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English alphabet

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The modern English alphabet is a Latin alphabet consisting of 26 letters, each having an uppercase and a lowercase form: The same letters constitute the ISO basic Latin alphabet. [1]

116 relations: A, Adjective, Aircraft, Allography, Alphabet, Alphabet song, American Braille, American English, American manual alphabet, Ampersand, Anglo-Saxon runes, Anglo-Saxons, Ansuz (rune), Apostrophe, B, Body cavity, British English, Byrhtferth, C, Carolingian G, Cherokee syllabary, Consonant, Contraction (grammar), Cursive, D, Deseret alphabet, Diacritic, Diaeresis (diacritic), Dictionary.com, Digraph (orthography), E, Early Modern English, Egyptian hieroglyphs, Encyclopedia, English Braille, English in the Commonwealth of Nations, English language, English orthography, English-language spelling reform, Eth, F, Faroese language, Font, G, Great Vowel Shift, Greek alphabet, Gregg shorthand, H, Handwriting, Hiberno-English, ..., I, Icelandic language, Insular G, Irish language, ISO basic Latin alphabet, J, J. R. R. Tolkien, John Wiley & Sons, K, L, Latin, Latin alphabet, Latin script, Letter (alphabet), Letter case, Loanword, Logogram, Long s, M, Malaysian English, Mathematical Association of America, Middle English, MIT Technology Review, Modern English, N, NATO phonetic alphabet, New York Point, O, Odal (rune), Old Italic script, Osage alphabet, Oxford English Dictionary, P, Pangram, Phoenician alphabet, Plural, Possessive, Proto-Sinaitic script, Proto-writing, Q, R, Received Pronunciation, S, Scottish English, Semivowel, Shavian alphabet, Spelling alphabet, Syllable, T, Th (digraph), The New Yorker, Thorn (letter), Tironian notes, Two-handed manual alphabets, Typeface, Typographic ligature, U, V, Vowel, W, Wynn, X, Y, Yerba mate, Yogh, Z. Expand index (66 more) »

A

A (named, plural As, A's, as, a's or aes) is the first letter and the first vowel of the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Adjective

In linguistics, an adjective (abbreviated) is a describing word, the main syntactic role of which is to qualify a noun or noun phrase, giving more information about the object signified.

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Aircraft

An aircraft is a machine that is able to fly by gaining support from the air.

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Allography

Allography, from the Greek for "other writing", has several meanings which all relate to how words and sounds are written down.

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Alphabet

An alphabet is a standard set of letters (basic written symbols or graphemes) that is used to write one or more languages based upon the general principle that the letters represent phonemes (basic significant sounds) of the spoken language.

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Alphabet song

An alphabet song is any of various songs used to teach children the alphabet.

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American Braille

American Braille was a popular braille alphabet used in the United States before the adoption of standardized English braille in 1918.

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American English

American English (AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US), sometimes called United States English or U.S. English, is the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States.

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American manual alphabet

The American Manual Alphabet (AMA) is a manual alphabet that augments the vocabulary of American Sign Language.

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Ampersand

The ampersand is the logogram &, representing the conjunction "and".

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Anglo-Saxon runes

Anglo-Saxon runes are runes used by the early Anglo-Saxons as an alphabet in their writing.

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Anglo-Saxons

The Anglo-Saxons were a people who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century.

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Ansuz (rune)

Ansuz is the conventional name given to the a-rune of the Elder Futhark,.

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Apostrophe

The apostrophe ( ' or) character is a punctuation mark, and sometimes a diacritical mark, in languages that use the Latin alphabet and some other alphabets.

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B

B or b (pronounced) is the second letter of the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Body cavity

A body cavity is any fluid-filled space in a multicellular organism other than those of vessels (such as blood vessels and lymph vessels).

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British English

British English is the standard dialect of English language as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.

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Byrhtferth

Byrhtferth (Byrhtferð) was a priest and monk who lived at Ramsey Abbey in Huntingdonshire.

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C

C is the third letter in the English alphabet and a letter of the alphabets of many other writing systems which inherited it from the Latin alphabet.

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Carolingian G

The Carolingian G or French G is one of two historical variants of the letter G which were in use in the Middle English alphabet; the other variant was the insular G or Irish G. The Carolingian G is named for the Carolingian minuscule script, an exemplar of its use.

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Cherokee syllabary

The Cherokee syllabary is a syllabary invented by Sequoyah to write the Cherokee language in the late 1810s and early 1820s.

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Consonant

In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a speech sound that is articulated with complete or partial closure of the vocal tract.

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Contraction (grammar)

A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters and sounds.

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Cursive

Cursive (also known as script or longhand, among other names) is any style of penmanship in which some characters are written joined together in a flowing manner, generally for the purpose of making writing faster.

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D

D (named dee) is the fourth letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Deseret alphabet

The Deseret alphabet (Deseret: 𐐔𐐯𐑅𐐨𐑉𐐯𐐻 or 𐐔𐐯𐑆𐐲𐑉𐐯𐐻) is a phonemic English-language spelling reform developed between 1847 and 1854 by the board of regents of the University of Deseret under the leadership of Brigham Young, the second president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

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Diacritic

A diacritic – also diacritical mark, diacritical point, diacritical sign, or an accent – is a glyph added to a letter, or basic glyph.

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Diaeresis (diacritic)

The diaeresis (plural: diaereses), also spelled diæresis or dieresis and also known as the tréma (also: trema) or the umlaut, is a diacritical mark that consists of two dots placed over a letter, usually a vowel.

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Dictionary.com

Dictionary.com is an online dictionary whose domain was first registered on May 14, 1995.

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Digraph (orthography)

A digraph or digram (from the δίς dís, "double" and γράφω gráphō, "to write") is a pair of characters used in the orthography of a language to write either a single phoneme (distinct sound), or a sequence of phonemes that does not correspond to the normal values of the two characters combined.

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E

E (named e, plural ees) is the fifth letter and the second vowel in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Early Modern English

Early Modern English, Early New English (sometimes abbreviated to EModE, EMnE or EME) is the stage of the English language from the beginning of the Tudor period to the English Interregnum and Restoration, or from the transition from Middle English, in the late 15th century, to the transition to Modern English, in the mid-to-late 17th century.

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Egyptian hieroglyphs

Egyptian hieroglyphs were the formal writing system used in Ancient Egypt.

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Encyclopedia

An encyclopedia or encyclopaedia is a reference work or compendium providing summaries of information from either all branches of knowledge or from a particular field or discipline.

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English Braille

English Braille, also known as Grade 2 Braille, is the braille alphabet used for English.

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English in the Commonwealth of Nations

The use of the English language in most member countries of the Commonwealth of Nations was inherited from British colonisation.

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English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

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English orthography

English orthography is the system of writing conventions used to represent spoken English in written form that allows readers to connect spelling to sound to meaning.

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English-language spelling reform

For centuries, there has been a movement to reform the spelling of English.

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Eth

Eth (uppercase: Ð, lowercase: ð; also spelled edh or eð) is a letter used in Old English, Middle English, Icelandic, Faroese (in which it is called edd), and Elfdalian.

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F

F (named ef) is the sixth letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Faroese language

Faroese (føroyskt mál,; færøsk) is a North Germanic language spoken as a first language by about 66,000 people, 45,000 of whom reside on the Faroe Islands and 21,000 in other areas, mainly Denmark.

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Font

In metal typesetting, a font was a particular size, weight and style of a typeface.

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G

G (named gee) is the 7th letter in the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Great Vowel Shift

The Great Vowel Shift was a major series of changes in the pronunciation of the English language that took place, beginning in southern England, primarily between 1350 and the 1600s and 1700s, today influencing effectively all dialects of English.

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Greek alphabet

The Greek alphabet has been used to write the Greek language since the late 9th or early 8th century BC.

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Gregg shorthand

Gregg shorthand is a form of shorthand that was invented by John Robert Gregg in 1888.

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H

H (named aitch or, regionally, haitch, plural aitches)"H" Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition (1989); Merriam-Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (1993); "aitch" or "haitch", op.

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Handwriting

Handwriting is the writing done with a writing instrument, such as a pen or pencil, in the hand.

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Hiberno-English

Hiberno‐English (from Latin Hibernia: "Ireland") or Irish English is the set of English dialects natively written and spoken within the island of Ireland (including both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland).

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I

I (named i, plural ies) is the ninth letter and the third vowel in the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Icelandic language

Icelandic (íslenska) is a North Germanic language, and the language of Iceland.

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Insular G

Insular G (font:Ᵹ ᵹ; image) is a form of the letter g used in Insular fonts somewhat resembling a tailed z or lowercase delta, used in Great Britain and Ireland.

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Irish language

The Irish language (Gaeilge), also referred to as the Gaelic or the Irish Gaelic language, is a Goidelic language (Gaelic) of the Indo-European language family originating in Ireland and historically spoken by the Irish people.

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ISO basic Latin alphabet

The ISO basic Latin alphabet is a Latin-script alphabet and consists of two sets of 26 letters, codified in various national and international standards and used widely in international communication.

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J

J is the tenth letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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J. R. R. Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, (Tolkien pronounced his surname, see his phonetic transcription published on the illustration in The Return of the Shadow: The History of The Lord of the Rings, Part One. Christopher Tolkien. London: Unwin Hyman, 1988. (The History of Middle-earth; 6). In General American the surname is also pronounced. This pronunciation no doubt arose by analogy with such words as toll and polka, or because speakers of General American realise as, while often hearing British as; thus or General American become the closest possible approximation to the Received Pronunciation for many American speakers. Wells, John. 1990. Longman pronunciation dictionary. Harlow: Longman, 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion.

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John Wiley & Sons

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., also referred to as Wiley, is a global publishing company that specializes in academic publishing.

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K

K (named kay) is the eleventh letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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L

L (named el) is the twelfth letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet, used in words such as lagoon, lantern, and less.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Latin alphabet

The Latin alphabet or the Roman alphabet is a writing system originally used by the ancient Romans to write the Latin language.

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Latin script

Latin or Roman script is a set of graphic signs (script) based on the letters of the classical Latin alphabet, which is derived from a form of the Cumaean Greek version of the Greek alphabet, used by the Etruscans.

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Letter (alphabet)

A letter is a grapheme (written character) in an alphabetic system of writing.

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Letter case

Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger upper case (also uppercase, capital letters, capitals, caps, large letters, or more formally majuscule) and smaller lower case (also lowercase, small letters, or more formally minuscule) in the written representation of certain languages.

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Loanword

A loanword (also loan word or loan-word) is a word adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation.

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Logogram

In written language, a logogram or logograph is a written character that represents a word or phrase.

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Long s

The long, medial, or descending s (ſ) is an archaic form of the lower case letter s. It replaced a single s, or the first in a double s, at the beginning or in the middle of a word (e.g. "ſinfulneſs" for "sinfulness" and "ſucceſsful" for "successful").

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M

M (named em) is the thirteenth letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Malaysian English

Malaysian English (MyE), formally known as Malaysian Standard English (MySE), is a form of English used and spoken in Malaysia.

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Mathematical Association of America

The Mathematical Association of America (MAA) is a professional society that focuses on mathematics accessible at the undergraduate level.

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Middle English

Middle English (ME) is collectively the varieties of the English language spoken after the Norman Conquest (1066) until the late 15th century; scholarly opinion varies but the Oxford English Dictionary specifies the period of 1150 to 1500.

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MIT Technology Review

MIT Technology Review is a magazine published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Modern English

Modern English (sometimes New English or NE as opposed to Middle English and Old English) is the form of the English language spoken since the Great Vowel Shift in England, which began in the late 14th century and was completed in roughly 1550.

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N

N (named en) is the fourteenth letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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NATO phonetic alphabet

The NATO phonetic alphabet, officially denoted as the International Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet, and also commonly known as the ICAO phonetic alphabet, and in a variation also known officially as the ITU phonetic alphabet and figure code, is the most widely used radiotelephone spelling alphabet.

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New York Point

New York Point is a braille-like system of tactile writing for the blind invented by William Bell Wait (1839–1916), a teacher in the New York Institute for the Education of the Blind.

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O

O (named o, plural oes) is the 15th letter and the fourth vowel in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Odal (rune)

The Elder Futhark Odal rune, also known as the Othala rune, represents the o sound.

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Old Italic script

Old Italic is one of several now extinct alphabet systems used on the Italian Peninsula in ancient times for various Indo-European languages (predominantly Italic) and non-Indo-European (e.g. Etruscan) languages.

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Osage alphabet

The Osage alphabet is a new script promulgated in 2006 for the Osage language.

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Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University Press.

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P

P (named pee) is the 16th letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Pangram

A pangram (παν γράμμα, pan gramma, "every letter") or holoalphabetic sentence is a sentence using every letter of a given alphabet at least once.

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Phoenician alphabet

The Phoenician alphabet, called by convention the Proto-Canaanite alphabet for inscriptions older than around 1050 BC, is the oldest verified alphabet.

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Plural

The plural (sometimes abbreviated), in many languages, is one of the values of the grammatical category of number.

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Possessive

A possessive form (abbreviated) is a word or grammatical construction used to indicate a relationship of possession in a broad sense.

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Proto-Sinaitic script

Proto-Sinaitic, also referred to as Sinaitic, Proto-Canaanite, Old Canaanite, or Canaanite, is a term for both a Middle Bronze Age (Middle Kingdom) script attested in a small corpus of inscriptions found at Serabit el-Khadim in the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt, and the reconstructed common ancestor of the Paleo-Hebrew, Phoenician and South Arabian scripts (and, by extension, of most historical and modern alphabets).

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Proto-writing

Proto-writing consists of visible marks communicating limited information.

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Q

Q (named cue) is the 17th letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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R

R (named ar/or) is the 18th letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Received Pronunciation

Received Pronunciation (RP) is an accent of Standard English in the United Kingdom and is defined in the Concise Oxford English Dictionary as "the standard accent of English as spoken in the south of England", although it can be heard from native speakers throughout England and Wales.

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S

S (named ess, plural esses) is the 19th letter in the Modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Scottish English

Scottish English refers to the varieties of English spoken in Scotland.

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Semivowel

In phonetics and phonology, a semivowel or glide, also known as a non-syllabic vocoid, is a sound that is phonetically similar to a vowel sound but functions as the syllable boundary, rather than as the nucleus of a syllable.

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Shavian alphabet

The Shavian alphabet (also known as the Shaw alphabet) is an alphabet conceived as a way to provide simple, phonetic orthography for the English language to replace the difficulties of conventional spelling.

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Spelling alphabet

A spelling alphabet, word-spelling alphabet, voice procedure alphabet, radio alphabet, or telephone alphabet is a set of words used to stand for the letters of an alphabet in oral communication.

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Syllable

A syllable is a unit of organization for a sequence of speech sounds.

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T

T (named tee) is the 20th letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Th (digraph)

Th is a digraph in the Latin script.

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The New Yorker

The New Yorker is an American magazine of reportage, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry.

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Thorn (letter)

Thorn or þorn (Þ, þ) is a letter in the Old English, Gothic, Old Norse and modern Icelandic alphabets, as well as some dialects of Middle English.

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Tironian notes

Tironian notes (notae Tironianae; or Tironian shorthand) is a system of shorthand invented by Tiro (94 4 BC), Marcus Tullius Cicero's slave and personal secretary, and later his freedman.

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Two-handed manual alphabets

Several manual alphabets in use around the world employ two hands to represent some or all of the letters of an alphabet, usually as a part of a deaf sign language.

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Typeface

In typography, a typeface (also known as font family) is a set of one or more fonts each composed of glyphs that share common design features.

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Typographic ligature

In writing and typography, a ligature occurs where two or more graphemes or letters are joined as a single glyph.

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U

U (named u, plural ues) is the 21st letter and the fifth vowel in the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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V

V (named vee) is the 22nd letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Vowel

A vowel is one of the two principal classes of speech sound, the other being a consonant.

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W

W (named double-u,Pronounced plural double-ues) is the 23rd letter of the modern English and ISO basic Latin alphabets.

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Wynn

Ƿynn (Ƿ ƿ) (also spelled wen, ƿynn, or ƿen) is a letter of the Old English alphabet, where it is used to represent the sound.

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X

X (named ex, plural exes) is the 24th and antepenultimate letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Y

Y (named wye, plural wyes) is the 25th and penultimate letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Yerba mate

Yerba mate (from Spanish; erva-mate or; ka'a) is a species of the holly genus (Ilex), with the botanical name Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil., named by the French botanist Auguste François César Prouvençal de Saint-Hilaire.

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Yogh

The letter yogh (ȝogh) (Ȝ ȝ; Middle English: ȝogh) was used in Middle English and Older Scots, representing y and various velar phonemes.

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Z

Z (named zed or zee "Z", Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition (1989); Merriam-Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (1993); "zee", op. cit.) is the 26th and final letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

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Redirects here:

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ, Abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz, English Alphabet, English letters, Latin alphabet for English, Letters of the English alphabet.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_alphabet

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