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Decimetre

Index Decimetre

The decimetre (SI symbol dm) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one tenth of a metre (the International System of Units base unit of length), ten centimetres or 1/0.254 (approximately 3.93700787) inches. [1]

16 relations: Centimetre, Conversion of units, Decametre, Deci-, Imperial units, International System of Units, Kilogram, Length, Litre, Metre, Metric prefix, Metric system, Orders of magnitude (length), SI base unit, Unit of measurement, United States customary units.

Centimetre

A centimetre (international spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures; symbol cm) or centimeter (American spelling) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one hundredth of a metre, centi being the SI prefix for a factor of.

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Conversion of units

Conversion of units is the conversion between different units of measurement for the same quantity, typically through multiplicative conversion factors.

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Decametre

A decametre or dekametre (American spelling: decameter, earlier dekameter; symbol dam,, This measure is included in the SI mostly for completeness: in principle, any combination of prefix and unit can be written, but many are rarely used in practice. One practical use of the decameter is for altitude of geopotential heights in meteorology. Meteorologists also use another seldom encountered SI prefix: hecto- in hectopascal (hPa). The volumetric form (see below) cubic decametre is convenient for describing large volumes of water such as in rivers and lakes. The square decametre (dam2) also known as the are (a), is the basis for the hectare (100 dam2), the standard metric unit of land registry.

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Deci-

Deci- (symbol d) is a decimal unit prefix in the metric system denoting a factor of one tenth.

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Imperial units

The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial or Exchequer Standards of 1825) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced.

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International System of Units

The International System of Units (SI, abbreviated from the French Système international (d'unités)) is the modern form of the metric system, and is the most widely used system of measurement.

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Kilogram

The kilogram or kilogramme (symbol: kg) is the base unit of mass in the International System of Units (SI), and is defined as being equal to the mass of the International Prototype of the Kilogram (IPK, also known as "Le Grand K" or "Big K"), a cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy stored by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures at Saint-Cloud, France.

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Length

In geometric measurements, length is the most extended dimension of an object.

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Litre

The litre (SI spelling) or liter (American spelling) (symbols L or l, sometimes abbreviated ltr) is an SI accepted metric system unit of volume equal to 1 cubic decimetre (dm3), 1,000 cubic centimetres (cm3) or 1/1,000 cubic metre. A cubic decimetre (or litre) occupies a volume of 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm (see figure) and is thus equal to one-thousandth of a cubic metre. The original French metric system used the litre as a base unit. The word litre is derived from an older French unit, the litron, whose name came from Greek — where it was a unit of weight, not volume — via Latin, and which equalled approximately 0.831 litres. The litre was also used in several subsequent versions of the metric system and is accepted for use with the SI,, p. 124. ("Days" and "hours" are examples of other non-SI units that SI accepts.) although not an SI unit — the SI unit of volume is the cubic metre (m3). The spelling used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures is "litre", a spelling which is shared by almost all English-speaking countries. The spelling "liter" is predominantly used in American English. One litre of liquid water has a mass of almost exactly one kilogram, because the kilogram was originally defined in 1795 as the mass of one cubic decimetre of water at the temperature of melting ice. Subsequent redefinitions of the metre and kilogram mean that this relationship is no longer exact.

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Metre

The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units (SI).

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Metric prefix

A metric prefix is a unit prefix that precedes a basic unit of measure to indicate a multiple or fraction of the unit.

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Metric system

The metric system is an internationally adopted decimal system of measurement.

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Orders of magnitude (length)

The following are examples of orders of magnitude for different lengths.

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SI base unit

The International System of Units (SI) defines seven units of measure as a basic set from which all other SI units can be derived.

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Unit of measurement

A unit of measurement is a definite magnitude of a quantity, defined and adopted by convention or by law, that is used as a standard for measurement of the same kind of quantity.

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United States customary units

United States customary units are a system of measurements commonly used in the United States.

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Redirects here:

Decimeter, Decimeters, Decimetres, .

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimetre

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