Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.)

+ Save concept

The Dumbarton Bridge, also known as the Q Street Bridge and the Buffalo Bridge, is a historic masonry arch bridge in Washington, D.C. Dumbarton Bridge was built between 1914 and 1915 to convey Q Street Northwest across Rock Creek Park between the city's Dupont Circle and Georgetown neighborhoods. [1]

28 relations: Alexander Phimister Proctor, Bridge, Buffalo (Proctor), Daniel B. Luten, Dumbarton House, Dupont Circle, Georgetown (Washington, D.C.), Glenn Brown (architect), Kicking Bear, Letters patent, List of bridges documented by the Historic American Engineering Record in Washington, D.C., List of bridges on the National Register of Historic Places in Washington, D.C., List of crossings of Rock Creek, Lyon's Mill Footbridge, M Street (Washington, D.C.), National Register of Historic Places, National Register of Historic Places listings in Washington, D.C., Northwest, Washington, D.C., Rock Creek (Potomac River tributary), Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway Bridge near P Street, Rock Creek Park, Romanesque Revival architecture, Sioux, Smithsonian Institution, Taft Bridge, The Crown, Washington, D.C., 16th Street Bridge (Washington, D.C.).

Alexander Phimister Proctor

Alexander Phimister Proctor (September 27, 1860 or 1862 – September 5, 1950) was an American sculptor with the contemporary reputation as one of the nation's foremost animaliers.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Alexander Phimister Proctor · See more »

Bridge

A bridge is a structure built to span physical obstacles without closing the way underneath such as a body of water, valley, or road, for the purpose of providing passage over the obstacle.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Bridge · See more »

Buffalo (Proctor)

Buffalo, also known as Buffaloes, Dumbarton Bridge: Buffaloes, and Q Street Buffalo, is a series of monumental sculptures of buffalo by Alexander Phimister Proctor.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Buffalo (Proctor) · See more »

Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,Martindale, Cyril Charles.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Christmas · See more »

Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, also called the festive season, or the holiday season (mainly in the U.S. and Canada; often simply called the holidays),, is an annually recurring period recognized in many Western and Western-influenced countries that is generally considered to run from late November to early January.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Christmas and holiday season · See more »

Christmas Eve

Christmas Eve is the evening or entire day before Christmas Day, the festival commemorating the birth of Jesus.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Christmas Eve · See more »

Christmas traditions

Christmas traditions vary from country to country.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Christmas traditions · See more »

Daniel B. Luten

Daniel B. Luten also known as Daniel Benjamin Luten (Dec. 26, 1869-July 3, 1946) was an American bridge builder and engineer based in Indianapolis, Indiana.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Daniel B. Luten · See more »

Dumbarton House

Dumbarton House is a Federal style house located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C..

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Dumbarton House · See more »

Dupont Circle

Dupont Circle is a traffic circle, park, neighborhood, and historic district in Northwest Washington, D.C. The traffic circle is located at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue NW, Connecticut Avenue NW, New Hampshire Avenue NW, P Street NW, and 19th Street NW.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Dupont Circle · See more »

Georgetown (Washington, D.C.)

Georgetown is a historic neighborhood and a commercial and entertainment district located in northwest Washington, D.C., situated along the Potomac River.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Georgetown (Washington, D.C.) · See more »

Glenn Brown (architect)

Glenn Brown (1854–1932) was an American architect and historian.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Glenn Brown (architect) · See more »

Kicking Bear

Kicking Bear (March 18, 1846 – May 28, 1904), also called Matȟó Wanáȟtaka, was an Oglala Lakota who became a band chief of the Miniconjou Lakota Sioux. He fought in several battles with his brother, Flying Hawk and first cousin, Crazy Horse during the War for the Black Hills, including Battle of the Greasy Grass. Kicking Bear was one of the five warrior cousins who sacrificed blood and flesh for Crazy Horse at the Last Sun Dance of 1877. The ceremony was held to honor Crazy Horse one year after the victory at the Battle of the Greasy Grass, and to offer prayers for him in the trying times ahead. Crazy Horse attended the Sun Dance as the honored guest but did not take part in the dancing. The five warrior cousins were brothers Kicking Bear, Flying Hawk and Black Fox II, all sons of Chief Black Fox, also known as Great Kicking Bear, and two other cousins, Eagle Thunder and Walking Eagle. The five warrior cousins were braves considered vigorous battle men of distinction. Kicking Bear was also a holy man active in the Ghost Dance religious movement of 1890, and had traveled with fellow Lakota Short Bull to visit the movement's leader, Wovoka (a Paiute holy man living in Nevada). The three Lakota men were instrumental in bringing the movement to their people who were living on reservations in South Dakota. Following the murder of Sitting Bull, Kicking Bear and Short Bull were imprisoned at Fort Sheridan, Illinois. Upon their release in 1891, both men joined Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show, and toured with the show in Europe. That experience was humiliating to him. After a year-long tour, Kicking Bear returned to the Pine Ridge Reservation to care for his family. In March 1896, Kicking Bear traveled to Washington, D.C. as one of three Sioux delegates taking grievances to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. He made his feelings known about the drunken behavior of traders on the reservation, and asked that Native Americans have more ability to make their own decisions. While in Washington, Kicking Bear agreed to have a life mask made of himself. The mask was to be used as the face of a Sioux warrior to be displayed in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. A gifted artist, he painted his account of the Battle of Greasy Grass at the request of artist Frederic Remington in 1898, more than twenty years after the battle. Kicking Bear was buried with the arrowhead as a symbol of the ways he so dearly desired to resurrect when he died on May 28, 1904. His remains are buried somewhere in the vicinity of Manderson-White Horse Creek.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Kicking Bear · See more »

Letters patent

Letters patent (always in the plural) are a type of legal instrument in the form of a published written order issued by a monarch, president, or other head of state, generally granting an office, right, monopoly, title, or status to a person or corporation.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Letters patent · See more »

List of bridges documented by the Historic American Engineering Record in Washington, D.C.

This is a list of bridges documented by the Historic American Engineering Record in Washington, D.C.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and List of bridges documented by the Historic American Engineering Record in Washington, D.C. · See more »

List of bridges on the National Register of Historic Places in Washington, D.C.

This is a list of bridges on the National Register of Historic Places in Washington, D.C.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and List of bridges on the National Register of Historic Places in Washington, D.C. · See more »

List of crossings of Rock Creek

This is a list of crossings of Rock Creek.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and List of crossings of Rock Creek · See more »

Lyon's Mill Footbridge

The Lyon's Mill Footbridge, also called the Devil's Chair Footbridge, is a concrete footbridge across Rock Creek in Washington, DC.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Lyon's Mill Footbridge · See more »

M Street (Washington, D.C.)

The name "M Street" refers to two major roads in the United States capital of Washington, D.C. Because of the Cartesian coordinate system used to name streets in Washington, the name "M Street" can be used to refer to any east-west street located twelve blocks north or south of the dome of the United States Capitol (not thirteen blocks, as there is no J Street).

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and M Street (Washington, D.C.) · See more »

National Register of Historic Places

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and National Register of Historic Places · See more »

National Register of Historic Places listings in Washington, D.C.

This is a list of properties and districts in the District of Columbia on the National Register of Historic Places.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and National Register of Historic Places listings in Washington, D.C. · See more »

New Year

New Year is the time or day at which a new calendar year begins and the calendar's year count increments by one.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and New Year · See more »

New Year's Day

New Year's Day, also called simply New Year's or New Year, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and New Year's Day · See more »

New Year's Eve

In the Gregorian calendar, New Year's Eve (also known as Old Year's Day or Saint Sylvester's Day in many countries), the last day of the year, is on 31 December which is the seventh day of Christmastide.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and New Year's Eve · See more »

Northwest, Washington, D.C.

Northwest (NW or N.W.) is the northwestern quadrant of Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States, and is located north of the National Mall and west of North Capitol Street.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Northwest, Washington, D.C. · See more »

Rock Creek (Potomac River tributary)

Rock Creek is a free-flowing tributary of the Potomac River, which empties into the Atlantic Ocean via the Chesapeake Bay.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Rock Creek (Potomac River tributary) · See more »

Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway Bridge near P Street

The Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway Bridge near P Street is a bridge carrying the Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway across Rock Creek in Washington, DC.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway Bridge near P Street · See more »

Rock Creek Park

Rock Creek Park is a large urban park that bisects the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. The park was created by an Act of Congress in 1890, and today is administered by the National Park Service.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Rock Creek Park · See more »

Romanesque Revival architecture

Romanesque Revival (or Neo-Romanesque) is a style of building employed beginning in the mid-19th century inspired by the 11th- and 12th-century Romanesque architecture.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Romanesque Revival architecture · See more »

Sioux

The Sioux also known as Očhéthi Šakówiŋ, are groups of Native American tribes and First Nations peoples in North America.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Sioux · See more »

Smithsonian Institution

The Smithsonian Institution, established on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Smithsonian Institution · See more »

Taft Bridge

The Taft Bridge, also known as the Connecticut Avenue Bridge or William Howard Taft Bridge, is a historic bridge located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. It carries Connecticut Avenue over the Rock Creek gorge, including Rock Creek and the Rock Creek and Potomac Parkway, connecting the neighborhoods of Woodley Park and Kalorama.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Taft Bridge · See more »

The Crown

The Crown is the state in all its aspects within the jurisprudence of the Commonwealth realms and their sub-divisions (such as Crown dependencies, provinces, or states).

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and The Crown · See more »

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and Washington, D.C. · See more »

16th Street Bridge (Washington, D.C.)

The 16th Street Bridge, also known as the Piney Branch Bridge, is an automobile and pedestrian bridge that carries 16th Street NW over Piney Branch and Piney Branch Parkway in Washington, D.C. It was the first parabolic arch bridge in the United States.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and 16th Street Bridge (Washington, D.C.) · See more »

2018

2018 has been designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and 2018 · See more »

2019

2019 (MMXIX) will be a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

New!!: Dumbarton Bridge (Washington, D.C.) and 2019 · See more »

Redirects here:

Buffalo Bridge, Dumbarton Bridge (DC), Q Street Bridge.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dumbarton_Bridge_(Washington,_D.C.)

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »