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East Slavic languages

Index East Slavic languages

The East Slavic languages constitute one of three regional subgroups of Slavic languages, currently spoken throughout Eastern Europe, Northern Asia, and the Caucasus. [1]

48 relations: Akanye, Balto-Slavic languages, Belarusian language, Brest, Belarus, Bulgaria, Bulgarians, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, Caucasus, Central Russian dialects, Church Slavonic language, Cyrillic script, Dental stop, Diglossia, Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Isogloss, Kievan Rus', Labial consonant, Locative case, Middle Polish language, North Asia, Northern Russian dialects, Old Church Slavonic, Old East Slavic, Old Novgorod dialect, Polesia, Polish language, Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, Prepositional case, Proto-language, Proto-Slavic, Russian Empire, Russian language, Rusyn language, Ruthenian language, Slavic languages, Slavic second palatalization, South Slavic languages, Southern Russian dialects, Stratum (linguistics), Ukrainian language, Variety (linguistics), Vologda, Vowel reduction in Russian, West Polesian microlanguage, West Slavic languages, Writing.

Akanye

Akanye or akanje (аканне, аканье,, akanje) is a phonological phenomenon in Slavic languages in which the phonemes or are realized as more or less close to.

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Balto-Slavic languages

The Balto-Slavic languages are a branch of the Indo-European family of languages.

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Belarusian language

Belarusian (беларуская мова) is an official language of Belarus, along with Russian, and is spoken abroad, mainly in Ukraine and Russia.

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Brest, Belarus

Brest (Брэст There is also the name "Berestye", but it is found only in the Old Russian language and Tarashkevich., Брест Brest, Берестя Berestia, בריסק Brisk), formerly Brest-Litoŭsk (Брэст-Лiтоўск) (Brest-on-the-Bug), is a city (population 340,141 in 2016) in Belarus at the border with Poland opposite the Polish city of Terespol, where the Bug and Mukhavets rivers meet.

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Bulgaria

Bulgaria (България, tr.), officially the Republic of Bulgaria (Република България, tr.), is a country in southeastern Europe.

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Bulgarians

Bulgarians (българи, Bǎlgari) are a South Slavic ethnic group who are native to Bulgaria and its neighboring regions.

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Cambridge

Cambridge is a university city and the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, on the River Cam approximately north of London.

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Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

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Caucasus

The Caucasus or Caucasia is a region located at the border of Europe and Asia, situated between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea and occupied by Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Armenia.

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Central Russian dialects

Central or Middle Russian dialects is one of the main groups of the Russian dialects.

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Church Slavonic language

Church Slavonic, also known as Church Slavic, New Church Slavonic or New Church Slavic, is the conservative Slavic liturgical language used by the Orthodox Church in Bulgaria, Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, Russia, Belarus, Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Republic of Macedonia and Ukraine.

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Cyrillic script

The Cyrillic script is a writing system used for various alphabets across Eurasia (particularity in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and North Asia).

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Dental stop

In phonetics and phonology, a dental stop is a type of consonantal sound, made with the tongue in contact with the upper teeth (hence dental), held tightly enough to block the passage of air (hence a stop consonant).

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Diglossia

In linguistics, diglossia is a situation in which two dialects or languages are used by a single language community.

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Eastern Europe

Eastern Europe is the eastern part of the European continent.

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Eurasia

Eurasia is a combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia.

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Isogloss

An isogloss, also called a heterogloss (see Etymology below), is the geographic boundary of a certain linguistic feature, such as the pronunciation of a vowel, the meaning of a word, or the use of some morphological or syntactic feature.

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Kievan Rus'

Kievan Rus' (Рѹ́сь, Рѹ́сьскаѧ землѧ, Rus(s)ia, Ruscia, Ruzzia, Rut(h)enia) was a loose federationJohn Channon & Robert Hudson, Penguin Historical Atlas of Russia (Penguin, 1995), p.16.

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Labial consonant

Labial consonants are consonants in which one or both lips are the active articulator.

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Locative case

Locative (abbreviated) is a grammatical case which indicates a location.

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Middle Polish language

Middle Polish (język średniopolski) is the period in the history of the Polish language between the 16th and 18th centuries.

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North Asia

North Asia or Northern Asia, sometimes known as Siberia, is a subregion of Asia, consisting of the Russian regions of Siberia, Ural and the Russian Far East – an area east of the Ural Mountains.

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Northern Russian dialects

The northern Russian dialects make up one of the main groups of the Russian dialects.

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Old Church Slavonic

Old Church Slavonic, also known as Old Church Slavic (or Ancient/Old Slavonic often abbreviated to OCS; (autonym словѣ́ньскъ ѩꙁꙑ́къ, slověnĭskŭ językŭ), not to be confused with the Proto-Slavic, was the first Slavic literary language. The 9th-century Byzantine missionaries Saints Cyril and Methodius are credited with standardizing the language and using it in translating the Bible and other Ancient Greek ecclesiastical texts as part of the Christianization of the Slavs. It is thought to have been based primarily on the dialect of the 9th century Byzantine Slavs living in the Province of Thessalonica (now in Greece). It played an important role in the history of the Slavic languages and served as a basis and model for later Church Slavonic traditions, and some Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches use this later Church Slavonic as a liturgical language to this day. As the oldest attested Slavic language, OCS provides important evidence for the features of Proto-Slavic, the reconstructed common ancestor of all Slavic languages.

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Old East Slavic

Old East Slavic or Old Russian was a language used during the 10th–15th centuries by East Slavs in Kievan Rus' and states which evolved after the collapse of Kievan Rus'.

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Old Novgorod dialect

Old Novgorod dialect (Russian: древненовгородский диалект, dryevnyenovgorodsky dialekt; also translated as Old Novgorodian or Ancient Novgorod dialect) is a term introduced by Andrey Zaliznyak to describe the dialect found in the Old East Slavic birch bark writings ("berestyanaya gramota").

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Polesia

Polesia, Polesie or Polesye (Палессе Paliessie, Полісся Polissia or Polisia, Polesie, Поле́сье Poles'e) is a natural and historical region starting from the farthest edges of Central Europe and into Eastern Europe, stretching from parts of Eastern Poland, touching similarly named Podlasie, straddling the Belarus–Ukraine border and into western Russia.

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Polish language

Polish (język polski or simply polski) is a West Slavic language spoken primarily in Poland and is the native language of the Poles.

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Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth

The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, formally the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, after 1791 the Commonwealth of Poland, was a dualistic state, a bi-confederation of Poland and Lithuania ruled by a common monarch, who was both the King of Poland and the Grand Duke of Lithuania.

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Prepositional case

Prepositional case (abbreviated) and postpositional case (abbreviated) are grammatical cases that respectively mark the object of a preposition and a postposition.

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Proto-language

A proto-language, in the tree model of historical linguistics, is a language, usually hypothetical or reconstructed, and usually unattested, from which a number of attested known languages are believed to have descended by evolution, forming a language family.

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Proto-Slavic

Proto-Slavic is the unattested, reconstructed proto-language of all the Slavic languages.

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Russian Empire

The Russian Empire (Российская Империя) or Russia was an empire that existed across Eurasia and North America from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.

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Russian language

Russian (rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language, which is official in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, as well as being widely spoken throughout Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, the Caucasus and Central Asia.

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Rusyn language

Rusyn (Carpathian Rusyn), по нашому (po našomu); Pannonian Rusyn)), also known in English as Ruthene (sometimes Ruthenian), is a Slavic language spoken by the Rusyns of Eastern Europe.

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Ruthenian language

Ruthenian or Old Ruthenian (see other names) was the group of varieties of East Slavic spoken in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and later in the East Slavic territories of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.

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Slavic languages

The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages) are the Indo-European languages spoken by the Slavic peoples.

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Slavic second palatalization

The Slavic second palatalization is a Proto-Slavic sound change that manifested as a regressive palatalization of inherited Balto-Slavic velar consonants that occurred after the first and before the third Slavic palatalizations.

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South Slavic languages

The South Slavic languages are one of three branches of the Slavic languages.

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Southern Russian dialects

Southern Russian is one of the main groups of Russian dialects.

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Stratum (linguistics)

In linguistics, a stratum (Latin for "layer") or strate is a language that influences, or is influenced by another through contact.

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Ukrainian language

No description.

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Variety (linguistics)

In sociolinguistics a variety, also called a lect, is a specific form of a language or language cluster.

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Vologda

Vologda (p) is a city and the administrative, cultural, and scientific center of Vologda Oblast, Russia, located on the Vologda River within the watershed of the Northern Dvina.

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Vowel reduction in Russian

Vowel reduction in Russian differs in the standard language and dialects, which differ from one another.

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West Polesian microlanguage

The West Polesian microlanguage (Native name: Заходышнополіська волода, Zakhodyshnopoliska voloda; Західнополіська мікромова, Zakhidnopolis'ka mikromova; Заходнепалеская мікрамова, Zakhodniepalieskaya mikramova) or dialect is spoken in Southwestern Belarus, in Northwestern Ukraine and in the bordering regions of Poland.

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West Slavic languages

The West Slavic languages are a subdivision of the Slavic language group.

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Writing

Writing is a medium of human communication that represents language and emotion with signs and symbols.

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Redirects here:

East Slavic Languages, East Slavic language, East Slavonic languages, East slavic languages, Eastern Slavic language, Eastern Slavic languages, ISO 639:zle, List of East Slavic languages.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Slavic_languages

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