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Ebonite

Index Ebonite

Ebonite is a brand name for very hard rubber first obtained by Charles Goodyear by vulcanizing natural rubber for prolonged periods. [1]

34 relations: Bowling ball, Carbon black, Caster, Charles Goodyear, Clarinet, Cross-link, Ebony, Elastomer, Electric battery, Fountain pen, Hockey puck, Hydrochloric acid, Hydrofluoric acid, Hygroscopy, Linseed oil, Mouthpiece (woodwind), Natural rubber, Newell Brands, Physics, Poly(methyl methacrylate), Polypropylene, Polysulfide, Room temperature, Saxophone, Static electricity, Sulfur, Sulfuric acid, Tobacco pipe, United States Patent and Trademark Office, Van der Waals force, Vulcanite, Vulcanization, Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Wetting.

Bowling ball

A bowling ball is a piece of sporting equipment used to hit bowling pins in the sport of bowling.

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Carbon black

Carbon black (subtypes are acetylene black, channel black, furnace black, lamp black and thermal black) is a material produced by the incomplete combustion of heavy petroleum products such as FCC tar, coal tar, ethylene cracking tar, with the addition of a small amount of vegetable oil.

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Caster

A caster (also castor according to some dictionaries) is a wheeled device typically mounted to a larger object that enables relatively easy rolling movement of the object.

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Charles Goodyear

Charles Goodyear (December 29, 1800 – July 1, 1860) was an American self-taught chemist and manufacturing engineer who developed vulcanized rubber, for which he received patent number 3633 from the United States Patent Office on June 15, 1844.

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Clarinet

The clarinet is a musical-instrument family belonging to the group known as the woodwind instruments.

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Cross-link

A cross-link is a bond that links one polymer chain to another.

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Ebony

Ebony is a dense black hardwood, most commonly yielded by several different species in the genus Diospyros, which also contains the persimmons.

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Elastomer

An elastomer is a polymer with viscoelasticity (i. e., both viscosity and elasticity) and very weak intermolecular forces, and generally low Young's modulus and high failure strain compared with other materials.

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Electric battery

An electric battery is a device consisting of one or more electrochemical cells with external connections provided to power electrical devices such as flashlights, smartphones, and electric cars.

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Fountain pen

A fountain pen is a nib pen that, unlike its predecessor, the dip pen, contains an internal reservoir of liquid ink.

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Hockey puck

A hockey puck is a disk made of vulcanized rubber that serves the same functions in various games as a ball does in ball games.

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Hydrochloric acid

Hydrochloric acid is a colorless inorganic chemical system with the formula.

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Hydrofluoric acid

Hydrofluoric acid is a solution of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in water.

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Hygroscopy

Hygroscopy is the phenomenon of attracting and holding water molecules from the surrounding environment, which is usually at normal or room temperature.

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Linseed oil

Linseed oil, also known as flaxseed oil or flax oil, is a colourless to yellowish oil obtained from the dried, ripened seeds of the flax plant (Linum usitatissimum).

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Mouthpiece (woodwind)

The mouthpiece of a woodwind instrument is that part of the instrument which is placed partly in the player's mouth.

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Natural rubber

Natural rubber, also called India rubber or caoutchouc, as initially produced, consists of polymers of the organic compound isoprene, with minor impurities of other organic compounds, plus water.

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Newell Brands

Newell Brands is an American worldwide marketer of consumer and commercial products with a portfolio of brands including Rubbermaid food storage, home organization and reusable container products; Contigo and Bubba water bottles; Coleman outdoor products; Diamond matches; Sharpie, Expo Markers, PaperMate, Dymo, Elmer's, Krazy Glue, Mr. Sketch, Parker Pens, Uniball, Prismacolor, Rotring, Xacto, Waterman, Berol stationery products; Bicycle and Bee Playing Cards; Aprica, Nuk, Tigex, Babysun, Baby Jogger and Graco children's products; First Alert alarm systems; Calphalon cookware and kitchen electrics; Sunbeam, Rival, Crock-Pot, Holmes, FoodSaver, Oster, Osterizer, Mr. Coffee small kitchen appliances; Yankee Candle candles; Jostens custom memorabilia; and Goody hair care accessories.

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Physics

Physics (from knowledge of nature, from φύσις phýsis "nature") is the natural science that studies matterAt the start of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Richard Feynman offers the atomic hypothesis as the single most prolific scientific concept: "If, in some cataclysm, all scientific knowledge were to be destroyed one sentence what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that all things are made up of atoms – little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another..." and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force."Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or, in other words, to the regular succession of events." Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves."Physics is one of the most fundamental of the sciences. Scientists of all disciplines use the ideas of physics, including chemists who study the structure of molecules, paleontologists who try to reconstruct how dinosaurs walked, and climatologists who study how human activities affect the atmosphere and oceans. Physics is also the foundation of all engineering and technology. No engineer could design a flat-screen TV, an interplanetary spacecraft, or even a better mousetrap without first understanding the basic laws of physics. (...) You will come to see physics as a towering achievement of the human intellect in its quest to understand our world and ourselves."Physics is an experimental science. Physicists observe the phenomena of nature and try to find patterns that relate these phenomena.""Physics is the study of your world and the world and universe around you." Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines and, through its inclusion of astronomy, perhaps the oldest. Over the last two millennia, physics, chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics were a part of natural philosophy, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, these natural sciences emerged as unique research endeavors in their own right. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics often enable advances in new technologies. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society, such as television, computers, domestic appliances, and nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.

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Poly(methyl methacrylate)

Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), also known as acrylic or acrylic glass as well as by the trade names Crylux, Plexiglas, Acrylite, Lucite, and Perspex among several others (see below), is a transparent thermoplastic often used in sheet form as a lightweight or shatter-resistant alternative to glass.

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Polypropylene

Polypropylene (PP), also known as polypropene, is a thermoplastic polymer used in a wide variety of applications.

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Polysulfide

Polysulfides are a class of chemical compounds containing chains of sulfur atoms.

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Room temperature

Colloquially, room temperature is the range of air temperatures that most people prefer for indoor settings, which feel comfortable when wearing typical indoor clothing.

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Saxophone

The saxophone (also referred to as the sax) is a family of woodwind instruments.

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Static electricity

Static electricity is an imbalance of electric charges within or on the surface of a material.

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Sulfur

Sulfur or sulphur is a chemical element with symbol S and atomic number 16.

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Sulfuric acid

Sulfuric acid (alternative spelling sulphuric acid) is a mineral acid with molecular formula H2SO4.

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Tobacco pipe

A tobacco pipe, often called simply a pipe, is a device specifically made to smoke tobacco.

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United States Patent and Trademark Office

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is an agency in the U.S. Department of Commerce that issues patents to inventors and businesses for their inventions, and trademark registration for product and intellectual property identification.

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Van der Waals force

In molecular physics, the van der Waals forces, named after Dutch scientist Johannes Diderik van der Waals, are distance-dependent interactions between atoms or molecules.

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Vulcanite

Vulcanite is a rare copper telluride mineral.

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Vulcanization

Vulcanization or vulcanisation is a chemical process for converting natural rubber or related polymers into more durable materials by heating them with sulfur or other equivalent curatives or accelerators.

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Webster's Third New International Dictionary

Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (commonly known as Webster's Third, or W3) was published in September 1961.

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Wetting

Wetting is the ability of a liquid to maintain contact with a solid surface, resulting from intermolecular interactions when the two are brought together.

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Redirects here:

Hard rubber, Vulcanite (hard rubber), Vulcanite (rubber).

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebonite

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