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Episcopal Diocese of Washington

Index Episcopal Diocese of Washington

The Episcopal Diocese of Washington is a diocese of the Episcopal Church covering Washington, D.C. and nearby counties of Maryland in the United States. [1]

53 relations: Alfred Harding (bishop), American Revolutionary War, Anglican Communion, Angus Dun, Barbara Harris (bishop), Bishop, Burning of Washington, Capitol Hill, Cathedra, Chapel of ease, Charles County, Maryland, Christ Church (Georgetown, Washington, D.C.), Christ Church, Washington Parish, Church of the Epiphany (Washington, D.C.), Diocese, Episcopal Church (United States), Episcopal Diocese of Maryland, George H. W. Bush, Glebe, Gothic Revival architecture, Henry Y. Satterlee, InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington, James E. Freeman, Jane Dixon, John Bryson Chane, John T. Walker, Lafayette Square Historic District, Washington, D.C., Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C., List of presiding bishops of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, Mariann Budde, Maryland, Montgomery County, Maryland, Online Books Page, Oxford Movement, Paul Moore Jr., Poolesville, Maryland, Potomac River, Prince George's County, Maryland, Province 3 of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, Rock Creek Cemetery, Ronald H. Haines, St. John's Episcopal Church (Fort Washington, Maryland), St. John's Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square, St. Mary's County, Maryland, St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish (Washington, D.C.), Theodore Roosevelt, United States, United States Congress, War of 1812, Washington National Cathedral, ..., Washington, D.C., White House, William Creighton (bishop). Expand index (3 more) »

Alfred Harding (bishop)

Alfred Harding (August 15, 1852 – May 2, 1923) was the second Episcopal Bishop of Washington.

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American Revolutionary War

The American Revolutionary War (17751783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a global war that began as a conflict between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America. After 1765, growing philosophical and political differences strained the relationship between Great Britain and its colonies. Patriot protests against taxation without representation followed the Stamp Act and escalated into boycotts, which culminated in 1773 with the Sons of Liberty destroying a shipment of tea in Boston Harbor. Britain responded by closing Boston Harbor and passing a series of punitive measures against Massachusetts Bay Colony. Massachusetts colonists responded with the Suffolk Resolves, and they established a shadow government which wrested control of the countryside from the Crown. Twelve colonies formed a Continental Congress to coordinate their resistance, establishing committees and conventions that effectively seized power. British attempts to disarm the Massachusetts militia at Concord, Massachusetts in April 1775 led to open combat. Militia forces then besieged Boston, forcing a British evacuation in March 1776, and Congress appointed George Washington to command the Continental Army. Concurrently, an American attempt to invade Quebec and raise rebellion against the British failed decisively. On July 2, 1776, the Continental Congress voted for independence, issuing its declaration on July 4. Sir William Howe launched a British counter-offensive, capturing New York City and leaving American morale at a low ebb. However, victories at Trenton and Princeton restored American confidence. In 1777, the British launched an invasion from Quebec under John Burgoyne, intending to isolate the New England Colonies. Instead of assisting this effort, Howe took his army on a separate campaign against Philadelphia, and Burgoyne was decisively defeated at Saratoga in October 1777. Burgoyne's defeat had drastic consequences. France formally allied with the Americans and entered the war in 1778, and Spain joined the war the following year as an ally of France but not as an ally of the United States. In 1780, the Kingdom of Mysore attacked the British in India, and tensions between Great Britain and the Netherlands erupted into open war. In North America, the British mounted a "Southern strategy" led by Charles Cornwallis which hinged upon a Loyalist uprising, but too few came forward. Cornwallis suffered reversals at King's Mountain and Cowpens. He retreated to Yorktown, Virginia, intending an evacuation, but a decisive French naval victory deprived him of an escape. A Franco-American army led by the Comte de Rochambeau and Washington then besieged Cornwallis' army and, with no sign of relief, he surrendered in October 1781. Whigs in Britain had long opposed the pro-war Tories in Parliament, and the surrender gave them the upper hand. In early 1782, Parliament voted to end all offensive operations in North America, but the war continued in Europe and India. Britain remained under siege in Gibraltar but scored a major victory over the French navy. On September 3, 1783, the belligerent parties signed the Treaty of Paris in which Great Britain agreed to recognize the sovereignty of the United States and formally end the war. French involvement had proven decisive,Brooks, Richard (editor). Atlas of World Military History. HarperCollins, 2000, p. 101 "Washington's success in keeping the army together deprived the British of victory, but French intervention won the war." but France made few gains and incurred crippling debts. Spain made some minor territorial gains but failed in its primary aim of recovering Gibraltar. The Dutch were defeated on all counts and were compelled to cede territory to Great Britain. In India, the war against Mysore and its allies concluded in 1784 without any territorial changes.

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Anglican Communion

The Anglican Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members, founded in 1867 in London, England.

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Angus Dun

Angus Dun (May 4, 1892, New York – August 12, 1971, Washington) was a noted United States clergyman and author, who served as the 4th Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington in Washington, DC.

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Barbara Harris (bishop)

Barbara Clementine Harris (born June 12, 1930) is a retired bishop of the Episcopal Church.

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Bishop

A bishop (English derivation from the New Testament of the Christian Bible Greek επίσκοπος, epískopos, "overseer", "guardian") is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight.

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Burning of Washington

The Burning of Washington was a British invasion of Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States, during the War of 1812.

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Capitol Hill

Capitol Hill, in addition to being a metonym for the United States Congress, is the largest historic residential neighborhood in Washington, D.C., stretching easterly in front of the United States Capitol along wide avenues.

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Cathedra

A cathedra (Latin, "chair", from Greek, καθέδρα kathédra, "seat") or bishop's throne is the seat of a bishop.

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Chapel of ease

A chapel of ease (or chapel-of-ease) is a church building other than the parish church, built within the bounds of a parish for the attendance of those who cannot reach the parish church conveniently.

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Charles County, Maryland

Charles County is a county located in the southern central portion of the U.S. state of Maryland.

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Christ Church (Georgetown, Washington, D.C.)

Christ Church, founded in 1817, is a historic Episcopal church located at 3115 O Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C., in the Georgetown neighborhood.

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Christ Church, Washington Parish

Christ Church — known also as Christ Church, Washington Parish or Christ Church on Capitol Hill — is a historic Episcopal church located at 620 G Street SE in Washington, D.C., USA.

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Church of the Epiphany (Washington, D.C.)

The Church of the Epiphany, built in 1844, is an historic Episcopal church located at 1317 G Street, N.W., in Washington, D.C..

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Diocese

The word diocese is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration".

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Episcopal Church (United States)

The Episcopal Church is the United States-based member church of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

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Episcopal Diocese of Maryland

The Episcopal Diocese of Maryland forms part of Province 3 of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America.

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George H. W. Bush

George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 41st President of the United States from 1989 to 1993.

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Glebe

Glebe (also known as church furlong, rectory manor or parson's close(s)McGurk 1970, p. 17) is an area of land within an ecclesiastical parish used to support a parish priest.

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Gothic Revival architecture

Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic or neo-Gothic) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England.

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Henry Y. Satterlee

Henry Yates Satterlee (1843–1908) was the first Episcopal Bishop of Washington, New York Times. December 7, 1895.

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InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington

The InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington (IFC or IFCMW) is an interfaith non-profit organization based in Washington, D.C..

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James E. Freeman

James Edward Freeman (July 24, 1866 – June 6, 1943) was the third bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, serving from 1923 to 1943.

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Jane Dixon

Jane Holmes Dixon (born Jane Hart Holmes; July 24, 1937 – December 25, 2012) was an American bishop of the Episcopal Church.

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John Bryson Chane

John Bryson Chane (born May 13, 1944) is a bishop in the Episcopal Church.

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John T. Walker

John Thomas Walker (1925-September 30, 1989) was Bishop of Washington from 1977 to 1989 in the Episcopal Diocese of Washington.

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Lafayette Square Historic District, Washington, D.C.

The Lafayette Square Historic District is a National Historic Landmark District in Washington, D.C., encompassing a portion of the original L'Enfant Plan for the city's core.

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Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C.

Lafayette Square is a seven-acre (30,000 m²) public park located within President's Park, Washington, D.C. directly north of the White House on H Street, bounded by Jackson Place on the west, Madison Place on the east, and Pennsylvania Avenue.

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List of presiding bishops of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America

This is a list of the Presiding Bishops of the Episcopal Church in the United States.

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Mariann Budde

Mariann Edgar Budde (born December 10, 1959) is the diocesan bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington.

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Maryland

Maryland is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C. to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware to its east.

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Montgomery County, Maryland

Montgomery County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of Maryland, located adjacent to Washington, D.C. As of the 2010 census, the county's population was 971,777, increasing by 9.0% to an estimated 1,058,810 in 2017.

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Online Books Page

The Online Books Page is an index of e-text books available on the Internet.

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Oxford Movement

The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church members of the Church of England which eventually developed into Anglo-Catholicism.

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Paul Moore Jr.

Paul Moore Jr. (November 15, 1919 – May 1, 2003) was a bishop of the Episcopal Church and former United States Marine Corps officer.

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Poolesville, Maryland

Poolesville is a town in the western portion of Montgomery County, Maryland.

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Potomac River

The Potomac River is located within the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States and flows from the Potomac Highlands into the Chesapeake Bay.

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Prince George's County, Maryland

Prince George’s County (often shortened to "PG County") is a county in the U.S. state of Maryland, bordering the eastern portion of Washington, D.C. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the population was 863,420, making it the second-most populous county in Maryland, behind only Montgomery County.

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Province 3 of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America

Province 3 (III) is one of nine ecclesiastical provinces making up the Episcopal Church in the United States of America.

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Rock Creek Cemetery

Rock Creek Cemetery is an cemetery with a natural and rolling landscape located at Rock Creek Church Road, NW, and Webster Street, NW, off Hawaii Avenue, NE, in the Petworth neighborhood of Washington, D.C., United States.

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Ronald H. Haines

Ronald Hayward Haines (April 14, 1934 - March 21, 2008) was bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington from 1990 to 2000.

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St. John's Episcopal Church (Fort Washington, Maryland)

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St. John's Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square

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St. Mary's County, Maryland

Saint Mary's County (often abbreviated as St. Mary's County), established in 1637, is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland.

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St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Rock Creek Parish (Washington, D.C.)

St.

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Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was an American statesman and writer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909.

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United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

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United States Congress

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the Federal government of the United States.

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War of 1812

The War of 1812 was a conflict fought between the United States, the United Kingdom, and their respective allies from June 1812 to February 1815.

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Washington National Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in the City and Diocese of Washington, commonly known as Washington National Cathedral, is a cathedral of the Episcopal Church located in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States.

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Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.

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White House

The White House is the official residence and workplace of the President of the United States.

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William Creighton (bishop)

William Forman Creighton (July 23, 1909–May 20, 1987) was the fifth bishop of the Diocese of Washington in the Episcopal Church in the United States of America.

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Redirects here:

Bishop of Washington, Episcopal Bishop of Washington, Episcopal diocese of washington.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Episcopal_Diocese_of_Washington

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