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Duchy of Aquitaine

Index Duchy of Aquitaine

The Duchy of Aquitaine (Ducat d'Aquitània,, Duché d'Aquitaine) was a historical fiefdom in western, central and southern areas of present-day France to the south of the Loire River, although its extent, as well as its name, fluctuated greatly over the centuries, at times comprising much of what is now southwestern France (Gascony) and central France. [1]

137 relations: Agenais, Albi, Angevin Empire, Angevin kings of England, Anjou, Aquitaine, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, Battle of Agincourt, Battle of Castillon, Battle of Toulouse (721), Battle of Vouillé, Bordeaux, Bourbonnais, Bourges, Burgundy, Carolingian dynasty, Carolingian Empire, Centre-Val de Loire, Charibert II, Charlemagne, Charles Martel, Charles the Bald, Charles the Simple, Charles VII of France, Childebert II, Chlothar II, Clovis I, Cluny Abbey, Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor, Count of Périgord, Count of Poitiers, Count of Toulouse, Counts and Dukes of Angoulême, Counts and dukes of Anjou, Counts of Blois, County of Barcelona, County of La Marche, County of Rodez, County of Toulouse, Crown lands of France, Dagobert I, Dauphin of France, Déols, Duchy of Brittany, Duchy of Gascony, Duke of Aquitaine, Edward III of England, Edward the Black Prince, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Felix of Aquitaine, ..., Fief, France, Francia, Franks, Gallia Aquitania, Gascony, Gévaudan, Guntram, Guyenne, Henry II of England, Henry IV of England, Henry V of England, Henry VI of England, High Middle Ages, History of Auvergne, History of Limousin, House of Plantagenet, House of Valois, Hugh Capet, Hundred Years' War, Issoudun, John II of France, John of Gaunt, Kingdom of Aragon, Kingdom of Arles, Kingdom of Burgundy, Kingdom of England, Kingdom of France, Kingdom of Italy (Holy Roman Empire), Kingdom of Navarre, Languedoc, Limoges, Loire, Louis the Stammerer, Louis VII of France, Louis, Duke of Guyenne, Marca Hispanica, Mayor of the Palace, Medieval Latin, Middle Ages, Normandy, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, Occitania, Occitanie (administrative region), Odo the Great, Old Occitan, Orléans, Pays de la Loire, Pepin I of Aquitaine, Pepin II of Aquitaine, Philip IV of France, Philip VI of France, Poitiers, Primogeniture, Provence, Pyrenees, Quercy, Ramnulfids, Ranulf I of Aquitaine, Regions of France, Richard I of England, Richard II of England, Roman law, Rouergue, Saintonge, Septimania, Treaty of Andelot, Treaty of Brétigny, Treaty of Picquigny, Treaty of Troyes, Umayyad conquest of Hispania, Velay, Visigothic Code, Visigothic Kingdom, Visigoths, Waiofar, Wars of the Roses, Wenilo (archbishop of Sens), West Francia, Western Christianity, William I, Duke of Aquitaine, William II, Duke of Aquitaine, William IX, Duke of Aquitaine, William V, Duke of Aquitaine, William VIII, Duke of Aquitaine, William X, Duke of Aquitaine, 7th century. Expand index (87 more) »

Agenais

Agenais, or Agenois, was an ancient region that became a county (Old French: conté or cunté) of France, south of Périgord.

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Albi

Albi (Albi) is a commune in southern France.

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Angevin Empire

The Angevin Empire (L'Empire Plantagenêt) is a collective exonym referring to the possessions of the Angevin kings of England, who also held lands in France, during the 12th and 13th centuries.

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Angevin kings of England

The Angevins ("from Anjou") were a royal house that ruled England in the 12th and early 13th centuries; its monarchs were Henry II, Richard I and John.

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Anjou

Anjou (Andegavia) is a historical province of France straddling the lower Loire River.

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Aquitaine

Aquitaine (Aquitània; Akitania; Poitevin-Saintongeais: Aguiéne), archaic Guyenne/Guienne (Occitan: Guiana) was a traditional region of France, and was an administrative region of France until 1 January 2016.

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Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes

Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes (Ôvèrgne-Rôno-Ârpes, Auvèrnhe Ròse Aups, Alvernia-Rodano-Alpi) is a region of France created by the territorial reform of French Regions in 2014; it resulted from the merger of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes.

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Battle of Agincourt

The Battle of Agincourt (Azincourt) was a major English victory in the Hundred Years' War.

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Battle of Castillon

The Battle of Castillon was a battle fought on 17 July 1453 in Gascony near the town of Castillon-sur-Dordogne (later Castillon-la-Bataille).

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Battle of Toulouse (721)

The Battle of Toulouse (721) was a victory of an Aquitanian Christian army led by Duke Odo of Aquitaine over an Umayyad Muslim army besieging the city of Toulouse, and led by the governor of Al-Andalus, Al-Samh ibn Malik al-Khawlani.

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Battle of Vouillé

The Battle of Vouillé — or Vouglé (from Latin Campus Vogladensis) — was fought in the northern marches of Visigothic territory, at Vouillé near Poitiers (Gaul), in the spring of 507 between the Franks commanded by Clovis and the Visigoths commanded by Alaric II.

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Bordeaux

Bordeaux (Gascon Occitan: Bordèu) is a port city on the Garonne in the Gironde department in Southwestern France.

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Bourbonnais

Bourbonnais was a historic province in the centre of France that corresponded to the modern département of Allier, along with part of the département of Cher.

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Bourges

Bourges is a city in central France on the Yèvre river.

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Burgundy

Burgundy (Bourgogne) is a historical territory and a former administrative region of France.

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Carolingian dynasty

The Carolingian dynasty (known variously as the Carlovingians, Carolingus, Carolings or Karlings) was a Frankish noble family founded by Charles Martel with origins in the Arnulfing and Pippinid clans of the 7th century AD.

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Carolingian Empire

The Carolingian Empire (800–888) was a large empire in western and central Europe during the early Middle Ages.

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Centre-Val de Loire

Centre-Val de Loire ("Centre-Loire Valley") is one of the 18 administrative regions of France.

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Charibert II

Charibert II (607/617–8 April 632), a son of Clotaire II and his junior wife Sichilde, was briefly King of Aquitaine from 629 to his death, with his capital at Toulouse.

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Charlemagne

Charlemagne or Charles the Great (Karl der Große, Carlo Magno; 2 April 742 – 28 January 814), numbered Charles I, was King of the Franks from 768, King of the Lombards from 774, and Holy Roman Emperor from 800.

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Charles Martel

Charles Martel (c. 688 – 22 October 741) was a Frankish statesman and military leader who as Duke and Prince of the Franks and Mayor of the Palace, was the de facto ruler of Francia from 718 until his death.

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Charles the Bald

Charles the Bald (13 June 823 – 6 October 877) was the King of West Francia (843–877), King of Italy (875–877) and Holy Roman Emperor (875–877, as Charles II).

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Charles the Simple

Charles III (17 September 879 – 7 October 929), called the Simple or the Straightforward (from the Latin Carolus Simplex), was the King of West Francia from 898 until 922 and the King of Lotharingia from 911 until 919–23.

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Charles VII of France

Charles VII (22 February 1403 – 22 July 1461), called the Victorious (le Victorieux)Charles VII, King of France, Encyclopedia of the Hundred Years War, ed.

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Childebert II

Childebert II (570–595) was the Merovingian king of Austrasia, which included Provence at the time, from 575 until his death in 595, the eldest and succeeding son of Sigebert I, and the king of Burgundy from 592 to his death, as the adopted and succeeding son of his uncle Guntram.

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Chlothar II

Chlothar II (or Chlotar, Clothar, Clotaire, Chlotochar, or Hlothar; 584–629), called the Great or the Young, was King of Neustria and King of the Franks, and the son of Chilperic I and his third wife, Fredegund.

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Clovis I

Clovis (Chlodovechus; reconstructed Frankish: *Hlōdowig; 466 – 27 November 511) was the first king of the Franks to unite all of the Frankish tribes under one ruler, changing the form of leadership from a group of royal chieftains to rule by a single king and ensuring that the kingship was passed down to his heirs.

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Cluny Abbey

Cluny Abbey (formerly also Cluni, or Clugny) is a former Benedictine monastery in Cluny, Saône-et-Loire, France.

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Conrad II, Holy Roman Emperor

Conrad II (4 June 1039), also known as and, was Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire from 1027 until his death in 1039.

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Count of Périgord

Count of Périgord (Fr.: comte de Périgord) is a noble title in the peerage of France, first created for Emenon, who was also Count of Poitiers and Count of Angoulême.

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Count of Poitiers

Among the people who have borne the title of Count of Poitiers (or Poitou, in what is now France but in the Middle Ages became part of Aquitaine) are.

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Count of Toulouse

The Count of Toulouse was the ruler of Toulouse during the 8th to 13th centuries.

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Counts and Dukes of Angoulême

Angoulême (L'Angoumois) in western France was part of the Carolingian Empire as the kingdom of Aquitaine.

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Counts and dukes of Anjou

The Count of Anjou was the ruler of the county of Anjou, first granted by Charles the Bald in the 9th century to Robert the Strong.

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Counts of Blois

The County of Blois was originally centred on Blois, south of Paris, France.

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County of Barcelona

The County of Barcelona (Comitatus Barcinonensis) was originally a frontier region under the rule of the Carolingian dynasty.

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County of La Marche

The County of Marche (la Marcha) was a medieval French county, approximately corresponding to the modern département of Creuse.

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County of Rodez

The County of Rodez was a fief of the County of Toulouse formed out of part of the old County of Rouergue in what is today Aveyron, France.

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County of Toulouse

The County of Toulouse was a territory in southern France consisting of the city of Toulouse and its environs, ruled by the Count of Toulouse from the late 9th century until the late 13th century.

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Crown lands of France

The crown lands, crown estate, royal domain or (in French) domaine royal (from demesne) of France refers to the lands, fiefs and rights directly possessed by the kings of France.

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Dagobert I

Dagobert I (Dagobertus; 603/605 – 19 January 639 AD) was the king of Austrasia (623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria and Burgundy (629–639).

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Dauphin of France

The Dauphin of France (Dauphin de France)—strictly The Dauphin of Viennois (Dauphin de Viennois)—was the dynastic title given to the heir apparent to the throne of France from 1350 to 1791 and 1824 to 1830.

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Déols

Déols is a commune in the department of Indre in the Centre-Val de Loire Region of central France.

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Duchy of Brittany

The Duchy of Brittany (Breton: Dugelezh Breizh, French: Duché de Bretagne) was a medieval feudal state that existed between approximately 939 and 1547.

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Duchy of Gascony

The Duchy of Gascony or Duchy of Vasconia (Baskoniako dukerria; ducat de Gasconha; duché de Gascogne, duché de Vasconie) was a duchy in present southwestern France and northeastern Spain, part corresponding to the modern region of Gascony after 824.

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Duke of Aquitaine

The Duke of Aquitaine (Duc d'Aquitània, Duc d'Aquitaine) was the ruler of the ancient region of Aquitaine (not to be confused with modern-day Aquitaine) under the supremacy of Frankish, English, and later French kings.

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Edward III of England

Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England and Lord of Ireland from January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II.

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Edward the Black Prince

Edward of Woodstock, known as the Black Prince (15 June 1330 – 8 June 1376), was the eldest son of Edward III, King of England, and Philippa of Hainault and participated in the early years of the Hundred Years War.

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Eleanor of Aquitaine

Eleanor of Aquitaine (Aliénor d'Aquitaine, Éléonore,; 1124 – 1 April 1204) was queen consort of France (1137–1152) and England (1154–1189) and duchess of Aquitaine in her own right (1137–1204).

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Felix of Aquitaine

Felix (floruit 660s) was a patrician in the Frankish kingdom under the Merovingians.

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Fief

A fief (feudum) was the central element of feudalism and consisted of heritable property or rights granted by an overlord to a vassal who held it in fealty (or "in fee") in return for a form of feudal allegiance and service, usually given by the personal ceremonies of homage and fealty.

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France

France, officially the French Republic (République française), is a sovereign state whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.

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Francia

Francia, also called the Kingdom of the Franks (Regnum Francorum), or Frankish Empire was the largest post-Roman Barbarian kingdom in Western Europe.

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Franks

The Franks (Franci or gens Francorum) were a collection of Germanic peoples, whose name was first mentioned in 3rd century Roman sources, associated with tribes on the Lower and Middle Rhine in the 3rd century AD, on the edge of the Roman Empire.

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Gallia Aquitania

Gallia Aquitania, also known as Aquitaine or Aquitaine Gaul, was a province of the Roman Empire.

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Gascony

Gascony (Gascogne; Gascon: Gasconha; Gaskoinia) is an area of southwest France that was part of the "Province of Guyenne and Gascony" prior to the French Revolution.

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Gévaudan

Gévaudan (Gavaudan, Gevaudan) is a historical area of France in Lozère département.

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Guntram

Saint Gontrand (c. AD 532 in Soissons – 28 January AD 592 in Chalon-sur-Saône), also called Gontran, Gontram, Guntram, Gunthram, Gunthchramn, and Guntramnus, was the king of the Kingdom of Orleans from AD 561 to AD 592.

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Guyenne

Guyenne or Guienne (Guiana) was an old French province which corresponded roughly to the Roman province of Aquitania Secunda and the archdiocese of Bordeaux.

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Henry II of England

Henry II (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189), also known as Henry Curtmantle (Court-manteau), Henry FitzEmpress or Henry Plantagenet, ruled as Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Nantes, King of England and Lord of Ireland; at various times, he also partially controlled Wales, Scotland and Brittany.

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Henry IV of England

Henry IV (15 April 1367 – 20 March 1413), also known as Henry Bolingbroke, was King of England and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413, and asserted the claim of his grandfather, Edward III, to the Kingdom of France.

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Henry V of England

Henry V (9 August 1386 – 31 August 1422) was King of England from 1413 until his death at the age of 36 in 1422.

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Henry VI of England

Henry VI (6 December 1421 – 21 May 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471, and disputed King of France from 1422 to 1453.

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High Middle Ages

The High Middle Ages, or High Medieval Period, was the period of European history that commenced around 1000 AD and lasted until around 1250 AD.

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History of Auvergne

The history of the Auvergne dates back to the early Middle Ages, when it was a historic province in south central France.

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History of Limousin

The history of Limousin (Lemosin), one of the traditional provinces of France, reaches back to Celtic and Roman times.

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House of Plantagenet

The House of Plantagenet was a royal house which originated from the lands of Anjou in France.

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House of Valois

The House of Valois was a cadet branch of the Capetian dynasty.

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Hugh Capet

Hugh CapetCapet is a byname of uncertain meaning distinguishing him from his father Hugh the Great.

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Hundred Years' War

The Hundred Years' War was a series of conflicts waged from 1337 to 1453 by the House of Plantagenet, rulers of the Kingdom of England, against the House of Valois, over the right to rule the Kingdom of France.

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Issoudun

Issoudun is a commune in the Indre department in the Centre-Val de Loire region of France.

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John II of France

John II (Jean II; 26 April 1319 – 8 April 1364), called John the Good (French: Jean le Bon), was a monarch of the House of Valois who ruled as King of France from 1350 until his death.

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John of Gaunt

John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, KG (6 March 1340 – 3 February 1399) was an English nobleman, soldier, statesman, and prince, the third of five surviving sons of King Edward III of England.

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Kingdom of Aragon

The Kingdom of Aragon (Reino d'Aragón, Regne d'Aragó, Regnum Aragonum, Reino de Aragón) was a medieval and early modern kingdom on the Iberian Peninsula, corresponding to the modern-day autonomous community of Aragon, in Spain.

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Kingdom of Arles

The Kingdom of Arles (also Kingdom of Arelat or Second Kingdom of Burgundy) was a Frankish dominion established from lands of the early medieval Kingdom of the Burgundians in 933 by the merger of the kingdoms of Upper and Lower Burgundy under King Rudolf II.

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Kingdom of Burgundy

Kingdom of Burgundy was a name given to various states located in Western Europe during the Middle Ages.

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Kingdom of England

The Kingdom of England (French: Royaume d'Angleterre; Danish: Kongeriget England; German: Königreich England) was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from the 10th century—when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms—until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

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Kingdom of France

The Kingdom of France (Royaume de France) was a medieval and early modern monarchy in Western Europe.

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Kingdom of Italy (Holy Roman Empire)

The Kingdom of Italy (Latin: Regnum Italiae or Regnum Italicum, Italian: Regno d'Italia) was one of the constituent kingdoms of the Holy Roman Empire, along with the kingdoms of Germany, Bohemia, and Burgundy.

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Kingdom of Navarre

The Kingdom of Navarre (Nafarroako Erresuma, Reino de Navarra, Royaume de Navarre, Regnum Navarrae), originally the Kingdom of Pamplona (Iruñeko Erresuma), was a Basque-based kingdom that occupied lands on either side of the western Pyrenees, alongside the Atlantic Ocean between present-day Spain and France.

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Languedoc

Languedoc (Lengadòc) is a former province of France.

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Limoges

Limoges (Occitan: Lemòtges or Limòtges) is a city and commune, the capital of the Haute-Vienne department and was the administrative capital of the former Limousin region in west-central France.

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Loire

The Loire (Léger; Liger) is the longest river in France and the 171st longest in the world.

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Louis the Stammerer

Louis the Stammerer (Louis le Bègue; 1 November 846 – 10 April 879) was the King of Aquitaine and later the King of West Francia.

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Louis VII of France

Louis VII (called the Younger or the Young; Louis le Jeune; 1120 – 18 September 1180) was King of the Franks from 1137 until his death.

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Louis, Duke of Guyenne

Louis (22 January 1397 – 18 December 1415) was the eighth of twelve children of King Charles VI of France and Isabeau of Bavaria.

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Marca Hispanica

The Marca Hispanica (Marca Hispánica, Marca Hispànica, Aragonese and Marca Hispanica, Hispaniako Marka, Marche d'Espagne), also known as the March of Barcelona, was a military buffer zone beyond the former province of Septimania, created by Charlemagne in 795 as a defensive barrier between the Umayyad Moors of Al-Andalus and the Frankish Carolingian Empire (Duchy of Gascony, the Duchy of Aquitaine and Carolingian Septimania).

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Mayor of the Palace

Under the Merovingian dynasty, the mayor of the palace (maior palatii) or majordomo (maior domus) was the manager of the household of the Frankish king.

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Medieval Latin

Medieval Latin was the form of Latin used in the Middle Ages, primarily as a medium of scholarly exchange, as the liturgical language of Chalcedonian Christianity and the Roman Catholic Church, and as a language of science, literature, law, and administration.

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Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages (or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century.

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Normandy

Normandy (Normandie,, Norman: Normaundie, from Old French Normanz, plural of Normant, originally from the word for "northman" in several Scandinavian languages) is one of the 18 regions of France, roughly referring to the historical Duchy of Normandy.

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Nouvelle-Aquitaine

Nouvelle-Aquitaine ("New Aquitaine"; Nòva Aquitània; Akitania Berria; Poitevin-Saintongeais: Novéle-Aguiéne) is the largest administrative region in France, located in the southwest of the country.

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Occitania

Occitania (Occitània,,,, or) is the historical region and a nation, in southern Europe where Occitan was historically the main language spoken, and where it is sometimes still used, for the most part as a second language.

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Occitanie (administrative region)

Occitanie (Occitània,, Occitània) is an administrative region of France that was created on 1 January 2016 from former French regions Languedoc-Roussillon and Midi-Pyrénées.

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Odo the Great

Odo the Great (also called Eudes or Eudo) (died 735), was the Duke of Aquitaine by 700.

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Old Occitan

Old Occitan (Modern Occitan: occitan ancian, occità antic), also called Old Provençal, was the earliest form of the Occitano-Romance languages, as attested in writings dating from the eighth through the fourteenth centuries.

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Orléans

Orléans is a prefecture and commune in north-central France, about 111 kilometres (69 miles) southwest of Paris.

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Pays de la Loire

Pays de la Loire (Broioù al Liger, meaning Loire Country) is one of the 18 regions of France.

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Pepin I of Aquitaine

Pepin I or Pepin I of Aquitaine (797 – 13 December 838) was King of Aquitaine and Duke of Maine.

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Pepin II of Aquitaine

Pepin II, called the Younger (823 – after 864 in Senlis), was King of Aquitaine from 838 as the successor upon the death of his father, Pepin I. Pepin II was eldest son of Pepin I and Ingeltrude, daughter of Theodobert, count of Madrie.

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Philip IV of France

Philip IV (April–June 1268 – 29 November 1314), called the Fair (Philippe le Bel) or the Iron King (le Roi de fer), was King of France from 1285 until his death.

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Philip VI of France

Philip VI (Philippe VI) (1293 – 22 August 1350), called the Fortunate (le Fortuné) and of Valois, was the first King of France from the House of Valois.

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Poitiers

Poitiers is a city on the Clain river in west-central France.

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Primogeniture

Primogeniture is the right, by law or custom, of the paternally acknowledged, firstborn son to inherit his parent's entire or main estate, in preference to daughters, elder illegitimate sons, younger sons and collateral relatives; in some cases the estate may instead be the inheritance of the firstborn child or occasionally the firstborn daughter.

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Provence

Provence (Provençal: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) is a geographical region and historical province of southeastern France, which extends from the left bank of the lower Rhône River to the west to the Italian border to the east, and is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the south.

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Pyrenees

The Pyrenees (Pirineos, Pyrénées, Pirineus, Pirineus, Pirenèus, Pirinioak) is a range of mountains in southwest Europe that forms a natural border between Spain and France.

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Quercy

Quercy (Carcin, locally) is a former province of France located in the country's southwest, bounded on the north by Limousin, on the west by Périgord and Agenais, on the south by Gascony and Languedoc, and on the east by Rouergue and Auvergne.

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Ramnulfids

The Ramnulfids, or the House of Poitiers, were a French dynasty ruling the County of Poitou and Duchy of Aquitaine in the 9th through 12th centuries.

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Ranulf I of Aquitaine

Ranulf I (also Ramnulf, Rannulf, and Ranulph) (820–866) was a Count of Poitiers (from 835) and Duke of Aquitaine (from 852).

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Regions of France

France is divided into 18 administrative regions (région), including 13 metropolitan regions and 5 overseas regions.

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Richard I of England

Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 1189 until his death.

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Richard II of England

Richard II (6 January 1367 – c. 14 February 1400), also known as Richard of Bordeaux, was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399.

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Roman law

Roman law is the legal system of ancient Rome, including the legal developments spanning over a thousand years of jurisprudence, from the Twelve Tables (c. 449 BC), to the Corpus Juris Civilis (AD 529) ordered by Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I. Roman law forms the basic framework for civil law, the most widely used legal system today, and the terms are sometimes used synonymously.

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Rouergue

Rouergue is a former province of France, corresponding roughly with the modern department of Aveyron.

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Saintonge

Saintonge, historically spelled Xaintonge and Xainctonge, is a former province of France located on the west central Atlantic coast.

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Septimania

Septimania (Septimanie,; Septimània,; Septimània) was the western region of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis that passed under the control of the Visigoths in 462, when Septimania was ceded to their king, Theodoric II.

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Treaty of Andelot

The Treaty of Andelot (or the Pact of Andelot), was signed at Andelot-Blancheville in 587 between King Guntram of Burgundy and Queen Brunhilda of Austrasia.

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Treaty of Brétigny

The Treaty of Brétigny was a treaty, drafted on 8 May 1360 and ratified on 24 October 1360, between King Edward III of England and King John II of France (the Good).

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Treaty of Picquigny

The Treaty of Picquigny was a peace treaty negotiated on 29 August 1475 between the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of France.

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Treaty of Troyes

The Treaty of Troyes was an agreement that King Henry V of England and his heirs would inherit the French crown upon the death of King Charles VI of France.

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Umayyad conquest of Hispania

The Umayyad conquest of Hispania was the initial expansion of the Umayyad Caliphate over Hispania, largely extending from 711 to 788.

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Velay

Velay is a historical area of France situated in east Haute-Loire département and south east of Massif central.

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Visigothic Code

The Visigothic Code (Latin, Forum Iudicum or Liber Iudiciorum; Spanish, Libro de los Jueces, Book of the Judges), also called Lex Visigothorum (English: Law of the Visigoths) is a set of laws first promulgated by king Chindasuinth (642-653) of the Visigothic Kingdom in his second year of rule (642-643) that survives only in fragments.

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Visigothic Kingdom

The Visigothic Kingdom or Kingdom of the Visigoths (Regnum Gothorum) was a kingdom that occupied what is now southwestern France and the Iberian Peninsula from the 5th to the 8th centuries.

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Visigoths

The Visigoths (Visigothi, Wisigothi, Vesi, Visi, Wesi, Wisi; Visigoti) were the western branches of the nomadic tribes of Germanic peoples referred to collectively as the Goths.

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Waiofar

Waiofar, also spelled Waifar, Waifer or Waiffre (died 768), was the last independent Duke of Aquitaine from 745 to 768.

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Wars of the Roses

The Wars of the Roses were a series of English civil wars for control of the throne of England fought between supporters of two rival branches of the royal House of Plantagenet: the House of Lancaster, associated with a red rose, and the House of York, whose symbol was a white rose.

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Wenilo (archbishop of Sens)

Wenilo (died 865) was the archbishop of Sens from 836 or 837.

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West Francia

In medieval historiography, West Francia (Latin: Francia occidentalis) or the Kingdom of the West Franks (regnum Francorum occidentalium) was the western part of Charlemagne's Empire, inhabited and ruled by the Germanic Franks that forms the earliest stage of the Kingdom of France, lasting from about 840 until 987.

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Western Christianity

Western Christianity is the type of Christianity which developed in the areas of the former Western Roman Empire.

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William I, Duke of Aquitaine

William I (22 March 875 – 6 July 918), called the Pious, was the Count of Auvergne from 886 and Duke of Aquitaine from 893, succeeding the Poitevin ruler Ebalus Manser.

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William II, Duke of Aquitaine

William II the Young (died 12 December 926) was the Count of Auvergne and Duke of Aquitaine from 918 to his death, succeeding his uncle William I. William was son of the Acfred I of Carcassonne and Adelinde, William I's sister and Bernard Plantapilosa's daughter.

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William IX, Duke of Aquitaine

William IX (Guilhèm de Peitieus; Guilhem de Poitou Guillaume de Poitiers) (22 October 1071 – 10 February 1127), called the Troubador, was the Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitou (as William VII) between 1086 and his death.

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William V, Duke of Aquitaine

William the Great (Guillaume le Grand; 969 – 31 January 1030) was duke of Aquitaine (as) and count of Poitou (as or III) from 990 until his death.

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William VIII, Duke of Aquitaine

William VIII (– 25 September 1086), born Guy-Geoffrey (Gui-Geoffroi), was duke of Gascony (1052–1086), and then duke of Aquitaine and count of Poitiers (as William VI) between 1058 and 1086, succeeding his brother William VII (Pierre-Guillaume).

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William X, Duke of Aquitaine

William X (Guillém X in Occitan) (1099 – 9 April 1137), called the Saint, was Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, and Count of Poitou (as William VIII) from 1126 to 1137.

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7th century

The 7th century is the period from 601 to 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Common Era.

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Redirects here:

Anglo-Aquitanian, Duchy of Aquitania, Frankish Aquitaine, King of Aquitaine, Kingdom of Aquitaine, Kingdom of Aquitania, Kings of Aquitaine.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duchy_of_Aquitaine

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