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Chu (state)

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Chu (Old Chinese: *s-r̥aʔ) was a hegemonic, Zhou dynasty era state. [1]

265 relations: Ahom language, Ancestor veneration in China, Ancient Chinese coinage, Ancient Chinese states, Anhui, Anlu, Asterism (astronomy), Austroasiatic languages, Ba (state), Bai Qi, Baiyue, Baofeng County, Battle of Bi, Battle of Boju, Battle of Changping, Battle of Chengpu, Battle of Julu, Bird-worm seal script, Black Tortoise, Caesarean section, Cai (state), Chen (state), Chen Sheng, Chinese astronomy, Chinese bronze inscriptions, Chinese dragon, Chinese folk religion, Chinese kin, Chinese nobility, Chinese ritual bronzes, Chinese surname, Cho-yun Hsu, Chongqing, Chu Ci, Chu Silk Manuscript, Chu–Han Contention, Confucianism, Corvée, Dabie Mountains, Dan River (Shaanxi), Danfeng County, Danyang (Chu), Dao (state), Dazexiang uprising, Deng (state), Dou Yuejiao, Dragon Boat Festival, Du'ao, Duke Xi of Lu, E (state), ..., Emperor Gaozu of Han, Emperor Ku, Emperor Wu of Han, Emperor Yi of Chu, Epsilon Ophiuchi, Ezhou, Fenghuang, Fengjian, Fenmao, Five Hegemons, Four Lords of the Warring States, Four Symbols (China), Fuchai, Fuchu, Funerary art, G55 Erenhot–Guangzhou Expressway, Girl (Chinese constellation), Gongyang Zhuan, Goujian, Grand chancellor (China), Great Wall of China, Guizhou, Guodian Chu Slips, Guoyu (book), Guqin, Han (state), Han Chinese, Han dynasty, Han River (Hubei), Hangu Pass, Heavenly Market enclosure, Henan, Heqin, Hmong–Mien languages, Huai River, Huaiyang County, Huang (state), Huanggang, Hubei, Hunan, Interstate relations during the Spring and Autumn period, James Legge, Jia'ao, Jianghan Plain, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Jianli County, Jilian, Jin (Chinese state), Jing Ju, Jing Mountains, Jingzhou, Ju (state), Kam language, King Ai of Chu, King Cheng of Chu, King Cheng of Zhou, King Dao of Chu, King Gong of Chu, King Huai of Chu, King Hui of Chu, King Huiwen of Qin, King Jian of Chu, King Kang of Chu, King Kaolie of Chu, King Ling of Chu, King Mu of Chu, King Mu of Zhou, King Ping of Chu, King Qingxiang of Chu, King Sheng of Chu, King Su of Chu, King Wei of Chu, King Wen of Chu, King Wen of Zhou, King Wu of Chu, King Xuan of Chu, King You of Chu, King Zhao of Chu, King Zhao of Zhou, King Zhuang of Chu, Kra languages, Kra–Dai languages, Kuaiji Commandery, Lacquer, Lao language, Legalism (Chinese philosophy), Li Xin (Qin), Liao (Zhou dynasty state), Linquan County, List of castles in China, Lord Changping, Lord Chunshen, Lu (state), Macheng, Mandate of Heaven, Marc Miyake, Mawangdui, Mi (surname), Middle Chinese, Mulam language, North China Plain, Old Chinese, Old Chinese phonology, Pan Geng, Phi Capricorni, Pi (state), Pingyu County, Prime minister (Chu State), Qi (Henan), Qi (state), Qichun County, Qin (state), Qin Shi Huang, Qu Yuan, Quan (state), Records of the Grand Historian, Regular script, Ruo (state), Ruo'ao, School of Diplomacy, Se (instrument), Seal script, Shaanxi, Shang dynasty, Shang Yang, Shanghai, Shen (state), Shishou, Shou County, Shu (state), Shuihudi Qin bamboo texts, Sichuan Basin, Sima Qian, Snakes in Chinese mythology, Song (state), Spring and Autumn period, Sui (state), Sui language, Suizhou, Tai languages, Taoism, Temple name, Then language, Tomb of Marquis Yi of Zeng, Tsinghua Bamboo Slips, Twenty-Eight Mansions, Wang Jian (Qin), Warring States period, Wei (state), Wey (state), Wu (region), Wu (shaman), Wu (state), Wu Pass, Wu Qi, Wulipu, Wuyue, Wuzi, Xi (state), Xi River, Xia dynasty, Xiang Liang, Xiang Yu, Xiao'ao, Xichuan County, Xiong (surname), Xiong Ai, Xiong Dan, Xiong E, Xiong Kang, Xiong Kuang, Xiong Li, Xiong Qu, Xiong Sheng, Xiong Shuang, Xiong Xun, Xiong Yan (elder), Xiong Yan (younger), Xiong Yang, Xiong Yi, Xiong Yong, Xiong Zhi, Xiongnu, Xu (state), Xuzhou, Yan (state), Yang Kuan, Yangtze, Yanling County, Henan, Yellow Emperor, Yellow River, Ying (Chu), Yingbo, Yue (state), Yunyang District, Yuxiong, Zhan Guo Ce, Zhang Yi (Warring States period), Zhao (state), Zhejiang, Zheng (state), Zheng Mao, Zhijiang, Hubei, Zhongshan (state), Zhongyuan, Zhou dynasty, Zhou–Chu War, Zhuanxu, Zhurong, Zi'ao, Zou (state), Zuo zhuan, 24 Capricorni, 590s BC. Expand index (215 more) »

Ahom language

The Ahom language is a nearly extinct Tai language spoken by the Ahom people who ruled the Brahmaputra river valley in the present day Indian state of Assam between the 13th and the 18th centuries.

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Ancestor veneration in China

Chinese ancestor worship, or Chinese ancestor veneration, also called the Chinese patriarchal religion, is an aspect of the Chinese traditional religion which revolves around the ritual celebration of the deified ancestors and tutelary deities of people with the same surname organised into lineage societies in ancestral shrines.

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Ancient Chinese coinage

Ancient Chinese coinage includes some of the earliest known coins.

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Ancient Chinese states

Ancient Chinese States were typified by variously sized city states and territories that existed in China prior to its unification by Qin Shi Huang in 221 BCE.

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Anhui

Anhui is a province of the People's Republic of China located in the eastern region of the country.

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Anlu

Anlu is a county-level city in east-central Hubei province, China.

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Asterism (astronomy)

In observational astronomy, an asterism is a popular known pattern or group of stars that are recognised in the night sky.

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Austroasiatic languages

The Austroasiatic languages, formerly known as Mon–Khmer, are a large language family of Mainland Southeast Asia, also scattered throughout India, Bangladesh, Nepal and the southern border of China, with around 117 million speakers.

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Ba (state)

Ba was an ancient state in eastern Sichuan, China.

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Bai Qi

Bai Qi (died 257 BC), also known as Bo Qi, was a military general of the Qin state in the Warring States period of China.

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Baiyue

The Baiyue, Hundred Yue or Yue were various indigenous peoples of mostly non-Chinese ethnicity who inhabited the region stretching along the coastal area from Shandong to the Yangtze basin, and as far to west as the present-day Sichuan province between the first millennium BC and the first millennium AD.

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Baofeng County

Baofeng County is a county in Pingdingshan, Henan Province, China.

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Battle of Bi

The Battle of Bi was fought during the Spring and Autumn period in 597 BC, between the major states of Chǔ and Jìn.

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Battle of Boju

The Battle of Boju was the decisive battle of the war fought in 506 BC between Wu and Chu, two major kingdoms during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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Battle of Changping

The Battle of Changping (長平之戰) was a military campaign that took place during the Warring States period in ancient China.

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Battle of Chengpu

The Battle of Chengpu took place in 632 BC between the State of Jin and the State of Chu and its allies during the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history.

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Battle of Julu

The Battle of Julu was fought in Julu (in present-day Pingxiang County, Xingtai, Hebei, China) in 207 BC primarily between forces of the Qin dynasty and the insurgent state of Chu.

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Bird-worm seal script

Bird-worm seal script is a type of ancient seal script originating in China.

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Black Tortoise

The Black Tortoise or Black Turtle is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations.

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Caesarean section

Caesarean section, also known as C-section or caesarean delivery, is the use of surgery to deliver one or more babies.

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Cai (state)

Cài (Old Chinese: *s.r̥ˁat-s) was an ancient Chinese state established at the beginning of the Zhou dynasty, rising to prominence during the Spring and Autumn period, and destroyed early in the Warring States period.

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Chen (state)

Chen (陳) was a Zhou dynasty vassal state of ancient China.

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Chen Sheng

Chen Sheng (died 208 BC), also known as Chen She, was the leader of the Dazexiang Uprising, the first rebellion against the Qin Dynasty.

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Chinese astronomy

Astronomy in China has a long history, beginning from the Shang Dynasty (Chinese Bronze Age).

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Chinese bronze inscriptions

Chinese bronze inscriptions, also commonly referred to as Bronze script or Bronzeware script, are writing in a variety of Chinese scripts on Chinese ritual bronzes such as zhōng bells and dǐng tripodal cauldrons from the Shang dynasty to the Zhou dynasty and even later.

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Chinese dragon

Chinese dragons or East Asian dragons are legendary creatures in Chinese mythology, Chinese folklore, and East Asian culture at large.

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Chinese folk religion

Chinese folk religion (Chinese popular religion) or Han folk religion is the religious tradition of the Han people, including veneration of forces of nature and ancestors, exorcism of harmful forces, and a belief in the rational order of nature which can be influenced by human beings and their rulers as well as spirits and gods.

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Chinese kin

A Chinese kin, lineage or sometimes rendered as clan, is a patrilineal and patrilocal group of related Chinese people with a common surname sharing a common ancestor and, in many cases, an ancestral home.

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Chinese nobility

Chinese sovereignty and peerage, the nobility of China, was an important feature of the traditional social and political organization of Imperial China.

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Chinese ritual bronzes

Sets of ritual bronzes (in chinese: 中国青铜器) are the most impressive surviving objects from the Chinese Bronze Age.

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Chinese surname

Chinese surnames are used by Han Chinese and Sinicized ethnic groups in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, Brunei, Taiwan, Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam and among overseas Chinese communities.

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Cho-yun Hsu

Cho-yun Hsu (born July 10, 1930) is a Chinese American historian.

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Chongqing

Chongqing, formerly romanized as Chungking, is a major city in southwest China.

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Chu Ci

The Chu Ci, variously translated as Verses of Chu or Songs of Chu, is an anthology of Chinese poetry traditionally attributed mainly to Qu Yuan and Song Yu from the Warring States period (ended 221 BC), though about half of the poems seem to have been composed several centuries later, during the Han dynasty.

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Chu Silk Manuscript

The Chu Silk Manuscript, also known as the Chu Silk Manuscript from Zidanku in Changsha, is a Chinese astrological and astronomical text.

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Chu–Han Contention

The Chu–Han Contention (206–202 BC) was an interregnum between the Qin dynasty and the Han dynasty in Chinese history.

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Confucianism

Confucianism, also known as Ruism, is described as tradition, a philosophy, a religion, a humanistic or rationalistic religion, a way of governing, or simply a way of life.

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Corvée

Corvée is a form of unpaid, unfree labour, which is intermittent in nature and which lasts limited periods of time: typically only a certain number of days' work each year.

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Dabie Mountains

The Dabie Mountains are a major mountain range located in central China.

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Dan River (Shaanxi)

The Dan River, formerly known as the Dan Shui (丹水) or 800 ''Li'' Black River (八百里黑江), is a river located in Shaanxi province in the People's Republic of China.

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Danfeng County

Danfeng County is a county of Shangluo, Shaanxi, China, has an area of and a population of 300,000 as of 2004.

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Danyang (Chu)

Danyang was the first capital of the State of Chu.

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Dao (state)

Dao was a Chinese vassal state during the Zhou Dynasty (1046 – 221 BCE) located in the southern part of Runan County, Henan.

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Dazexiang uprising

The Dazexiang uprising (July 209 B.C. - December 209 B.C.), also known as the Uprising of Chen Sheng and Wu Guang, was the first uprising against Qin rule following the death of Qin Shi Huang.

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Deng (state)

The State of Deng was a Chinese vassal state during the Shang and Zhou Dynasties and the Spring and Autumn period (c. 1200 – 475 BCE) ruled by the Màn family (曼).

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Dou Yuejiao

Dou Yuejiao, ancestral name Mi, clan name Ruo'ao, was a Chu politician and aristocrat during 7th century BCE.

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Dragon Boat Festival

The Duanwu Festival, also often known as the Dragon Boat Festival, is a traditional holiday originating in China, occurring near the summer solstice.

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Du'ao

Du'ao (died 672 BC), also called Zhuang'ao, was from 676 to 672 BC king of the state of Chu during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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Duke Xi of Lu

Duke Xi of Lu was the ruler of Lu from 659 BC to 627 BC in Spring and Autumn period.

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E (state)

The State of E (IPA:/ɤ̂/), whose Middle and Old Chinese name has been reconstructed as Ngak (IPA:/ŋˤak/), was an ancient Chinese state in the area of present-day Henan and Hubei in China from around the 12th century BCE until its overthrow in 863 BCE.

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Emperor Gaozu of Han

Emperor Gaozu of Han (256 BC – 1 June 195 BC), born Liu Bang (刘邦), was the founder and first emperor of the Han dynasty, reigning from 202 – 195 BC.

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Emperor Ku

Kù, usually referred to as Dì Kù, also known as Gaoxin or Gāoxīn Shì, was (according to many versions of the list) one of the Five Emperors of the Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors of Chinese mythology: some sources treat Ku as a semi-historical figure, while others make fantastic mythological or religious claims about him.

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Emperor Wu of Han

Emperor Wu of Han (30 July 157BC29 March 87BC), born Liu Che, courtesy name Tong, was the seventh emperor of the Han dynasty of China, ruling from 141–87 BC.

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Emperor Yi of Chu

Emperor Yi of Chu (died 206 BC), also known as King Huai II of Chu, personal name Xiong Xin, was the ruler of the Chu state in the late Qin dynasty.

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Epsilon Ophiuchi

Epsilon Ophiuchi (ε Ophiuchi, abbreviated Epsilon Oph, ε Oph), also named Yed Posterior, is a red giant star in the constellation of Ophiuchus.

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Ezhou

Ezhou is a prefecture-level city in eastern Hubei Province, China.

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Fenghuang

Fenghuang are mythological birds of East Asia that reign over all other birds.

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Fengjian

Fēngjiàn (封建) was a political ideology during the later part of the Zhou dynasty of ancient China, its social structure forming a decentralized system of government based on four occupations, or "four categories of the people." The Zhou kings enfeoffed their fellow warriors and relatives, creating large domains of land.

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Fenmao

Fenmao (died 741 BC) was from 757 to 741 BC the monarch of the state of Chu during the early Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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Five Hegemons

The Five Hegemons refers to several especially powerful rulers of Chinese states of the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history (770 to 476 BCE), sometimes alternatively referred to as the "Age of Hegemons".

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Four Lords of the Warring States

The Four Lords of the Warring States were four powerful aristocrats of the late Warring States period of Chinese history who exerted a strong influence on the politics of their respective states in the third century BCE.

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Four Symbols (China)

The Four Symbols (literally meaning "four images") are four mythological creatures in the Chinese constellations.

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Fuchai

Fuchai (reigned 495–473), sometimes also written Fucha, was the last king of the state of Wu during the Spring and Autumn Period of Chinese history.

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Fuchu

Fuchu, full name Xiong Fuchu, was from 227 to 223 BC the last king of the state of Chu during the late Warring States period of ancient China.

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Funerary art

Funerary art is any work of art forming, or placed in, a repository for the remains of the dead.

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G55 Erenhot–Guangzhou Expressway

The Erenhot–Guangzhou Expressway, commonly referred to as the Erguang Expressway is an expressway that connects the cities of Erenhot, Inner Mongolia, China, and Guangzhou, Guangdong.

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Girl (Chinese constellation)

The Girl mansion (女宿, pinyin: Nǚ Xiù) is one of the Twenty-eight mansions of the Chinese constellations.

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Gongyang Zhuan

The Gōngyáng Zhuàn (pronounced) is a commentary on Chunqiu, or the Spring and Autumn Annals, and is thus one of the classic books of ancient Chinese.

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Goujian

Goujian (reigned 496–465 BC) was the king of the Kingdom of Yue (present-day northern Zhejiang) near the end of the Spring and Autumn period.

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Grand chancellor (China)

The grand chancellor, also translated as counselor-in-chief, chancellor, chief councillor, chief minister, imperial chancellor, lieutenant chancellor and prime minister, was the highest-ranking executive official in the imperial Chinese government.

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Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China is a series of fortifications made of stone, brick, tamped earth, wood, and other materials, generally built along an east-to-west line across the historical northern borders of China to protect the Chinese states and empires against the raids and invasions of the various nomadic groups of the Eurasian Steppe with an eye to expansion.

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Guizhou

Guizhou, formerly romanized as Kweichow, is a province of the People's Republic of China located in the southwestern part of the country.

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Guodian Chu Slips

The Guodian Chu Slips were unearthed in 1993 in Tomb no.

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Guoyu (book)

The Guoyu, usually translated Discourses of the States, is an ancient Chinese text that consists of a collection of speeches attributed to rulers and other men from the Spring and Autumn period (771–476).

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Guqin

The guqin is a plucked seven-string Chinese musical instrument of the zither family.

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Han (state)

Han (Old Chinese: &#42) was an ancient Chinese state during the Warring States period of ancient China, located in modern-day Shanxi and Henan.

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Han Chinese

The Han Chinese,.

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Han dynasty

The Han dynasty was the second imperial dynasty of China (206 BC–220 AD), preceded by the Qin dynasty (221–206 BC) and succeeded by the Three Kingdoms period (220–280 AD). Spanning over four centuries, the Han period is considered a golden age in Chinese history. To this day, China's majority ethnic group refers to themselves as the "Han Chinese" and the Chinese script is referred to as "Han characters". It was founded by the rebel leader Liu Bang, known posthumously as Emperor Gaozu of Han, and briefly interrupted by the Xin dynasty (9–23 AD) of the former regent Wang Mang. This interregnum separates the Han dynasty into two periods: the Western Han or Former Han (206 BC–9 AD) and the Eastern Han or Later Han (25–220 AD). The emperor was at the pinnacle of Han society. He presided over the Han government but shared power with both the nobility and appointed ministers who came largely from the scholarly gentry class. The Han Empire was divided into areas directly controlled by the central government using an innovation inherited from the Qin known as commanderies, and a number of semi-autonomous kingdoms. These kingdoms gradually lost all vestiges of their independence, particularly following the Rebellion of the Seven States. From the reign of Emperor Wu (r. 141–87 BC) onward, the Chinese court officially sponsored Confucianism in education and court politics, synthesized with the cosmology of later scholars such as Dong Zhongshu. This policy endured until the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1911 AD. The Han dynasty saw an age of economic prosperity and witnessed a significant growth of the money economy first established during the Zhou dynasty (c. 1050–256 BC). The coinage issued by the central government mint in 119 BC remained the standard coinage of China until the Tang dynasty (618–907 AD). The period saw a number of limited institutional innovations. To finance its military campaigns and the settlement of newly conquered frontier territories, the Han government nationalized the private salt and iron industries in 117 BC, but these government monopolies were repealed during the Eastern Han dynasty. Science and technology during the Han period saw significant advances, including the process of papermaking, the nautical steering ship rudder, the use of negative numbers in mathematics, the raised-relief map, the hydraulic-powered armillary sphere for astronomy, and a seismometer for measuring earthquakes employing an inverted pendulum. The Xiongnu, a nomadic steppe confederation, defeated the Han in 200 BC and forced the Han to submit as a de facto inferior partner, but continued their raids on the Han borders. Emperor Wu launched several military campaigns against them. The ultimate Han victory in these wars eventually forced the Xiongnu to accept vassal status as Han tributaries. These campaigns expanded Han sovereignty into the Tarim Basin of Central Asia, divided the Xiongnu into two separate confederations, and helped establish the vast trade network known as the Silk Road, which reached as far as the Mediterranean world. The territories north of Han's borders were quickly overrun by the nomadic Xianbei confederation. Emperor Wu also launched successful military expeditions in the south, annexing Nanyue in 111 BC and Dian in 109 BC, and in the Korean Peninsula where the Xuantu and Lelang Commanderies were established in 108 BC. After 92 AD, the palace eunuchs increasingly involved themselves in court politics, engaging in violent power struggles between the various consort clans of the empresses and empresses dowager, causing the Han's ultimate downfall. Imperial authority was also seriously challenged by large Daoist religious societies which instigated the Yellow Turban Rebellion and the Five Pecks of Rice Rebellion. Following the death of Emperor Ling (r. 168–189 AD), the palace eunuchs suffered wholesale massacre by military officers, allowing members of the aristocracy and military governors to become warlords and divide the empire. When Cao Pi, King of Wei, usurped the throne from Emperor Xian, the Han dynasty would eventually collapse and ceased to exist.

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Han River (Hubei)

The Han River, also known by its Chinese names Hanshui and Han Jiang, is a left tributary of the Yangtze in central China.

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Hangu Pass

Hangu Pass or Hanguguan is a pass separating the upper Yellow River and Wei valleys—the cradle of Chinese civilization and seat of its longtime capital Xi'an—from the fertile North China Plain.

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Heavenly Market enclosure

The Heavenly Market Enclosure (天市垣, Tian Shi Yuan), is one of the San Yuan or Three enclosures.

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Henan

Henan is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the central part of the country.

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Heqin

Heqin, also known as marriage alliance, refers to the historical practice of Chinese emperors marrying princesses—usually members of minor branches of the royal family—to rulers of neighboring states.

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Hmong–Mien languages

The Hmong–Mien (also known as Miao–Yao) languages are a highly tonal language family of southern China and northern Southeast Asia.

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Huai River

The Huai River, formerly romanized as the Hwai, is a major river in China.

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Huaiyang County

Huaiyang County is a county in the prefecture-level city of Zhoukou in the east of Henan province, People's Republic of China.

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Huang (state)

Huang was a vassal state that existed during the Zhou dynasty until the middle Spring and Autumn period.

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Huanggang

Huanggang is a prefecture-level city in eastern Hubei Province, China.

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Hubei

Hubei is a province of the People's Republic of China, located in the Central China region.

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Hunan

Hunan is the 7th most populous province of China and the 10th most extensive by area.

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Interstate relations during the Spring and Autumn period

Certain patterns emerged to govern the conduct of relations among the states of the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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James Legge

James Legge (20 December 181529 November 1897) was a Scottish sinologist, missionary, and scholar, best known as an early and prolific translator of Classical Chinese texts into English.

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Jia'ao

Jia'ao (died 541 BC) was from 544 to 541 BC the king of Chu, a major power during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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Jianghan Plain

Jianghan Plain, named for the confluence of the Yangtze ('Jiang') and Han ('han') rivers, is an alluvial plain located in the middle and south of Hubei, China.

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Jiangsu

Jiangsu, formerly romanized as Kiangsu, is an eastern-central coastal province of the People's Republic of China.

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Jiangxi

Jiangxi, formerly spelled as Kiangsi Gan: Kongsi) is a province in the People's Republic of China, located in the southeast of the country. Spanning from the banks of the Yangtze river in the north into hillier areas in the south and east, it shares a border with Anhui to the north, Zhejiang to the northeast, Fujian to the east, Guangdong to the south, Hunan to the west, and Hubei to the northwest. The name "Jiangxi" derives from the circuit administrated under the Tang dynasty in 733, Jiangnanxidao (道, Circuit of Western Jiangnan; Gan: Kongnomsitau). The short name for Jiangxi is 赣 (pinyin: Gàn; Gan: Gōm), for the Gan River which runs across from the south to the north and flows into the Yangtze River. Jiangxi is also alternately called Ganpo Dadi (贛鄱大地) which literally means the "Great Land of Gan and Po".

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Jianli County

Jianli County is a county of southern Hubei Province, China, located on the northern (left) bank of the Yangtze River and bordering Hunan Province to the south.

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Jilian

Jilian was the first recorded ruler of the ancient Chinese state that was later known as Chu.

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Jin (Chinese state)

Jin (Old Chinese: &#42), originally known as Tang (唐), was a major state during the middle part of the Zhou dynasty, based near the centre of what was then China, on the lands attributed to the legendary Xia dynasty: the southern part of modern Shanxi.

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Jing Ju

Jing Ju (died 208 BC) was one of the leaders during the Dazexiang Uprising against the Qin Dynasty.

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Jing Mountains

The Jingshan or Jing Mountains are a chain of mountains in the western part of Nanzhang County, Hubei Province, People’s Republic of China.

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Jingzhou

Jingzhou is a prefecture-level city in southern Hubei, China, located on the banks of the Yangtze River.

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Ju (state)

Ju was an Dongyi state in modern Shandong province during the Zhou dynasty (1046–256 BCE) of ancient China.

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Kam language

The Kam language, also known as Gam (autonym: lix Gaeml), or in Chinese, Dong or Tung-Chia, is a Kam–Sui language spoken by the Dong people.

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King Ai of Chu

King Ai of Chu (died 228 BC), born Xiong You, was a king of Chu during the late Warring States period of ancient China.

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King Cheng of Chu

King Cheng of Chu (died 626 BC) was from 671 to 626 BC king of the state of Chu during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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King Cheng of Zhou

King Cheng of Zhou or King Ch'eng of Chou was the second king of the Chinese Zhou Dynasty.

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King Dao of Chu

King Dao of Chu (died 381 BC) was the king of the state of Chu from 401 BC to 381 BC during the early Warring States period of ancient China.

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King Gong of Chu

King Gong of Chu (600–560 BC) was from 590 to 560 BC the king of Chu, a major power during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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King Huai of Chu

King Huai of Chu (died 296 BC) was from 328 to 299 BC the king of the state of Chu during the Warring States period of ancient China.

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King Hui of Chu

King Hui of Chu (died 432 BC) was the king of the State of Chu from 488 BC to 432 BC during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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King Huiwen of Qin

King Huiwen of Qin, also known as Lord Huiwen of Qin or King Hui of Qin, given name Si (駟), was the ruler of the Qin state from 338 to 311 BC during the Warring States period of Chinese history and likely an ancestor of Emperor Qin Shi Huang.

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King Jian of Chu

King Jian of Chu (died 408 BC) was from 431 to 408 BC the king of the state of Chu during the transition from the Spring and Autumn period to the Warring States period.

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King Kang of Chu

King Kang of Chu (died 545 BC) was from 559 to 545 BC the king of Chu, a major power during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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King Kaolie of Chu

King Kaolie of Chu (died 238 BC) was from 262 to 238 BC the king of the state of Chu during the late Warring States period of ancient China.

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King Ling of Chu

King Ling of Chu was king of the State of Chu between 540 and 529 BC.

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King Mu of Chu

King Mu of Chu (died 614 BC) was from 625 to 614 BC king of the state of Chu during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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King Mu of Zhou

King Mu of Zhou was the fifth king of the Zhou dynasty of China.

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King Ping of Chu

King Píng of Chu (died 516 BC).

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King Qingxiang of Chu

King Qingxiang of Chu (died 263 BC) was from 298 to 263 BC the king of the state of Chu during the Warring States period of ancient China.

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King Sheng of Chu

King Sheng of Chu (died 402 BC) was the king of the state of Chu from 407 BC to 402 BC during the early Warring States period of ancient China.

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King Su of Chu

King Su of Chu (died 370 BC) was from 380 to 370 BC the king of the state of Chu during the Warring States period of ancient China.

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King Wei of Chu

King Wei of Chu (died 329 BC) was the king of the state of Chu from 339 to 329 BC, during the Warring States period of ancient China.

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King Wen of Chu

King Wen of Chu (died 677 BC) was from 689 to 677 BC king of the state of Chu during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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King Wen of Zhou

King Wen of Zhou (1152 1056 BC) was king of Zhou during the late Shang dynasty in ancient China.

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King Wu of Chu

King Wu of Chu (died 690 BC) was the first king of the State of Chu during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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King Xuan of Chu

King Xuan of Chu (died 340 BC) was from 369 to 340 BC the king of the state of Chu during the Warring States period of ancient China.

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King You of Chu

King You of Chu (died 228 BC) was from 237 to 228 BC the king of the state of Chu during the late Warring States period of ancient China.

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King Zhao of Chu

King Zhao of Chu (died 489 BC) was from 515 to 489 BC the king of the State of Chu during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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King Zhao of Zhou

King Zhao of Zhou, personal name Jī Xiá, was the fourth king of the Chinese Zhou dynasty.

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King Zhuang of Chu

King Zhuang of Chu (reigned 613-591 BC) was a monarch of the Zhou Dynasty State of Chu during the Spring and Autumn period in ancient China.

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Kra languages

The Kra languages (Chinese: Gēyāng, 仡央, short for '''Ge'''lao–Bu'''yang''') are a branch of the Kra–Dai language family spoken in southern China (Yunnan, Guangxi, Hainan) and in northern Vietnam.

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Kra–Dai languages

The Kra–Dai languages (also known as Tai–Kadai, Daic and Kadai) are a language family of tonal languages found in southern China, Northeast India and Southeast Asia.

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Kuaiji Commandery

Kuaiji Commandery (Chinese: t 郡, s 郡, p Kuàijī Jùn), formerly romanized as K‘uai-chi Commandery, was a former commandery of China in the area of Hangzhou Bay.

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Lacquer

The term lacquer is used for a number of hard and potentially shiny finishes applied to materials such as wood.

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Lao language

Lao, sometimes referred to as Laotian (ລາວ 'Lao' or ພາສາລາວ 'Lao language') is a tonal language of the Kra–Dai language family.

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Legalism (Chinese philosophy)

Fajia or Legalism is one of Sima Tan's six classical schools of thought in Chinese philosophy.

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Li Xin (Qin)

Li Xin (李信) was a general of Qin during the Warring States era.

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Liao (Zhou dynasty state)

Liǎo was a Zhou dynasty vassal state during the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history (771–476 BCE).

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Linquan County

Linquan County is a county in the northwest of Anhui Province, China, bordering Henan province to the northwest, west, and southwest.

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List of castles in China

This is a list of castles in China.

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Lord Changping

Lord Changping (昌平君; died 223 BC) was a general and lord of Qin, but later seceded from Qin and died as the last king of Chu (224–223 BC) in the last days of the Warring States period of ancient China.

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Lord Chunshen

Lord Chunshen (died 238 BC), born Huang Xie, was a nobleman, general, and Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Chu during the late Warring States period of ancient China.

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Lu (state)

Lu (c. 1042–249 BC) was a vassal state during the Zhou dynasty of ancient China.

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Macheng

Macheng is a city in northeastern Hubei province, People's Republic of China, bordering the provinces of Henan to the north and Anhui to the northeast.

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Mandate of Heaven

The Mandate of Heaven or Tian Ming is a Chinese political and religious doctrine used since ancient times to justify the rule of the King or Emperor of China.

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Marc Miyake

Marc Hideo Miyake (Japanese name:; born July 28, 1971) is an American linguist, who specializes in historical linguistics, particularly the study of Old Japanese and Tangut.

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Mawangdui

Mawangdui is an archaeological site located in Changsha, China.

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Mi (surname)

Mi is the pinyin romanisation of various Chinese surnames, including 麋, 米, 禰, 羋 and others.

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Middle Chinese

Middle Chinese (formerly known as Ancient Chinese) or the Qieyun system (QYS) is the historical variety of Chinese recorded in the Qieyun, a rime dictionary first published in 601 and followed by several revised and expanded editions.

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Mulam language

No description.

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North China Plain

The North China Plain is based on the deposits of the Yellow River and is the largest alluvial plain of China.

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Old Chinese

Old Chinese, also called Archaic Chinese in older works, is the oldest attested stage of Chinese, and the ancestor of all modern varieties of Chinese.

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Old Chinese phonology

Scholars have attempted to reconstruct the phonology of Old Chinese from documentary evidence.

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Pan Geng

Pán Gēng, given name Xun, was a Shang dynasty King of China.

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Phi Capricorni

Phi Capricorni (φ Cap, φ Capricorni) is a solitary star in the southern constellation of Capricornus.

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Pi (state)

Pi was a Zhou dynasty (1045–256 BC) vassal state in ancient China.

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Pingyu County

Pingyu County is a county of Henan, China.

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Prime minister (Chu State)

The post of lingyin, translated as prime minister or chancellor, was an official government position established in the Chu state during the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history (771 – 475 BCE).

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Qi (Henan)

Qi (Old Chinese) was a minor feudal state in ancient China that existed from the beginning of the Shang Dynasty (16th century BCE) until the beginning of the Warring States period, c. 445 BCE.

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Qi (state)

Qi was a state of the Zhou dynasty-era in ancient China, variously reckoned as a march, duchy, and independent kingdom.

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Qichun County

Qichun County) is a county of eastern Hubei province, People's Republic of China. It is under the administration of Huanggang City. Qichun is the birthplace of famous herbalist Li Shizhen, who was born and lived in Qizhou town, on the southern edge of the county, alongside the Yangtze River. In turn, Qichun is a major center of the herbal industry in China. Qichun County is known in China as the "County of Scholars" because more professors (400+) and doctors were born there than in any other county of China. The town of Qichun consists of Qichun proper, and Caohe precinct.

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Qin (state)

Qin (Old Chinese: *) was an ancient Chinese state during the Zhou dynasty.

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Qin Shi Huang

Qin Shi Huang (18 February 25910 September 210) was the founder of the Qin dynasty and was the first emperor of a unified China.

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Qu Yuan

Qu Yuan (–278 BC) was a Chinese poet and minister who lived during the Warring States period of ancient China.

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Quan (state)

The State of Quán was a small Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BC) vassal state of Central China.

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Records of the Grand Historian

The Records of the Grand Historian, also known by its Chinese name Shiji, is a monumental history of ancient China and the world finished around 94 BC by the Han dynasty official Sima Qian after having been started by his father, Sima Tan, Grand Astrologer to the imperial court.

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Regular script

Regular script (Hepburn: kaisho), also called 正楷, 真書 (zhēnshū), 楷體 (kǎitǐ) and 正書 (zhèngshū), is the newest of the Chinese script styles (appearing by the Cao Wei dynasty ca. 200 CE and maturing stylistically around the 7th century), hence most common in modern writings and publications (after the Ming and gothic styles, used exclusively in print).

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Ruo (state)

The State of Ruò was a small vassal state during the Chinese Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BCE) whose rulers used the title Zǐ (子), roughly equivalent to a Viscount.

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Ruo'ao

Ruo'ao (died 764 BC) was from 790 to 764 BC the monarch of the state of Chu during the Western Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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School of Diplomacy

The School of Diplomacy, or the School of Vertical and Horizontal Alliances was a political and diplomatic clique during the Warring States period of Chinese history (476-220 BCE).

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Se (instrument)

The se is an ancient Chinese plucked zither (string instrument).

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Seal script

Seal script is an ancient style of writing Chinese characters that was common throughout the latter half of the 1st millennium BC.

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Shaanxi

Shaanxi is a province of the People's Republic of China.

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Shang dynasty

The Shang dynasty or Yin dynasty, according to traditional historiography, ruled in the Yellow River valley in the second millennium BC, succeeding the Xia dynasty and followed by the Zhou dynasty.

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Shang Yang

Shang Yang, or Wei YangAntonio S. Cua (ed.), 2003, p. 362, Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy (born with the surname Gongsun in Wey, Zhou Kingdom; c. 390 – 338 BCE), was a statesman and reformer of the State of Qin during the Warring States period of ancient China.

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Shanghai

Shanghai (Wu Chinese) is one of the four direct-controlled municipalities of China and the most populous city proper in the world, with a population of more than 24 million.

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Shen (state)

The State of Shen was a Chinese vassal state during the Zhou dynasty (1046 – 221 BCE) ruled by the Jiāng family (姜) as an earldom.

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Shishou

Shishou is a county-level city under the administration of the prefectural-level city Jingzhou, in the south of Hubei province, China, near its border with Hunan province.

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Shou County

Shou County or Shouxian is a county in Anhui Province, China, under the jurisdiction of Huainan City.

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Shu (state)

The State of Shu was an ancient state in what is now Sichuan Province.

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Shuihudi Qin bamboo texts

The Shuihudi Qin bamboo texts are early Chinese texts written on bamboo slips, and are also sometimes called the Yúnmèng Qin bamboo texts.

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Sichuan Basin

The Sichuan Basin, formerly transliterated as the Szechwan Basin, sometimes called the Red Basin, is a lowland region in southwestern China.

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Sima Qian

Sima Qian was a Chinese historian of the early Han dynasty (206AD220).

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Snakes in Chinese mythology

Snakes (also known as serpents) are an important motif in Chinese mythology.

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Song (state)

Sòng (Old Chinese: *) was a state during the Zhou dynasty of ancient China, with its capital at Shangqiu.

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Spring and Autumn period

The Spring and Autumn period was a period in Chinese history from approximately 771 to 476 BC (or according to some authorities until 403 BC) which corresponds roughly to the first half of the Eastern Zhou Period.

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Sui (state)

Suí was a Zhou dynasty vassal state in the Han River Basin in modern Suizhou, Hubei, China.

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Sui language

The Sui language is a Kam–Sui language spoken by the Sui people of Guizhou province in China.

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Suizhou

Suizhou, formerly Sui County, is a prefecture-level city in northern Hubei province, People's Republic of China, bordering Henan province to the north and east.

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Tai languages

The Tai or Zhuang–Tai languages (ภาษาไท or ภาษาไต, transliteration: or) are a branch of the Kra–Dai language family.

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Taoism

Taoism, also known as Daoism, is a religious or philosophical tradition of Chinese origin which emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao (also romanized as ''Dao'').

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Temple name

Temple names are commonly used when naming most Chinese, Korean (Goryeo and Joseon periods), and Vietnamese (such dynasties as Trần, Lý, and Lê) royalty.

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Then language

The Then language (also known as Yánghuáng 佯僙语 in Chinese; alternate spellings: T'en and Ten) is a Kam–Sui language spoken in Pingtang County, southern Guizhou.

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Tomb of Marquis Yi of Zeng

The Tomb of Marquis Yi of Zeng is an important archaeological site in Leigudun Community (擂鼓墩社区), Nanjiao Subdistrict (南郊街道), Zengdu District, Suizhou (then Sui County), Hubei, China, dated sometime after 433 BC.

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Tsinghua Bamboo Slips

The Tsinghua Bamboo Slips are a collection of Chinese texts dating to the Warring States period and written in ink on strips of bamboo, that were acquired in 2008 by Tsinghua University, China.

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Twenty-Eight Mansions

The Twenty-Eight Mansions, hsiu, xiu or sieu are part of the Chinese constellations system.

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Wang Jian (Qin)

Wang Jian (220s BC) was a military general of the State of Qin during the Warring States period.

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Warring States period

The Warring States period was an era in ancient Chinese history of warfare, as well as bureaucratic and military reforms and consolidation, following the Spring and Autumn period and concluding with the Qin wars of conquest that saw the annexation of all other contender states, which ultimately led to the Qin state's victory in 221 BC as the first unified Chinese empire known as the Qin dynasty.

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Wei (state)

Wei (Old Chinese: *) was an ancient Chinese state during the Warring States period.

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Wey (state)

Wei (Old Chinese: *ɢʷat-s), commonly spelled Wey to distinguish from the larger Wei (魏) state, was an ancient Chinese state that was founded in the early Western Zhou dynasty and rose to prominence during the Spring and Autumn period.

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Wu (region)

Wu refers to a region in China whose core area is around Lake Tai in Jiangnan (the south of the Yangtze River).

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Wu (shaman)

Wu are spirit mediums who have practiced divination, prayer, sacrifice, rainmaking, and healing in Chinese traditions dating back over 3,000 years.

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Wu (state)

Wu (Old Chinese: &#42) was one of the states during the Western Zhou Dynasty and the Spring and Autumn period.

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Wu Pass

Wuguan was one of four strategic mountain passes along the southern border of the ancient state of Qin and the north western border of Chu.

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Wu Qi

Wu Qi (440-381 BC) was a Chinese military leader, Legalist philosopher, and politician in the Warring States period.

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Wulipu

Wulipu is a town in the northwest corner of Shayang County, Jingmen, Hubei Province, China.

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Wuyue

Wuyue (Shanghainese), 907–978, was an independent coastal kingdom founded during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms (907–960) of Chinese history.

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Wuzi

The Wuzi is a classic Chinese work on military strategy attributed to Wu Qi.

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Xi (state)

Xi was a Chinese vassal state during the Shang and Zhou dynasties and the Spring and Autumn period (1600 – 475 BCE) ruled by members of the Jī family (姬).

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Xi River

The Xi River is the western tributary of the Pearl River in China.

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Xia dynasty

The Xia dynasty is the legendary, possibly apocryphal first dynasty in traditional Chinese history.

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Xiang Liang

Xiang Liang (died 208 BC) was a military leader who led a rebellion against the Qin dynasty.

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Xiang Yu

Xiang Ji (232–202 BC), courtesy name Yu, better known as Xiang Yu, was a prominent warlord who lived in the late Qin dynasty.

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Xiao'ao

Xiāo’áo (died 758 BC) was from 763 to 758 BC the monarch of the state of Chu during the early Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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Xichuan County

Xichuan County is a county of Nanyang, Henan, China.

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Xiong (surname)

Xiong is the pinyin romanization of the Chinese surname 熊 (Xióng).

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Xiong Ai

Xiong Ai (reigned c. 977 BCE) was the second viscount of the state of Chu during the early Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Xiong Dan

Xiong Dan (reigned c. 941 BC) was the third viscount of the state of Chu during the early Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Xiong E

Xiong E (died 791 BC) was from 799 to 791 BC the monarch of the state of Chu during the Western Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Xiong Kang

Xiong Kang, also called Xiong Wukang, was the seventh viscount of the state of Chu during the early Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BC) of ancient China.

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Xiong Kuang

Xiong Kuang (reigned 11th century BC) was an early ruler of the state of Chu during the early Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BC) of ancient China.

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Xiong Li

Xiong Li (reigned 11th century BC) was an early ruler of the state of Chu during the early Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Xiong Qu

Xiong Qu was the sixth viscount of the state of Chu during the early Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BC) of ancient China.

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Xiong Sheng

Xiong Sheng was the fourth viscount of the state of Chu during the early Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BC) of ancient China.

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Xiong Shuang

Xiong Shuang (died 822 BC) was from 827 to 822 BC the 12th viscount of the state of Chu during the Western Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Xiong Xun

Xiong Xun (died 800 BC) was from 821 to 800 BC the monarch of the state of Chu during the Western Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Xiong Yan (elder)

Xiong Yan (died 848 BC) was the ninth viscount of the state of Chu during the Western Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Xiong Yan (younger)

Xiong Yan (died 828 BC) was from 837 to 828 BC the 11th viscount of the state of Chu during the Western Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Xiong Yang

Xiong Yang was the fifth viscount of the state of Chu during the early Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BC) of ancient China.

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Xiong Yi

Xiong Yi (reigned 11th century BC) was the first viscount and an early ruler of the State of Chu during early Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Xiong Yong

Xiong Yong (died 838 BC) was from 847 to 838 BC the 10th viscount of the state of Chu during the Western Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Xiong Zhi

Xiong Zhi was the eighth viscount of the state of Chu during the early Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BC) of ancient China.

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Xiongnu

The Xiongnu were a confederation of nomadic peoples who, according to ancient Chinese sources, inhabited the eastern Asian Steppe from the 3rd century BC to the late 1st century AD.

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Xu (state)

The State of Xu (also called Xu Rong (徐戎) or Xu Yi (徐夷) by its enemies) was an independent Huaiyi state of the Chinese Bronze Age that was ruled by the Ying family (嬴) and controlled much of the Huai River valley for at least two centuries. With its capital at Xizhou and its ritual center at Pizhou, Xu's heartland was northern Anhui, northwestern Jiangsu, and the Lower Huai River valley. An ancient but originally minor state that already existed during the late Shang dynasty, Xu was subjugated by the Western Zhou dynasty around 1039 BC, and was gradually sinified from then on. It eventually regained its independence and formed a confederation of 36 states that became powerful enough to challenge the Zhou empire for supremacy over the Central Plain. Able to consolidate its rule over a territory that stretched from Hubei in the south, through eastern Henan, northern Anhui and Jiangsu, as far north as southern Shandong, Xu's confederation remained a major power until the early Spring and Autumn period. It reached its apogee in the mid 8th century BC, expanding its influence as far as Zhejiang in the south. By that time, however, Xu's confederation began to break up as result of internal unrest. As its power waned, Xu was increasingly threatened by neighboring states, losing control over the Huai River to Chu. Reduced to its heartland, Xu was eventually conquered by Wu in 512 BC.

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Xuzhou

Xuzhou, known as Pengcheng in ancient times, is a major city in Jiangsu province, China.

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Yan (state)

Yan (Old Chinese pronunciation: &#42) was an ancient Chinese state during the Zhou dynasty.

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Yang Kuan

Yang Kuan (1914 − September 1, 2005) was a Chinese historian specializing in pre-Qin Dynasty Chinese history.

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Yangtze

The Yangtze, which is 6,380 km (3,964 miles) long, is the longest river in Asia and the third-longest in the world.

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Yanling County, Henan

Yanling County is a county of Henan, China.

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Yellow Emperor

The Yellow Emperor, also known as the Yellow Thearch, the Yellow God or the Yellow Lord, or simply by his Chinese name Huangdi, is a deity in Chinese religion, one of the legendary Chinese sovereigns and culture heroes included among the mytho-historical Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors and cosmological Five Forms of the Highest Deity (五方上帝 Wǔfāng Shàngdì).

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Yellow River

The Yellow River or Huang He is the second longest river in Asia, after the Yangtze River, and the sixth longest river system in the world at the estimated length of.

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Ying (Chu)

Ying (Yǐng) was a capital city of the State of Chu during the Spring and Autumn and Warring States periods of Chinese History.

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Yingbo

Yingbo was an early ruler of the ancient Chinese state that would later be known as Chu.

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Yue (state)

Yue (Old Chinese: &#42), also known as Yuyue, was a state in ancient China which existed during the first millennium BC the Spring and Autumn and Warring States periods of China's Zhou dynasty in the modern provinces of Zhejiang, Shanghai, and Jiangsu.

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Yunyang District

Yunyang District, formerly Yun County or Yunxian, is a district of Shiyan City in northwestern Hubei province, China.

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Yuxiong

Yuxiong (reigned 11th century BC), also known as Yuzi or Master Yu, was an early ruler of the ancient Chinese state that was later known as Chu.

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Zhan Guo Ce

The Zhan Guo Ce, also known in English as the Strategies of the Warring States, is an ancient Chinese text that contains anecdotes of political manipulation and warfare during the Warring States period (5th to 3rd centuries).

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Zhang Yi (Warring States period)

Zhang Yi (before 329 BC – 309 BC) was born in the Wei state during the Warring States period of Chinese history.

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Zhao (state)

Zhao was one of the seven major states during the Warring States period of ancient China.

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Zhejiang

, formerly romanized as Chekiang, is an eastern coastal province of China.

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Zheng (state)

Zheng (Old Chinese: *) was a vassal state in China during the Zhou Dynasty (1046–221 BCE) located in the centre of ancient China in modern-day Henan Province on the North China Plain about east of the royal capital at Luoyang.

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Zheng Mao

Zheng Mao was the primary wife of King Cheng of the State of Chu during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China.

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Zhijiang, Hubei

Zhijiang is a county-level city of Yichang City, in the west of Hubei province, People's Republic of China.

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Zhongshan (state)

Zhongshan was a small state that existed during the Warring States period, which managed to survive for almost 120 years despite its small size.

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Zhongyuan

Zhongyuan, Chungyuan, or the Central Plain, also known as Zhongtu, Chungtu or Zhongzhou, Chungchou, is the area on the lower reaches of the Yellow River which formed the cradle of Chinese civilization.

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Zhou dynasty

The Zhou dynasty or the Zhou Kingdom was a Chinese dynasty that followed the Shang dynasty and preceded the Qin dynasty.

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Zhou–Chu War

The Zhou–Chu War was a military conflict between the Zhou dynasty under King Zhao and the state of Chu from 961 to 957 BC.

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Zhuanxu

Zhuanxu (Chinese: trad. 頊, simp. 颛顼, pinyin Zhuānxū), also known as Gao Yang (t 陽, s 高阳, p Gāoyáng), was a mythological emperor of ancient China.

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Zhurong

Zhurong, also known as Chongli, is an important personage in Chinese mythology and Chinese folk religion.

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Zi'ao

Zi'ao (died 529 BC) was a king of the state of Chu, although his reign lasted less than twenty days.

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Zou (state)

Zou, originally Zhu (邾) or Zhulou (邾婁), was a minor state that existed during the Zhou Dynasty of ancient China.

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Zuo zhuan

The Zuo zhuan, generally translated The Zuo Tradition or The Commentary of Zuo, is an ancient Chinese narrative history that is traditionally regarded as a commentary on the ancient Chinese chronicle ''Spring and Autumn Annals'' (''Chunqiu'' 春秋).

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24 Capricorni

24 Capricorni is a single star in the constellation Capricornus.

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590s BC

This article concerns the period 599 BC – 590 BC.

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Redirects here:

Cho (state), Chu (vassal state), Dynasty of Chu, House of Mi, Jing (state), Jingchu, King of Chu, Kingdom of Chu, List of the kings of Chu, State of Chu, State of Jing, Western Chu.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chu_(state)

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