Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

Dalmatian language

Index Dalmatian language

Dalmatian or Dalmatic was a Romance language spoken in the Dalmatia region of present-day Croatia, and as far south as Kotor in Montenegro. [1]

64 relations: Adriatic Sea, Analytic language, Article (grammar), Austrian Academy of Sciences, Cambridge University Press, Chakavian, Cres, Croatia, Croatian language, Dalmatae, Dalmatia, Dalmatian language, Dubrovnik, Eastern Herzegovinian dialect, Eastern Romance languages, English language, European squid, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, Francesco Maria Appendini, Friulian language, Gilt-head bream, Illyria, Illyrian languages, Illyro-Roman, Istria, Istriot language, Istro-Romanian language, Italian language, Italic languages, Italo-Dalmatian languages, Italy, Kotor, Krk, Kvarner Gulf, Languages of Europe, Latin, Lord's Prayer, Maritime republics, Marko Marulić, Matteo Bartoli, Migration Period, Montenegro, Official language, Rab, Republic of Ragusa, Rijeka, Roman Republic, Romance languages, Romanian language, Sardinian language, ..., Serbo-Croatian, Shtokavian, Slavs, Split, Croatia, Treccani, Trogir, Tuone Udaina, University of Michigan, University of North Carolina Press, Venetian language, Vulgar Latin, Wiley-Blackwell, Zadar, 4th century. Expand index (14 more) »

Adriatic Sea

The Adriatic Sea is a body of water separating the Italian Peninsula from the Balkan peninsula.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Adriatic Sea · See more »

Analytic language

In linguistic typology, an analytic language is a language that primarily conveys relationships between words in sentences by way of helper words (particles, prepositions, etc.) and word order, as opposed to utilizing inflections (changing the form of a word to convey its role in the sentence).

New!!: Dalmatian language and Analytic language · See more »

Article (grammar)

An article (with the linguistic glossing abbreviation) is a word that is used with a noun (as a standalone word or a prefix or suffix) to specify grammatical definiteness of the noun, and in some languages extending to volume or numerical scope.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Article (grammar) · See more »

Austrian Academy of Sciences

The Austrian Academy of Sciences (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften) is a legal entity under the special protection of the Republic of Austria.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Austrian Academy of Sciences · See more »

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Cambridge University Press · See more »

Chakavian

Chakavian or Čakavian,, (čakavski, proper name: čakavica or čakavština, own name: čokovski, čakavski, čekavski) is a dialect of the Serbo-Croatian language spoken by a minority of Croats.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Chakavian · See more »

Cres

Cres (Cherso, Kersch, Crepsa, Greek: Χέρσος, Chersos) is an Adriatic island in Croatia.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Cres · See more »

Croatia

Croatia (Hrvatska), officially the Republic of Croatia (Republika Hrvatska), is a country at the crossroads of Central and Southeast Europe, on the Adriatic Sea.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Croatia · See more »

Croatian language

Croatian (hrvatski) is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language used by Croats, principally in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Serbian province of Vojvodina and other neighboring countries.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Croatian language · See more »

Dalmatae

The Dalmatae or Delmatae were an ancient people who inhabited the core of what would then become known as Dalmatia after the Roman conquest — now the eastern Adriatic coast in Croatia, between the rivers Krka and Neretva.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Dalmatae · See more »

Dalmatia

Dalmatia (Dalmacija; see names in other languages) is one of the four historical regions of Croatia, alongside Croatia proper, Slavonia and Istria.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Dalmatia · See more »

Dalmatian language

Dalmatian or Dalmatic was a Romance language spoken in the Dalmatia region of present-day Croatia, and as far south as Kotor in Montenegro.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Dalmatian language · See more »

Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik (historically Ragusa) is a Croatian city on the Adriatic Sea.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Dubrovnik · See more »

Eastern Herzegovinian dialect

The Eastern Herzegovinian dialect (Serbo-Croatian: istočnohercegovački/источнохерцеговачки or istočnohercegovačko-krajiški/источнохерцеговачко-крајишки) is the most widespread subdialect of the Shtokavian dialect of Serbo-Croatian, both by territory and the number of speakers.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Eastern Herzegovinian dialect · See more »

Eastern Romance languages

The Eastern Romance languages are a group of Romance languages that developed in Eastern Europe (specifically in the Balkans) from the local variant of Vulgar Latin.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Eastern Romance languages · See more »

English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

New!!: Dalmatian language and English language · See more »

European squid

The European squid or common squid (Loligo vulgaris) is a large squid belonging to the family Loliginidae.

New!!: Dalmatian language and European squid · See more »

Fairleigh Dickinson University Press

Fairleigh Dickinson University Press (FDU Press) is a publishing house under the operation and oversight of Fairleigh Dickinson University, the largest private university in New Jersey with international campuses in Vancouver, British Columbia and Wroxton, Oxfordshire.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Fairleigh Dickinson University Press · See more »

Francesco Maria Appendini

Francesco Maria Appendini (November 4, 1768 – 1837) was an Italian Latin and Italian scholar who studied Slavic languages in the Republic of Ragusa.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Francesco Maria Appendini · See more »

Friulian language

Friulian or Friulan (or, affectionately, marilenghe in Friulian, friulano in Italian, Furlanisch in German, furlanščina in Slovene; also Friulian) is a Romance language belonging to the Rhaeto-Romance family, spoken in the Friuli region of northeastern Italy.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Friulian language · See more »

Gilt-head bream

The gilt-head (sea) bream (Sparus aurata) is a fish of the bream family Sparidae found in the Mediterranean Sea and the eastern coastal regions of the North Atlantic Ocean.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Gilt-head bream · See more »

Illyria

In classical antiquity, Illyria (Ἰλλυρία, Illyría or Ἰλλυρίς, Illyrís; Illyria, see also Illyricum) was a region in the western part of the Balkan Peninsula inhabited by the Illyrians.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Illyria · See more »

Illyrian languages

The Illyrian languages are a group of Indo-European languages that were spoken in the western part of the Balkans in former times by groups identified as Illyrians: Ardiaei, Delmatae, Pannonii, Autariates, Taulantii (see list of ancient tribes in Illyria).

New!!: Dalmatian language and Illyrian languages · See more »

Illyro-Roman

Illyro-Roman is a term used in historiography and anthropological studies for the Romanized Illyrians within the ancient Roman provinces of Illyricum, Moesia, Pannonia and Dardania.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Illyro-Roman · See more »

Istria

Istria (Croatian, Slovene: Istra; Istriot: Eîstria; Istria; Istrien), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Istria · See more »

Istriot language

Istriot is a Romance language spoken by about 400 people in the southwestern part of the Istrian Peninsula in Croatia, particularly in Rovinj and Vodnjan.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Istriot language · See more »

Istro-Romanian language

The Istro-Romanian language (Istro-Romanian: Rumârește) is an Eastern Romance language, spoken in a few villages and hamlets in the peninsula of Istria in Croatia, as well as in diaspora, most notably in Italy, Sweden, Germany, Northern and Southern America, and Australia.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Istro-Romanian language · See more »

Italian language

Italian (or lingua italiana) is a Romance language.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Italian language · See more »

Italic languages

The Italic languages are a subfamily of the Indo-European language family, originally spoken by Italic peoples.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Italic languages · See more »

Italo-Dalmatian languages

The Italo-Dalmatian languages, or Central Romance languages, are a group of Romance languages spoken in Italy, Corsica (France) and formerly in Dalmatia (Croatia).

New!!: Dalmatian language and Italo-Dalmatian languages · See more »

Italy

Italy (Italia), officially the Italian Republic (Repubblica Italiana), is a sovereign state in Europe.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Italy · See more »

Kotor

Kotor (Montenegrin Cyrillic: Котор,; Cattaro) is a coastal town in Montenegro.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Kotor · See more »

Krk

Krk (Vegl; Curicta; Veglia; Vegliot Dalmatian: Vikla; Ancient Greek Kyrikon, Κύρικον) is a Croatian island in the northern Adriatic Sea, located near Rijeka in the Bay of Kvarner and part of Primorje-Gorski Kotar county.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Krk · See more »

Kvarner Gulf

The Kvarner Gulf (or, Sinus Flanaticus or Liburnicus sinus), sometimes also Kvarner Bay, is a bay in the northern Adriatic Sea, located between the Istrian peninsula and the northern Croatian Littoral mainland.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Kvarner Gulf · See more »

Languages of Europe

Most languages of Europe belong to the Indo-European language family.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Languages of Europe · See more »

Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Latin · See more »

Lord's Prayer

The Lord's Prayer (also called the Our Father, Pater Noster, or the Model Prayer) is a venerated Christian prayer which, according to the New Testament, Jesus taught as the way to pray: Two versions of this prayer are recorded in the gospels: a longer form within the Sermon on the Mount in the Gospel of Matthew, and a shorter form in the Gospel of Luke when "one of his disciples said to him, 'Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.'" Lutheran theologian Harold Buls suggested that both were original, the Matthaen version spoken by Jesus early in his ministry in Galilee, and the Lucan version one year later, "very likely in Judea".

New!!: Dalmatian language and Lord's Prayer · See more »

Maritime republics

The maritime republics (repubbliche marinare) of the Mediterranean Basin were thalassocratic city-states which flourished in Italy and Dalmatia during the Middle Ages.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Maritime republics · See more »

Marko Marulić

Marko Marulić (Marco Marulo; 18 August 1450 – 5 January 1524) was a Croatian national poet and Renaissance humanist, known as the Crown of the Croatian Medieval Age and the father of the Croatian Renaissance.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Marko Marulić · See more »

Matteo Bartoli

Matteo Giulio Bartoli (22 November 1873 in Labin/Albona – 23 January 1946 in Turin) was an Italian linguist from Istria (then a part of Austria-Hungary, today part of modern Croatia).

New!!: Dalmatian language and Matteo Bartoli · See more »

Migration Period

The Migration Period was a period during the decline of the Roman Empire around the 4th to 6th centuries AD in which there were widespread migrations of peoples within or into Europe, mostly into Roman territory, notably the Germanic tribes and the Huns.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Migration Period · See more »

Montenegro

Montenegro (Montenegrin: Црна Гора / Crna Gora, meaning "Black Mountain") is a sovereign state in Southeastern Europe.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Montenegro · See more »

Official language

An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in a particular country, state, or other jurisdiction.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Official language · See more »

Rab

Rab (Arba, Arbe, Arbey) is an island in Croatia and a town of the same name located just off the northern Croatian coast in the Adriatic Sea.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Rab · See more »

Republic of Ragusa

The Republic of Ragusa was a maritime republic centered on the city of Dubrovnik (Ragusa in Italian, German and Latin; Raguse in French) in Dalmatia (today in southernmost Croatia) that carried that name from 1358 until 1808.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Republic of Ragusa · See more »

Rijeka

Rijeka (Fiume; Reka; Sankt Veit am Flaum; see other names) is the principal seaport and the third-largest city in Croatia (after Zagreb and Split).

New!!: Dalmatian language and Rijeka · See more »

Roman Republic

The Roman Republic (Res publica Romana) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Roman Republic · See more »

Romance languages

The Romance languages (also called Romanic languages or Neo-Latin languages) are the modern languages that began evolving from Vulgar Latin between the sixth and ninth centuries and that form a branch of the Italic languages within the Indo-European language family.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Romance languages · See more »

Romanian language

Romanian (obsolete spellings Rumanian, Roumanian; autonym: limba română, "the Romanian language", or românește, lit. "in Romanian") is an East Romance language spoken by approximately 24–26 million people as a native language, primarily in Romania and Moldova, and by another 4 million people as a second language.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Romanian language · See more »

Sardinian language

Sardinian or Sard (sardu, limba sarda or língua sarda) is the primary indigenous Romance language spoken on most of the island of Sardinia (Italy).

New!!: Dalmatian language and Sardinian language · See more »

Serbo-Croatian

Serbo-Croatian, also called Serbo-Croat, Serbo-Croat-Bosnian (SCB), Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian (BCS), or Bosnian-Croatian-Montenegrin-Serbian (BCMS), is a South Slavic language and the primary language of Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Montenegro.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Serbo-Croatian · See more »

Shtokavian

Shtokavian or Štokavian (štokavski / штокавски) is the prestige dialect of the pluricentric Serbo-Croatian language, and the basis of its Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian, and Montenegrin standards.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Shtokavian · See more »

Slavs

Slavs are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group who speak the various Slavic languages of the larger Balto-Slavic linguistic group.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Slavs · See more »

Split, Croatia

Split (see other names) is the second-largest city of Croatia and the largest city of the region of Dalmatia. It lies on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea and is spread over a central peninsula and its surroundings. An intraregional transport hub and popular tourist destination, the city is linked to the Adriatic islands and the Apennine peninsula. Home to Diocletian's Palace, built for the Roman emperor in 305 CE, the city was founded as the Greek colony of Aspálathos (Aσπάλαθος) in the 3rd or 2nd century BC. It became a prominent settlement around 650 CE when it succeeded the ancient capital of the Roman province of Dalmatia, Salona. After the Sack of Salona by the Avars and Slavs, the fortified Palace of Diocletian was settled by the Roman refugees. Split became a Byzantine city, to later gradually drift into the sphere of the Republic of Venice and the Kingdom of Croatia, with the Byzantines retaining nominal suzerainty. For much of the High and Late Middle Ages, Split enjoyed autonomy as a free city, caught in the middle of a struggle between Venice and the King of Hungary for control over the Dalmatian cities. Venice eventually prevailed and during the early modern period Split remained a Venetian city, a heavily fortified outpost surrounded by Ottoman territory. Its hinterland was won from the Ottomans in the Morean War of 1699, and in 1797, as Venice fell to Napoleon, the Treaty of Campo Formio rendered the city to the Habsburg Monarchy. In 1805, the Peace of Pressburg added it to the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy and in 1806 it was included in the French Empire, becoming part of the Illyrian Provinces in 1809. After being occupied in 1813, it was eventually granted to the Austrian Empire following the Congress of Vienna, where the city remained a part of the Austrian Kingdom of Dalmatia until the fall of Austria-Hungary in 1918 and the formation of Yugoslavia. In World War II, the city was annexed by Italy, then liberated by the Partisans after the Italian capitulation in 1943. It was then re-occupied by Germany, which granted it to its puppet Independent State of Croatia. The city was liberated again by the Partisans in 1944, and was included in the post-war Socialist Yugoslavia, as part of its republic of Croatia. In 1991, Croatia seceded from Yugoslavia amid the Croatian War of Independence.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Split, Croatia · See more »

Treccani

The Enciclopedia Italiana di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti (Italian for "Italian Encyclopaedia of Science, Letters, and Arts"), best known as Treccani for its developer Giovanni Treccani or Enciclopedia Italiana, is an Italian-language encyclopaedia.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Treccani · See more »

Trogir

Trogir (Tragurium; Traù; Ancient Greek: Τραγύριον, Tragyrion or Τραγούριον, Tragourion Trogkir) is a historic town and harbour on the Adriatic coast in Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia, with a population of 10,818 (2011) and a total municipality population of 13,260 (2011).

New!!: Dalmatian language and Trogir · See more »

Tuone Udaina

Tuone Udaina (1823 – June 10, 1898; Antonio Udina in Italian) was the last person to have any active knowledge of the Dalmatian language, a Romance language that had evolved from Latin along the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Tuone Udaina · See more »

University of Michigan

The University of Michigan (UM, U-M, U of M, or UMich), often simply referred to as Michigan, is a public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

New!!: Dalmatian language and University of Michigan · See more »

University of North Carolina Press

The University of North Carolina Press (or UNC Press), founded in 1922, is a university press that is part of the University of North Carolina.

New!!: Dalmatian language and University of North Carolina Press · See more »

Venetian language

Venetian or Venetan (Venetian: vèneto, vènet or łéngua vèneta) is a Romance language spoken as a native language by almost four million people in the northeast of Italy,Ethnologue.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Venetian language · See more »

Vulgar Latin

Vulgar Latin or Sermo Vulgaris ("common speech") was a nonstandard form of Latin (as opposed to Classical Latin, the standard and literary version of the language) spoken in the Mediterranean region during and after the classical period of the Roman Empire.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Vulgar Latin · See more »

Wiley-Blackwell

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Wiley-Blackwell · See more »

Zadar

Zadar (see other names) is the oldest continuously inhabited Croatian city.

New!!: Dalmatian language and Zadar · See more »

4th century

The 4th century (per the Julian calendar and Anno Domini/Common era) was the time period which lasted from 301 to 400.

New!!: Dalmatian language and 4th century · See more »

Redirects here:

Dalmatian Language, Dalmatic language, Dalmato-Romanic language, ISO 639:dlm, Ragusan dialect, Ragusan language, Ragusean Dalmatian, Vegliot, Vegliot Dalmatian language, Vegliot dialect, Vegliot language, Vegliote, Velioto.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dalmatian_language

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »