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Degree (music)

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In music theory, scale degree refers to the position of a particular note on a scale relative to the tonic, the first and main note of the scale from which each octave is assumed to begin. [1]

43 relations: Aeolian mode, Chord (music), Chromatic scale, Diatonic function, Diatonic scale, Dominant (music), Dorian mode, Factor (chord), Interval (music), Ionian mode, Leading-tone, Locrian mode, Lydian mode, Major scale, Major second, Major seventh, Major sixth, Major third, Mediant, Minor scale, Minor seventh, Minor sixth, Minor third, Mixolydian mode, Mode (music), Music education, Music theory, Musical note, Octave, Perfect fifth, Perfect fourth, Phrygian mode, Pitch class, Roman numeral analysis, Scale (music), Semitone, Set theory (music), Steps and skips, Subdominant, Submediant, Supertonic, Tonality, Tonic (music).

Aeolian mode

The Aeolian mode is a musical mode or, in modern usage, a diatonic scale called the natural minor scale.

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Chord (music)

A chord, in music, is any harmonic set of pitches consisting of two or more (usually three or more) notes (also called "pitches") that are heard as if sounding simultaneously.

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Chromatic scale

The chromatic scale is a musical scale with twelve pitches, each a semitone above or below its adjacent pitches.

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Diatonic function

In tonal music theory, a function (often called harmonic function, tonal function or diatonic function, or also chord area) is the relationship of a chord to a tonal center.

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Diatonic scale

In western music theory, a diatonic scale is a heptatonic scale that includes five whole steps (whole tones) and two half steps (semitones) in each octave, in which the two half steps are separated from each other by either two or three whole steps, depending on their position in the scale.

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Dominant (music)

In music, the dominant is the fifth scale degree of the diatonic scale, called "dominant" because it is next in importance to the tonic, and a dominant chord is any chord built upon that pitch, using the notes of the same diatonic scale.

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Dorian mode

Dorian mode or Doric mode can refer to three very different but interrelated subjects: one of the Ancient Greek harmoniai (characteristic melodic behaviour, or the scale structure associated with it), one of the medieval musical modes, or, most commonly, one of the modern modal diatonic scales, corresponding to the white notes from D to D, or any transposition of this.

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Factor (chord)

In music, a factor or chord factor is a member or component of a chord.

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Interval (music)

In music theory, an interval is the difference between two pitches.

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Ionian mode

Ionian mode is a musical mode or, in modern usage, a diatonic scale also called the major scale.

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Leading-tone

In music theory, a leading-note (also subsemitone, and called the leading-tone in the US) is a note or pitch which resolves or "leads" to a note one semitone higher or lower, being a lower and upper leading-tone, respectively.

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Locrian mode

The Locrian mode is either a musical mode or simply a diatonic scale.

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Lydian mode

The modern Lydian mode is a seven-tone musical scale formed from a rising pattern of pitches comprising three whole tones, a semitone, two more whole tones, and a final semitone.

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Major scale

The major scale (or Ionian scale) is one of the most commonly used musical scales, especially in Western music.

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Major second

In Western music theory, a major second (sometimes also called whole tone) is a second spanning two semitones.

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Major seventh

In classical music from Western culture, a seventh is a musical interval encompassing seven staff positions (see Interval number for more details), and the major seventh is one of two commonly occurring sevenths.

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Major sixth

In music from Western culture, a sixth is a musical interval encompassing six note letter names or staff positions (see Interval number for more details), and the major sixth is one of two commonly occurring sixths.

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Major third

In classical music from Western culture, a third is a musical interval encompassing three staff positions (see Interval number for more details), and the major third is a third spanning four semitones.

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Mediant

In music, the mediant (Latin: to be in the middle) is the third scale degree of a diatonic scale, being the note halfway between the tonic and the dominant.

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Minor scale

In music theory, the term minor scale refers to three scale formations – the natural minor scale (or Aeolian mode), the harmonic minor scale, and the melodic minor scale (ascending or descending) – rather than just one as with the major scale.

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Minor seventh

In music theory, a minor seventh is one of two musical intervals that span seven staff positions.

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Minor sixth

In classical music from Western culture, a sixth is a musical interval encompassing six staff positions (see Interval number for more details), and the minor sixth is one of two commonly occurring sixths.

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Minor third

In the music theory of Western culture, a minor third is a musical interval that encompasses three half steps, or semitones.

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Mixolydian mode

Mixolydian mode may refer to one of three things: the name applied to one of the ancient Greek harmoniai or tonoi, based on a particular octave species or scale; one of the medieval church modes; a modern musical mode or diatonic scale, related to the medieval mode.

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Mode (music)

In the theory of Western music, a mode is a type of musical scale coupled with a set of characteristic melodic behaviors.

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Music education

Music education is a field of study associated with the teaching and learning of music.

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Music theory

Music theory is the study of the practices and possibilities of music.

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Musical note

In music, a note is the pitch and duration of a sound, and also its representation in musical notation (♪, ♩).

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Octave

In music, an octave (octavus: eighth) or perfect octave is the interval between one musical pitch and another with half or double its frequency.

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Perfect fifth

In music theory, a perfect fifth is the musical interval corresponding to a pair of pitches with a frequency ratio of 3:2, or very nearly so.

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Perfect fourth

In classical music from Western culture, a fourth spans exactly four letter names (staff positions), while a perfect fourth (harmonic series) always involves the same interval, regardless of key (sharps and flats) between letters. A perfect fourth is the relationship between the third and fourth harmonics, sounding neither major nor minor, but consonant with an unstable quality (additive synthesis). In the key of C, the notes C and F constitute a perfect fourth relationship, as they're separated by four semitones (C, C#, D, D#, E, F). Up until the late 19th century, the perfect fourth was often called by its Greek name, diatessaron. A perfect fourth in just intonation corresponds to a pitch ratio of 4:3, or about 498 cents, while in equal temperament a perfect fourth is equal to five semitones, or 500 cents. The perfect fourth is a perfect interval like the unison, octave, and perfect fifth, and it is a sensory consonance. In common practice harmony, however, it is considered a stylistic dissonance in certain contexts, namely in two-voice textures and whenever it appears above the bass. If the bass note also happens to be the chord's root, the interval's upper note almost always temporarily displaces the third of any chord, and, in the terminology used in popular music, is then called a suspended fourth. Conventionally, adjacent strings of the double bass and of the bass guitar are a perfect fourth apart when unstopped, as are all pairs but one of adjacent guitar strings under standard guitar tuning. Sets of tom-tom drums are also commonly tuned in perfect fourths. The 4:3 just perfect fourth arises in the C major scale between G and C.

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Phrygian mode

The Phrygian mode (pronounced) can refer to three different musical modes: the ancient Greek tonos or harmonia sometimes called Phrygian, formed on a particular set of octave species or scales; the Medieval Phrygian mode, and the modern conception of the Phrygian mode as a diatonic scale, based on the latter.

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Pitch class

In music, a pitch class (p.c. or pc) is a set of all pitches that are a whole number of octaves apart, e.g., the pitch class C consists of the Cs in all octaves.

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Roman numeral analysis

In music, Roman numeral analysis uses Roman numerals to represent chords.

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Scale (music)

In music theory, a scale is any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch.

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Semitone

A semitone, also called a half step or a half tone, is the smallest musical interval commonly used in Western tonal music, and it is considered the most dissonant when sounded harmonically.

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Set theory (music)

Musical set theory provides concepts for categorizing musical objects and describing their relationships.

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Steps and skips

In music, a step, or conjunct motion,Bonds, Mark Evan (2006).

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Subdominant

In music, the subdominant is the technical name for the fourth tonal degree of the diatonic scale.

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Submediant

In music, the submediant is the sixth scale degree of the diatonic scale, the 'lower mediant', halfway between the tonic and the subdominant or 'lower dominant'.

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Supertonic

In music, the supertonic is the second degree or note of a diatonic scale, one step above the tonic.

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Tonality

Tonality is the arrangement of pitches and/or chords of a musical work in a hierarchy of perceived relations, stabilities, attractions and directionality.

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Tonic (music)

In music, the tonic is the first scale degree of a diatonic scale (the first note of a scale) and the tonal center or final resolution tone that is commonly used in the final cadence in tonal (musical key-based) classical music, popular music and traditional music.

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Redirects here:

Degree (scale), Degrees of the scale, Scale degree, Scale degrees, Scale-degree.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Degree_(music)

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