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Dionysius of Halicarnassus

Index Dionysius of Halicarnassus

Dionysius of Halicarnassus (Διονύσιος Ἀλεξάνδρου Ἁλικαρνασσεύς, Dionysios Alexandrou Halikarnasseus, "Dionysios son of Alexandros of Halikarnassos"; c. 60 BCafter 7 BC) was a Greek historian and teacher of rhetoric, who flourished during the reign of Caesar Augustus. [1]

112 relations: Aelius Dionysius, Aeneas, Amulius, Angelo Mai, Antemnae, Appian, Arcadia (ancient region), Aristotle, Attic Greek, Atticism, Augury, Augustus, Aventine Hill, Bibliotheca Teubneriana, Breastfeeding, Bride kidnapping, Caenina, Camerini, Cato the Elder, Celer (builder), Child abandonment, Circus Maximus, Classical Athens, Classical language, Collection Budé, Constantine VII, Crustumerium, Cures, Curia, Demosthenes, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Dinarchus, Dionysian imitatio, Education in ancient Rome, Edward Spelman, Fabia (gens), Faustinus, Faustulus, Ficus Ruminalis, First Punic War, Friedrich Sylburg, Gabii, Gnaeus Gellius, Greeks, Halicarnassus, Harvard University Press, Hermann Usener, Hersilia, Isaeus, Isocrates, ..., Johann Jakob Reiske, Laconia, Latin, Latins (Italic tribe), Latinus, Latium, Laurentia, Lavinium, Lawrencium, Licinius Macer, Lictor, List of narrative techniques, Livy, Loeb Classical Library, Lucius Cincius Alimentus, Ludwig Radermacher, Lupercal, Lupercalia, Lysias, Mars (mythology), Milan, Mimesis, Neptune (mythology), Numitor, Old Latium, Paideia, Palatine Hill, Patrician (ancient Rome), Patronage in ancient Rome, Piso, Plebs, Plutarch, Pompey, Procas, Prostitution in ancient Rome, Quintus Aelius Tubero, Quirinus, Quirites, Rhea Silvia, Rhetoric, Right of asylum, Roman cavalry, Roman Republic, Roman Senate, Roman tribe, Romanization (cultural), Rome, Romulus, Romulus and Remus, Routledge, Sabines, Separation of powers, Slaughterhouse, Spring (hydrology), Stillbirth, Tarpeia, Terentius Varro, Titus Tatius, Tribune, Trojan War, Valerius Antias, Vestal Virgin. Expand index (62 more) »

Aelius Dionysius

Aelius Dionysius (Αἴλιος Διονύσιος) was a Greek rhetorician from Halicarnassus, who lived in the time of the emperor Hadrian.

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Aeneas

In Greco-Roman mythology, Aeneas (Greek: Αἰνείας, Aineías, possibly derived from Greek αἰνή meaning "praised") was a Trojan hero, the son of the prince Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite (Venus).

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Amulius

In Roman mythology, Amulius was king of Alba Longa who ordered the death of his infant, twin grandnephews Romulus, the eventual founder and king of Rome, and Remus.

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Angelo Mai

Angelo Mai (Latin Angelus Maius; March 7, 1782September 8, 1854) was an Italian Cardinal and philologist.

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Antemnae

Antemnae was a town and Roman colony of ancient Latium in Italy.

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Appian

Appian of Alexandria (Ἀππιανὸς Ἀλεξανδρεύς Appianòs Alexandreús; Appianus Alexandrinus) was a Greek historian with Roman citizenship who flourished during the reigns of Emperors of Rome Trajan, Hadrian, and Antoninus Pius.

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Arcadia (ancient region)

Arcadia (Ἀρκαδία) was a region in the central Peloponnese.

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Aristotle

Aristotle (Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs,; 384–322 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidiki, in the north of Classical Greece.

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Attic Greek

Attic Greek is the Greek dialect of ancient Attica, including the city of Athens.

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Atticism

Atticism (meaning "favouring Attica", the region that includes Athens in Greece) was a rhetorical movement that began in the first quarter of the 1st century BC; it may also refer to the wordings and phrasings typical of this movement, in contrast with various contemporary forms of Koine Greek (both literary and vulgar), which continued to evolve in directions guided by the common usages of Hellenistic Greek.

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Augury

Augury is the practice from ancient Roman religion of interpreting omens from the observed flight of birds (aves).

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Augustus

Augustus (Augustus; 23 September 63 BC – 19 August 14 AD) was a Roman statesman and military leader who was the first Emperor of the Roman Empire, controlling Imperial Rome from 27 BC until his death in AD 14.

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Aventine Hill

The Aventine Hill (Collis Aventinus; Aventino) is one of the Seven Hills on which ancient Rome was built.

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Bibliotheca Teubneriana

The Bibliotheca Teubneriana, or Teubner editions of Greek and Latin texts, comprise the most thorough modern collection ever published of ancient (and some medieval) Greco-Roman literature.

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Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding, also known as nursing, is the feeding of babies and young children with milk from a woman's breast.

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Bride kidnapping

Bride kidnapping, also known as marriage by abduction or marriage by capture, is a practice in which a man abducts the woman he wishes to marry.

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Caenina

Caenina is a genus of moths in the family Lymantriidae.

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Camerini

Camerini refers to the people of Cameria or Camerium, an ancient city of Latium.

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Cato the Elder

Cato the Elder (Cato Major; 234–149 BC), born and also known as (Cato Censorius), (Cato Sapiens), and (Cato Priscus), was a Roman senator and historian known for his conservatism and opposition to Hellenization.

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Celer (builder)

According to Ovid's description of the founding of Rome by Romulus (Fasti IV.809 ff.), Celer was the name of an otherwise unknown foreman, appointed by Romulus to oversee the building of Rome's first walls.

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Child abandonment

Child abandonment is the practice of relinquishing interests and claims over one's offspring in an extralegal way with the intent of never again resuming or reasserting guardianship over them.

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Circus Maximus

The Circus Maximus (Latin for greatest or largest circus; Italian: Circo Massimo) is an ancient Roman chariot-racing stadium and mass entertainment venue located in Rome, Italy.

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Classical Athens

The city of Athens (Ἀθῆναι, Athênai a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯; Modern Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athínai) during the classical period of Ancient Greece (508–322 BC) was the major urban center of the notable polis (city-state) of the same name, located in Attica, Greece, leading the Delian League in the Peloponnesian War against Sparta and the Peloponnesian League.

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Classical language

A classical language is a language with a literature that is classical.

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Collection Budé

The Collection Budé, or the Collection des Universités de France, is a series of books comprising the Greek and Latin classics up to the middle of the 6th century (before Emperor Justinian).

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Constantine VII

Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos or Porphyrogenitus ("the Purple-born", that is, born in the purple marble slab-paneled imperial bed chambers; translit; 17–18 May 905 – 9 November 959) was the fourth Emperor of the Macedonian dynasty of the Byzantine Empire, reigning from 913 to 959.

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Crustumerium

Crustumerium (or Crustuminum) was an ancient town of Latium, on the edge of the Sabine territory, near the headwaters of the Allia, not far from the Tiber.

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Cures

Cures was an ancient Sabine town between the left bank of the Tiber and the Via Salaria, about from Rome.

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Curia

Curia (Latin plural curiae) in ancient Rome referred to one of the original groupings of the citizenry, eventually numbering 30, and later every Roman citizen was presumed to belong to one.

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Demosthenes

Demosthenes (Δημοσθένης Dēmosthénēs;; 384 – 12 October 322 BC) was a Greek statesman and orator of ancient Athens.

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Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology

The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology (1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia/biographical dictionary.

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Dinarchus

Dinarchus or Dinarch (Δείναρχος; Corinth, c. 361 – c. 291 BC) was a logographer (speechwriter) in Ancient Greece.

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Dionysian imitatio

Dionysian imitatio is the influential literary method of imitation as formulated by Greek author Dionysius of Halicarnassus in the first century BCE, which conceived it as the rhetorical practice of emulating, adapting, reworking and enriching a source text by an earlier author.

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Education in ancient Rome

Education in ancient Rome progressed from an informal, familial system of education in the early Republic to a tuition-based system during the late Republic and the Empire.

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Edward Spelman

Edward Spelman or Yallop (died 1767) was an English author and translator.

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Fabia (gens)

The gens Fabia was one of the most ancient patrician families at Rome.

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Faustinus

Faustinus was a 3rd-century CE political figure who launched a rebellion against the Gallic Emperor Tetricus I. His full name and his year of birth are unknown.

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Faustulus

In Roman mythology, Faustulus was the shepherd who found the infants Romulus and Remus, who were being suckled by a she-wolf, known as Lupa, on the Palatine Hill.

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Ficus Ruminalis

The Ficus Ruminalis was a wild fig tree that had religious and mythological significance in ancient Rome.

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First Punic War

The First Punic War (264 to 241 BC) was the first of three wars fought between Ancient Carthage and the Roman Republic, the two great powers of the Western Mediterranean.

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Friedrich Sylburg

Friedrich Sylburg (1536 – 17 February 1596) was a German classical scholar.

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Gabii

Gabii was an ancient city of Latium, located due east of Rome along the Via Praenestina, which was in early times known as the Via Gabina.

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Gnaeus Gellius

Gnaeus Gellius (2nd half of 2nd century BC) was the author of a history of Rome from the earliest epoch, extending at least to the year 145 BC, as indicated by Censorinus.

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Greeks

The Greeks or Hellenes (Έλληνες, Éllines) are an ethnic group native to Greece, Cyprus, southern Albania, Italy, Turkey, Egypt and, to a lesser extent, other countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. They also form a significant diaspora, with Greek communities established around the world.. Greek colonies and communities have been historically established on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea, but the Greek people have always been centered on the Aegean and Ionian seas, where the Greek language has been spoken since the Bronze Age.. Until the early 20th century, Greeks were distributed between the Greek peninsula, the western coast of Asia Minor, the Black Sea coast, Cappadocia in central Anatolia, Egypt, the Balkans, Cyprus, and Constantinople. Many of these regions coincided to a large extent with the borders of the Byzantine Empire of the late 11th century and the Eastern Mediterranean areas of ancient Greek colonization. The cultural centers of the Greeks have included Athens, Thessalonica, Alexandria, Smyrna, and Constantinople at various periods. Most ethnic Greeks live nowadays within the borders of the modern Greek state and Cyprus. The Greek genocide and population exchange between Greece and Turkey nearly ended the three millennia-old Greek presence in Asia Minor. Other longstanding Greek populations can be found from southern Italy to the Caucasus and southern Russia and Ukraine and in the Greek diaspora communities in a number of other countries. Today, most Greeks are officially registered as members of the Greek Orthodox Church.CIA World Factbook on Greece: Greek Orthodox 98%, Greek Muslim 1.3%, other 0.7%. Greeks have greatly influenced and contributed to culture, arts, exploration, literature, philosophy, politics, architecture, music, mathematics, science and technology, business, cuisine, and sports, both historically and contemporarily.

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Halicarnassus

Halicarnassus (Ἁλικαρνᾱσσός, Halikarnāssós or Ἀλικαρνασσός, Alikarnāssós, Halikarnas) was an ancient Greek city which stood on the site of modern Bodrum in Turkey.

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Harvard University Press

Harvard University Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing.

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Hermann Usener

Hermann Karl Usener (23 October 1834 – 21 October 1905) was a German scholar in the fields of philology and comparative religion.

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Hersilia

In Roman mythology, Hersilia was a figure in the foundation myth of Rome.

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Isaeus

Isaeus (Ἰσαῖος Isaios; fl. early 4th century BC) was one of the ten Attic Orators according to the Alexandrian canon.

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Isocrates

Isocrates (Ἰσοκράτης; 436–338 BC), an ancient Greek rhetorician, was one of the ten Attic orators.

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Johann Jakob Reiske

Johann Jakob Reiske (December 25, 1716 – August 14, 1774) was a German scholar and physician.

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Laconia

Laconia (Λακωνία, Lakonía), also known as Lacedaemonia, is a region in the southeastern part of the Peloponnese peninsula.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Latins (Italic tribe)

The Latins (Latin: Latini), sometimes known as the Latians, were an Italic tribe which included the early inhabitants of the city of Rome.

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Latinus

Latinus (Lătīnŭs; Λατῖνος) was a figure in both Greek and Roman mythology.

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Latium

Latium is the region of central western Italy in which the city of Rome was founded and grew to be the capital city of the Roman Empire.

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Laurentia

Laurentia or the North American Craton is a large continental craton that forms the ancient geological core of the North American continent.

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Lavinium

Lavinium was a port city of Latium, to the south of Rome, midway between the Tiber river at Ostia and Anzio.

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Lawrencium

Lawrencium is a synthetic chemical element with symbol Lr (formerly Lw) and atomic number 103.

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Licinius Macer

Gaius Licinius Macer (died 66BC) was an official and annalist of ancient Rome.

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Lictor

A lictor (possibly from ligare, "to bind") was a Roman civil servant who was a bodyguard to magistrates who held imperium.

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List of narrative techniques

A narrative technique (also known more narrowly for literary fictional narratives as a literary technique, literary device, or fictional device) is any of several specific methods the creator of a narrative uses to convey what they want—in other words, a strategy used in the making of a narrative to relay information to the audience and, particularly, to "develop" the narrative, usually in order to make it more complete, complicated, or interesting.

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Livy

Titus Livius Patavinus (64 or 59 BCAD 12 or 17) – often rendered as Titus Livy, or simply Livy, in English language sources – was a Roman historian.

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Loeb Classical Library

The Loeb Classical Library (LCL; named after James Loeb) is a series of books, today published by Harvard University Press, which presents important works of ancient Greek and Latin literature in a way designed to make the text accessible to the broadest possible audience, by presenting the original Greek or Latin text on each left-hand page, and a fairly literal translation on the facing page.

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Lucius Cincius Alimentus

Lucius Cincius Alimentus was a celebrated Roman annalist and jurist, who was praetor in Sicily in 209 BC, with the command of two legions.

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Ludwig Radermacher

Ludwig Radermacher (31 October 1867 – 28 June 1952) was a German-Austrian classical philologist born in Siegburg.

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Lupercal

The Lupercal (from lupa, Latin for she-wolf) was a cave at the southwest foot of the Palatine Hill in Rome, located somewhere between the temple of Magna Mater and the Basilica di Sant'Anastasia al Palatino.

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Lupercalia

Lupercalia was a very ancient, possibly pre-Roman pastoral annual festival, observed in the city of Rome on February 15, to avert evil spirits and purify the city, releasing health and fertility.

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Lysias

Lysias (Λυσίας; c. 445 BC – c. 380 BC) was a logographer (speech writer) in Ancient Greece.

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Mars (mythology)

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Mars (Mārs) was the god of war and also an agricultural guardian, a combination characteristic of early Rome.

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Milan

Milan (Milano; Milan) is a city in northern Italy, capital of Lombardy, and the second-most populous city in Italy after Rome, with the city proper having a population of 1,380,873 while its province-level municipality has a population of 3,235,000.

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Mimesis

Mimesis (μίμησις (mīmēsis), from μιμεῖσθαι (mīmeisthai), "to imitate", from μῖμος (mimos), "imitator, actor") is a critical and philosophical term that carries a wide range of meanings, which include imitation, representation, mimicry, imitatio, receptivity, nonsensuous similarity, the act of resembling, the act of expression, and the presentation of the self.

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Neptune (mythology)

Neptune (Neptūnus) was the god of freshwater and the sea in Roman religion.

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Numitor

In Roman mythology, King Numitor of Alba Longa, was the son of Procas, descendant of Aeneas the Trojan, and father of Rhea Silvia and Lausus In 794 BC Procas died and was meant to be succeeded by Numitor.

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Old Latium

Old Latium (Latium vetus or Latium antiquum) is a region of the Italian peninsula bounded to the north by the river Tiber, to the east by the central Apennine mountains, to the west by the Mediterranean Sea and to the south by Monte Circeo.

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Paideia

In the culture of ancient Greece, the term paideia (also spelled paedeia) (παιδεία, paideía) referred to the rearing and education of the ideal member of the polis.

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Palatine Hill

The Palatine Hill (Collis Palatium or Mons Palatinus; Palatino) is the centremost of the Seven Hills of Rome and is one of the most ancient parts of the city.

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Patrician (ancient Rome)

The patricians (from patricius) were originally a group of ruling class families in ancient Rome.

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Patronage in ancient Rome

Patronage (clientela) was the distinctive relationship in ancient Roman society between the patronus (plural patroni, "patron") and their cliens (plural clientes, "client").

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Piso

The Piso family of ancient Rome was a prominent plebeian branch of the gens Calpurnia, descended from Calpus the son of Numa Pompilius.

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Plebs

The plebs were, in ancient Rome, the general body of free Roman citizens who were not patricians, as determined by the census.

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Plutarch

Plutarch (Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos,; c. CE 46 – CE 120), later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος) was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives and Moralia.

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Pompey

Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (29 September 106 BC – 28 September 48 BC), usually known in English as Pompey or Pompey the Great, was a military and political leader of the late Roman Republic.

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Procas

Procas or Proca (said to have reigned 817-794 BC) was one of the Latin kings of Alba Longa in the mythic tradition of the founding of Rome.

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Prostitution in ancient Rome

Prostitution in ancient Rome was legal and licensed.

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Quintus Aelius Tubero

Quintus Aelius Tubero (born 74 BC – fl. 11 BC) was a Roman jurist, statesman and writer.

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Quirinus

In Roman mythology and religion, Quirinus is an early god of the Roman state.

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Quirites

Quirites was an early name of the citizens of Ancient Rome.

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Rhea Silvia

Rhea Silvia (also written as Rea Silvia), and also known as Ilia, was the mythical mother of the twins Romulus and Remus, who founded the city of Rome.

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Rhetoric

Rhetoric is the art of discourse, wherein a writer or speaker strives to inform, persuade, or motivate particular audiences in specific situations.

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Right of asylum

The right of asylum (sometimes called right of political asylum, from the Ancient Greek word ἄσυλον) is an ancient juridical concept, under which a person persecuted by his own country may be protected by another sovereign authority, such as another country or church official, who in medieval times could offer sanctuary.

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Roman cavalry

Roman cavalry (Latin: equites Romani) refers to the horse-mounted forces of the Roman army throughout the Regal, Republican, and Imperial eras.

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Roman Republic

The Roman Republic (Res publica Romana) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire.

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Roman Senate

The Roman Senate (Senatus Romanus; Senato Romano) was a political institution in ancient Rome.

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Roman tribe

A tribus, or tribe, was a division of the Roman people, constituting the voting units of a legislative assembly of the Roman Republic.

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Romanization (cultural)

Romanization or Latinization (or Romanisation or Latinisation), in the historical and cultural meanings of both terms, indicate different historical processes, such as acculturation, integration and assimilation of newly incorporated and peripheral populations by the Roman Republic and the later Roman Empire.

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Rome

Rome (Roma; Roma) is the capital city of Italy and a special comune (named Comune di Roma Capitale).

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Romulus

Romulus was the legendary founder and first king of Rome.

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Romulus and Remus

In Roman mythology, Romulus and Remus are twin brothers, whose story tells the events that led to the founding of the city of Rome and the Roman Kingdom by Romulus.

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Routledge

Routledge is a British multinational publisher.

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Sabines

The Sabines (Sabini; Σαβῖνοι Sabĩnoi; Sabini, all exonyms) were an Italic tribe which lived in the central Apennines of ancient Italy, also inhabiting Latium north of the Anio before the founding of Rome.

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Separation of powers

The separation of powers is a model for the governance of a state.

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Slaughterhouse

A slaughterhouse or abattoir is a facility where animals are slaughtered for consumption as food.

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Spring (hydrology)

A spring is any natural situation where water flows from an aquifer to the Earth's surface.

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Stillbirth

Stillbirth is typically defined as fetal death at or after 20 to 28 weeks of pregnancy.

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Tarpeia

In Roman mythology, Tarpeia, daughter of the Roman commander Spurius Tarpeius, was a Vestal virgin who betrayed the city of Rome to the Sabines at the time of their women's abduction for what she thought would be a reward of jewellery.

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Terentius Varro

Terentius Varro was the name used by men in a branch of the gens Terentia in ancient Rome, including.

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Titus Tatius

According to the Roman foundation myth, Titus Tatius was the king of the Sabines from Cures and joint-ruler of Rome for several years.

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Tribune

Tribune was the title of various elected officials in ancient Rome.

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Trojan War

In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans (Greeks) after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, king of Sparta.

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Valerius Antias

Valerius Antias (1st century BC) was an ancient Roman annalist whom Livy mentions as a source.

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Vestal Virgin

In ancient Rome, the Vestals or Vestal Virgins (Latin: Vestālēs, singular Vestālis) were priestesses of Vesta, goddess of the hearth.

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Redirects here:

Antiquitates Romanae, De Compositione Verborum, Denys d'Halicarnasse, Dion Halicarnassus, Dionys. Hal., Dionysios Halicarnassensis, Dionysios of Halicarnassos, Dionysios of Halikarnassos, Dionysius Halicarnassensis, Dionysius Halicarnassius, Dionysius Halicarnassus, Dionysius of Hallicarnassus, Dionysius of halicarnassus, Dionysus Of Halicarnassus, Dionysus of Halicarnassus, Dyonisios of Alicarnassos, Roman Antiquities.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dionysius_of_Halicarnassus

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