Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Download
Faster access than browser!
 

Enteric fermentation

Index Enteric fermentation

Enteric fermentation is a digestive process by which carbohydrates are broken down by microorganisms into simple molecules for absorption into the bloodstream of an animal. [1]

22 relations: Asparagopsis taxiformis, Atmospheric methane, Burping, Camel, Cat, Cattle, Cellulose, Deer, Dog, Even-toed ungulate, Family (biology), Flatulence, Gnotobiosis, Human, Kangaroo, Kilogram, Large intestine, Methane emissions, Microorganism, Monogastric, Rumen, Succinivibrionaceae.

Asparagopsis taxiformis

Asparagopsis taxiformis, limu kohu formerly A. sanfordiana, is a species of red algae, with cosmopolitan distribution in tropical to warm temperate waters.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Asparagopsis taxiformis · See more »

Atmospheric methane

Atmospheric methane is the methane present in earth's atmosphere.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Atmospheric methane · See more »

Burping

Burping (also known as belching, ructus, eruptus or eructation) is the release of gas from the digestive tract (mainly esophagus and stomach) through the mouth.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Burping · See more »

Camel

A camel is an even-toed ungulate in the genus Camelus that bears distinctive fatty deposits known as "humps" on its back.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Camel · See more »

Cat

The domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus or Felis catus) is a small, typically furry, carnivorous mammal.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Cat · See more »

Cattle

Cattle—colloquially cows—are the most common type of large domesticated ungulates.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Cattle · See more »

Cellulose

Cellulose is an organic compound with the formula, a polysaccharide consisting of a linear chain of several hundred to many thousands of β(1→4) linked D-glucose units.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Cellulose · See more »

Deer

Deer (singular and plural) are the ruminant mammals forming the family Cervidae.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Deer · See more »

Dog

The domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris when considered a subspecies of the gray wolf or Canis familiaris when considered a distinct species) is a member of the genus Canis (canines), which forms part of the wolf-like canids, and is the most widely abundant terrestrial carnivore.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Dog · See more »

Even-toed ungulate

The even-toed ungulates (Artiodactyla) are ungulates (hoofed animals) whose weight is borne equally by the third and fourth toes.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Even-toed ungulate · See more »

Family (biology)

In biological classification, family (familia, plural familiae) is one of the eight major taxonomic ranks; it is classified between order and genus.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Family (biology) · See more »

Flatulence

Flatulence is defined in the medical literature as "flatus expelled through the anus" or the "quality or state of being flatulent", which is defined in turn as "marked by or affected with gases generated in the intestine or stomach; likely to cause digestive flatulence".

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Flatulence · See more »

Gnotobiosis

Gnotobiosis (from Greek roots gnostos "known" and bios "life") is a condition in which all the forms of life present within an organism can be accounted for.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Gnotobiosis · See more »

Human

Humans (taxonomically Homo sapiens) are the only extant members of the subtribe Hominina.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Human · See more »

Kangaroo

The kangaroo is a marsupial from the family Macropodidae (macropods, meaning "large foot").

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Kangaroo · See more »

Kilogram

The kilogram or kilogramme (symbol: kg) is the base unit of mass in the International System of Units (SI), and is defined as being equal to the mass of the International Prototype of the Kilogram (IPK, also known as "Le Grand K" or "Big K"), a cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy stored by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures at Saint-Cloud, France.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Kilogram · See more »

Large intestine

The large intestine, also known as the large bowel or colon, is the last part of the gastrointestinal tract and of the digestive system in vertebrates.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Large intestine · See more »

Methane emissions

Global methane emissions are major part of the global greenhouse gas emissions.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Methane emissions · See more »

Microorganism

A microorganism, or microbe, is a microscopic organism, which may exist in its single-celled form or in a colony of cells. The possible existence of unseen microbial life was suspected from ancient times, such as in Jain scriptures from 6th century BC India and the 1st century BC book On Agriculture by Marcus Terentius Varro. Microbiology, the scientific study of microorganisms, began with their observation under the microscope in the 1670s by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. In the 1850s, Louis Pasteur found that microorganisms caused food spoilage, debunking the theory of spontaneous generation. In the 1880s Robert Koch discovered that microorganisms caused the diseases tuberculosis, cholera and anthrax. Microorganisms include all unicellular organisms and so are extremely diverse. Of the three domains of life identified by Carl Woese, all of the Archaea and Bacteria are microorganisms. These were previously grouped together in the two domain system as Prokaryotes, the other being the eukaryotes. The third domain Eukaryota includes all multicellular organisms and many unicellular protists and protozoans. Some protists are related to animals and some to green plants. Many of the multicellular organisms are microscopic, namely micro-animals, some fungi and some algae, but these are not discussed here. They live in almost every habitat from the poles to the equator, deserts, geysers, rocks and the deep sea. Some are adapted to extremes such as very hot or very cold conditions, others to high pressure and a few such as Deinococcus radiodurans to high radiation environments. Microorganisms also make up the microbiota found in and on all multicellular organisms. A December 2017 report stated that 3.45 billion year old Australian rocks once contained microorganisms, the earliest direct evidence of life on Earth. Microbes are important in human culture and health in many ways, serving to ferment foods, treat sewage, produce fuel, enzymes and other bioactive compounds. They are essential tools in biology as model organisms and have been put to use in biological warfare and bioterrorism. They are a vital component of fertile soils. In the human body microorganisms make up the human microbiota including the essential gut flora. They are the pathogens responsible for many infectious diseases and as such are the target of hygiene measures.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Microorganism · See more »

Monogastric

A monogastric organism has a simple single-chambered stomach, compared with a ruminant organism, like a cow, goat, or sheep, which has a four-chambered complex stomach.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Monogastric · See more »

Rumen

The rumen, also known as a paunch, forms the larger part of the reticulorumen, which is the first chamber in the alimentary canal of ruminant animals.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Rumen · See more »

Succinivibrionaceae

The Succinivibrionaceae are Gram-negative bacteria and belong to the Gammaproteobacteria.

New!!: Enteric fermentation and Succinivibrionaceae · See more »

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enteric_fermentation

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »