Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Free
Faster access than browser!
 

English law

+ Save concept

English law is the common law legal system of England and Wales, comprising mainly criminal law and civil law, each branch having its own courts and procedures. [1]

223 relations: Account of profits, Act of Parliament, Act of the National Assembly for Wales, Act of the Scottish Parliament, Acts of Parliament in the United Kingdom, Actus reus, Ad hoc, Admiralty court, Admiralty law, Analogy, Anticipatory repudiation, Appellate court, Arrest Convention 1999, Assize of novel disseisin, BBC News, Books of authority, British Empire, By-law, Cambridge University Press, Canon law of the Anglican Communion, Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1971, Carriage of Goods By Sea Act 1992, Case of Proclamations, Case of Prohibitions, Causation in English law, Cause of action, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, Civil law (common law), Civil law (legal system), Civil procedure in England and Wales, Civil Procedure Rules, Civil Rights Act of 1964, Codification (law), Collision, Commercial law, Common law, Commonwealth of Nations, Contract, County council, Court of Appeal (England and Wales), Court of Chancery, Court of King's Bench (England), Courts of England and Wales, Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996, Crown Prosecution Service, Crusades, Damages, Debt, Declaratory judgment, Deviation (law), ..., Devolution, Diminished responsibility in English law, Dominion, Donoghue v Stevenson, Duress in English law, Ecclesiastical court, Edward Coke, Edward III of England, England and Wales, English contract law, English Criminal Code, English criminal law, English family law, English property law, English tort law, English trust law, Equitable remedy, Equity (law), European Commission of Human Rights, European Convention on Human Rights, European Union, Euthanasia, Financial compensation, Fiqh, Fisher v Bell, Frederic William Maitland, Gavin Simonds, 1st Viscount Simonds, Gothic Revival architecture, Government, Government of Wales Act 2006, Grant v Norway, Hague–Visby Rules, Halsbury's Laws of England, Hawala, Hearsay in English law, Henry II of England, Henry VIII of England, High Court, High Court of Justice, Hong Kong Fir Shipping Co Ltd v Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd, Human Rights Act 1998, Injunction, Inns of Court, Intention in English law, International Convention on Salvage, International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, International trade law, Judge, Judicature Acts, Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, Jurisdiction (area), Jury, Kingdom of England, Knights Templar, Law, Law Commission (England and Wales), Law French, Law of agency, Law of Carriage of Goods by Sea, Law of Property Act 1925, Law of the United States, Law school, Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542, Legal case, Legal fiction, Legal remedy, Legislation, Legislative session, Lex mercatoria, List of English monarchs, List of national legal systems, Lloyd's Open Form, Madrasa, Maliki, Manslaughter in English law, Marine Insurance Act 1906, Marine salvage, Maritime Labour Convention, Maxims of equity, Measure of the National Assembly for Wales, Mechanisms of the English common law, Melbourne University Law Review, Mens rea, Merton College, Oxford, Metropolitan borough, Ministerial order, Misrepresentation Act 1967, Monism and dualism in international law, Montesquieu, Murder in English law, Napoleonic Code, National Assembly for Wales, National Assembly for Wales election, 2007, Necessity in English criminal law, Negligence, Norman conquest of England, Norman law, Normans, North Carolina Law Review, Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland (Temporary Provisions) Act 1972, Northern Ireland Assembly, Nuisance abatement, Open justice, Order in Council, Oxford English Dictionary, Parliament of England, Parliament of the United Kingdom, Pleading in English Act 1362, Precedent, Procedural law, Provocation in English law, Public law, Qiyas, Ratio decidendi, Recklessness (law), Regnal year, Regulation (European Union), Rescission (contract law), Richard I of England, Rights, Robbery, Roger II of Sicily, Roman law, Royal and noble ranks, Royal assent, Royal Courts of Justice, S. F. C. Milsom, Sale of Goods Act 1979, Scotland, Scots law, Self-defence in English law, Self-help (law), Sharia, Short and long titles, Sir Frederick Pollock, 1st Baronet, Statutory instrument, Statutory instrument (UK), Statutory interpretation, Statutory rules of Northern Ireland, Sui generis, Suicide pact, Supranational union, Supreme court, Supreme Court of Judicature Act, Supreme Court of New Zealand, Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, Theft, Theft Act 1968, Time immemorial, Tort, Town council, Treaty, Treaty of Rome, Trust law, United Kingdom, United Kingdom administrative law, United Kingdom company law, United Kingdom constitutional law, United Kingdom labour law, United Kingdom legislation, University of North Carolina School of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Wales, Walter de Merton, Waqf, Welsh language, Welsh Language Act 1967, Welsh Language Act 1993, Welsh law, William Blackstone, Writ, 1952 Arrest Convention. Expand index (173 more) »

Account of profits

An account of profits (sometimes referred to as an accounting for profits or simply an accounting) is a type of equitable remedy most commonly used in cases of breach of fiduciary duty.

New!!: English law and Account of profits · See more »

Act of Parliament

Acts of Parliament, also called primary legislation, are statutes passed by a parliament (legislature).

New!!: English law and Act of Parliament · See more »

Act of the National Assembly for Wales

In Wales, an Act of the National Assembly for Wales (Deddf Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru) (informally, an Act of the Assembly) is primary legislation that can be made by the National Assembly for Wales under part 4 of the Government of Wales Act 2006.

New!!: English law and Act of the National Assembly for Wales · See more »

Act of the Scottish Parliament

An Act of the Scottish Parliament (Achd Pàrlamaid na h-Alba) is primary legislation made by the Scottish Parliament.

New!!: English law and Act of the Scottish Parliament · See more »

Acts of Parliament in the United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, Acts of Parliament are primary legislation passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

New!!: English law and Acts of Parliament in the United Kingdom · See more »

Actus reus

Actus reus, sometimes called the external element or the objective element of a crime, is the Latin term for the "guilty act" which, when proved beyond a reasonable doubt in combination with the mens rea, "guilty mind", produces criminal liability in the common law-based criminal law jurisdictions of England and Wales, Canada, Australia, India, Kenya, Pakistan, South Africa, New Zealand, Scotland, Nigeria, Ghana, Ireland, Israel and the United States of America.

New!!: English law and Actus reus · See more »

Ad hoc

Ad hoc is a Latin phrase meaning literally "for this".

New!!: English law and Ad hoc · See more »

Admiralty court

Admiralty courts, also known as maritime courts, are courts exercising jurisdiction over all maritime contracts, torts, injuries, and offenses.

New!!: English law and Admiralty court · See more »

Admiralty law

Admiralty law or maritime law is a body of law that governs nautical issues and private maritime disputes.

New!!: English law and Admiralty law · See more »

Analogy

Analogy (from Greek ἀναλογία, analogia, "proportion", from ana- "upon, according to" + logos "ratio") is a cognitive process of transferring information or meaning from a particular subject (the analog, or source) to another (the target), or a linguistic expression corresponding to such a process.

New!!: English law and Analogy · See more »

Anticipatory repudiation

Anticipatory repudiation, also called an anticipatory breach, is a term in the law of contracts that describes a declaration by the promising party to a contract that he or she does not intend to live up to his or her obligations under the contract.

New!!: English law and Anticipatory repudiation · See more »

Appellate court

An appellate court, commonly called an appeals court, court of appeals (American English), appeal court (British English), court of second instance or second instance court, is any court of law that is empowered to hear an appeal of a trial court or other lower tribunal.

New!!: English law and Appellate court · See more »

Arrest Convention 1999

In 1999, the final text of the International Convention on Arrest of Ships was concluded, and the Convention (generally known as the "Arrest Convention 1999") came into force on 14 September 2011.

New!!: English law and Arrest Convention 1999 · See more »

Assize of novel disseisin

In English law, the Assize of novel disseisin ("recent dispossession") was an action to recover lands of which the plaintiff had been disseised, or dispossessed.

New!!: English law and Assize of novel disseisin · See more »

BBC News

BBC News is an operational business division of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) responsible for the gathering and broadcasting of news and current affairs.

New!!: English law and BBC News · See more »

Books of authority

Books of authority is a term used by legal writers to refer to a number of early legal textbooks that are excepted from the rule that textbooks (and all books other than statute or law report) are not treated as authorities by the courts of England and Wales and other common law jurisdictions.

New!!: English law and Books of authority · See more »

British Empire

The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states.

New!!: English law and British Empire · See more »

By-law

A by-law (bylaw) is a rule or law established by an organization or community to regulate itself, as allowed or provided for by some higher authority.

New!!: English law and By-law · See more »

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge.

New!!: English law and Cambridge University Press · See more »

Canon law of the Anglican Communion

The Anglican Communion as a whole, unlike the Roman Catholic Church, does not have a centralised canon law of its own.

New!!: English law and Canon law of the Anglican Communion · See more »

Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1971

The Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1971 is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament.

New!!: English law and Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1971 · See more »

Carriage of Goods By Sea Act 1992

The Carriage of Goods By Sea Act 1992 is a UK Statute that repeals the Bills of Lading Act 1855 and makes new provisions.

New!!: English law and Carriage of Goods By Sea Act 1992 · See more »

Case of Proclamations

The Case of Proclamations was a court decision during the reign of King James VI and I (1603-1625) which defined some limitations on the Royal Prerogative at that time.

New!!: English law and Case of Proclamations · See more »

Case of Prohibitions

Case of Prohibitions is a historical English court decision by Sir Edward Coke.

New!!: English law and Case of Prohibitions · See more »

Causation in English law

Causation in English law concerns the legal tests of remoteness, causation and foreseeability in the tort of negligence.

New!!: English law and Causation in English law · See more »

Cause of action

A cause of action, in law, is a set of facts sufficient to justify a right to sue to obtain money, property, or the enforcement of a right against another party.

New!!: English law and Cause of action · See more »

Chief Justice of the Common Pleas

The Chief Justice of the Common Pleas was the head of the Court of Common Pleas, also known as the Common Bench or Common Place, which was the second-highest common law court in the English legal system until 1875, when it, along with the other two common law courts and the equity and probate courts, became part of the High Court of Justice.

New!!: English law and Chief Justice of the Common Pleas · See more »

Civil law (common law)

Civil law is a branch of the law.

New!!: English law and Civil law (common law) · See more »

Civil law (legal system)

Civil law, civilian law, or Roman law is a legal system originating in Europe, intellectualized within the framework of Roman law, the main feature of which is that its core principles are codified into a referable system which serves as the primary source of law.

New!!: English law and Civil law (legal system) · See more »

Civil procedure in England and Wales

English civil procedure shares much in common with the civil law systems of other common law countries.

New!!: English law and Civil procedure in England and Wales · See more »

Civil Procedure Rules

The Civil Procedure Rules (CPR) are the rules of civil procedure used by the Court of Appeal, High Court of Justice, and County Courts in civil cases in England and Wales.

New!!: English law and Civil Procedure Rules · See more »

Civil Rights Act of 1964

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a landmark civil rights and US labor law in the United States that outlaws discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.

New!!: English law and Civil Rights Act of 1964 · See more »

Codification (law)

In law, codification is the process of collecting and restating the law of a jurisdiction in certain areas, usually by subject, forming a legal code, i.e. a codex (book) of law.

New!!: English law and Codification (law) · See more »

Collision

A collision is an event in which two or more bodies exert forces on each other for a relatively short time.

New!!: English law and Collision · See more »

Commercial law

Commercial law, also known as trade law, is the body of law that applies to the rights, relations, and conduct of persons and businesses engaged in commerce, merchandising, trade, and sales.

New!!: English law and Commercial law · See more »

Common law

Common law (also known as judicial precedent or judge-made law, or case law) is that body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.

New!!: English law and Common law · See more »

Commonwealth of Nations

The Commonwealth of Nations, often known as simply the Commonwealth, is an intergovernmental organisation of 53 member states that are mostly former territories of the British Empire.

New!!: English law and Commonwealth of Nations · See more »

Contract

A contract is a promise or set of promises that are legally enforceable and, if violated, allow the injured party access to legal remedies.

New!!: English law and Contract · See more »

County council

A county council is the elected administrative body governing an area known as a county.

New!!: English law and County council · See more »

Court of Appeal (England and Wales)

The Court of Appeal (COA, formally "Her Majesty's Court of Appeal in England") is the highest court within the Senior Courts of England and Wales, and second only to the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom.

New!!: English law and Court of Appeal (England and Wales) · See more »

Court of Chancery

The Court of Chancery was a court of equity in England and Wales that followed a set of loose rules to avoid the slow pace of change and possible harshness (or "inequity") of the common law.

New!!: English law and Court of Chancery · See more »

Court of King's Bench (England)

The Court of King's Bench (or Court of Queen's Bench during the reign of a female monarch), formally known as The Court of the King Before the King Himself, was an English court of common law in the English legal system.

New!!: English law and Court of King's Bench (England) · See more »

Courts of England and Wales

The Courts of England and Wales, supported administratively by Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service, are the civil and criminal courts responsible for the administration of justice in England and Wales.

New!!: English law and Courts of England and Wales · See more »

Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996

The Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996 is a piece of statutory legislation in the United Kingdom that regulates the procedures of investigating and prosecution of criminal offences.

New!!: English law and Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996 · See more »

Crown Prosecution Service

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is the principal public prosecuting agency for conducting criminal prosecutions in England and Wales.

New!!: English law and Crown Prosecution Service · See more »

Crusades

The Crusades were a series of religious wars sanctioned by the Latin Church in the medieval period.

New!!: English law and Crusades · See more »

Damages

In law, damages are an award, typically of money, to be paid to a person as compensation for loss or injury.

New!!: English law and Damages · See more »

Debt

Debt is when something, usually money, is owed by one party, the borrower or debtor, to a second party, the lender or creditor.

New!!: English law and Debt · See more »

Declaratory judgment

A declaratory judgment, also called a declaration, is the legal determination of a court that resolves legal uncertainty for the litigants.

New!!: English law and Declaratory judgment · See more »

Deviation (law)

The doctrine of deviation is a particular aspect of contracts of carriage of goods by sea.

New!!: English law and Deviation (law) · See more »

Devolution

Devolution is the statutory delegation of powers from the central government of a sovereign state to govern at a subnational level, such as a regional or local level.

New!!: English law and Devolution · See more »

Diminished responsibility in English law

In English law, diminished responsibility is one of the partial defences that reduce the offence from murder to manslaughter if successful (termed "voluntary" manslaughter for these purposes).

New!!: English law and Diminished responsibility in English law · See more »

Dominion

Dominions were semi-independent polities under the British Crown, constituting the British Empire, beginning with Canadian Confederation in 1867.

New!!: English law and Dominion · See more »

Donoghue v Stevenson

was a landmark court decision in Scots delict law and English tort law by the House of Lords.

New!!: English law and Donoghue v Stevenson · See more »

Duress in English law

Duress in English law is a complete common law defence, operating in favour of those who commit crimes because they are forced or compelled to do so by the circumstances, or the threats of another.

New!!: English law and Duress in English law · See more »

Ecclesiastical court

An ecclesiastical court, also called court Christian or court spiritual, is any of certain courts having jurisdiction mainly in spiritual or religious matters.

New!!: English law and Ecclesiastical court · See more »

Edward Coke

Sir Edward Coke ("cook", formerly; 1 February 1552 – 3 September 1634) was an English barrister, judge, and politician who is considered to be the greatest jurist of the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras.

New!!: English law and Edward Coke · See more »

Edward III of England

Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England and Lord of Ireland from January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II.

New!!: English law and Edward III of England · See more »

England and Wales

England and Wales is a legal jurisdiction covering England and Wales, two of the four countries of the United Kingdom.

New!!: English law and England and Wales · See more »

English contract law

English contract law is a body of law regulating contracts in England and Wales.

New!!: English law and English contract law · See more »

English Criminal Code

The jurisdiction of England and Wales does not have a Criminal Code though such an instrument has been often recommended and attempted.

New!!: English law and English Criminal Code · See more »

English criminal law

English criminal law refers to the body of law in the jurisdiction of England and Wales which deals with crimes and their consequences, and which is complementary to the civil law of England and Wales.

New!!: English law and English criminal law · See more »

English family law

English family law concerns the law relating to family matters in England and Wales.

New!!: English law and English family law · See more »

English property law

English property law refers to the law of acquisition, sharing and protection of valuable assets in England and Wales.

New!!: English law and English property law · See more »

English tort law

English tort law is the law governing implicit civil responsibilities that people have to one another, as opposed to those responsibilities laid out in contracts.

New!!: English law and English tort law · See more »

English trust law

English trust law concerns the creation and protection of asset funds, which are usually held by one party for another's benefit.

New!!: English law and English trust law · See more »

Equitable remedy

Equitable remedies are judicial remedies developed by courts of equity from about the time of Henry VII to provide more flexible responses to changing social conditions than was possible in precedent-based common law.

New!!: English law and Equitable remedy · See more »

Equity (law)

In jurisdictions following the English common law system, equity is the body of law which was developed in the English Court of Chancery and which is now administered concurrently with the common law.

New!!: English law and Equity (law) · See more »

European Commission of Human Rights

European Commission of Human Rights was a special tribunal.

New!!: English law and European Commission of Human Rights · See more »

European Convention on Human Rights

The European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) (formally the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms) is an international treaty to protect human rights and political freedoms in Europe.

New!!: English law and European Convention on Human Rights · See more »

European Union

The European Union (EU) is a political and economic union of EUnum member states that are located primarily in Europe.

New!!: English law and European Union · See more »

Euthanasia

Euthanasia (from εὐθανασία; "good death": εὖ, eu; "well" or "good" – θάνατος, thanatos; "death") is the practice of intentionally ending a life to relieve pain and suffering.

New!!: English law and Euthanasia · See more »

Financial compensation

Financial compensation refers to the act of providing a person with money or other things of economic value in exchange for their goods, labor, or to provide for the costs of injuries that they have incurred.

New!!: English law and Financial compensation · See more »

Fiqh

Fiqh (فقه) is Islamic jurisprudence.

New!!: English law and Fiqh · See more »

Fisher v Bell

Fisher v Bell 1 QB 394 is an English contract law case concerning the requirements of offer and acceptance in the formation of a contract.

New!!: English law and Fisher v Bell · See more »

Frederic William Maitland

Frederic William Maitland, FBA (28 May 1850 – 19 December 1906) was an English historian and lawyer who is generally regarded as the modern father of English legal history.

New!!: English law and Frederic William Maitland · See more »

Gavin Simonds, 1st Viscount Simonds

Gavin Turnbull Simonds, 1st Viscount Simonds, (28 November 1881 – 28 June 1971) was a British judge, politician and Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain.

New!!: English law and Gavin Simonds, 1st Viscount Simonds · See more »

Gothic Revival architecture

Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic or neo-Gothic) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England.

New!!: English law and Gothic Revival architecture · See more »

Government

A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community, often a state.

New!!: English law and Government · See more »

Government of Wales Act 2006

The Government of Wales Act 2006 (c 32) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reforms the National Assembly for Wales and allows further powers to be granted to it more easily.

New!!: English law and Government of Wales Act 2006 · See more »

Grant v Norway

Grant v Norway (1851) is a case on the Law of Carriage of Goods by Sea; but since 1992 it has no longer been good law.

New!!: English law and Grant v Norway · See more »

Hague–Visby Rules

The Hague–Visby Rules is a set of international rules for the international carriage of goods by sea.

New!!: English law and Hague–Visby Rules · See more »

Halsbury's Laws of England

Halsbury's Laws of England is a uniquely comprehensive encyclopaedia of law, and provides the only complete narrative statement of law in England and Wales.

New!!: English law and Halsbury's Laws of England · See more »

Hawala

Hawala or hewala (حِوالة, meaning transfer or sometimes trust), also known as hundi or—in Somali, xawala or xawilaad—is a popular and informal value transfer system based not on the movement of cash, or on telegraph or computer network wire transfers between banks, but instead on the performance and honour of a huge network of money brokers (known as "hawaladars").

New!!: English law and Hawala · See more »

Hearsay in English law

The hearsay provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 reformed the common law relating to the admissibility of hearsay evidence in criminal proceedings begun on or after 4 April 2005.

New!!: English law and Hearsay in English law · See more »

Henry II of England

Henry II (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189), also known as Henry Curtmantle (Court-manteau), Henry FitzEmpress or Henry Plantagenet, ruled as Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Nantes, King of England and Lord of Ireland; at various times, he also partially controlled Wales, Scotland and Brittany.

New!!: English law and Henry II of England · See more »

Henry VIII of England

Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England from 1509 until his death.

New!!: English law and Henry VIII of England · See more »

High Court

High court usually refers to the superior court (or supreme court) of a country or state.

New!!: English law and High Court · See more »

High Court of Justice

The High Court of Justice is, together with the Court of Appeal and the Crown Court, one of the Senior Courts of England and Wales.

New!!: English law and High Court of Justice · See more »

Hong Kong Fir Shipping Co Ltd v Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd

Hong Kong Fir Shipping Co Ltd v Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd is a landmark English contract law case.

New!!: English law and Hong Kong Fir Shipping Co Ltd v Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd · See more »

Human Rights Act 1998

The Human Rights Act 1998 (c42) is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom which received Royal Assent on 9 November 1998, and mostly came into force on 2 October 2000.

New!!: English law and Human Rights Act 1998 · See more »

Injunction

An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that compels a party to do or refrain from specific acts.

New!!: English law and Injunction · See more »

Inns of Court

The Inns of Court in London are the professional associations for barristers in England and Wales.

New!!: English law and Inns of Court · See more »

Intention in English law

In English criminal law, intention is one of the types of mens rea (Latin for "guilty mind") that, when accompanied by an actus reus (Latin for "guilty act"), constitutes a crime.

New!!: English law and Intention in English law · See more »

International Convention on Salvage

The International Convention on Salvage is a treaty that was concluded in London on 28 April 1989 that replaced the Brussels Convention on Assistance and Salvage at Sea as the principal multilateral document governing marine salvage.

New!!: English law and International Convention on Salvage · See more »

International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea

The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1972 (COLREGs) are published by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and set out, among other things, the "rules of the road" or navigation rules to be followed by ships and other vessels at sea to prevent collisions between two or more vessels.

New!!: English law and International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea · See more »

International trade law

International trade law includes the appropriate rules and customs for handling trade between countries.

New!!: English law and International trade law · See more »

Judge

A judge is a person who presides over court proceedings, either alone or as a part of a panel of judges.

New!!: English law and Judge · See more »

Judicature Acts

The Judicature Acts are a series of Acts of Parliament, beginning in the 1870s, which aimed to fuse the hitherto split system of courts in England and Wales.

New!!: English law and Judicature Acts · See more »

Judicial Committee of the Privy Council

The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council (JCPC) is the highest court of appeal for certain British territories and Commonwealth countries.

New!!: English law and Judicial Committee of the Privy Council · See more »

Jurisdiction (area)

A jurisdiction is an area with a set of laws under the control of a system of courts or government entity which are different from neighbouring areas.

New!!: English law and Jurisdiction (area) · See more »

Jury

A jury is a sworn body of people convened to render an impartial verdict (a finding of fact on a question) officially submitted to them by a court, or to set a penalty or judgment.

New!!: English law and Jury · See more »

Kingdom of England

The Kingdom of England (French: Royaume d'Angleterre; Danish: Kongeriget England; German: Königreich England) was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from the 10th century—when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms—until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

New!!: English law and Kingdom of England · See more »

Knights Templar

The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon (Pauperes commilitones Christi Templique Salomonici), also known as the Order of Solomon's Temple, the Knights Templar or simply as Templars, were a Catholic military order recognised in 1139 by papal bull Omne Datum Optimum of the Holy See.

New!!: English law and Knights Templar · See more »

Law

Law is a system of rules that are created and enforced through social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior.

New!!: English law and Law · See more »

Law Commission (England and Wales)

In England and Wales the Law Commission (Comisiwm y Gyfraith) is an independent body set up by Parliament by the Law Commissions Act 1965 to keep the law of England and Wales under review and to recommend reforms.

New!!: English law and Law Commission (England and Wales) · See more »

Law French

Law French is an archaic language originally based on Old Norman and Anglo-Norman, but increasingly influenced by Parisian French and, later, English.

New!!: English law and Law French · See more »

Law of agency

The law of agency is an area of commercial law dealing with a set of contractual, quasi-contractual and non-contractual fiduciary relationships that involve a person, called the agent, that is authorized to act on behalf of another (called the principal) to create legal relations with a third party.

New!!: English law and Law of agency · See more »

Law of Carriage of Goods by Sea

The law of carriage of goods by sea is a body of law that governs the rights and duties of shippers, carriers and consignees of marine cargo.

New!!: English law and Law of Carriage of Goods by Sea · See more »

Law of Property Act 1925

The Law of Property Act 1925 is a statute of the United Kingdom Parliament.

New!!: English law and Law of Property Act 1925 · See more »

Law of the United States

The law of the United States comprises many levels of codified and uncodified forms of law, of which the most important is the United States Constitution, the foundation of the federal government of the United States.

New!!: English law and Law of the United States · See more »

Law school

A law school (also known as a law centre or college of law) is an institution specializing in legal education, usually involved as part of a process for becoming a lawyer within a given jurisdiction.

New!!: English law and Law school · See more »

Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542

The Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542 (Y Deddfau Cyfreithiau yng Nghymru 1535 a 1542) were parliamentary measures by which Wales became a full and equal part of the Kingdom of England and the legal system of England was extended to Wales and the norms of English administration introduced.

New!!: English law and Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542 · See more »

Legal case

A legal case is a dispute between opposing parties resolved by a court, or by some equivalent legal process.

New!!: English law and Legal case · See more »

Legal fiction

A legal fiction is a fact assumed or created by courts which is then used in order to help reach a decision or to apply a legal rule.

New!!: English law and Legal fiction · See more »

Legal remedy

A legal remedy, also judicial relief or a judicial remedy, is the means with which a court of law, usually in the exercise of civil law jurisdiction, enforces a right, imposes a penalty, or makes another court order to impose its will.

New!!: English law and Legal remedy · See more »

Legislation

Legislation (or "statutory law") is law which has been promulgated (or "enacted") by a legislature or other governing body or the process of making it.

New!!: English law and Legislation · See more »

Legislative session

A legislative session is the period of time in which a legislature, in both parliamentary and presidential systems, is convened for purpose of lawmaking, usually being one of two or more smaller divisions of the entire time between two elections.

New!!: English law and Legislative session · See more »

Lex mercatoria

Lex mercatoria (from the Latin for "merchant law"), often referred to as "the Law Merchant" in English, is the body of commercial law used by merchants throughout Europe during the medieval period.

New!!: English law and Lex mercatoria · See more »

List of English monarchs

This list of kings and queens of the Kingdom of England begins with Alfred the Great, King of Wessex, one of the petty kingdoms to rule a portion of modern England.

New!!: English law and List of English monarchs · See more »

List of national legal systems

The contemporary legal systems of the world are generally based on one of four basic systems: civil law, common law, statutory law, religious law or combinations of these.

New!!: English law and List of national legal systems · See more »

Lloyd's Open Form

The Lloyd's Open Form, formally "Lloyd's Standard Form of Salvage Agreement", and commonly referred to as the LOF, is a standard form contract for a proposed marine salvage operation.

New!!: English law and Lloyd's Open Form · See more »

Madrasa

Madrasa (مدرسة,, pl. مدارس) is the Arabic word for any type of educational institution, whether secular or religious (of any religion), and whether a school, college, or university.

New!!: English law and Madrasa · See more »

Maliki

The (مالكي) school is one of the four major madhhab of Islamic jurisprudence within Sunni Islam.

New!!: English law and Maliki · See more »

Manslaughter in English law

In the English law of homicide, manslaughter is a less serious offence than murder, the differential being between levels of fault based on the mens rea (Latin for "guilty mind") or by reason of a partial defence.

New!!: English law and Manslaughter in English law · See more »

Marine Insurance Act 1906

The Marine Insurance Act 1906 (8 Edw. 7 c.41) is a UK Act of Parliament regulating marine insurance.

New!!: English law and Marine Insurance Act 1906 · See more »

Marine salvage

Marine salvage is the process of recovering a ship and its cargo after a shipwreck or other maritime casualty.

New!!: English law and Marine salvage · See more »

Maritime Labour Convention

The Maritime Labour Convention (MLC) is an International Labour Organization convention, number 186, established in 2006 as the fourth pillar of international maritime law and embodies "all up-to-date standards of existing international maritime labour Conventions and Recommendations, as well as the fundamental principles to be found in other international labour Conventions".

New!!: English law and Maritime Labour Convention · See more »

Maxims of equity

Maxims of equity are legal maxims that serve as a set of general principles or rules which are said to govern the way in which equity operates.

New!!: English law and Maxims of equity · See more »

Measure of the National Assembly for Wales

A Measure of the National Assembly for Wales (informally, an Assembly Measure) is primary legislation in Wales that is a category lower than an Act of Parliament.

New!!: English law and Measure of the National Assembly for Wales · See more »

Mechanisms of the English common law

In the English system of common law, judges have devised a number of mechanisms to allow them to cope with precedent decisions.

New!!: English law and Mechanisms of the English common law · See more »

Melbourne University Law Review

The Melbourne University Law Review is a triannual law journal published by a student group at Melbourne Law School covering all areas of law.

New!!: English law and Melbourne University Law Review · See more »

Mens rea

Mens rea (Law Latin for "guilty mind") is the mental element of a person's intention to commit a crime; or knowledge that one's action or lack of action would cause a crime to be committed.

New!!: English law and Mens rea · See more »

Merton College, Oxford

Merton College (in full: The House or College of Scholars of Merton in the University of Oxford) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England.

New!!: English law and Merton College, Oxford · See more »

Metropolitan borough

A metropolitan borough is a type of local government district in England, and is a subdivision of a metropolitan county.

New!!: English law and Metropolitan borough · See more »

Ministerial order

A ministerial decree or ministerial order is a decree by a ministry.

New!!: English law and Ministerial order · See more »

Misrepresentation Act 1967

Misrepresentation Act 1967 is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom which amended the common law principles of misrepresentation.

New!!: English law and Misrepresentation Act 1967 · See more »

Monism and dualism in international law

The terms monism and dualism are used to describe two different theories of the relationship between international law and national law.

New!!: English law and Monism and dualism in international law · See more »

Montesquieu

Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu (18 January 1689 – 10 February 1755), generally referred to as simply Montesquieu, was a French judge, man of letters, and political philosopher.

New!!: English law and Montesquieu · See more »

Murder in English law

Murder is an offence under the common law of England and Wales.

New!!: English law and Murder in English law · See more »

Napoleonic Code

The Napoleonic Code (officially Code civil des Français, referred to as (le) Code civil) is the French civil code established under Napoléon I in 1804.

New!!: English law and Napoleonic Code · See more »

National Assembly for Wales

The National Assembly for Wales (Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru; commonly known as the Welsh Assembly) is a devolved parliament with power to make legislation in Wales.

New!!: English law and National Assembly for Wales · See more »

National Assembly for Wales election, 2007

The 2007 National Assembly election was held on Thursday 3 May 2007 to elect members to the National Assembly for Wales.

New!!: English law and National Assembly for Wales election, 2007 · See more »

Necessity in English criminal law

In English law, the defence of necessity recognises that there may be situations of such overwhelming urgency that a person must be allowed to respond by breaking the law.

New!!: English law and Necessity in English criminal law · See more »

Negligence

Negligence (Lat. negligentia) is a failure to exercise appropriate and or ethical ruled care expected to be exercised amongst specified circumstances.

New!!: English law and Negligence · See more »

Norman conquest of England

The Norman conquest of England (in Britain, often called the Norman Conquest or the Conquest) was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England by an army of Norman, Breton, Flemish and French soldiers led by Duke William II of Normandy, later styled William the Conqueror.

New!!: English law and Norman conquest of England · See more »

Norman law

Norman law refers to the customary law of the Duchy of Normandy which developed between the 10th and 13th centuries and which survives today in the legal systems of Jersey and the other Channel Islands.

New!!: English law and Norman law · See more »

Normans

The Normans (Norman: Normaunds; Normands; Normanni) were the people who, in the 10th and 11th centuries, gave their name to Normandy, a region in France.

New!!: English law and Normans · See more »

North Carolina Law Review

The North Carolina Law Review is the law journal of the University of North Carolina School of Law.

New!!: English law and North Carolina Law Review · See more »

Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland (Tuaisceart Éireann; Ulster-Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a part of the United Kingdom in the north-east of the island of Ireland, variously described as a country, province or region.

New!!: English law and Northern Ireland · See more »

Northern Ireland (Temporary Provisions) Act 1972

The Northern Ireland (Temporary Provisions) Act 1972 (c. 22) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that introduced direct rule in Northern Ireland with effect from 30 March 1972.

New!!: English law and Northern Ireland (Temporary Provisions) Act 1972 · See more »

Northern Ireland Assembly

The Northern Ireland Assembly (Tionól Thuaisceart Éireann, Ulster-Scots: Norlin Airlan Assemblie) is the devolved legislature of Northern Ireland.

New!!: English law and Northern Ireland Assembly · See more »

Nuisance abatement

Nuisance abatement is a growing area within policing and code enforcement.

New!!: English law and Nuisance abatement · See more »

Open justice

Open justice is a legal principle describing legal processes characterized by openness and transparency.

New!!: English law and Open justice · See more »

Order in Council

An Order in Council is a type of legislation in many countries, especially the Commonwealth realms.

New!!: English law and Order in Council · See more »

Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University Press.

New!!: English law and Oxford English Dictionary · See more »

Parliament of England

The Parliament of England was the legislature of the Kingdom of England, existing from the early 13th century until 1707, when it became the Parliament of Great Britain after the political union of England and Scotland created the Kingdom of Great Britain.

New!!: English law and Parliament of England · See more »

Parliament of the United Kingdom

The Parliament of the United Kingdom, commonly known as the UK Parliament or British Parliament, is the supreme legislative body of the United Kingdom, the Crown dependencies and overseas territories.

New!!: English law and Parliament of the United Kingdom · See more »

Pleading in English Act 1362

The Pleading in English Act 1362 (36 Edw. III c. 15), often rendered Statute of Pleading, was an Act of the Parliament of England.

New!!: English law and Pleading in English Act 1362 · See more »

Precedent

In common law legal systems, a precedent, or authority, is a principle or rule established in a previous legal case that is either binding on or persuasive for a court or other tribunal when deciding subsequent cases with similar issues or facts.

New!!: English law and Precedent · See more »

Procedural law

Procedural law, adjective law, or rules of court comprises the rules by which a court hears and determines what happens in civil, lawsuit, criminal or administrative proceedings.

New!!: English law and Procedural law · See more »

Provocation in English law

In English law, provocation was a mitigatory defence alleging a total loss of control as a response to another's provocative conduct sufficient to convert what would otherwise have been murder into manslaughter.

New!!: English law and Provocation in English law · See more »

Public law

Public law is that part of law which governs relationships between individuals and the government, and those relationships between individuals which are of direct concern to society.

New!!: English law and Public law · See more »

Qiyas

In Islamic jurisprudence, qiyās (قياس) is the process of deductive analogy in which the teachings of the Hadith are compared and contrasted with those of the Qur'an, in order to apply a known injunction (nass) to a new circumstance and create a new injunction.

New!!: English law and Qiyas · See more »

Ratio decidendi

Ratio decidendi (Latin plural rationes decidendi) is a Latin phrase meaning "the reason" or "the rationale for the decision".

New!!: English law and Ratio decidendi · See more »

Recklessness (law)

In criminal law and in the law of tort, recklessness may be defined as the state of mind where a person deliberately and unjustifiably pursues a course of action while consciously disregarding any risks flowing from such action.

New!!: English law and Recklessness (law) · See more »

Regnal year

A regnal year is a year of the reign of a sovereign, from the Latin regnum meaning kingdom, rule.

New!!: English law and Regnal year · See more »

Regulation (European Union)

A regulation is a legal act of the European Union that becomes immediately enforceable as law in all member states simultaneously.

New!!: English law and Regulation (European Union) · See more »

Rescission (contract law)

In contract law, rescission has been defined as the unmaking of a contract between parties.

New!!: English law and Rescission (contract law) · See more »

Richard I of England

Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 1189 until his death.

New!!: English law and Richard I of England · See more »

Rights

Rights are legal, social, or ethical principles of freedom or entitlement; that is, rights are the fundamental normative rules about what is allowed of people or owed to people, according to some legal system, social convention, or ethical theory.

New!!: English law and Rights · See more »

Robbery

Robbery is the crime of taking or attempting to take anything of value by force, threat of force, or by putting the victim in fear.

New!!: English law and Robbery · See more »

Roger II of Sicily

Roger II (22 December 1095Houben, p. 30. – 26 February 1154) was King of Sicily, son of Roger I of Sicily and successor to his brother Simon.

New!!: English law and Roger II of Sicily · See more »

Roman law

Roman law is the legal system of ancient Rome, including the legal developments spanning over a thousand years of jurisprudence, from the Twelve Tables (c. 449 BC), to the Corpus Juris Civilis (AD 529) ordered by Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I. Roman law forms the basic framework for civil law, the most widely used legal system today, and the terms are sometimes used synonymously.

New!!: English law and Roman law · See more »

Royal and noble ranks

Traditional rank amongst European royalty, peers, and nobility is rooted in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

New!!: English law and Royal and noble ranks · See more »

Royal assent

Royal assent or sanction is the method by which a country's monarch (possibly through a delegated official) formally approves an act of that nation's parliament.

New!!: English law and Royal assent · See more »

Royal Courts of Justice

The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is a court building in London which houses the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales.

New!!: English law and Royal Courts of Justice · See more »

S. F. C. Milsom

Stroud Francis Charles Milsom QC FBA FRHistS (2 May 1923 – 24 February 2016) was an English legal historian known for fundamentally revising some of the ideas of F.W. Maitland.

New!!: English law and S. F. C. Milsom · See more »

Sale of Goods Act 1979

The Sale of Goods Act 1979 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which regulated English contract law and UK commercial law in respect of goods that are sold and bought.

New!!: English law and Sale of Goods Act 1979 · See more »

Scotland

Scotland (Alba) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.

New!!: English law and Scotland · See more »

Scots law

Scots law is the legal system of Scotland.

New!!: English law and Scots law · See more »

Self-defence in English law

Self-defence is a legal doctrine which says that a person may use reasonable force in the defence of themself or another.

New!!: English law and Self-defence in English law · See more »

Self-help (law)

Self-help, in the sense of a legal doctrine, refers to individuals' implementation of their rights without resorting to legal writ or consultation of higher authority, as where a financial institution repossesses a car on which they hold both the title and a defaulted note.

New!!: English law and Self-help (law) · See more »

Sharia

Sharia, Sharia law, or Islamic law (شريعة) is the religious law forming part of the Islamic tradition.

New!!: English law and Sharia · See more »

Short and long titles

The short title is the formal name by which a piece of primary legislation may by law be cited in the United Kingdom and other Westminster-influenced jurisdictions (such as Canada or Australia), as well as the United States and the Philippines.

New!!: English law and Short and long titles · See more »

Sir Frederick Pollock, 1st Baronet

Sir Jonathan Frederick Pollock, 1st Baronet, PC (23 September 1783 – 28 August 1870) was a British lawyer and Tory politician.

New!!: English law and Sir Frederick Pollock, 1st Baronet · See more »

Statutory instrument

In many countries, a statutory instrument is a form of delegated legislation.

New!!: English law and Statutory instrument · See more »

Statutory instrument (UK)

A statutory instrument (SI) is the principal form in which delegated legislation is made in Great Britain.

New!!: English law and Statutory instrument (UK) · See more »

Statutory interpretation

Statutory interpretation is the process by which courts interpret and apply legislation.

New!!: English law and Statutory interpretation · See more »

Statutory rules of Northern Ireland

The statutory rules of Northern Ireland are the principal form in which delegated legislation is made in Northern Ireland.

New!!: English law and Statutory rules of Northern Ireland · See more »

Sui generis

Sui generis is a Latin phrase that means "of its (his, her, their) own kind; in a class by itself; unique." A number of disciplines use the term to refer to unique entities.

New!!: English law and Sui generis · See more »

Suicide pact

A suicide pact is an agreed plan between two or more individuals to commit suicide.

New!!: English law and Suicide pact · See more »

Supranational union

A supranational union is a type of multinational political union where negotiated power is delegated to an authority by governments of member states.

New!!: English law and Supranational union · See more »

Supreme court

A supreme court is the highest court within the hierarchy of courts in many legal jurisdictions.

New!!: English law and Supreme court · See more »

Supreme Court of Judicature Act

Supreme Court of Judicature Act (with its variations) is a stock short title which was formerly used for legislation in the United Kingdom relating to the Supreme Court of Judicature for England and Wales and the court of the same name for Ireland.

New!!: English law and Supreme Court of Judicature Act · See more »

Supreme Court of New Zealand

The Supreme Court of New Zealand (in Māori: Te Kōti Mana Nui) is the highest court and the court of last resort of New Zealand, having formally come into existence on 1 January 2004.

New!!: English law and Supreme Court of New Zealand · See more »

Supreme Court of the United Kingdom

The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom is the supreme court in all matters under English and Welsh law, Northern Irish law and Scottish civil law.

New!!: English law and Supreme Court of the United Kingdom · See more »

Theft

In common usage, theft is the taking of another person's property or services without that person's permission or consent with the intent to deprive the rightful owner of it.

New!!: English law and Theft · See more »

Theft Act 1968

The Theft Act 1968 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

New!!: English law and Theft Act 1968 · See more »

Time immemorial

Time immemorial (temps immémorial) is a phrase meaning time extending beyond the reach of memory, record, or tradition, indefinitely ancient, "ancient beyond memory or record".

New!!: English law and Time immemorial · See more »

Tort

A tort, in common law jurisdictions, is a civil wrong that causes a claimant to suffer loss or harm resulting in legal liability for the person who commits the tortious act.

New!!: English law and Tort · See more »

Town council

A town council, village council or rural council is a form of local government for small municipalities.

New!!: English law and Town council · See more »

Treaty

A treaty is an agreement under international law entered into by actors in international law, namely sovereign states and international organizations.

New!!: English law and Treaty · See more »

Treaty of Rome

The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU; also referred to as the Treaty of Rome) is one of two treaties forming the constitutional basis of the European Union (EU), the other being the Treaty on European Union (TEU; also referred to as the Treaty of Maastricht).

New!!: English law and Treaty of Rome · See more »

Trust law

A trust is a three-party fiduciary relationship in which the first party, the trustor or settlor, transfers ("settles") a property (often but not necessarily a sum of money) upon the second party (the trustee) for the benefit of the third party, the beneficiary.

New!!: English law and Trust law · See more »

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed with some organisations, including the and preferring to use Britain as shorthand for Great Britain is a sovereign country in western Europe.

New!!: English law and United Kingdom · See more »

United Kingdom administrative law

United Kingdom administrative law is a branch of UK public law concerned with the composition, procedures, powers, duties, rights and liabilities of public bodies that administer public policies.

New!!: English law and United Kingdom administrative law · See more »

United Kingdom company law

The United Kingdom company law regulates corporations formed under the Companies Act 2006.

New!!: English law and United Kingdom company law · See more »

United Kingdom constitutional law

United Kingdom constitutional law concerns the political governance of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

New!!: English law and United Kingdom constitutional law · See more »

United Kingdom labour law

United Kingdom labour law regulates the relations between workers, employers and trade unions.

New!!: English law and United Kingdom labour law · See more »

United Kingdom legislation

The United Kingdom legislation derives from a number of different sources.

New!!: English law and United Kingdom legislation · See more »

University of North Carolina School of Law

The University of North Carolina School of Law is a professional school within the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

New!!: English law and University of North Carolina School of Law · See more »

University of Pennsylvania Law Review

The University of Pennsylvania Law Review is a law review focusing on legal issues, published by an organization of second and third year J.D. students at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

New!!: English law and University of Pennsylvania Law Review · See more »

Wales

Wales (Cymru) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain.

New!!: English law and Wales · See more »

Walter de Merton

Walter de Merton (c. 1205 – 27 October 1277) was Bishop of Rochester and founder of Merton College, Oxford.

New!!: English law and Walter de Merton · See more »

Waqf

A waqf (وقف), also known as habous or mortmain property, is an inalienable charitable endowment under Islamic law, which typically involves donating a building, plot of land or other assets for Muslim religious or charitable purposes with no intention of reclaiming the assets.

New!!: English law and Waqf · See more »

Welsh language

Welsh (Cymraeg or y Gymraeg) is a member of the Brittonic branch of the Celtic languages.

New!!: English law and Welsh language · See more »

Welsh Language Act 1967

The Welsh Language Act 1967, is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom which gave some rights to use the Welsh language in legal proceedings in Wales (including Monmouthshire) and gave the relevant Minister the right to authorise the production of a Welsh version of any documents required or allowed by the Act.

New!!: English law and Welsh Language Act 1967 · See more »

Welsh Language Act 1993

The Welsh Language Act 1993, is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which put the Welsh language on an equal footing with the English language in Wales with regard to the public sector.

New!!: English law and Welsh Language Act 1993 · See more »

Welsh law

Welsh law is the primary and secondary legislation generated by the National Assembly for Wales, according to devolved authority granted in the Government of Wales Act 2006.

New!!: English law and Welsh law · See more »

William Blackstone

Sir William Blackstone (10 July 1723 – 14 February 1780) was an English jurist, judge and Tory politician of the eighteenth century.

New!!: English law and William Blackstone · See more »

Writ

In common law, a writ (Anglo-Saxon gewrit, Latin breve) is a formal written order issued by a body with administrative or judicial jurisdiction; in modern usage, this body is generally a court.

New!!: English law and Writ · See more »

1952 Arrest Convention

The 1952 Arrest Convention (full title: International Convention for the unification of certain rules relating to Arrest of Sea-going Ships) is a 1952 multilateral treaty whereby states agree to rules on the arrest of ships.

New!!: English law and 1952 Arrest Convention · See more »

Redirects here:

Anglo-Norman law, British Law, British common law, British judicial system, Common law of England, English Common Law, English Common law, English Law, English and Welsh law, English case law, English common Law, English common law, English common-law, English jurisdiction, English laws, English legal expression, English legal history, English legal system, English legal term, Jurisdiction of England and Wales, Law in England, Law in England and Wales, Law of England, Law of England and Wales, Laws of England, Leading cases in English law, Legal requirement in England, Legal system in England and Wales, Legal system of England and Wales, UK Civil Litigation.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_law

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »