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English people

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The English are a nation and an ethnic group native to England who speak the English language. The English identity is of early medieval origin, when they were known in Old English as the Angelcynn ("family of the Angles"). Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic peoples who migrated to Great Britain around the 5th century AD. England is one of the countries of the United Kingdom, and the majority of people living there are British citizens. Historically, the English population is descended from several peoples the earlier Celtic Britons (or Brythons) and the Germanic tribes that settled in Britain following the withdrawal of the Romans, including Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisians. Collectively known as the Anglo-Saxons, they founded what was to become England (from the Old English Englaland) along with the later Danes, Anglo-Normans and other groups. In the Acts of Union 1707, the Kingdom of England was succeeded by the Kingdom of Great Britain. Over the years, English customs and identity have become fairly closely aligned with British customs and identity in general. Today many English people have recent forebears from other parts of the United Kingdom, while some are also descended from more recent immigrants from other European countries and from the Commonwealth. The English people are the source of the English language, the Westminster system, the common law system and numerous major sports such as cricket, football, rugby union, rugby league and tennis. These and other English cultural characteristics have spread worldwide, in part as a result of the former British Empire. [1]

259 relations: A. J. P. Taylor, A. L. Rowse, Aballava, Acts of Union 1707, Acts of Union 1800, Alfred the Great, American ancestry, American Community Survey, Americans, Ancestor, Angevin Empire, Angles, Anglicanism, Anglicisation, Anglo, Anglo-Burmese people, Anglo-Indian, Anglo-Irish people, Anglo-Métis, Anglo-Norman language, Anglo-Normans, Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain, Anglo-Saxons, Annexation, Association football, Atlantic modal haplotype, Australia, Australians, Æthelred the Unready, Æthelstan, Battle of Brunanburh, BBC, BBC Television, Black British, Black people, Bonar Law, British Asian, British Bangladeshi, British diaspora in Africa, British Empire, British Isles, British nationality law, British people, British Raj, British Social Attitudes Survey, Brittonic languages, Burgh by Sands, Campaign for an English Parliament, Canada 2006 Census, Canada 2016 Census, ..., Catholic emancipation, Celtic Britons, Celts, Census, Channel 4, Check mark, Cline (biology), Cnut the Great, Common law, Commonwealth of Nations, Cornish language, Cornwall, Countries of the United Kingdom, County Durham, Cricket, Cultural assimilation, Culture of England, Culture of the United Kingdom, Cumberland, Cumbria, Cumbric, Current Biology, Danelaw, Danes (Germanic tribe), Daniel Defoe, Demography, Demography of England, Demography of the Roman Empire, Denmark, Devolution, Devolved English parliament, Devon, Dissenter, Early Middle Ages, Early Modern English, East India Company, Edict of Fontainebleau, Edward I of England, End of Roman rule in Britain, England, England and Wales, English Americans, English Argentines, English Australians, English Brazilians, English Canadians, English Chileans, English Democrats, English diaspora, English folklore, English language, English language in England, English language in Northern England, English language in southern England, English nationalism, English-speaking world, Englishry, Ethnic group, Ethnic groups in Europe, Ethnonym, European New Zealanders, Flag of England, Flag of Scotland, Francis Pryor, French language, Frisian languages, Frisians, Genetic history of Europe, Genetic history of the British Isles, Geneticist, Genetics, German Americans, Germanic languages, Germanic peoples, Germany, Gildas, Great Britain, Great power, H2g2, Henry II of England, Heptarchy, History of Anglo-Saxon England, History of Australia (1788–1850), History of the Church of England, House of Plantagenet, Huguenots, Hundred (county division), Indian subcontinent, Interracial marriage, Irish Americans, Irish Free State, Irish people, Islam in England, Isle of Man, James VI and I, Jeremy Paxman, Jews, John Curtice, Jutes, Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Great Britain, Kingdom of Ireland, Kingdom of Scotland, Krishan Kumar (sociologist), Lancashire, Language family, Last glacial period, Latin, Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542, List of English people, List of English words of Old Norse origin, Little Englander, Louis XIV of France, Malcolm Todd, Matthew Parris, Melvyn Bragg, Mercia, Middle English, Minority group, Modern immigration to the United Kingdom, Multiracial, Nation, Nation state, National Assembly for Wales, National identity, Neolithic, Newsnight, Nonconformist, Norman conquest of England, Norman Davies, Normans, Normans in Ireland, North Germanic languages, Northern England, Northern Ireland, Northumberland, Office for National Statistics, Old English, Old Norse, Oliver Cromwell, Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford History of England, Oxford University Press, Parliament of Scotland, Paul Johnson (writer), PDF, Peter Berresford Ellis, Petty kingdom, Plantation of Ulster, Protestantism, Religion in England, Resettlement of the Jews in England, Results breakdown of the United Kingdom general election, 2010, Richard English, Robert J. C. Young, Roman Britain, Roman Empire, Romano-British culture, Rugby league, Rugby union, Russian Empire, Saint Patrick's Saltire, Saxons, Scotch-Irish Americans, Scotland, Scottish Canadians, Scottish Lowlands, Scottish Parliament, Scottish people, Simon Schama, Social history of the United Kingdom (1945–present), South America, Southern England, Stephen Oppenheimer, Stephen, King of England, Sub-Roman Britain, Tennis, The Christian Science Monitor, The Economist, The Guardian, The Independent, The New York Times, The Spectator, Treaty of Alfred and Guthrum, Treaty of Union, Union Jack, United Kingdom, United Kingdom census, 2001, United Kingdom census, 2011, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, United States Census Bureau, Vikings, Wales, Welsh language, Welsh people, Wessex, West Germanic languages, West Lothian question, Western world, Westminster system, Westmorland, White people, Y Wladfa, 100% English, 1980 United States Census, 1990 United States Census, 2000 United States Census, 2013 New Zealand census, 2016 Australian census. Expand index (209 more) »

A. J. P. Taylor

Alan John Percivale Taylor (25 March 1906 – 7 September 1990) was an English historian who specialised in 19th- and 20th-century European diplomacy.

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A. L. Rowse

Alfred Leslie Rowse (4 December 1903 – 3 October 1997) was a British author and historian from Cornwall.

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Aballava

Aballava or Aballaba (with the modern name of Burgh by Sands) was a Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall, between Petriana (Stanwix) to the east and Coggabata (Drumburgh) to the west.

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Acts of Union 1707

The Acts of Union were two Acts of Parliament: the Union with Scotland Act 1706 passed by the Parliament of England, and the Union with England Act passed in 1707 by the Parliament of Scotland.

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Acts of Union 1800

The Acts of Union 1800 (sometimes erroneously referred to as a single Act of Union 1801) were parallel acts of the Parliament of Great Britain and the Parliament of Ireland which united the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland (previously in personal union) to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

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Alfred the Great

Alfred the Great (Ælfrēd, Ælfrǣd, "elf counsel" or "wise elf"; 849 – 26 October 899) was King of Wessex from 871 to 899.

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American ancestry

American ancestry refers to people in the United States who self-identify their ancestry as "American", rather than the more common officially recognized racial and ethnic groups that make up the bulk of the American people.

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American Community Survey

The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey by the U.S. Census Bureau.

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Americans

Americans are citizens of the United States of America.

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Ancestor

An ancestor is a parent or (recursively) the parent of an antecedent (i.e., a grandparent, great-grandparent, great-great-grandparent, and so forth).

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Angevin Empire

The Angevin Empire (L'Empire Plantagenêt) is a collective exonym referring to the possessions of the Angevin kings of England, who also held lands in France, during the 12th and 13th centuries.

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Angles

The Angles (Angli) were one of the main Germanic peoples who settled in Great Britain in the post-Roman period.

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Anglicanism

Anglicanism is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England following the Protestant Reformation.

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Anglicisation

Anglicisation (or anglicization, see English spelling differences), occasionally anglification, anglifying, englishing, refers to modifications made to foreign words, names and phrases to make them easier to spell, pronounce, or understand in English.

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Anglo

Anglo is a prefix indicating a relation to the Angles, England, the English people, or the English language, such as in the term Anglo-Saxon language.

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Anglo-Burmese people

The Anglo-Burmese, also known as the Anglo-Burmans, are a community of Eurasians of Burmese and European descent, who emerged as a distinct community through mixed relations (sometimes permanent, sometimes temporary) between the British and other European settlers and the indigenous peoples of Burma from 1826 until 1948 when Myanmar gained its independence from the United Kingdom.

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Anglo-Indian

The term Anglo-Indians can refer to at least two groups of people: those with mixed Indian and British ancestry, and people of British descent born or living in the Indian subcontinent.

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Anglo-Irish people

Anglo-Irish is a term which was more commonly used in the 19th and early 20th centuries to identify a social class in Ireland, whose members are mostly the descendants and successors of the English Protestant Ascendancy.

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Anglo-Métis

A 19th century community of the Métis people of Canada, the Anglo-Métis, although an oxymoron are more commonly known as Countryborn, were children of fur traders; they typically had Scots (Orcadian, mainland Scottish), or English fathers and Aboriginal mothers.

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Anglo-Norman language

Anglo-Norman, also known as Anglo-Norman French, is a variety of the Norman language that was used in England and, to a lesser extent, elsewhere in the British Isles during the Anglo-Norman period.

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Anglo-Normans

The Anglo-Normans were the medieval ruling class in England, composed mainly of a combination of ethnic Anglo-Saxons, Normans and French, following the Norman conquest.

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Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain

The Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain describes the process which changed the language and culture of most of what became England from Romano-British to Germanic.

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Anglo-Saxons

The Anglo-Saxons were a people who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century.

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Annexation

Annexation (Latin ad, to, and nexus, joining) is the administrative action and concept in international law relating to the forcible transition of one state's territory by another state.

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Association football

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played between two teams of eleven players with a spherical ball.

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Atlantic modal haplotype

In human genetics, the Atlantic modal haplotype (AMH) or haplotype 15 is a Y chromosome haplotype of Y-STR microsatellite variations, associated with the Haplogroup R1b.

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Australia

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania and numerous smaller islands.

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Australians

Australians, colloquially known as Aussies, are people associated with Australia, sharing a common history, culture, and language (Australian English).

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Æthelred the Unready

Æthelred II (Old English: Æþelræd,;Different spellings of this king’s name most commonly found in modern texts are "Ethelred" and "Æthelred" (or "Aethelred"), the latter being closer to the original Old English form Æþelræd. 966 – 23 April 1016), known as the Unready, was King of the English from 978 to 1013 and again from 1014 until his death.

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Æthelstan

Æthelstan or Athelstan (Old English: Æþelstan, or Æðelstān, meaning "noble stone"; 89427 October 939) was King of the Anglo-Saxons from 924 to 927 and King of the English from 927 to 939.

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Battle of Brunanburh

The Battle of Brunanburh was fought in 937 between Æthelstan, King of England, and an alliance of Olaf Guthfrithson, King of Dublin; Constantine, King of Alba and Owen, King of Strathclyde.

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BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster.

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BBC Television

BBC Television is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation.

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Black British

Black British are British citizens of Black origins or heritage, including those of African-Caribbean (sometimes called "Afro-Caribbean") background, and may include people with mixed ancestry.

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Black people

Black people is a term used in certain countries, often in socially based systems of racial classification or of ethnicity, to describe persons who are perceived to be dark-skinned compared to other populations.

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Bonar Law

Andrew Bonar Law (16 September 1858 – 30 October 1923), commonly called Bonar Law, was a British Conservative politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1922 to 1923.

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British Asian

British Asians (also referred as South Asians in the United Kingdom, Asian British people or Asian Britons) are persons of South Asian descent who reside in the United Kingdom.

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British Bangladeshi

British Bangladeshis (ব্রিটিশ বাংলাদেশি) are people of Bangladeshi origin who have attained citizenship in the United Kingdom, through immigration and historical naturalisation.

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British diaspora in Africa

The British diaspora in Africa is a population group broadly defined as English-speaking white Africans of mainly (but not only) British descent who live in or come from Sub-Saharan Africa.

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British Empire

The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states.

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British Isles

The British Isles are a group of islands off the north-western coast of continental Europe that consist of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man and over six thousand smaller isles.

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British nationality law

British nationality law is the law of the United Kingdom which concerns citizenship and other categories of British nationality.

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British people

The British people, or the Britons, are the citizens of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the British Overseas Territories, and the Crown dependencies.

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British Raj

The British Raj (from rāj, literally, "rule" in Hindustani) was the rule by the British Crown in the Indian subcontinent between 1858 and 1947.

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British Social Attitudes Survey

The British Social Attitudes Survey (BSA) is an annual statistical survey conducted in Great Britain by National Centre for Social Research since 1983.

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Brittonic languages

The Brittonic, Brythonic or British Celtic languages (ieithoedd Brythonaidd/Prydeinig; yethow brythonek/predennek; yezhoù predenek) form one of the two branches of the Insular Celtic language family; the other is Goidelic.

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Burgh by Sands

Burgh by Sands ("Brough") is a village and civil parish in the City of Carlisle district of Cumbria, England, situated near the Solway Firth.

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Campaign for an English Parliament

The Campaign for an English Parliament (CEP) is a pressure group which seeks the establishment of a devolved English parliament.

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Canada 2006 Census

The Canada 2006 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population.

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Canada 2016 Census

The Canada 2016 Census is the most recent detailed enumeration of the Canadian residents, which counted a population of 35,151,728, a change from its 2011 population of 33,476,688.

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Catholic emancipation

Catholic emancipation or Catholic relief was a process in the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century that involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the penal laws.

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Celtic Britons

The Britons, also known as Celtic Britons or Ancient Britons, were Celtic people who inhabited Great Britain from the British Iron Age into the Middle Ages, at which point their culture and language diverged into the modern Welsh, Cornish and Bretons (among others).

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Celts

The Celts (see pronunciation of ''Celt'' for different usages) were an Indo-European people in Iron Age and Medieval Europe who spoke Celtic languages and had cultural similarities, although the relationship between ethnic, linguistic and cultural factors in the Celtic world remains uncertain and controversial.

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Census

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population.

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Channel 4

Channel 4 is a British public-service television broadcaster that began transmission on 2 November 1982.

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Check mark

A check mark, checkmark or tick is a mark (✓, ✔, etc.) used (primarily in the English speaking world) to indicate the concept “yes” (e.g. “yes; this has been verified”, “yes; that is the correct answer”, “yes; this has been completed”, or “yes; this applies to me”).

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Cline (biology)

In biology, a cline (from the Greek “klinein”, meaning “to lean”) is a measurable gradient in a single character (or biological trait) of a species across its geographical range.

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Cnut the Great

Cnut the GreatBolton, The Empire of Cnut the Great: Conquest and the Consolidation of Power in Northern Europe in the Early Eleventh Century (Leiden, 2009) (Cnut se Micela, Knútr inn ríki. Retrieved 21 January 2016. – 12 November 1035), also known as Canute—whose father was Sweyn Forkbeard (which gave him the patronym Sweynsson, Sveinsson)—was King of Denmark, England and Norway; together often referred to as the North Sea Empire.

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Common law

Common law (also known as judicial precedent or judge-made law, or case law) is that body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.

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Commonwealth of Nations

The Commonwealth of Nations, often known as simply the Commonwealth, is an intergovernmental organisation of 53 member states that are mostly former territories of the British Empire.

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Cornish language

Cornish (Kernowek) is a revived language that became extinct as a first language in the late 18th century.

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Cornwall

Cornwall (Kernow) is a county in South West England in the United Kingdom.

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Countries of the United Kingdom

The United Kingdom (UK) comprises four countries: England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

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County Durham

County Durham (locally) is a county in North East England.

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Cricket

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players each on a cricket field, at the centre of which is a rectangular pitch with a target at each end called the wicket (a set of three wooden stumps upon which two bails sit).

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Cultural assimilation

Cultural assimilation is the process in which a minority group or culture comes to resemble those of a dominant group.

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Culture of England

The culture of England is defined by the idiosyncratic cultural norms of England and the English people.

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Culture of the United Kingdom

The culture of the United Kingdom is influenced by the UK's history as a developed state, a liberal democracy and a great power; its predominantly Christian religious life; and its composition of four countries—England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland—each of which has distinct customs, cultures and symbolism.

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Cumberland

Cumberland is a historic county of North West England that had an administrative function from the 12th century until 1974.

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Cumbria

Cumbria is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in North West England.

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Cumbric

Cumbric was a variety of the Common Brittonic language spoken during the Early Middle Ages in the Hen Ogledd or "Old North" in what is now Northern England and southern Lowland Scotland.

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Current Biology

Current Biology is a scientific journal that covers all areas of biology, especially molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, neurobiology, ecology and evolutionary biology.

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Danelaw

The Danelaw (also known as the Danelagh; Dena lagu; Danelagen), as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the Danes held sway and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons.

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Danes (Germanic tribe)

The Danes were a North Germanic tribe inhabiting southern Scandinavia, including the area now comprising Denmark proper, during the Nordic Iron Age and the Viking Age.

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Daniel Defoe

Daniel Defoe (13 September 1660 - 24 April 1731), born Daniel Foe, was an English trader, writer, journalist, pamphleteer and spy.

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Demography

Demography (from prefix demo- from Ancient Greek δῆμος dēmos meaning "the people", and -graphy from γράφω graphō, implies "writing, description or measurement") is the statistical study of populations, especially human beings.

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Demography of England

The demography of England has since 1801 been measured by the decennial national census, and is marked by centuries of population growth and urbanisation.

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Demography of the Roman Empire

Demographically, the Roman Empire was an ordinary premodern state.

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Denmark

Denmark (Danmark), officially the Kingdom of Denmark,Kongeriget Danmark,.

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Devolution

Devolution is the statutory delegation of powers from the central government of a sovereign state to govern at a subnational level, such as a regional or local level.

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Devolved English parliament

A devolved English parliament or assembly is a proposed institution that would give separate decision-making powers to representatives for voters in England, similar to the representation given by the National Assembly for Wales, Scottish Parliament and the Northern Ireland Assembly.

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Devon

Devon, also known as Devonshire, which was formerly its common and official name, is a county of England, reaching from the Bristol Channel in the north to the English Channel in the south.

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Dissenter

A dissenter (from the Latin dissentire, "to disagree") is one who disagrees in matters of opinion, belief, etc.

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Early Middle Ages

The Early Middle Ages or Early Medieval Period, typically regarded as lasting from the 5th or 6th century to the 10th century CE, marked the start of the Middle Ages of European history.

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Early Modern English

Early Modern English, Early New English (sometimes abbreviated to EModE, EMnE or EME) is the stage of the English language from the beginning of the Tudor period to the English Interregnum and Restoration, or from the transition from Middle English, in the late 15th century, to the transition to Modern English, in the mid-to-late 17th century.

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East India Company

The East India Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India Company and informally as John Company, was an English and later British joint-stock company, formed to trade with the East Indies (in present-day terms, Maritime Southeast Asia), but ended up trading mainly with Qing China and seizing control of large parts of the Indian subcontinent.

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Edict of Fontainebleau

The Edict of Fontainebleau (22 October 1685) was an edict issued by Louis XIV of France, also known as the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.

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Edward I of England

Edward I (17/18 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots (Malleus Scotorum), was King of England from 1272 to 1307.

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End of Roman rule in Britain

The end of Roman rule in Britain was the transition from Roman Britain to post-Roman Britain.

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England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.

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England and Wales

England and Wales is a legal jurisdiction covering England and Wales, two of the four countries of the United Kingdom.

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English Americans

English Americans, also referred to as Anglo-Americans, are Americans whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England, a country that is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

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English Argentines

English Argentines (also known as Anglo-Argentines) are citizens of Argentina, or the children of Argentine citizens brought up in Argentina, who can claim ancestry originating in England.

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English Australians

English Australians, also known as Anglo-Australians, are Australians of English descent, and are the largest 'ancestry' identity in the Australian census.

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English Brazilians

English Brazilians (Anglo-brasileiros) refers to Brazilians of full, partial, or predominantly English ancestry, or English-born people residing in Brazil.

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English Canadians

English Canadians or Anglo-Canadians (Canadiens anglais) refers to either Canadians of English ethnic origin and heritage, or to English-speaking, or Anglophone, Canadians of any ethnic origin; it is used primarily in contrast with French Canadians.

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English Chileans

English Chileans (Spanish: Anglochilenos) are citizens of Chile who are descended from English people who have emigrated.

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English Democrats

The English Democrats is an English nationalist political party in England. In its 2016 manifesto, the party proposed a devolved English Parliament, instead of its 2014 suggestion that England should become an independent country. It presents itself as an English equivalent to the Scottish National Party, though the Scottish National Party is generally considered to be a centre-left party, whereas the English Democrats are on the right of the political spectrum. The English Democrats have welcomed defectors from the far-right British National Party into leadership roles and former members of the party have criticised informal links with other far-right organisations, though party leader Robin Tilbrook has stated that party members are expected to pledge their opposition to racism. The party has had limited electoral success and has been regarded by some as a fringe party. At the English local elections in June 2009, the party's candidate Peter Davies won the mayoral election for the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster. However, he announced his resignation from the party on 5 February 2013.

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English diaspora

The English diaspora consists of English people and their descendants who emigrated from England.

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English folklore

English folklore is the folk tradition which has developed in England over a number of centuries.

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English language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca.

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English language in England

The English language spoken and written in England encompasses a diverse range of accents and dialects.

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English language in Northern England

The English language in Northern England has been shaped by the region's history of settlement and migration, and today encompasses a group of related dialects known as Northern England English (or, simply, Northern English in the United Kingdom).

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English language in southern England

English in southern England (also, rarely, Southern English English, or in the UK, simply, Southern English) is the collective set of different dialects and accents of the English spoken in southern England.

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English nationalism

English nationalism is the nationalism that asserts that the English are a nation and promotes the cultural unity of English people.

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English-speaking world

Approximately 330 to 360 million people speak English as their first language.

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Englishry

Englishry or, in Old French, Englescherie is a legal name given, in medieval England, for the status of a person as an Englishman (i.e., as a commoner of native Anglo-Saxon stock rather than a member of the Anglo-Norman elite).

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Ethnic group

An ethnic group, or an ethnicity, is a category of people who identify with each other based on similarities such as common ancestry, language, history, society, culture or nation.

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Ethnic groups in Europe

The Indigenous peoples of Europe are the focus of European ethnology, the field of anthropology related to the various indigenous groups that reside in the nations of Europe.

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Ethnonym

An ethnonym (from the ἔθνος, éthnos, "nation" and ὄνομα, ónoma, "name") is a name applied to a given ethnic group.

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European New Zealanders

European New Zealanders are New Zealanders of European descent.

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Flag of England

The flag of England is derived from St George's Cross (heraldic blazon: Argent, a cross gules).

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Flag of Scotland

The Flag of Scotland (bratach na h-Alba; Banner o Scotland) is also known as St Andrew's Cross or the Saltire.

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Francis Pryor

Francis Manning Marlborough Pryor, MBE, FSA (born 13 January 1945) is an English archaeologist specialising in the study of the Bronze and Iron Ages in Britain.

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French language

French (le français or la langue française) is a Romance language of the Indo-European family.

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Frisian languages

The Frisian languages are a closely related group of Germanic languages, spoken by about 500,000 Frisian people, who live on the southern fringes of the North Sea in the Netherlands and Germany.

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Frisians

The Frisians are a Germanic ethnic group indigenous to the coastal parts of the Netherlands and northwestern Germany.

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Genetic history of Europe

The genetic history of Europe since the Upper Paleolithic is inseparable from that of wider Western Eurasia.

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Genetic history of the British Isles

The genetic history of the British Isles is the subject of research within the larger field of human population genetics.

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Geneticist

A geneticist is a biologist who studies genetics, the science of genes, heredity, and variation of organisms.

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Genetics

Genetics is the study of genes, genetic variation, and heredity in living organisms.

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German Americans

German Americans (Deutschamerikaner) are Americans who have full or partial German ancestry.

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Germanic languages

The Germanic languages are a branch of the Indo-European language family spoken natively by a population of about 515 million people mainly in Europe, North America, Oceania, and Southern Africa.

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Germanic peoples

The Germanic peoples (also called Teutonic, Suebian, or Gothic in older literature) are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group of Northern European origin.

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Germany

Germany (Deutschland), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (Bundesrepublik Deutschland), is a sovereign state in central-western Europe.

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Gildas

Gildas (Breton: Gweltaz; c. 500 – c. 570) — also known as Gildas the Wise or Gildas Sapiens — was a 6th-century British monk best known for his scathing religious polemic De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae, which recounts the history of the Britons before and during the coming of the Saxons.

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Great Britain

Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe.

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Great power

A great power is a sovereign state that is recognized as having the ability and expertise to exert its influence on a global scale.

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H2g2

The h2g2 website is a British-based collaborative online encyclopedia project.

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Henry II of England

Henry II (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189), also known as Henry Curtmantle (Court-manteau), Henry FitzEmpress or Henry Plantagenet, ruled as Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Nantes, King of England and Lord of Ireland; at various times, he also partially controlled Wales, Scotland and Brittany.

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Heptarchy

The Heptarchy is a collective name applied to the seven petty kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England from the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain in 5th century until their unification into the Kingdom of England in the early 10th century.

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History of Anglo-Saxon England

Anglo-Saxon England was early medieval England, existing from the 5th to the 11th century from the end of Roman Britain until the Norman conquest in 1066.

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History of Australia (1788–1850)

The history of Australia from 1788–1850 covers the early colonial period of Australia's history, from the arrival in 1788 of the First Fleet of British ships at Sydney, New South Wales, who established the penal colony, the scientific exploration of the continent and later, establishment of other Australian colonies and the beginnings of representative democratic government.

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History of the Church of England

The formal history of the Church of England is traditionally dated by the Church to the Gregorian mission to Spain by Saint Augustine of Canterbury in AD 597.

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House of Plantagenet

The House of Plantagenet was a royal house which originated from the lands of Anjou in France.

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Huguenots

Huguenots (Les huguenots) are an ethnoreligious group of French Protestants who follow the Reformed tradition.

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Hundred (county division)

A hundred is an administrative division that is geographically part of a larger region.

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Indian subcontinent

The Indian subcontinent is a southern region and peninsula of Asia, mostly situated on the Indian Plate and projecting southwards into the Indian Ocean from the Himalayas.

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Interracial marriage

Interracial marriage is a form of marriage outside a specific social group (exogamy) involving spouses who belong to different socially-defined races or racialized ethnicities.

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Irish Americans

Irish Americans (Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are an ethnic group comprising Americans who have full or partial ancestry from Ireland, especially those who identify with that ancestry, along with their cultural characteristics.

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Irish Free State

The Irish Free State (Saorstát Éireann; 6 December 192229 December 1937) was a state established in 1922 under the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 1921.

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Irish people

The Irish people (Muintir na hÉireann or Na hÉireannaigh) are a nation and ethnic group native to the island of Ireland, who share a common Irish ancestry, identity and culture.

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Islam in England

Islam in England is the largest non-Christian religion, with most Muslims being immigrants from South Asia (in particular Bangladesh, Pakistan and North India) or descendants of immigrants from that region.

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Isle of Man

The Isle of Man (Ellan Vannin), also known simply as Mann (Mannin), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland.

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James VI and I

James VI and I (James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625.

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Jeremy Paxman

Jeremy Dickson Paxman (born 11 May 1950) is a British broadcaster, journalist, and author.

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Jews

Jews (יְהוּדִים ISO 259-3, Israeli pronunciation) or Jewish people are an ethnoreligious group and a nation, originating from the Israelites Israelite origins and kingdom: "The first act in the long drama of Jewish history is the age of the Israelites""The people of the Kingdom of Israel and the ethnic and religious group known as the Jewish people that descended from them have been subjected to a number of forced migrations in their history" and Hebrews of the Ancient Near East.

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John Curtice

Sir John Kevin Curtice, (born 10 December 1953) is a political scientist who is currently Professor of Politics at the University of Strathclyde and Senior Research Fellow at NatCen Social Research.

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Jutes

The Jutes, Iuti, or Iutæ were a Germanic people.

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Kingdom of England

The Kingdom of England (French: Royaume d'Angleterre; Danish: Kongeriget England; German: Königreich England) was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from the 10th century—when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms—until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

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Kingdom of Great Britain

The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called simply Great Britain,Parliament of the Kingdom of England.

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Kingdom of Ireland

The Kingdom of Ireland (Classical Irish: Ríoghacht Éireann; Modern Irish: Ríocht Éireann) was a nominal state ruled by the King or Queen of England and later the King or Queen of Great Britain that existed in Ireland from 1542 until 1800.

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Kingdom of Scotland

The Kingdom of Scotland (Rìoghachd na h-Alba; Kinrick o Scotland) was a sovereign state in northwest Europe traditionally said to have been founded in 843.

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Krishan Kumar (sociologist)

Krishan Kumar (born 1942 in Trinidad and Tobago) is a British sociologist who is currently Chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Virginia, where he holds the titles University Professor and William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of Sociology.

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Lancashire

Lancashire (abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England.

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Language family

A language family is a group of languages related through descent from a common ancestral language or parental language, called the proto-language of that family.

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Last glacial period

The last glacial period occurred from the end of the Eemian interglacial to the end of the Younger Dryas, encompassing the period years ago.

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Latin

Latin (Latin: lingua latīna) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages.

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Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542

The Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542 (Y Deddfau Cyfreithiau yng Nghymru 1535 a 1542) were parliamentary measures by which Wales became a full and equal part of the Kingdom of England and the legal system of England was extended to Wales and the norms of English administration introduced.

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List of English people

Listed below are English people of note and some notable individuals born in England.

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List of English words of Old Norse origin

Words of Old Norse origin have entered the English language, primarily from the contact between Old Norse and Old English during colonisation of eastern and northern England between the mid 9th to the 11th centuries (see also Danelaw).

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Little Englander

"Little Englander" is a term for English nationalists or English people who are described as xenophobic or overly nationalistic and are accused of being "ignorant" and "boorish".

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Louis XIV of France

Louis XIV (Louis Dieudonné; 5 September 16381 September 1715), known as Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (Roi Soleil), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who reigned as King of France from 1643 until his death in 1715.

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Malcolm Todd

Malcolm Todd, FSA (27 November 1939 – 6 June 2013) was a British historian and archaeologist with an interest in the interaction between the Roman Empire and Western Europe.

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Matthew Parris

Matthew Francis Parris (born 7 August 1949) is a South African-British political writer and broadcaster, formerly a Conservative Member of Parliament.

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Melvyn Bragg

Melvyn Bragg, Baron Bragg, (born 6 October 1939), is an English broadcaster, author and parliamentarian.

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Mercia

Mercia (Miercna rīce) was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy.

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Middle English

Middle English (ME) is collectively the varieties of the English language spoken after the Norman Conquest (1066) until the late 15th century; scholarly opinion varies but the Oxford English Dictionary specifies the period of 1150 to 1500.

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Minority group

A minority group refers to a category of people differentiated from the social majority, those who hold on to major positions of social power in a society.

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Modern immigration to the United Kingdom

Since 1945, immigration to the United Kingdom under British nationality law has been significant, in particular from the Republic of Ireland and from the former British Empire especially India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, the Caribbean, South Africa, Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya and Hong Kong.

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Multiracial

Multiracial is defined as made up of or relating to people of many races.

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Nation

A nation is a stable community of people, formed on the basis of a common language, territory, economic life, ethnicity or psychological make-up manifested in a common culture.

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Nation state

A nation state (or nation-state), in the most specific sense, is a country where a distinct cultural or ethnic group (a "nation" or "people") inhabits a territory and have formed a state (often a sovereign state) that they predominantly govern.

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National Assembly for Wales

The National Assembly for Wales (Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru; commonly known as the Welsh Assembly) is a devolved parliament with power to make legislation in Wales.

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National identity

National identity is one's identity or sense of belonging to one state or to one nation.

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Neolithic

The Neolithic was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of Western Asia, and later in other parts of the world and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC.

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Newsnight

Newsnight is a weekday BBC Television current affairs programme which specialises in analysis and often robust cross-examination of senior politicians.

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Nonconformist

In English church history, a nonconformist was a Protestant who did not "conform" to the governance and usages of the established Church of England.

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Norman conquest of England

The Norman conquest of England (in Britain, often called the Norman Conquest or the Conquest) was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England by an army of Norman, Breton, Flemish and French soldiers led by Duke William II of Normandy, later styled William the Conqueror.

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Norman Davies

Ivor Norman Richard Davies (born 8 June 1939) is a British-Polish historian noted for his publications on the history of Europe, Poland and the United Kingdom.

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Normans

The Normans (Norman: Normaunds; Normands; Normanni) were the people who, in the 10th and 11th centuries, gave their name to Normandy, a region in France.

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Normans in Ireland

The Normans in Ireland, or Hiberno-Normans, were a group of Normans who invaded the various realms of Gaelic Ireland.

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North Germanic languages

The North Germanic languages make up one of the three branches of the Germanic languages, a sub-family of the Indo-European languages, along with the West Germanic languages and the extinct East Germanic languages.

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Northern England

Northern England, also known simply as the North, is the northern part of England, considered as a single cultural area.

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Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland (Tuaisceart Éireann; Ulster-Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a part of the United Kingdom in the north-east of the island of Ireland, variously described as a country, province or region.

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Northumberland

Northumberland (abbreviated Northd) is a county in North East England.

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Office for National Statistics

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the executive office of the UK Statistics Authority, a non-ministerial department which reports directly to the UK Parliament.

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Old English

Old English (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon, is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages.

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Old Norse

Old Norse was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and inhabitants of their overseas settlements from about the 9th to the 13th century.

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Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell (25 April 15993 September 1658) was an English military and political leader.

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Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University Press.

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Oxford History of England

The Oxford History of England is a modern history series of the British Isles, with each individual volume written by historians of that period.

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Oxford University Press

Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press.

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Parliament of Scotland

The Parliament of Scotland was the legislature of the Kingdom of Scotland.

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Paul Johnson (writer)

Paul Bede Johnson (born 2 November 1928) is an English journalist, popular historian, speechwriter, and author.

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PDF

The Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format developed in the 1990s to present documents, including text formatting and images, in a manner independent of application software, hardware, and operating systems.

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Peter Berresford Ellis

Peter Berresford Ellis (born 10 March 1943) is a historian, literary biographer, and novelist who has published over 98 books to date either under his own name or his pseudonyms Peter Tremayne and Peter MacAlan.

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Petty kingdom

A petty kingdom is a kingdom described as minor or "petty" by contrast to an empire or unified kingdom that either preceded or succeeded it (e.g. the numerous kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England unified into the Kingdom of England in the 10th century, or the numerous Gaelic kingdoms of Ireland as the Kingdom of Ireland in the 16th century).

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Plantation of Ulster

The Plantation of Ulster (Plandáil Uladh; Ulster-Scots: Plantin o Ulstèr) was the organised colonisation (plantation) of Ulstera province of Irelandby people from Great Britain during the reign of James VI and I. Most of the colonists came from Scotland and England, although there was a small number of Welsh settlers.

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Protestantism

Protestantism is the second largest form of Christianity with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.

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Religion in England

Religion in England is dominated by the Church of England (Anglicanism), the established church of the state whose Supreme Governor is the Monarch of England.

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Resettlement of the Jews in England

The resettlement of the Jews in England was an informal arrangement during the Commonwealth of England in the mid-1650s, which allowed Jews to practise their faith openly.

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Results breakdown of the United Kingdom general election, 2010

This is the results breakdown of the United Kingdom general election, 2010.

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Richard English

Richard Ludlow English, (born 1963) is a historian from Northern Ireland.

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Robert J. C. Young

Robert J. C. Young FBA (born 1950) is a British postcolonial theorist, cultural critic, and historian.

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Roman Britain

Roman Britain (Britannia or, later, Britanniae, "the Britains") was the area of the island of Great Britain that was governed by the Roman Empire, from 43 to 410 AD.

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Roman Empire

The Roman Empire (Imperium Rōmānum,; Koine and Medieval Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Ῥωμαίων, tr.) was the post-Roman Republic period of the ancient Roman civilization, characterized by government headed by emperors and large territorial holdings around the Mediterranean Sea in Europe, Africa and Asia.

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Romano-British culture

Romano-British culture is the culture that arose in Britain under the Roman Empire following the Roman conquest in AD 43 and the creation of the province of Britannia.

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Rugby league

Rugby league football is a full-contact sport played by two teams of thirteen players on a rectangular field.

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Rugby union

Rugby union, commonly known in most of the world as rugby, is a contact team sport which originated in England in the first half of the 19th century.

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Russian Empire

The Russian Empire (Российская Империя) or Russia was an empire that existed across Eurasia and North America from 1721, following the end of the Great Northern War, until the Republic was proclaimed by the Provisional Government that took power after the February Revolution of 1917.

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Saint Patrick's Saltire

Saint Patrick's Saltire or Saint Patrick's Cross is a red saltire (X-shaped cross) on a white field, used to represent the island of Ireland or Saint Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland.

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Saxons

The Saxons (Saxones, Sachsen, Seaxe, Sahson, Sassen, Saksen) were a Germanic people whose name was given in the early Middle Ages to a large country (Old Saxony, Saxonia) near the North Sea coast of what is now Germany.

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Scotch-Irish Americans

Scotch-Irish (or Scots-Irish) Americans are American descendants of Presbyterian and other Ulster Protestant Dissenters from various parts of Ireland, but usually from the province of Ulster, who migrated during the 18th and 19th centuries.

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Scotland

Scotland (Alba) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.

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Scottish Canadians

Scottish Canadians are people of Scottish descent or heritage living in Canada.

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Scottish Lowlands

The Lowlands (the Lallans or the Lawlands; a' Ghalldachd, "the place of the foreigner") are a cultural and historic region of Scotland.

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Scottish Parliament

The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba; Scots: The Scots Pairlament) is the devolved national, unicameral legislature of Scotland.

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Scottish people

The Scottish people (Scots: Scots Fowk, Scottish Gaelic: Albannaich), or Scots, are a nation and ethnic group native to Scotland. Historically, they emerged from an amalgamation of two Celtic-speaking peoples, the Picts and Gaels, who founded the Kingdom of Scotland (or Alba) in the 9th century. Later, the neighbouring Celtic-speaking Cumbrians, as well as Germanic-speaking Anglo-Saxons and Norse, were incorporated into the Scottish nation. In modern usage, "Scottish people" or "Scots" is used to refer to anyone whose linguistic, cultural, family ancestral or genetic origins are from Scotland. The Latin word Scoti originally referred to the Gaels, but came to describe all inhabitants of Scotland. Considered archaic or pejorative, the term Scotch has also been used for Scottish people, primarily outside Scotland. John Kenneth Galbraith in his book The Scotch (Toronto: MacMillan, 1964) documents the descendants of 19th-century Scottish pioneers who settled in Southwestern Ontario and affectionately referred to themselves as 'Scotch'. He states the book was meant to give a true picture of life in the community in the early decades of the 20th century. People of Scottish descent live in many countries other than Scotland. Emigration, influenced by factors such as the Highland and Lowland Clearances, Scottish participation in the British Empire, and latterly industrial decline and unemployment, have resulted in Scottish people being found throughout the world. Scottish emigrants took with them their Scottish languages and culture. Large populations of Scottish people settled the new-world lands of North and South America, Australia and New Zealand. Canada has the highest level of Scottish descendants per capita in the world and the second-largest population of Scottish descendants, after the United States. Scotland has seen migration and settlement of many peoples at different periods in its history. The Gaels, the Picts and the Britons have their respective origin myths, like most medieval European peoples. Germanic peoples, such as the Anglo-Saxons, arrived beginning in the 7th century, while the Norse settled parts of Scotland from the 8th century onwards. In the High Middle Ages, from the reign of David I of Scotland, there was some emigration from France, England and the Low Countries to Scotland. Some famous Scottish family names, including those bearing the names which became Bruce, Balliol, Murray and Stewart came to Scotland at this time. Today Scotland is one of the countries of the United Kingdom, and the majority of people living there are British citizens.

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Simon Schama

Sir Simon Michael Schama, CBE, FRSL, FBA (born 13 February 1945) is an English historian specialising in art history, Dutch history, and French history.

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Social history of the United Kingdom (1945–present)

The social history of the United Kingdom from 1945 began with the aftermath of the Second World War.

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South America

South America is a continent in the Western Hemisphere, mostly in the Southern Hemisphere, with a relatively small portion in the Northern Hemisphere.

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Southern England

Southern England, or the South of England, also known as the South, refers roughly to the southern counties of England.

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Stephen Oppenheimer

Stephen Oppenheimer (born 1947) is a British paediatrician, geneticist, and writer.

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Stephen, King of England

Stephen (Étienne; – 25 October 1154), often referred to as Stephen of Blois, was King of England from 1135 to his death, as well as Count of Boulogne from 1125 until 1147 and Duke of Normandy from 1135 until 1144.

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Sub-Roman Britain

Sub-Roman Britain is the transition period between the Roman Empire's Crisis of the Third Century around CE 235 (and the subsequent collapse and end of Roman Britain), until the start of the Early Medieval period.

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Tennis

Tennis is a racket sport that can be played individually against a single opponent (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles).

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The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is a nonprofit news organization that publishes daily articles in electronic format as well as a weekly print edition.

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The Economist

The Economist is an English-language weekly magazine-format newspaper owned by the Economist Group and edited at offices in London.

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The Guardian

The Guardian is a British daily newspaper.

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The Independent

The Independent is a British online newspaper.

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The New York Times

The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City with worldwide influence and readership.

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The Spectator

The Spectator is a weekly British magazine on politics, culture, and current affairs.

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Treaty of Alfred and Guthrum

The Treaty of Alfred and Guthrum is an agreement between Alfred of Wessex and Guthrum, the Viking ruler of East Anglia.

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Treaty of Union

The Treaty of Union is the name usually now given to the agreement which led to the creation of the new state of Great Britain, stating that England (which already included Wales) and Scotland were to be "United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain",: Both Acts of Union and the Treaty state in Article I: That the Two Kingdoms of Scotland and England, shall upon 1 May next ensuing the date hereof, and forever after, be United into One Kingdom by the Name of GREAT BRITAIN.

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Union Jack

The Union Jack, or Union Flag, is the national flag of the United Kingdom.

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United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed with some organisations, including the and preferring to use Britain as shorthand for Great Britain is a sovereign country in western Europe.

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United Kingdom census, 2001

A nationwide census, known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday, 29 April 2001.

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United Kingdom census, 2011

A census of the population of the United Kingdom is taken every ten years.

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland.

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United States Census Bureau

The United States Census Bureau (USCB; officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy.

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Vikings

Vikings (Old English: wicing—"pirate", Danish and vikinger; Swedish and vikingar; víkingar, from Old Norse) were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of northern, central, eastern and western Europe, during the late 8th to late 11th centuries.

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Wales

Wales (Cymru) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain.

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Welsh language

Welsh (Cymraeg or y Gymraeg) is a member of the Brittonic branch of the Celtic languages.

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Welsh people

The Welsh (Cymry) are a nation and ethnic group native to, or otherwise associated with, Wales, Welsh culture, Welsh history, and the Welsh language.

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Wessex

Wessex (Westseaxna rīce, the "kingdom of the West Saxons") was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom in the south of Great Britain, from 519 until England was unified by Æthelstan in the early 10th century.

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West Germanic languages

The West Germanic languages constitute the largest of the three branches of the Germanic family of languages (the others being the North Germanic and the extinct East Germanic languages).

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West Lothian question

The West Lothian question, also known as the English question, refers to whether MPs from Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, sitting in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom, should be able to vote on matters that affect only England, while MPs from England are unable to vote on matters that have been devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly, the Scottish Parliament and the Welsh Assembly.

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Western world

The Western world refers to various nations depending on the context, most often including at least part of Europe and the Americas.

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Westminster system

The Westminster system is a parliamentary system of government developed in the United Kingdom.

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Westmorland

Westmorland (formerly also spelt Westmoreland;R. Wilkinson The British Isles, Sheet The British Isles. even older spellings are Westmerland and Westmereland) is a historic county in north west England.

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White people

White people is a racial classification specifier, used mostly for people of European descent; depending on context, nationality, and point of view, the term has at times been expanded to encompass certain persons of North African, Middle Eastern, and South Asian descent, persons who are often considered non-white in other contexts.

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Y Wladfa

Y Wladfa ('The Colony'); also occasionally Y Wladychfa Gymreig ('The Welsh Settlement') is a Welsh settlement in Argentina, which began in 1865 and occurred mainly along the coast of Chubut Province in the far southern region of Patagonia.

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100% English

100% English is a Channel 4 television programme shown in November 2006 in the United Kingdom.

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1980 United States Census

The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11.4 percent over the 203,184,772 persons enumerated during the 1970 Census.

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1990 United States Census

The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9.8 percent over the 226,545,805 persons enumerated during the 1980 Census.

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2000 United States Census

The Twenty-second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13.2% over the 248,709,873 people enumerated during the 1990 Census.

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2013 New Zealand census

The 2013 New Zealand census was the thirty-third national census.

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2016 Australian census

The 2016 Australian census was the seventeenth national population census held in Australia.

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Redirects here:

Angelcynn, Engla, Englander, Englanders, English (ethnic group), English (people), English People, English ancestry, English descent, English emigrants, English ethnicity, English ex-pat community, English expatriate, English genealogy, English immigrants, English nation, English settlers, English/Anglo-Saxons, Englishman, Englishmen, Englishwoman, Englishwomen, History of the English people, People of England, People of English descent, The English.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_people

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