Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Chronology

Index Chronology

Chronology (from Latin chronologia, from Ancient Greek χρόνος, chrónos, "time"; and -λογία, -logia) is the science of arranging events in their order of occurrence in time. [1]

74 relations: Ancient Greek, Anno Domini, Anno Mundi, Archaeology, Astronomy, Beaker culture, Bede, Book of Genesis, Calendar, Calibration, Carbon, Carbon-14, Christian, Chronicle, Chronicon (Eusebius), Chronological dating, Chronometry, Consul, Correlation and dependence, Dendrochronology, Dionysius Exiguus, Dionysius Exiguus' Easter table, Earth science, Easter, Ecclesiastical full moon, Eclipse of Thales, Egyptology, Epoch (reference date), Era, Evidence, Flashback (narrative), Flashforward, Flinders Petrie, Founding of Rome, French Revolution, Geologic time scale, Geology, George Syncellus, H. James Birx, Herodotus, Historiography, History, History of Earth, Internet Archive, Isotope, Jacques Cassini, Joseph Justus Scaliger, Julian day, Latin, Leap year, ..., List of timelines, Lunar phase, Millennium, Neolithic, Orosius, Oxford University Press, Paleontology, Periodization, Philippe de La Hire, Pope Boniface IV, Prabuddha Bharata, Radiocarbon dating, Recorded history, Reverse chronology, Rome, Science, Seriation (archaeology), Solar cycle (calendar), Time, Timeline, Timelines of world history, Torah, University of Sheffield, Writing system. Expand index (24 more) »

Ancient Greek

The Ancient Greek language includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD.

New!!: Chronology and Ancient Greek · See more »

Anno Domini

The terms anno Domini (AD) and before Christ (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars.

New!!: Chronology and Anno Domini · See more »

Anno Mundi

Anno Mundi (Latin for "in the year of the world"; Hebrew:, "to the creation of the world"), abbreviated as AM or A.M., or Year After Creation, is a calendar era based on the biblical accounts of the creation of the world and subsequent history.

New!!: Chronology and Anno Mundi · See more »

Archaeology

Archaeology, or archeology, is the study of humanactivity through the recovery and analysis of material culture.

New!!: Chronology and Archaeology · See more »

Astronomy

Astronomy (from ἀστρονομία) is a natural science that studies celestial objects and phenomena.

New!!: Chronology and Astronomy · See more »

Beaker culture

The Bell-Beaker culture (sometimes shortened to Beaker culture), is the term for a widely scattered archaeological culture of prehistoric western and Central Europe, starting in the late Neolithic or Chalcolithic and running into the early Bronze Age (in British terminology).

New!!: Chronology and Beaker culture · See more »

Bede

Bede (italic; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable Bede, and Bede the Venerable (Bēda Venerābilis), was an English Benedictine monk at the monastery of St.

New!!: Chronology and Bede · See more »

Book of Genesis

The Book of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek "", meaning "Origin"; בְּרֵאשִׁית, "Bərēšīṯ", "In beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh) and the Old Testament.

New!!: Chronology and Book of Genesis · See more »

Calendar

A calendar is a system of organizing days for social, religious, commercial or administrative purposes.

New!!: Chronology and Calendar · See more »

Calibration

Calibration in measurement technology and metrology is the comparison of measurement values delivered by a device under test with those of a calibration standard of known accuracy.

New!!: Chronology and Calibration · See more »

Carbon

Carbon (from carbo "coal") is a chemical element with symbol C and atomic number 6.

New!!: Chronology and Carbon · See more »

Carbon-14

Carbon-14, 14C, or radiocarbon, is a radioactive isotope of carbon with an atomic nucleus containing 6 protons and 8 neutrons.

New!!: Chronology and Carbon-14 · See more »

Christian

A Christian is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.

New!!: Chronology and Christian · See more »

Chronicle

A chronicle (chronica, from Greek χρονικά, from χρόνος, chronos, "time") is a historical account of facts and events ranged in chronological order, as in a time line.

New!!: Chronology and Chronicle · See more »

Chronicon (Eusebius)

The Chronicon or Chronicle (Greek: Παντοδαπὴ ἱστορία Pantodape historia, "Universal history") was a work in two books by Eusebius of Caesarea.

New!!: Chronology and Chronicon (Eusebius) · See more »

Chronological dating

Chronological dating, or simply dating, is the process of attributing to an object or event a date in the past, allowing such object or event to be located in a previously established chronology.

New!!: Chronology and Chronological dating · See more »

Chronometry

Chronometry (from Greek χρόνος chronos, "time" and μέτρον metron, "measure") is the science of the measurement of time, or timekeeping.

New!!: Chronology and Chronometry · See more »

Consul

Consul (abbrev. cos.; Latin plural consules) was the title of one of the chief magistrates of the Roman Republic, and subsequently a somewhat significant title under the Roman Empire.

New!!: Chronology and Consul · See more »

Correlation and dependence

In statistics, dependence or association is any statistical relationship, whether causal or not, between two random variables or bivariate data.

New!!: Chronology and Correlation and dependence · See more »

Dendrochronology

Dendrochronology (or tree-ring dating) is the scientific method of dating tree rings (also called growth rings) to the exact year they were formed in order to analyze atmospheric conditions during different periods in history.

New!!: Chronology and Dendrochronology · See more »

Dionysius Exiguus

Dionysius Exiguus (Latin for "Dionysius the Humble"; –) was a 6th-century monk born in Scythia Minor (probably modern Dobruja, in Romania and Bulgaria).

New!!: Chronology and Dionysius Exiguus · See more »

Dionysius Exiguus' Easter table

Dionysius Exiguus's Easter table was constructed in the year 525 by Dionysius Exiguus for the years 532–626.

New!!: Chronology and Dionysius Exiguus' Easter table · See more »

Earth science

Earth science or geoscience is a widely embraced term for the fields of natural science related to the planet Earth.

New!!: Chronology and Earth science · See more »

Easter

Easter,Traditional names for the feast in English are "Easter Day", as in the Book of Common Prayer, "Easter Sunday", used by James Ussher and Samuel Pepys and plain "Easter", as in books printed in,, also called Pascha (Greek, Latin) or Resurrection Sunday, is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, described in the New Testament as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary 30 AD.

New!!: Chronology and Easter · See more »

Ecclesiastical full moon

An ecclesiastical full moon is formally the 14th day of the ecclesiastical lunar month (an ecclesiastical moon) in an ecclesiastical lunar calendar.

New!!: Chronology and Ecclesiastical full moon · See more »

Eclipse of Thales

The Eclipse of Thales was a solar eclipse that was, according to The Histories of Herodotus, accurately predicted by the Greek philosopher Thales of Miletus.

New!!: Chronology and Eclipse of Thales · See more »

Egyptology

Egyptology (from Egypt and Greek -λογία, -logia. علم المصريات) is the study of ancient Egyptian history, language, literature, religion, architecture and art from the 5th millennium BC until the end of its native religious practices in the 4th century AD.

New!!: Chronology and Egyptology · See more »

Epoch (reference date)

In the fields of chronology and periodization, an epoch is an instant in time chosen as the origin of a particular era.

New!!: Chronology and Epoch (reference date) · See more »

Era

An era is a span of time defined for the purposes of chronology or historiography, as in the regnal eras in the history of a given monarchy, a calendar era used for a given calendar, or the geological eras defined for the history of Earth.

New!!: Chronology and Era · See more »

Evidence

Evidence, broadly construed, is anything presented in support of an assertion.

New!!: Chronology and Evidence · See more »

Flashback (narrative)

A flashback (sometimes called an analepsis) is an interjected scene that takes the narrative back in time from the current point in the story.

New!!: Chronology and Flashback (narrative) · See more »

Flashforward

A flashforward (also spelled flash-forward; also called a prolepsis) is a scene that temporarily takes the narrative forward in time from the current point of the story in literature, film, television and other media.

New!!: Chronology and Flashforward · See more »

Flinders Petrie

Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie, FRS, FBA (3 June 1853 – 28 July 1942), commonly known as Flinders Petrie, was an English Egyptologist and a pioneer of systematic methodology in archaeology and preservation of artifacts.

New!!: Chronology and Flinders Petrie · See more »

Founding of Rome

The founding of Rome can be investigated through archaeology, but traditional stories handed down by the ancient Romans themselves explain the earliest history of their city in terms of legend and myth.

New!!: Chronology and Founding of Rome · See more »

French Revolution

The French Revolution (Révolution française) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799.

New!!: Chronology and French Revolution · See more »

Geologic time scale

The geologic time scale (GTS) is a system of chronological dating that relates geological strata (stratigraphy) to time.

New!!: Chronology and Geologic time scale · See more »

Geology

Geology (from the Ancient Greek γῆ, gē, i.e. "earth" and -λoγία, -logia, i.e. "study of, discourse") is an earth science concerned with the solid Earth, the rocks of which it is composed, and the processes by which they change over time.

New!!: Chronology and Geology · See more »

George Syncellus

George Synkellos or Syncellus (Γεώργιος Σύγκελλος; died after 810) was a Byzantine chronicler and ecclesiastic.

New!!: Chronology and George Syncellus · See more »

H. James Birx

Born June 1, 1941 in Canandaigua, New York, H. (Harry) James Birx is an American anthropologist.

New!!: Chronology and H. James Birx · See more »

Herodotus

Herodotus (Ἡρόδοτος, Hêródotos) was a Greek historian who was born in Halicarnassus in the Persian Empire (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey) and lived in the fifth century BC (484– 425 BC), a contemporary of Thucydides, Socrates, and Euripides.

New!!: Chronology and Herodotus · See more »

Historiography

Historiography is the study of the methods of historians in developing history as an academic discipline, and by extension is any body of historical work on a particular subject.

New!!: Chronology and Historiography · See more »

History

History (from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation") is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.

New!!: Chronology and History · See more »

History of Earth

The history of Earth concerns the development of planet Earth from its formation to the present day.

New!!: Chronology and History of Earth · See more »

Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is a San Francisco–based nonprofit digital library with the stated mission of "universal access to all knowledge." It provides free public access to collections of digitized materials, including websites, software applications/games, music, movies/videos, moving images, and nearly three million public-domain books.

New!!: Chronology and Internet Archive · See more »

Isotope

Isotopes are variants of a particular chemical element which differ in neutron number.

New!!: Chronology and Isotope · See more »

Jacques Cassini

Jacques Cassini (18 February 1677 – 16 April 1756) was a French astronomer, son of the famous Italian astronomer Giovanni Domenico Cassini.

New!!: Chronology and Jacques Cassini · See more »

Joseph Justus Scaliger

Joseph Justus Scaliger (5 August 1540 – 21 January 1609) was a French religious leader and scholar, known for expanding the notion of classical history from Greek and ancient Roman history to include Persian, Babylonian, Jewish and ancient Egyptian history.

New!!: Chronology and Joseph Justus Scaliger · See more »

Julian day

Julian day is the continuous count of days since the beginning of the Julian Period and is used primarily by astronomers.

New!!: Chronology and Julian day · See more »

Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

New!!: Chronology and Latin · See more »

Leap year

A leap year (also known as an intercalary year or bissextile year) is a calendar year containing one additional day (or, in the case of lunisolar calendars, a month) added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year.

New!!: Chronology and Leap year · See more »

List of timelines

This is a list of timelines currently on Wikipedia.

New!!: Chronology and List of timelines · See more »

Lunar phase

The lunar phase or phase of the Moon is the shape of the directly sunlit portion of the Moon as viewed from Earth.

New!!: Chronology and Lunar phase · See more »

Millennium

A millennium (plural millennia or, rarely, millenniums) is a period equal to 1000 years, also called kiloyears.

New!!: Chronology and Millennium · See more »

Neolithic

The Neolithic was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of Western Asia, and later in other parts of the world and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC.

New!!: Chronology and Neolithic · See more »

Orosius

Paulus Orosius (born 375, died after 418 AD) — less often Paul Orosius in English — was a Gallaecian Chalcedonian priest, historian and theologian, a student of Augustine of Hippo.

New!!: Chronology and Orosius · See more »

Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

New!!: Chronology and Oxford University Press · See more »

Paleontology

Paleontology or palaeontology is the scientific study of life that existed prior to, and sometimes including, the start of the Holocene Epoch (roughly 11,700 years before present).

New!!: Chronology and Paleontology · See more »

Periodization

Periodization is the process or study of categorizing the past into discrete, quantified named blocks of timeAdam Rabinowitz.

New!!: Chronology and Periodization · See more »

Philippe de La Hire

Philippe de La Hire (or Lahire, La Hyre or Phillipe de La Hire) (18 March 1640 – 21 April 1718) Benezit Dictionary of Artists.

New!!: Chronology and Philippe de La Hire · See more »

Pope Boniface IV

Pope Boniface IV (Bonifatius IV; d. 8 May 615) was Pope from 25 September 608 to his death in 615.

New!!: Chronology and Pope Boniface IV · See more »

Prabuddha Bharata

Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India is an English-language monthly journal of the Ramakrishna Order, in publication since July 1896.

New!!: Chronology and Prabuddha Bharata · See more »

Radiocarbon dating

Radiocarbon dating (also referred to as carbon dating or carbon-14 dating) is a method for determining the age of an object containing organic material by using the properties of radiocarbon, a radioactive isotope of carbon.

New!!: Chronology and Radiocarbon dating · See more »

Recorded history

Recorded history or written history is a historical narrative based on a written record or other documented communication.

New!!: Chronology and Recorded history · See more »

Reverse chronology

Reverse chronology is a method of story-telling whereby the plot is revealed in reverse order.

New!!: Chronology and Reverse chronology · See more »

Rome

Rome (Roma; Roma) is the capital city of Italy and a special comune (named Comune di Roma Capitale).

New!!: Chronology and Rome · See more »

Science

R. P. Feynman, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol.1, Chaps.1,2,&3.

New!!: Chronology and Science · See more »

Seriation (archaeology)

In archaeology, seriation is a relative dating method in which assemblages or artifacts from numerous sites, in the same culture, are placed in chronological order.

New!!: Chronology and Seriation (archaeology) · See more »

Solar cycle (calendar)

The solar cycle is a 28-year cycle of the Julian calendar with respect to the week.

New!!: Chronology and Solar cycle (calendar) · See more »

Time

Time is the indefinite continued progress of existence and events that occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future.

New!!: Chronology and Time · See more »

Timeline

A timeline is a display of a list of events in chronological order.

New!!: Chronology and Timeline · See more »

Timelines of world history

;Prehistory.

New!!: Chronology and Timelines of world history · See more »

Torah

Torah (תּוֹרָה, "Instruction", "Teaching" or "Law") has a range of meanings.

New!!: Chronology and Torah · See more »

University of Sheffield

The University of Sheffield (informally Sheffield University) is a public research university in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England.

New!!: Chronology and University of Sheffield · See more »

Writing system

A writing system is any conventional method of visually representing verbal communication.

New!!: Chronology and Writing system · See more »

Redirects here:

Chronography, Chronologer, Chronological, Chronological Order, Chronological order, Chronologically, Chronologies, Chronologist, Chronology, General, Cronology, General Chronology.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronology

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »