Boyle · See more »

Robert M. Price

Robert McNair Price (born July 7, 1954) is an American theologian and writer, known for arguing against the existence of a historical Jesus (the Christ myth theory). He taught philosophy and religion at the Johnnie Colemon Theological Seminary. He is a professor of biblical criticism at the Center for Inquiry Institute, and the author of a number of books on theology and the historicity of Jesus. A former Baptist minister, he was the editor of the Journal of Higher Criticism from 1994 until it ceased publication in 2003. He has also written extensively about the Cthulhu Mythos, a "shared universe" created by the writer H. P. Lovecraft. He also co-wrote a book with his wife, Carol Selby Price, Mystic Rhythms: The Philosophical Vision of Rush (1999), on the rock band Rush. Price is a fellow of the Jesus Seminar, a group of 150 writers and scholars who study the historicity of Jesus, the organizer of a Web community for those interested in the history of Christianity, and sits on the advisory board of the Secular Student Alliance. Secular Student Alliance, accessed April 15, 2010. He is a religious skeptic, especially of orthodox Christian beliefs, occasionally describing himself as a Christian atheist.

New!!: Christianity and Robert M. Price · See more »

Roel van den Broek

Roelof "Roel" van den Broek (born 20 December 1931) is a Dutch religious scholar.

New!!: Christianity and Roel van den Broek · See more »

Roger E. Olson

Roger E. Olson (born 1952) is Professor of Theology, George W. Truett Theological Seminary, Baylor University, Waco, Texas, United States.

New!!: Christianity and Roger E. Olson · See more »

Role of Christianity in civilization

The role of Christianity in civilization has been intricately intertwined with the history and formation of Western society.

New!!: Christianity and Role of Christianity in civilization · See more »

Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

New!!: Christianity and Roman Empire · See more »

Roman Rite

The Roman Rite (Ritus Romanus) is the most widespread liturgical rite in the Catholic Church, as well as the most popular and widespread Rite in all of Christendom, and is one of the Western/Latin rites used in the Western or Latin Church.

New!!: Christianity and Roman Rite · See more »

Roman Syria

Syria was an early Roman province, annexed to the Roman Republic in 64 BC by Pompey in the Third Mithridatic War, following the defeat of Armenian King Tigranes the Great.

New!!: Christianity and Roman Syria · See more »

Romanesque architecture

Romanesque architecture is an architectural style of medieval Europe characterized by semi-circular arches.

New!!: Christianity and Romanesque architecture · See more »

Romanization of Greek

Romanization of Greek is the transliteration (letter-mapping) or transcription (sound-mapping) of text from the Greek alphabet into the Latin alphabet.

New!!: Christianity and Romanization of Greek · See more »

Rosicrucian Fellowship

The Rosicrucian Fellowship (TRF) ("An International Association of Christian Mystics") was founded in 1909 by Max Heindel with the aim of heralding the Aquarian Age and promulgating "the true Philosophy" of the Rosicrucians.

New!!: Christianity and Rosicrucian Fellowship · See more »

Russian Orthodox Church

The Russian Orthodox Church (ROC; Rússkaya pravoslávnaya tsérkov), alternatively legally known as the Moscow Patriarchate (Moskóvskiy patriarkhát), is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox churches, in full communion with other Eastern Orthodox patriarchates.

New!!: Christianity and Russian Orthodox Church · See more »

Russian Revolution

The Russian Revolution was a pair of revolutions in Russia in 1917 which dismantled the Tsarist autocracy and led to the rise of the Soviet Union.

New!!: Christianity and Russian Revolution · See more »

Rwanda

Rwanda (U Rwanda), officially the Republic of Rwanda (Repubulika y'u Rwanda; République du Rwanda), is a sovereign state in Central and East Africa and one of the smallest countries on the African mainland.

New!!: Christianity and Rwanda · See more »

Sabbath School

Sabbath School is a function of the Seventh-day Adventist Church,Seventh Day Baptist, Church of God (Seventh-Day), some other sabbatarian denominations, usually comprising a song service and Bible study lesson on the Sabbath.

New!!: Christianity and Sabbath School · See more »

Sacrament of Penance

The Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation (commonly called Penance, Reconciliation, or Confession) is one of the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church (called sacred mysteries in the Eastern Catholic Churches), in which the faithful obtain absolution for the sins committed against God and neighbour and are reconciled with the community of the Church.

New!!: Christianity and Sacrament of Penance · See more »

Sacramental bread

Sacramental bread (Latin: hostia, Italian: ostia), sometimes called altar bread, Communion bread, the Lamb or simply the host, is the bread or wafer used in the Christian ritual of the Eucharist.

New!!: Christianity and Sacramental bread · See more »

Sacramental wine

Sacramental wine, Communion wine or altar wine is wine obtained from grapes and intended for use in celebration of the Eucharist (referred to also as the Lord's Supper or Holy Communion, among other names).

New!!: Christianity and Sacramental wine · See more »

Sacraments of the Catholic Church

There are seven sacraments of the Catholic Church, which according to Catholic theology were instituted by Jesus and entrusted to the Church.

New!!: Christianity and Sacraments of the Catholic Church · See more »

Sacred mysteries

Sacred mysteries are the areas of supernatural phenomena associated with a divinity or a religious ideology.

New!!: Christianity and Sacred mysteries · See more »

Sacred tradition

Sacred Tradition, or Holy Tradition, is a theological term used in some Christian traditions, primarily those claiming apostolic succession such as the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Assyrian, and Anglican traditions, to refer to the foundation of the doctrinal and spiritual authority of the Christian Church and of the Bible.

New!!: Christianity and Sacred tradition · See more »

Saint

A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.

New!!: Christianity and Saint · See more »

Saint Dominic

Saint Dominic (Santo Domingo), also known as Dominic of Osma and Dominic of Caleruega, often called Dominic de Guzmán and Domingo Félix de Guzmán (8 August 1170 – 6 August 1221), was a Castilian priest and founder of the Dominican Order.

New!!: Christianity and Saint Dominic · See more »

Saint Peter

Saint Peter (Syriac/Aramaic: ܫܸܡܥܘܿܢ ܟܹ݁ܐܦ݂ܵܐ, Shemayon Keppa; שמעון בר יונה; Petros; Petros; Petrus; r. AD 30; died between AD 64 and 68), also known as Simon Peter, Simeon, or Simon, according to the New Testament, was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus Christ, leaders of the early Christian Great Church.

New!!: Christianity and Saint Peter · See more »

Salvation

Salvation (salvatio; sōtēría; yāšaʕ; al-ḵalaṣ) is being saved or protected from harm or being saved or delivered from a dire situation.

New!!: Christianity and Salvation · See more »

Salvation in Christianity

Salvation in Christianity, or deliverance, is the saving of the soul from sin and its consequences.

New!!: Christianity and Salvation in Christianity · See more »

Sarcophagus

A sarcophagus (plural, sarcophagi) is a box-like funeral receptacle for a corpse, most commonly carved in stone, and usually displayed above ground, though it may also be buried.

New!!: Christianity and Sarcophagus · See more »

Schism

A schism (pronounced, or, less commonly) is a division between people, usually belonging to an organization, movement, or religious denomination.

New!!: Christianity and Schism · See more »

School

A school is an institution designed to provide learning spaces and learning environments for the teaching of students (or "pupils") under the direction of teachers.

New!!: Christianity and School · See more »

School of Antioch

The School of Antioch was one of the two major centers of the study of biblical exegesis and theology during Late Antiquity; the other was the Catechetical School of Alexandria.

New!!: Christianity and School of Antioch · See more »

Schwarzenau Brethren

The Schwarzenau Brethren, the German Baptist Brethren, Dunkers, Dunkards, Tunkers, or simply the German Baptists, are an Anabaptist group that originally dissented from several Lutheran and Reformed churches that were officially established in some German-speaking states in western and southwestern parts of the Holy Roman Empire as a result of the Radical Pietist ferment of the late 17th and early 18th centuries.

New!!: Christianity and Schwarzenau Brethren · See more »

Science

R. P. Feynman, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol.1, Chaps.1,2,&3.

New!!: Christianity and Science · See more »

Scientific Revolution

The Scientific Revolution was a series of events that marked the emergence of modern science during the early modern period, when developments in mathematics, physics, astronomy, biology (including human anatomy) and chemistry transformed the views of society about nature.

New!!: Christianity and Scientific Revolution · See more »

Scotland

Scotland (Alba) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.

New!!: Christianity and Scotland · See more »

Scribe

A scribe is a person who serves as a professional copyist, especially one who made copies of manuscripts before the invention of automatic printing.

New!!: Christianity and Scribe · See more »

Season

A season is a division of the year marked by changes in weather, ecology, and amount of daylight.

New!!: Christianity and Season · See more »

Second Coming

The Second Coming (sometimes called the Second Advent or the Parousia) is a Christian and Islamic belief regarding the future (or past) return of Jesus Christ after his incarnation and ascension to heaven about two thousand years ago.

New!!: Christianity and Second Coming · See more »

Second Council of Lyon

The Second Council of Lyon was the fourteenth ecumenical council of the Catholic Church, convoked on 31 March 1272 and convened in Lyon, France, in 1274.

New!!: Christianity and Second Council of Lyon · See more »

Second Council of Nicaea

The Second Council of Nicaea is recognized as the last of the first seven ecumenical councils by the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church.

New!!: Christianity and Second Council of Nicaea · See more »

Second Great Awakening

The Second Great Awakening was a Protestant religious revival during the early 19th century in the United States.

New!!: Christianity and Second Great Awakening · See more »

Second Temple Judaism

Second Temple Judaism is Judaism between the construction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, c. 515 BCE, and its destruction by the Romans in 70 CE.

New!!: Christianity and Second Temple Judaism · See more »

Second Vatican Council

The Second Vatican Council, fully the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican and informally known as addressed relations between the Catholic Church and the modern world.

New!!: Christianity and Second Vatican Council · See more »

Septuagint

The Septuagint or LXX (from the septuāgintā literally "seventy"; sometimes called the Greek Old Testament) is the earliest extant Greek translation of the Old Testament from the original Hebrew.

New!!: Christianity and Septuagint · See more »

Sermon

A sermon is an oration, lecture, or talk by a member of a religious institution or clergy.

New!!: Christianity and Sermon · See more »

Sermon on the Mount

The Sermon on the Mount (anglicized from the Matthean Vulgate Latin section title: Sermo in monte) is a collection of sayings and teachings of Jesus, which emphasizes his moral teaching found in the Gospel of Matthew (chapters 5, 6, and 7).

New!!: Christianity and Sermon on the Mount · See more »

Seventh-day Adventist Church

The Seventh-day Adventist Church is a Protestant Christian denomination distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week in Christian and Jewish calendars, as the Sabbath, and by its emphasis on the imminent Second Coming (advent) of Jesus Christ.

New!!: Christianity and Seventh-day Adventist Church · See more »

Sign of the cross

The sign of the cross (signum crucis), or blessing oneself or crossing oneself, is a ritual blessing made by members of most branches of Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Sign of the cross · See more »

Skepticism

Skepticism (American English) or scepticism (British English, Australian English) is generally any questioning attitude or doubt towards one or more items of putative knowledge or belief.

New!!: Christianity and Skepticism · See more »

Slavs

Slavs are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group who speak the various Slavic languages of the larger Balto-Slavic linguistic group.

New!!: Christianity and Slavs · See more »

Socialism

Socialism is a range of economic and social systems characterised by social ownership and democratic control of the means of production as well as the political theories and movements associated with them.

New!!: Christianity and Socialism · See more »

Sola scriptura

Sola Scriptura (Latin: by scripture alone) is a theological doctrine held by some Christian denominations that the Christian scriptures are the sole infallible rule of faith and practice.

New!!: Christianity and Sola scriptura · See more »

Solemnity

A solemnity is a feast day of the highest rank in the liturgical calendar of the Roman Rite, celebrating a mystery of faith such as the Trinity, an event in the life of Jesus, his mother Mary, or another important saint.

New!!: Christianity and Solemnity · See more »

Son of God

Historically, many rulers have assumed titles such as son of God, son of a god or son of heaven.

New!!: Christianity and Son of God · See more »

Son of God (Christianity)

The terms "son of God" and "son of the " are found in several passages of the Old Testament.

New!!: Christianity and Son of God (Christianity) · See more »

South Africa

South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa (RSA), is the southernmost country in Africa.

New!!: Christianity and South Africa · See more »

Southern Africa

Southern Africa is the southernmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics, and including several countries.

New!!: Christianity and Southern Africa · See more »

Southern Cone

The Southern Cone (Cono Sur, Cone Sul) is a geographic and cultural region composed of the southernmost areas of South America, south of and around the Tropic of Capricorn.

New!!: Christianity and Southern Cone · See more »

Southern United States

The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland, or simply the South, is a region of the United States of America.

New!!: Christianity and Southern United States · See more »

Spain

Spain (España), officially the Kingdom of Spain (Reino de España), is a sovereign state mostly located on the Iberian Peninsula in Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Spain · See more »

Spanish Civil War

The Spanish Civil War (Guerra Civil Española),Also known as The Crusade (La Cruzada) among Nationalists, the Fourth Carlist War (Cuarta Guerra Carlista) among Carlists, and The Rebellion (La Rebelión) or Uprising (Sublevación) among Republicans.

New!!: Christianity and Spanish Civil War · See more »

Spiritual Christianity

Spiritual Christianity (духовное христианство) refers to "folk Protestants" (narody protestanty), non-Orthodox indigenous to the Russian Empire that emerged from among the Orthodox, and from the Bezpopovtsy Raskolniks.

New!!: Christianity and Spiritual Christianity · See more »

Split of early Christianity and Judaism

The split of early Christianity and Judaism took place during the first centuries CE.

New!!: Christianity and Split of early Christianity and Judaism · See more »

State atheism

State atheism, according to Oxford University Press's A Dictionary of Atheism, "is the name given to the incorporation of positive atheism or non-theism into political regimes, particularly associated with Soviet systems." In contrast, a secular state purports to be officially neutral in matters of religion, supporting neither religion nor irreligion.

New!!: Christianity and State atheism · See more »

State church of the Roman Empire

Nicene Christianity became the state church of the Roman Empire with the Edict of Thessalonica in 380 AD, when Emperor Theodosius I made it the Empire's sole authorized religion.

New!!: Christianity and State church of the Roman Empire · See more »

State religion

A state religion (also called an established religion or official religion) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state.

New!!: Christianity and State religion · See more »

Stephen

Stephen or Steven is a common English first name.

New!!: Christianity and Stephen · See more »

Sub-Saharan Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa is, geographically, the area of the continent of Africa that lies south of the Sahara.

New!!: Christianity and Sub-Saharan Africa · See more »

Subsistit in

Subsistit in (subsists in) is a Latin phrase, which appears in the eighth paragraph of Lumen gentium, a landmark document of the Second Vatican Council of the Catholic Church: This sentence and the correct meaning of "subsists in" affects the definition of the Church with important implications for how the Catholic Church views itself, its relations with other Christian communities and other religions.

New!!: Christianity and Subsistit in · See more »

Substitutionary atonement

Technically speaking, substitutionary atonement is the name given to a number of Christian models of the atonement that regard Jesus as dying as a substitute for others, 'instead of' them.

New!!: Christianity and Substitutionary atonement · See more »

Summa contra Gentiles

The Summa contra Gentiles (also known as Liber de veritate catholicae fidei contra errores infidelium, "Book on the truth of the Catholic faith against the errors of the unbelievers") is one of the best-known books by St Thomas Aquinas, written during c. 1259–1265.

New!!: Christianity and Summa contra Gentiles · See more »

Summa Theologica

The Summa Theologiae (written 1265–1274 and also known as the Summa Theologica or simply the Summa) is the best-known work of Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225–1274).

New!!: Christianity and Summa Theologica · See more »

Sunday school

A Sunday School is an educational institution, usually (but not always) Christian, which catered to children and other young people who would be working on weekdays.

New!!: Christianity and Sunday school · See more »

Switzerland

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a sovereign state in Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Switzerland · See more »

Sydney E. Ahlstrom

Sydney Eckman Ahlstrom (December 16, 1919 – July 3, 1984) was an American educator and historian.

New!!: Christianity and Sydney E. Ahlstrom · See more »

Syriac language

Syriac (ܠܫܢܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܐ), also known as Syriac Aramaic or Classical Syriac, is a dialect of Middle Aramaic.

New!!: Christianity and Syriac language · See more »

Syriac Orthodox Church

The Syriac Orthodox Church of Antioch (ʿĪṯo Suryoyṯo Trišaṯ Šubḥo; الكنيسة السريانية الأرثوذكسية), or Syriac Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and All the East, is an Oriental Orthodox Church with autocephalous patriarchate established in Antioch in 518, tracing its founding to St. Peter and St. Paul in the 1st century, according to its tradition.

New!!: Christianity and Syriac Orthodox Church · See more »

Syro-Malabar Catholic Church

The Syro-Malabar Catholic Church (Aramaic/Syriac: ܥܸܕܬܵܐ ܩܵܬܘܿܠܝܼܩܝܼ ܕܡܲܠܲܒܵܪ ܣܘܼܪܝܵܝܵܐ Edta Qatholiqi D'Malabar Suryaya); (Malayalam: സുറിയാനി മലബാര്‍ കത്തോലിക്ക സഭ Suriyani Malabar Katholika Sabha) or Church of Malabar Syrian Catholics is an Eastern Catholic Major Archiepiscopal Church based in Kerala, India.

New!!: Christianity and Syro-Malabar Catholic Church · See more »

Taiwan

Taiwan, officially the Republic of China (ROC), is a state in East Asia.

New!!: Christianity and Taiwan · See more »

Taizé Community

The Taizé Community is an ecumenical Christian monastic community in Taizé, Saône-et-Loire, Burgundy, France.

New!!: Christianity and Taizé Community · See more »

Taizé, Saône-et-Loire

Taizé is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté in eastern France.

New!!: Christianity and Taizé, Saône-et-Loire · See more »

Tanakh

The Tanakh (or; also Tenakh, Tenak, Tanach), also called the Mikra or Hebrew Bible, is the canonical collection of Jewish texts, which is also a textual source for the Christian Old Testament.

New!!: Christianity and Tanakh · See more »

Ten Commandments

The Ten Commandments (עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדִּבְּרוֹת, Aseret ha'Dibrot), also known as the Decalogue, are a set of biblical principles relating to ethics and worship, which play a fundamental role in Judaism and Christianity.

New!!: Christianity and Ten Commandments · See more »

Tertullian

Tertullian, full name Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, c. 155 – c. 240 AD, was a prolific early Christian author from Carthage in the Roman province of Africa.

New!!: Christianity and Tertullian · See more »

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), often informally known as the Mormon Church, is a nontrinitarian, Christian restorationist church that is considered by its members to be the restoration of the original church founded by Jesus Christ.

New!!: Christianity and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints · See more »

The gospel

In Christianity, the gospel (euangélion; gospel), or the Good News, is the news of the coming of the Kingdom of God.

New!!: Christianity and The gospel · See more »

The New York Review of Books

The New York Review of Books (or NYREV or NYRB) is a semi-monthly magazine with articles on literature, culture, economics, science and current affairs.

New!!: Christianity and The New York Review of Books · See more »

The Shape of Sola Scriptura

The Shape of Sola Scriptura is a 2001 book by Reformed Christian theologian Keith Mathison.

New!!: Christianity and The Shape of Sola Scriptura · See more »

The True Word

The True Word (or Discourse, Account, Doctrine; Λόγος Ἀληθής, Logos Alēthēs) is a lost treatise in which the ancient Greek philosopher Celsus addressed many principal points of Early Christianity and refuted or argued against their validity.

New!!: Christianity and The True Word · See more »

Theodosius I

Theodosius I (Flavius Theodosius Augustus; Θεοδόσιος Αʹ; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also known as Theodosius the Great, was Roman Emperor from AD 379 to AD 395, as the last emperor to rule over both the eastern and the western halves of the Roman Empire. On accepting his elevation, he campaigned against Goths and other barbarians who had invaded the empire. His resources were not equal to destroy them, and by the treaty which followed his modified victory at the end of the Gothic War, they were established as Foederati, autonomous allies of the Empire, south of the Danube, in Illyricum, within the empire's borders. He was obliged to fight two destructive civil wars, successively defeating the usurpers Magnus Maximus and Eugenius, not without material cost to the power of the empire. He also issued decrees that effectively made Nicene Christianity the official state church of the Roman Empire."Edict of Thessalonica": See Codex Theodosianus XVI.1.2 He neither prevented nor punished the destruction of prominent Hellenistic temples of classical antiquity, including the Temple of Apollo in Delphi and the Serapeum in Alexandria. He dissolved the order of the Vestal Virgins in Rome. In 393, he banned the pagan rituals of the Olympics in Ancient Greece. After his death, Theodosius' young sons Arcadius and Honorius inherited the east and west halves respectively, and the Roman Empire was never again re-united, though Eastern Roman emperors after Zeno would claim the united title after Julius Nepos' death in 480 AD.

New!!: Christianity and Theodosius I · See more »

Theology

Theology is the critical study of the nature of the divine.

New!!: Christianity and Theology · See more »

Theophilus of Antioch

Theophilus, Patriarch of Antioch (Θεόφιλος ὁ Ἀντιοχεύς) succeeded Eros c. 169, and was succeeded by Maximus I c. 183, according to Henry Fynes Clinton, but these dates are only approximations.

New!!: Christianity and Theophilus of Antioch · See more »

Thirty Years' War

The Thirty Years' War was a war fought primarily in Central Europe between 1618 and 1648.

New!!: Christianity and Thirty Years' War · See more »

Thomas Aquinas

Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225 – 7 March 1274) was an Italian Dominican friar, Catholic priest, and Doctor of the Church.

New!!: Christianity and Thomas Aquinas · See more »

Thomas Müntzer

Thomas Müntzer (December 1489 – 27 May 1525) was a German preacher and radical theologian of the early Reformation whose opposition to both Luther and the Roman Catholic Church led to his open defiance of late-feudal authority in central Germany.

New!!: Christianity and Thomas Müntzer · See more »

Tonga

Tonga (Tongan: Puleʻanga Fakatuʻi ʻo Tonga), officially the Kingdom of Tonga, is a Polynesian sovereign state and archipelago comprising 169 islands, of which 36 are inhabited.

New!!: Christianity and Tonga · See more »

Total depravity

Total depravity (also called radical corruption or pervasive depravity) is a Christian theological doctrine derived from the Augustinian concept of original sin.

New!!: Christianity and Total depravity · See more »

Tradition

A tradition is a belief or behavior passed down within a group or society with symbolic meaning or special significance with origins in the past.

New!!: Christianity and Tradition · See more »

Transcaucasia

Transcaucasia (Закавказье), or the South Caucasus, is a geographical region in the vicinity of the southern Caucasus Mountains on the border of Eastern Europe and Western Asia.

New!!: Christianity and Transcaucasia · See more »

Trinitarian formula

The trinitarian formula is the phrase "in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit" (original Greek εἰς τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ Πατρὸς καὶ τοῦ Υἱοῦ καὶ τοῦ Ἁγίου Πνεύματος,, or in Latin in nomine Patris et Filii et Spiritus Sancti), or words to that form and effect referring to the three persons of the Christian Trinity.

New!!: Christianity and Trinitarian formula · See more »

Trinity

The Christian doctrine of the Trinity (from Greek τριάς and τριάδα, from "threefold") holds that God is one but three coeternal consubstantial persons or hypostases—the Father, the Son (Jesus Christ), and the Holy Spirit—as "one God in three Divine Persons".

New!!: Christianity and Trinity · See more »

Tritheism

Tritheism is the belief that cosmic divinity is composed of three powerful entities.

New!!: Christianity and Tritheism · See more »

Turkish people

Turkish people or the Turks (Türkler), also known as Anatolian Turks (Anadolu Türkleri), are a Turkic ethnic group and nation living mainly in Turkey and speaking Turkish, the most widely spoken Turkic language.

New!!: Christianity and Turkish people · See more »

Tuvalu

Tuvalu, formerly known as the Ellice Islands, is a Polynesian island nation located in the Pacific Ocean, about midway between Hawaii and Australia, lying east-northeast of the Santa Cruz Islands (belonging to the Solomons), southeast of Nauru, south of Kiribati, west of Tokelau, northwest of Samoa and Wallis and Futuna and north of Fiji.

New!!: Christianity and Tuvalu · See more »

Typology (theology)

Typology in Christian theology and Biblical exegesis is a doctrine or theory concerning the relationship of the Old Testament to the New Testament.

New!!: Christianity and Typology (theology) · See more »

Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church

The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (UGCC) (Ecclesia Graeco-Catholica Ucrainae) is a Byzantine Rite Eastern Catholic Church in full communion with the Holy See.

New!!: Christianity and Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church · See more »

Ultramontanism

Ultramontanism is a clerical political conception within the Catholic Church that places strong emphasis on the prerogatives and powers of the pope.

New!!: Christianity and Ultramontanism · See more »

Umayyad Caliphate

The Umayyad Caliphate (ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلأُمَوِيَّة, trans. Al-Khilāfatu al-ʾUmawiyyah), also spelt, was the second of the four major caliphates established after the death of Muhammad.

New!!: Christianity and Umayyad Caliphate · See more »

Unitarian Universalism

Unitarian Universalism (UU) is a liberal religion characterized by a "free and responsible search for truth and meaning".

New!!: Christianity and Unitarian Universalism · See more »

Unitarianism

Unitarianism (from Latin unitas "unity, oneness", from unus "one") is historically a Christian theological movement named for its belief that the God in Christianity is one entity, as opposed to the Trinity (tri- from Latin tres "three") which defines God as three persons in one being; the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

New!!: Christianity and Unitarianism · See more »

United and uniting churches

A united church, also called a uniting church, is a church formed from the merger or other form of union of two or more different Protestant denominations.

New!!: Christianity and United and uniting churches · See more »

United Church of Canada

The United Church of Canada (Église unie du Canada) is a mainline Reformed denomination and the largest Protestant Christian denomination in Canada, and the largest Canadian Christian denomination after the Catholic Church.

New!!: Christianity and United Church of Canada · See more »

Uniting Church in Australia

The Uniting Church in Australia (UCA) was established on 22 June 1977 when most congregations of the Methodist Church of Australasia, about two thirds of the Presbyterian Church of Australia and almost all the churches of the Congregational Union of Australia came together under the Basis of Union.

New!!: Christianity and Uniting Church in Australia · See more »

University

A university (universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines.

New!!: Christianity and University · See more »

University of Bologna

The University of Bologna (Università di Bologna, UNIBO), founded in 1088, is the oldest university in continuous operation, as well as one of the leading academic institutions in Italy and Europe.

New!!: Christianity and University of Bologna · See more »

University of Fribourg

The University of Fribourg (Université de Fribourg; Universität Freiburg) is a university in the city of Fribourg, Switzerland.

New!!: Christianity and University of Fribourg · See more »

University of Oxford

The University of Oxford (formally The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford) is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England.

New!!: Christianity and University of Oxford · See more »

University of Paris

The University of Paris (Université de Paris), metonymically known as the Sorbonne (one of its buildings), was a university in Paris, France, from around 1150 to 1793, and from 1806 to 1970.

New!!: Christianity and University of Paris · See more »

Value (ethics)

In ethics, value denotes the degree of importance of some thing or action, with the aim of determining what actions are best to do or what way is best to live (normative ethics), or to describe the significance of different actions.

New!!: Christianity and Value (ethics) · See more »

Vandals

The Vandals were a large East Germanic tribe or group of tribes that first appear in history inhabiting present-day southern Poland.

New!!: Christianity and Vandals · See more »

Vatican City

Vatican City (Città del Vaticano; Civitas Vaticana), officially the Vatican City State or the State of Vatican City (Stato della Città del Vaticano; Status Civitatis Vaticanae), is an independent state located within the city of Rome.

New!!: Christianity and Vatican City · See more »

Vestment

Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religion, especially among the Eastern Orthodox, Catholics (Latin Church and others), Anglicans, and Lutherans.

New!!: Christianity and Vestment · See more »

Vine

A vine (Latin vīnea "grapevine", "vineyard", from vīnum "wine") is any plant with a growth habit of trailing or scandent (that is, climbing) stems, lianas or runners.

New!!: Christianity and Vine · See more »

Vision hypothesis

The vision hypothesis is a term used to cover a range of theories that question the physical resurrection of Jesus, and suggest that sightings of a risen Jesus were visionary experiences.

New!!: Christianity and Vision hypothesis · See more »

Welfare

Welfare is a government support for the citizens and residents of society.

New!!: Christianity and Welfare · See more »

Western Christianity

Western Christianity is the type of Christianity which developed in the areas of the former Western Roman Empire.

New!!: Christianity and Western Christianity · See more »

Western culture

Western culture, sometimes equated with Western civilization, Occidental culture, the Western world, Western society, European civilization,is a term used very broadly to refer to a heritage of social norms, ethical values, traditional customs, belief systems, political systems and specific artifacts and technologies that have some origin or association with Europe.

New!!: Christianity and Western culture · See more »

Western esotericism

Western esotericism (also called esotericism and esoterism), also known as the Western mystery tradition, is a term under which scholars have categorised a wide range of loosely related ideas and movements which have developed within Western society.

New!!: Christianity and Western esotericism · See more »

Western Rite Orthodoxy

Western Rite Orthodoxy or Western Orthodoxy or Orthodox Western Rite are terms used to describe congregations that are within Churches of Orthodox tradition but which use liturgies of Western or Latin origin rather than adopting Eastern liturgies such as the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom.

New!!: Christianity and Western Rite Orthodoxy · See more »

Western United States

The Western United States, commonly referred to as the American West, the Far West, or simply the West, traditionally refers to the region comprising the westernmost states of the United States.

New!!: Christianity and Western United States · See more »

Western world

The Western world refers to various nations depending on the context, most often including at least part of Europe and the Americas.

New!!: Christianity and Western world · See more »

Westport, Connecticut

Westport is an affluent town located in Connecticut, along Long Island Sound within Connecticut's Gold Coast in Fairfield County, Connecticut.

New!!: Christianity and Westport, Connecticut · See more »

Why I Am Not a Christian

Why I Am Not a Christian is an essay by the British philosopher Bertrand Russell.

New!!: Christianity and Why I Am Not a Christian · See more »

William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company

Wm.

New!!: Christianity and William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company · See more »

William F. Albright

William Foxwell Albright (May 24, 1891 – September 19, 1971) was an American archaeologist, biblical scholar, philologist, and expert on ceramics.

New!!: Christianity and William F. Albright · See more »

William H. Brackney

William H. Brackney (born 1948) is the Pioneer MacDonald Professor of Baptist Theology and Ethics at Carey Theological College in Vancouver, British Columbia.

New!!: Christianity and William H. Brackney · See more »

William Lane Craig

William Lane Craig (born August 23, 1949) is an American analytic philosopher and Christian theologian.

New!!: Christianity and William Lane Craig · See more »

William Miller (preacher)

William Miller (February 15, 1782 – December 20, 1849) was an American Baptist preacher who is credited with beginning the mid-19th-century North American religious movement known as the Millerites.

New!!: Christianity and William Miller (preacher) · See more »

William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin

William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, (26 June 1824 – 17 December 1907) was a Scots-Irish mathematical physicist and engineer who was born in Belfast in 1824.

New!!: Christianity and William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin · See more »

World Council of Churches

The World Council of Churches (WCC) is a worldwide inter-church organization founded in 1948.

New!!: Christianity and World Council of Churches · See more »

World Evangelical Alliance

The World Evangelical Alliance (WEA) is a global organization of evangelical Christian churches, serving more than 600 million evangelicals, founded in 1846 in London, England to unite evangelicals worldwide.

New!!: Christianity and World Evangelical Alliance · See more »

World Methodist Council

The World Methodist Council (WMC), founded in 1881, is a consultative body and association of churches in the Methodist tradition.

New!!: Christianity and World Methodist Council · See more »

World population

In demographics, the world population is the total number of humans currently living, and was estimated to have reached 7.6 billion people as of May 2018.

New!!: Christianity and World population · See more »

World Values Survey

The World Values Survey (WVS) is a global research project that explores people’s values and beliefs, how they change over time and what social and political impact they have.

New!!: Christianity and World Values Survey · See more »

World view

A world view or worldview is the fundamental cognitive orientation of an individual or society encompassing the whole of the individual's or society's knowledge and point of view.

New!!: Christianity and World view · See more »

Yale University Press

Yale University Press is a university press associated with Yale University.

New!!: Christianity and Yale University Press · See more »

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe, officially the Republic of Zimbabwe, is a landlocked country located in southern Africa, between the Zambezi and Limpopo Rivers, bordered by South Africa, Botswana, Zambia and Mozambique. The capital and largest city is Harare. A country of roughly million people, Zimbabwe has 16 official languages, with English, Shona, and Ndebele the most commonly used. Since the 11th century, present-day Zimbabwe has been the site of several organised states and kingdoms as well as a major route for migration and trade. The British South Africa Company of Cecil Rhodes first demarcated the present territory during the 1890s; it became the self-governing British colony of Southern Rhodesia in 1923. In 1965, the conservative white minority government unilaterally declared independence as Rhodesia. The state endured international isolation and a 15-year guerrilla war with black nationalist forces; this culminated in a peace agreement that established universal enfranchisement and de jure sovereignty as Zimbabwe in April 1980. Zimbabwe then joined the Commonwealth of Nations, from which it was suspended in 2002 for breaches of international law by its then government and from which it withdrew from in December 2003. It is a member of the United Nations, the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the African Union (AU), and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA). It was once known as the "Jewel of Africa" for its prosperity. Robert Mugabe became Prime Minister of Zimbabwe in 1980, when his ZANU-PF party won the elections following the end of white minority rule; he was the President of Zimbabwe from 1987 until his resignation in 2017. Under Mugabe's authoritarian regime, the state security apparatus dominated the country and was responsible for widespread human rights violations. Mugabe maintained the revolutionary socialist rhetoric of the Cold War era, blaming Zimbabwe's economic woes on conspiring Western capitalist countries. Contemporary African political leaders were reluctant to criticise Mugabe, who was burnished by his anti-imperialist credentials, though Archbishop Desmond Tutu called him "a cartoon figure of an archetypal African dictator". The country has been in economic decline since the 1990s, experiencing several crashes and hyperinflation along the way. On 15 November 2017, in the wake of over a year of protests against his government as well as Zimbabwe's rapidly declining economy, Mugabe was placed under house arrest by the country's national army in a coup d'état. On 19 November 2017, ZANU-PF sacked Robert Mugabe as party leader and appointed former Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa in his place. On 21 November 2017, Mugabe tendered his resignation prior to impeachment proceedings being completed.

New!!: Christianity and Zimbabwe · See more »

Zoroastrianism

Zoroastrianism, or more natively Mazdayasna, is one of the world's oldest extant religions, which is monotheistic in having a single creator god, has dualistic cosmology in its concept of good and evil, and has an eschatology which predicts the ultimate destruction of evil.

New!!: Christianity and Zoroastrianism · See more »

1 Corinthians 15

1 Corinthians 15 is the fifteenth chapter of the First Epistle to the Corinthians by Paul the Apostle.

New!!: Christianity and 1 Corinthians 15 · See more »

1910 World Missionary Conference

The 1910 World Missionary Conference, or the Edinburgh Missionary Conference, was held on 14 to 23 June, 1910.

New!!: Christianity and 1910 World Missionary Conference · See more »

Redirects here:

Al Masihiya, Al Masihiyya, Al-Masihiya, Al-Masihiyya, Belief in Jesus, Belief in jesus, Chistianity, Christ's Faithful, Christainity, Christan, Christanity, Christian Beliefs, Christian Religion, Christian belief, Christian beliefs, Christian faith, Christian religion, Christian-ism, ChristianIty, Christianry, Christianty, Christianty Impact On Civilization, Chritianity, Doctrine, Christian, Hıristiyanlık, Impact Of Christianity On Civilization, Jesusry, Kristendom, Kristendommen, Living for Jesus, Living for jesus, Masihiya, Masihiyya, Nazarethism, X'ianity, Xianity, Xtianity, Xty.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christianity

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »