Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Androidâ„¢ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Constitution of New Hampshire

+ Save concept

The Constitution of the State of New Hampshire is the fundamental law of the State of New Hampshire, with which all statute laws must comply. [1]

48 relations: Absentee ballot, Adjournment sine die, American Revolutionary War, Bribery, Claremont School District v. Governor of New Hampshire, Claremont, New Hampshire, Clerks, Commonwealth (U.S. state), Continental Congress, Domicile (law), Eminent domain, Excellency, Executive Council of New Hampshire, Exeter, New Hampshire, Floterial district, Freedom of religion, Freedom of speech, Freedom of the press, Gender neutrality, Government of New Hampshire, Governor of New Hampshire, House of Commons of the United Kingdom, Impeachment in New Hampshire, Jury trial, Kelo v. City of New London, Lawsuit, Malpractice, Mootness, Natural and legal rights, New Hampshire, New Hampshire General Court, New Hampshire National Guard, New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated, New Hampshire Supreme Court, Nomination, Pardon, Pension, Political corruption, Province of New Hampshire, Redistricting, Referendum, Right of revolution, Right to keep and bear arms, State of emergency, Town meeting, United States Constitution, United States House of Representatives, Writ.

Absentee ballot

An absentee ballot is a vote cast by someone who is unable or unwilling to attend the official polling station to which the voter is normally allocated.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Absentee ballot · See more »

Adjournment sine die

Adjournment sine die (from the Latin "without day") means "without assigning a day for a further meeting or hearing".

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Adjournment sine die · See more »

American Revolutionary War

The American Revolutionary War (17751783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a global war that began as a conflict between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America. After 1765, growing philosophical and political differences strained the relationship between Great Britain and its colonies. Patriot protests against taxation without representation followed the Stamp Act and escalated into boycotts, which culminated in 1773 with the Sons of Liberty destroying a shipment of tea in Boston Harbor. Britain responded by closing Boston Harbor and passing a series of punitive measures against Massachusetts Bay Colony. Massachusetts colonists responded with the Suffolk Resolves, and they established a shadow government which wrested control of the countryside from the Crown. Twelve colonies formed a Continental Congress to coordinate their resistance, establishing committees and conventions that effectively seized power. British attempts to disarm the Massachusetts militia at Concord, Massachusetts in April 1775 led to open combat. Militia forces then besieged Boston, forcing a British evacuation in March 1776, and Congress appointed George Washington to command the Continental Army. Concurrently, an American attempt to invade Quebec and raise rebellion against the British failed decisively. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted for independence, issuing its declaration on July 4. Sir William Howe launched a British counter-offensive, capturing New York City and leaving American morale at a low ebb. However, victories at Trenton and Princeton restored American confidence. In 1777, the British launched an invasion from Quebec under John Burgoyne, intending to isolate the New England Colonies. Instead of assisting this effort, Howe took his army on a separate campaign against Philadelphia, and Burgoyne was decisively defeated at Saratoga in October 1777. Burgoyne's defeat had drastic consequences. France formally allied with the Americans and entered the war in 1778, and Spain joined the war the following year as an ally of France but not as an ally of the United States. In 1780, the Kingdom of Mysore attacked the British in India, and tensions between Great Britain and the Netherlands erupted into open war. In North America, the British mounted a "Southern strategy" led by Charles Cornwallis which hinged upon a Loyalist uprising, but too few came forward. Cornwallis suffered reversals at King's Mountain and Cowpens. He retreated to Yorktown, Virginia, intending an evacuation, but a decisive French naval victory deprived him of an escape. A Franco-American army led by the Comte de Rochambeau and Washington then besieged Cornwallis' army and, with no sign of relief, he surrendered in October 1781. Whigs in Britain had long opposed the pro-war Tories in Parliament, and the surrender gave them the upper hand. In early 1782, Parliament voted to end all offensive operations in North America, but the war continued in Europe and India. Britain remained under siege in Gibraltar but scored a major victory over the French navy. On September 3, 1783, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Paris in which Great Britain agreed to recognize the sovereignty of the United States and formally end the war. French involvement had proven decisive,Brooks, Richard (editor). Atlas of World Military History. HarperCollins, 2000, p. 101 "Washington's success in keeping the army together deprived the British of victory, but French intervention won the war." but France made few gains and incurred crippling debts. Spain made some minor territorial gains but failed in its primary aim of recovering Gibraltar. The Dutch were defeated on all counts and were compelled to cede territory to Great Britain. In India, the war against Mysore and its allies concluded in 1784 without any territorial changes.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and American Revolutionary War · See more »

Bribery

Bribery is the act of giving or receiving something of value in exchange for some kind of influence or action in return, that the recipient would otherwise not alter.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Bribery · See more »

Claremont School District v. Governor of New Hampshire

Claremont School District v Governor of New Hampshire is an important legal case in New Hampshire.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Claremont School District v. Governor of New Hampshire · See more »

Claremont, New Hampshire

Claremont is the only city in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, United States.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Claremont, New Hampshire · See more »

Clerks

Clerks is a 1994 American independent black-and-white comedy film written, directed, and co-produced by Kevin Smith.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Clerks · See more »

Commonwealth (U.S. state)

Commonwealth is a designation used by four of the 50 states of the United States in their full official state names: Kentucky, Massachusetts,, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Commonwealth (U.S. state) · See more »

Continental Congress

The Continental Congress, also known as the Philadelphia Congress, was a convention of delegates called together from the Thirteen Colonies.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Continental Congress · See more »

Domicile (law)

In law, domicile is the status or attribution of being a lawful permanent resident in a particular jurisdiction.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Domicile (law) · See more »

Eminent domain

Eminent domain (United States, Philippines), land acquisition (Singapore), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Ireland), resumption (Hong Kong, Uganda), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia), or expropriation (France, Italy, Mexico, South Africa, Canada, Brazil, Portugal, Spain, Chile, Denmark, Sweden) is the power of a state, provincial, or national government to take private property for public use.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Eminent domain · See more »

Excellency

Excellency is an honorific style given to certain high-level officers of a sovereign state, officials of an international organization, or members of an aristocracy.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Excellency · See more »

Executive Council of New Hampshire

The Executive Council of the State of New Hampshire (commonly known as the Governor's Council) is the executive body of the U.S. state of New Hampshire.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Executive Council of New Hampshire · See more »

Exeter, New Hampshire

Exeter is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Exeter, New Hampshire · See more »

Floterial district

A floterial district is a legislative district that includes several separate districts that independently would not be entitled to additional representation, but whose combined population entitles the area to another seat in the legislative body.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Floterial district · See more »

Freedom of religion

Freedom of religion is a principle that supports the freedom of an individual or community, in public or private, to manifest religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship, and observance without government influence or intervention.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Freedom of religion · See more »

Freedom of speech

Freedom of speech is a principle that supports the freedom of an individual or a community to articulate their opinions and ideas without fear of retaliation, censorship, or sanction.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Freedom of speech · See more »

Freedom of the press

Freedom of the press or freedom of the media is the principle that communication and expression through various media, including printed and electronic media, especially published materials, should be considered a right to be exercised freely.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Freedom of the press · See more »

Gender neutrality

Gender neutrality (adjective form: gender-neutral), also known as gender-neutralism or the gender neutrality movement, describes the idea that policies, language, and other social institutions should avoid distinguishing roles according to people's sex or gender, in order to avoid discrimination arising from the impression that there are social roles for which one gender is more suited than another.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Gender neutrality · See more »

Government of New Hampshire

The State of New Hampshire has a republican form of government modeled after the Government of the United States, with three branches: the executive, consisting of the Governor of New Hampshire and the other elected constitutional officers; the legislative, called the New Hampshire General Court, which includes the Senate and the House of Representatives; and the judicial, consisting of the Supreme Court of New Hampshire and lower courts.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Government of New Hampshire · See more »

Governor of New Hampshire

The Governor of New Hampshire is the head of the executive branch of New Hampshire's state government.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Governor of New Hampshire · See more »

House of Commons of the United Kingdom

The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and House of Commons of the United Kingdom · See more »

Impeachment in New Hampshire

Impeachment in New Hampshire is an expressed Constitutional power of the House of Representatives to bring formal charges against a state officer for "bribery, corruption, malpractice or maladministration, in office." Upon the impeachment of a state officer, the Senate acts as "a court, with full power and authority to hear, try, and determine, all impeachments made by the house of representatives." Upon conviction, the Senate can impose a punishment that "does not extend further than removal from office, disqualification to hold or enjoy any place of honor, trust, or profit, under this state." Unlike at the Federal level where an impeachment conviction requires 2/3 of the United States Senators present to vote in the affirmative, the New Hampshire Constitution does not mention the burden of proof needed to impeach or convict an official, thus each house is left to decide the standard it will use.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Impeachment in New Hampshire · See more »

Jury trial

A jury trial, or trial by jury, is a lawful proceeding in which a jury makes a decision or findings of fact.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Jury trial · See more »

Kelo v. City of New London

Kelo v. City of New London, 545 U.S. 469 (2005),.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Kelo v. City of New London · See more »

Lawsuit

A lawsuit (or suit in law) is "a vernacular term for a suit, action, or cause instituted or depending between two private persons in the courts of law." A lawsuit is any proceeding by a party or parties against another in a court of law.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Lawsuit · See more »

Malpractice

In the law of torts, malpractice, also known as professional negligence, is an "instance of negligence or incompetence on the part of a professional".

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Malpractice · See more »

Mootness

In law, the terms moot and mootness have different meanings in British English and American English.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Mootness · See more »

Natural and legal rights

Natural and legal rights are two types of rights.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Natural and legal rights · See more »

New Hampshire

New Hampshire is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and New Hampshire · See more »

New Hampshire General Court

The General Court of New Hampshire is the bicameral state legislature of the U.S. state of New Hampshire.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and New Hampshire General Court · See more »

New Hampshire National Guard

The New Hampshire National Guard is a component of the New Hampshire Adjutant General's Department.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and New Hampshire National Guard · See more »

New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated

The New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated (RSA) forms the codified law of the state subordinate to the New Hampshire State Constitution.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated · See more »

New Hampshire Supreme Court

The New Hampshire Supreme Court is the supreme court of the U. S. state of New Hampshire and sole appellate court of the state.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and New Hampshire Supreme Court · See more »

Nomination

Nomination is part of the process of selecting a candidate for either election to a public office, or the bestowing of an honor or award.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Nomination · See more »

Pardon

A pardon is a government decision to allow a person to be absolved of guilt for an alleged crime or other legal offense, as if the act never occurred.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Pardon · See more »

Pension

A pension is a fund into which a sum of money is added during an employee's employment years, and from which payments are drawn to support the person's retirement from work in the form of periodic payments.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Pension · See more »

Political corruption

Political corruption is the use of powers by government officials or their network contacts for illegitimate private gain.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Political corruption · See more »

Province of New Hampshire

The Province of New Hampshire was a colony of England and later a British province in North America.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Province of New Hampshire · See more »

Redistricting

Redistricting is the process of drawing electoral district boundaries in the United States.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Redistricting · See more »

Referendum

A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is invited to vote on a particular proposal.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Referendum · See more »

Right of revolution

In political philosophy, the right of revolution (or right of rebellion) is the right or duty of the people of a nation to overthrow a government that acts against their common interests and/or threatens the safety of the people without cause.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Right of revolution · See more »

Right to keep and bear arms

The right to keep and bear arms (often referred to as the right to bear arms) is the people's right to possess weapons (arms) for their own defense, as described in the philosophical and political writings of Aristotle, Cicero, John Locke, Machiavelli, the English Whigs and others.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Right to keep and bear arms · See more »

State of emergency

A state of emergency is a situation in which a government is empowered to perform actions that it would normally not be permitted.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and State of emergency · See more »

Town meeting

A town meeting is a form of direct democratic rule, used primarily in portions of the United States – principally in New England – since the 17th century, in which most or all the members of a community come together to legislate policy and budgets for local government.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Town meeting · See more »

United States Constitution

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and United States Constitution · See more »

United States House of Representatives

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and United States House of Representatives · See more »

Writ

In common law, a writ (Anglo-Saxon gewrit, Latin breve) is a formal written order issued by a body with administrative or judicial jurisdiction; in modern usage, this body is generally a court.

New!!: Constitution of New Hampshire and Writ · See more »

Redirects here:

Constitution of the State of New Hampshire, New Hampshire Constitution, New Hampshire State Constitution, New Hampshire constitution.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_New_Hampshire

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »