Logo
Unionpedia
Communication
Get it on Google Play
New! Download Unionpedia on your Android™ device!
Install
Faster access than browser!
 

Euclidean vector

+ Save concept

In mathematics, physics, and engineering, a Euclidean vector (sometimes called a geometric or spatial vector, or—as here—simply a vector) is a geometric object that has magnitude (or length) and direction. [1]

164 relations: A History of Vector Analysis, Absolute value, Acceleration, Addition, Additive inverse, Adhémar Jean Claude Barré de Saint-Venant, Affine space, Algebraic operation, Angle, Angular acceleration, Angular momentum, Angular velocity, Applied mathematics, Area, Array data structure, Arrow, Associative property, August Ferdinand Möbius, Augustin-Louis Cauchy, Banach space, Basis (linear algebra), Bivector, Calculus, Car, Caret, Cartesian coordinate system, Chain rule, Clifford algebra, Commutative property, Complex number, Coordinate system, Coordinate vector, Covariance and contravariance of vectors, Cross product, Cylindrical coordinate system, Del, Derivative, Determinant, Differential geometry, Dimensional analysis, Dimensionless quantity, Directional derivative, Displacement (vector), Distance, Distributive property, Dot product, Edwin Bidwell Wilson, Einstein notation, Electric field, Elements of Dynamic, ..., Engineering, Equipollence (geometry), Equivalence class, Equivalence relation, Euclidean space, Euclidean vector, Euler angles, Exterior algebra, Field (mathematics), Force, Four-vector, Fraktur, Function (mathematics), Function space, German language, Giusto Bellavitis, Gradient, Hermann Grassmann, Hilbert space, Imaginary unit, Index notation, Inertial frame of reference, Inner product space, Integral, Invertible matrix, James Clerk Maxwell, Josiah Willard Gibbs, Kelvin, Law of cosines, Length, Letter case, Level of measurement, Line segment, Linear independence, Magnetic field, Magnitude (mathematics), Mathematics, Matrix (mathematics), Matthew O'Brien (mathematician), Metre, Minkowski space, MIT Press, Momentum, Multiplication, Newton (unit), Newton's laws of motion, Norm (mathematics), Normal (geometry), Null vector, Orientation (geometry), Orientation (vector space), Origin (mathematics), Orthogonality, Parallel (geometry), Parallelepiped, Parallelogram, Parametric equation, Parity (physics), Participle, PDF, Perpendicular, Peter Tait (physicist), Physics, Plane (geometry), Point (geometry), Position (vector), Proportionality (mathematics), Pseudoscalar, Pseudovector, Pure mathematics, Pythagorean theorem, Quaternion, Radius, Real line, Real number, Relative direction, Right-hand rule, Rotation, Rotation formalisms in three dimensions, Rotation matrix, Row and column vectors, Seven-dimensional cross product, Special relativity, Speed, Spherical coordinate system, Standard basis, Subtraction, Symmetry, Tangent space, Tangential and normal components, Tensor, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Theory of relativity, Thermodynamics, Tilde, Torque, Transformation matrix, Transpose, Trigonometric functions, Tuple, Unit vector, Vector algebra, Vector Analysis, Vector bundle, Vector calculus, Vector field, Vector notation, Vector projection, Vector space, Vector-valued function, Velocity, Wheel, William Kingdon Clifford, William Rowan Hamilton. Expand index (114 more) »

A History of Vector Analysis

A History of Vector Analysis (1967) is a book on the history of vector analysis by Michael J. Crowe, originally published by the University of Notre Dame Press.

New!!: Euclidean vector and A History of Vector Analysis · See more »

Absolute value

In mathematics, the absolute value or modulus of a real number is the non-negative value of without regard to its sign.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Absolute value · See more »

Acceleration

In physics, acceleration is the rate of change of velocity of an object with respect to time.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Acceleration · See more »

Addition

Addition (often signified by the plus symbol "+") is one of the four basic operations of arithmetic; the others are subtraction, multiplication and division.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Addition · See more »

Additive inverse

In mathematics, the additive inverse of a number is the number that, when added to, yields zero.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Additive inverse · See more »

Adhémar Jean Claude Barré de Saint-Venant

Adhémar Jean Claude Barré de Saint-Venant (23 August 1797, Villiers-en-Bière, Seine-et-Marne – 6 January 1886, Saint-Ouen, Loir-et-Cher) was a mechanician and mathematician who contributed to early stress analysis and also developed the unsteady open channel flow shallow water equations, also known as the Saint-Venant equations that are a fundamental set of equations used in modern hydraulic engineering.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Adhémar Jean Claude Barré de Saint-Venant · See more »

Affine space

In mathematics, an affine space is a geometric structure that generalizes the properties of Euclidean spaces in such a way that these are independent of the concepts of distance and measure of angles, keeping only the properties related to parallelism and ratio of lengths for parallel line segments.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Affine space · See more »

Algebraic operation

In mathematics, a basic algebraic operation is any one of the traditional operations of arithmetic, which are addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, raising to an integer power, and taking roots (fractional power).

New!!: Euclidean vector and Algebraic operation · See more »

Angle

In plane geometry, an angle is the figure formed by two rays, called the sides of the angle, sharing a common endpoint, called the vertex of the angle.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Angle · See more »

Angular acceleration

Angular acceleration is the rate of change of angular velocity.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Angular acceleration · See more »

Angular momentum

In physics, angular momentum (rarely, moment of momentum or rotational momentum) is the rotational equivalent of linear momentum.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Angular momentum · See more »

Angular velocity

In physics, the angular velocity of a particle is the rate at which it rotates around a chosen center point: that is, the time rate of change of its angular displacement relative to the origin.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Angular velocity · See more »

Applied mathematics

Applied mathematics is the application of mathematical methods by different fields such as science, engineering, business, computer science, and industry.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Applied mathematics · See more »

Area

Area is the quantity that expresses the extent of a two-dimensional figure or shape, or planar lamina, in the plane.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Area · See more »

Array data structure

In computer science, an array data structure, or simply an array, is a data structure consisting of a collection of elements (values or variables), each identified by at least one array index or key.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Array data structure · See more »

Arrow

An arrow is a fin-stabilized projectile that is launched via a bow, and usually consists of a long straight stiff shaft with stabilizers called fletchings, as well as a weighty (and usually sharp and pointed) arrowhead attached to the front end, and a slot at the rear end called nock for engaging bowstring.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Arrow · See more »

Associative property

In mathematics, the associative property is a property of some binary operations.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Associative property · See more »

August Ferdinand Möbius

August Ferdinand Möbius (17 November 1790 – 26 September 1868) was a German mathematician and theoretical astronomer.

New!!: Euclidean vector and August Ferdinand Möbius · See more »

Augustin-Louis Cauchy

Baron Augustin-Louis Cauchy FRS FRSE (21 August 178923 May 1857) was a French mathematician, engineer and physicist who made pioneering contributions to several branches of mathematics, including: mathematical analysis and continuum mechanics.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Augustin-Louis Cauchy · See more »

Banach space

In mathematics, more specifically in functional analysis, a Banach space (pronounced) is a complete normed vector space.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Banach space · See more »

Basis (linear algebra)

In mathematics, a set of elements (vectors) in a vector space V is called a basis, or a set of, if the vectors are linearly independent and every vector in the vector space is a linear combination of this set.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Basis (linear algebra) · See more »

Bivector

In mathematics, a bivector or 2-vector is a quantity in exterior algebra or geometric algebra that extends the idea of scalars and vectors.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Bivector · See more »

Calculus

Calculus (from Latin calculus, literally 'small pebble', used for counting and calculations, as on an abacus), is the mathematical study of continuous change, in the same way that geometry is the study of shape and algebra is the study of generalizations of arithmetic operations.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Calculus · See more »

Car

A car (or automobile) is a wheeled motor vehicle used for transportation.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Car · See more »

Caret

The caret is an inverted V-shaped grapheme.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Caret · See more »

Cartesian coordinate system

A Cartesian coordinate system is a coordinate system that specifies each point uniquely in a plane by a pair of numerical coordinates, which are the signed distances to the point from two fixed perpendicular directed lines, measured in the same unit of length.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Cartesian coordinate system · See more »

Chain rule

In calculus, the chain rule is a formula for computing the derivative of the composition of two or more functions.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Chain rule · See more »

Clifford algebra

In mathematics, a Clifford algebra is an algebra generated by a vector space with a quadratic form, and is a unital associative algebra.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Clifford algebra · See more »

Commutative property

In mathematics, a binary operation is commutative if changing the order of the operands does not change the result.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Commutative property · See more »

Complex number

A complex number is a number that can be expressed in the form, where and are real numbers, and is a solution of the equation.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Complex number · See more »

Coordinate system

In geometry, a coordinate system is a system which uses one or more numbers, or coordinates, to uniquely determine the position of the points or other geometric elements on a manifold such as Euclidean space.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Coordinate system · See more »

Coordinate vector

In linear algebra, a coordinate vector is a representation of a vector as an ordered list of numbers that describes the vector in terms of a particular ordered basis.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Coordinate vector · See more »

Covariance and contravariance of vectors

In multilinear algebra and tensor analysis, covariance and contravariance describe how the quantitative description of certain geometric or physical entities changes with a change of basis.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Covariance and contravariance of vectors · See more »

Cross product

In mathematics and vector algebra, the cross product or vector product (occasionally directed area product to emphasize the geometric significance) is a binary operation on two vectors in three-dimensional space \left(\mathbb^3\right) and is denoted by the symbol \times.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Cross product · See more »

Cylindrical coordinate system

A cylindrical coordinate system is a three-dimensional coordinate system that specifies point positions by the distance from a chosen reference axis, the direction from the axis relative to a chosen reference direction, and the distance from a chosen reference plane perpendicular to the axis.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Cylindrical coordinate system · See more »

Del

Del, or nabla, is an operator used in mathematics, in particular in vector calculus, as a vector differential operator, usually represented by the nabla symbol ∇.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Del · See more »

Derivative

The derivative of a function of a real variable measures the sensitivity to change of the function value (output value) with respect to a change in its argument (input value).

New!!: Euclidean vector and Derivative · See more »

Determinant

In linear algebra, the determinant is a value that can be computed from the elements of a square matrix.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Determinant · See more »

Differential geometry

Differential geometry is a mathematical discipline that uses the techniques of differential calculus, integral calculus, linear algebra and multilinear algebra to study problems in geometry.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Differential geometry · See more »

Dimensional analysis

In engineering and science, dimensional analysis is the analysis of the relationships between different physical quantities by identifying their base quantities (such as length, mass, time, and electric charge) and units of measure (such as miles vs. kilometers, or pounds vs. kilograms) and tracking these dimensions as calculations or comparisons are performed.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Dimensional analysis · See more »

Dimensionless quantity

In dimensional analysis, a dimensionless quantity is a quantity to which no physical dimension is assigned.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Dimensionless quantity · See more »

Directional derivative

In mathematics, the directional derivative of a multivariate differentiable function along a given vector v at a given point x intuitively represents the instantaneous rate of change of the function, moving through x with a velocity specified by v. It therefore generalizes the notion of a partial derivative, in which the rate of change is taken along one of the curvilinear coordinate curves, all other coordinates being constant.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Directional derivative · See more »

Displacement (vector)

A displacement is a vector whose length is the shortest distance from the initial to the final position of a point P. It quantifies both the distance and direction of an imaginary motion along a straight line from the initial position to the final position of the point.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Displacement (vector) · See more »

Distance

Distance is a numerical measurement of how far apart objects are.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Distance · See more »

Distributive property

In abstract algebra and formal logic, the distributive property of binary operations generalizes the distributive law from boolean algebra and elementary algebra.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Distributive property · See more »

Dot product

In mathematics, the dot product or scalar productThe term scalar product is often also used more generally to mean a symmetric bilinear form, for example for a pseudo-Euclidean space.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Dot product · See more »

Edwin Bidwell Wilson

Edwin Bidwell Wilson (April 25, 1879 – December 28, 1964) was an American mathematician and polymath.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Edwin Bidwell Wilson · See more »

Einstein notation

In mathematics, especially in applications of linear algebra to physics, the Einstein notation or Einstein summation convention is a notational convention that implies summation over a set of indexed terms in a formula, thus achieving notational brevity.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Einstein notation · See more »

Electric field

An electric field is a vector field surrounding an electric charge that exerts force on other charges, attracting or repelling them.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Electric field · See more »

Elements of Dynamic

Elements of Dynamic is a book published by William Kingdon Clifford in 1878.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Elements of Dynamic · See more »

Engineering

Engineering is the creative application of science, mathematical methods, and empirical evidence to the innovation, design, construction, operation and maintenance of structures, machines, materials, devices, systems, processes, and organizations.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Engineering · See more »

Equipollence (geometry)

In Euclidean geometry, equipollence is a binary relation between directed line segments.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Equipollence (geometry) · See more »

Equivalence class

In mathematics, when the elements of some set S have a notion of equivalence (formalized as an equivalence relation) defined on them, then one may naturally split the set S into equivalence classes.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Equivalence class · See more »

Equivalence relation

In mathematics, an equivalence relation is a binary relation that is reflexive, symmetric and transitive.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Equivalence relation · See more »

Euclidean space

In geometry, Euclidean space encompasses the two-dimensional Euclidean plane, the three-dimensional space of Euclidean geometry, and certain other spaces.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Euclidean space · See more »

Euclidean vector

In mathematics, physics, and engineering, a Euclidean vector (sometimes called a geometric or spatial vector, or—as here—simply a vector) is a geometric object that has magnitude (or length) and direction.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Euclidean vector · See more »

Euler angles

The Euler angles are three angles introduced by Leonhard Euler to describe the orientation of a rigid body with respect to a fixed coordinate system.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Euler angles · See more »

Exterior algebra

In mathematics, the exterior product or wedge product of vectors is an algebraic construction used in geometry to study areas, volumes, and their higher-dimensional analogs.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Exterior algebra · See more »

Field (mathematics)

In mathematics, a field is a set on which addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division are defined, and behave as when they are applied to rational and real numbers.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Field (mathematics) · See more »

Force

In physics, a force is any interaction that, when unopposed, will change the motion of an object.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Force · See more »

Four-vector

In special relativity, a four-vector (also known as a 4-vector) is an object with four components, which transform in a specific way under Lorentz transformation.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Four-vector · See more »

Fraktur

Fraktur is a calligraphic hand of the Latin alphabet and any of several blackletter typefaces derived from this hand.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Fraktur · See more »

Function (mathematics)

In mathematics, a function was originally the idealization of how a varying quantity depends on another quantity.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Function (mathematics) · See more »

Function space

In mathematics, a function space is a set of functions between two fixed sets.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Function space · See more »

German language

German (Deutsch) is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe.

New!!: Euclidean vector and German language · See more »

Giusto Bellavitis

Giusto Bellavitis (22 November 1803 – 6 November 1880) was an Italian mathematician, senator, and municipal councilor.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Giusto Bellavitis · See more »

Gradient

In mathematics, the gradient is a multi-variable generalization of the derivative.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Gradient · See more »

Hermann Grassmann

Hermann Günther Grassmann (Graßmann; April 15, 1809 – September 26, 1877) was a German polymath, known in his day as a linguist and now also as a mathematician.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Hermann Grassmann · See more »

Hilbert space

The mathematical concept of a Hilbert space, named after David Hilbert, generalizes the notion of Euclidean space.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Hilbert space · See more »

Imaginary unit

The imaginary unit or unit imaginary number is a solution to the quadratic equation.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Imaginary unit · See more »

Index notation

In mathematics and computer programming, index notation is used to specify the elements of an array of numbers.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Index notation · See more »

Inertial frame of reference

An inertial frame of reference in classical physics and special relativity is a frame of reference in which a body with zero net force acting upon it is not accelerating; that is, such a body is at rest or it is moving at a constant speed in a straight line.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Inertial frame of reference · See more »

Inner product space

In linear algebra, an inner product space is a vector space with an additional structure called an inner product.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Inner product space · See more »

Integral

In mathematics, an integral assigns numbers to functions in a way that can describe displacement, area, volume, and other concepts that arise by combining infinitesimal data.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Integral · See more »

Invertible matrix

In linear algebra, an n-by-n square matrix A is called invertible (also nonsingular or nondegenerate) if there exists an n-by-n square matrix B such that where In denotes the n-by-n identity matrix and the multiplication used is ordinary matrix multiplication.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Invertible matrix · See more »

James Clerk Maxwell

James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish scientist in the field of mathematical physics.

New!!: Euclidean vector and James Clerk Maxwell · See more »

Josiah Willard Gibbs

Josiah Willard Gibbs (February 11, 1839 – April 28, 1903) was an American scientist who made important theoretical contributions to physics, chemistry, and mathematics.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Josiah Willard Gibbs · See more »

Kelvin

The Kelvin scale is an absolute thermodynamic temperature scale using as its null point absolute zero, the temperature at which all thermal motion ceases in the classical description of thermodynamics.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Kelvin · See more »

Law of cosines

In trigonometry, the law of cosines (also known as the cosine formula or cosine rule) relates the lengths of the sides of a triangle to the cosine of one of its angles.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Law of cosines · See more »

Length

In geometric measurements, length is the most extended dimension of an object.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Length · See more »

Letter case

Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger upper case (also uppercase, capital letters, capitals, caps, large letters, or more formally majuscule) and smaller lower case (also lowercase, small letters, or more formally minuscule) in the written representation of certain languages.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Letter case · See more »

Level of measurement

Level of measurement or scale of measure is a classification that describes the nature of information within the values assigned to variables.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Level of measurement · See more »

Line segment

In geometry, a line segment is a part of a line that is bounded by two distinct end points, and contains every point on the line between its endpoints.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Line segment · See more »

Linear independence

In the theory of vector spaces, a set of vectors is said to be if one of the vectors in the set can be defined as a linear combination of the others; if no vector in the set can be written in this way, then the vectors are said to be.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Linear independence · See more »

Magnetic field

A magnetic field is a vector field that describes the magnetic influence of electrical currents and magnetized materials.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Magnetic field · See more »

Magnitude (mathematics)

In mathematics, magnitude is the size of a mathematical object, a property which determines whether the object is larger or smaller than other objects of the same kind.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Magnitude (mathematics) · See more »

Mathematics

Mathematics (from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") is the study of such topics as quantity, structure, space, and change.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Mathematics · See more »

Matrix (mathematics)

In mathematics, a matrix (plural: matrices) is a rectangular array of numbers, symbols, or expressions, arranged in rows and columns.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Matrix (mathematics) · See more »

Matthew O'Brien (mathematician)

Matthew O'Brien (1814–1855) was an Irish mathematician.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Matthew O'Brien (mathematician) · See more »

Metre

The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units (SI).

New!!: Euclidean vector and Metre · See more »

Minkowski space

In mathematical physics, Minkowski space (or Minkowski spacetime) is a combining of three-dimensional Euclidean space and time into a four-dimensional manifold where the spacetime interval between any two events is independent of the inertial frame of reference in which they are recorded.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Minkowski space · See more »

MIT Press

The MIT Press is a university press affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States).

New!!: Euclidean vector and MIT Press · See more »

Momentum

In Newtonian mechanics, linear momentum, translational momentum, or simply momentum (pl. momenta) is the product of the mass and velocity of an object.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Momentum · See more »

Multiplication

Multiplication (often denoted by the cross symbol "×", by a point "⋅", by juxtaposition, or, on computers, by an asterisk "∗") is one of the four elementary mathematical operations of arithmetic; with the others being addition, subtraction and division.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Multiplication · See more »

Newton (unit)

The newton (symbol: N) is the International System of Units (SI) derived unit of force.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Newton (unit) · See more »

Newton's laws of motion

Newton's laws of motion are three physical laws that, together, laid the foundation for classical mechanics.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Newton's laws of motion · See more »

Norm (mathematics)

In linear algebra, functional analysis, and related areas of mathematics, a norm is a function that assigns a strictly positive length or size to each vector in a vector space—save for the zero vector, which is assigned a length of zero.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Norm (mathematics) · See more »

Normal (geometry)

In geometry, a normal is an object such as a line or vector that is perpendicular to a given object.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Normal (geometry) · See more »

Null vector

In mathematics, given a vector space X with an associated quadratic form q, written, a null vector or isotropic vector is a non-zero element x of X for which.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Null vector · See more »

Orientation (geometry)

In geometry the orientation, angular position, or attitude of an object such as a line, plane or rigid body is part of the description of how it is placed in the space it occupies.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Orientation (geometry) · See more »

Orientation (vector space)

In mathematics, orientation is a geometric notion that in two dimensions allows one to say when a cycle goes around clockwise or counterclockwise, and in three dimensions when a figure is left-handed or right-handed.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Orientation (vector space) · See more »

Origin (mathematics)

In mathematics, the origin of a Euclidean space is a special point, usually denoted by the letter O, used as a fixed point of reference for the geometry of the surrounding space.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Origin (mathematics) · See more »

Orthogonality

In mathematics, orthogonality is the generalization of the notion of perpendicularity to the linear algebra of bilinear forms.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Orthogonality · See more »

Parallel (geometry)

In geometry, parallel lines are lines in a plane which do not meet; that is, two lines in a plane that do not intersect or touch each other at any point are said to be parallel.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Parallel (geometry) · See more »

Parallelepiped

In geometry, a parallelepiped is a three-dimensional figure formed by six parallelograms (the term rhomboid is also sometimes used with this meaning).

New!!: Euclidean vector and Parallelepiped · See more »

Parallelogram

In Euclidean geometry, a parallelogram is a simple (non-self-intersecting) quadrilateral with two pairs of parallel sides.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Parallelogram · See more »

Parametric equation

In mathematics, a parametric equation defines a group of quantities as functions of one or more independent variables called parameters.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Parametric equation · See more »

Parity (physics)

In quantum mechanics, a parity transformation (also called parity inversion) is the flip in the sign of one spatial coordinate.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Parity (physics) · See more »

Participle

A participle is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun, noun phrase, verb, or verb phrase, and plays a role similar to an adjective or adverb.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Participle · See more »

PDF

The Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format developed in the 1990s to present documents, including text formatting and images, in a manner independent of application software, hardware, and operating systems.

New!!: Euclidean vector and PDF · See more »

Perpendicular

In elementary geometry, the property of being perpendicular (perpendicularity) is the relationship between two lines which meet at a right angle (90 degrees).

New!!: Euclidean vector and Perpendicular · See more »

Peter Tait (physicist)

Peter Guthrie Tait FRSE (28 April 1831 – 4 July 1901) was a Scottish mathematical physicist and early pioneer in thermodynamics.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Peter Tait (physicist) · See more »

Physics

Physics (from knowledge of nature, from φύσις phýsis "nature") is the natural science that studies matterAt the start of The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Richard Feynman offers the atomic hypothesis as the single most prolific scientific concept: "If, in some cataclysm, all scientific knowledge were to be destroyed one sentence what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that all things are made up of atoms – little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another..." and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force."Physical science is that department of knowledge which relates to the order of nature, or, in other words, to the regular succession of events." Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves."Physics is one of the most fundamental of the sciences. Scientists of all disciplines use the ideas of physics, including chemists who study the structure of molecules, paleontologists who try to reconstruct how dinosaurs walked, and climatologists who study how human activities affect the atmosphere and oceans. Physics is also the foundation of all engineering and technology. No engineer could design a flat-screen TV, an interplanetary spacecraft, or even a better mousetrap without first understanding the basic laws of physics. (...) You will come to see physics as a towering achievement of the human intellect in its quest to understand our world and ourselves."Physics is an experimental science. Physicists observe the phenomena of nature and try to find patterns that relate these phenomena.""Physics is the study of your world and the world and universe around you." Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines and, through its inclusion of astronomy, perhaps the oldest. Over the last two millennia, physics, chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics were a part of natural philosophy, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, these natural sciences emerged as unique research endeavors in their own right. Physics intersects with many interdisciplinary areas of research, such as biophysics and quantum chemistry, and the boundaries of physics are not rigidly defined. New ideas in physics often explain the fundamental mechanisms studied by other sciences and suggest new avenues of research in academic disciplines such as mathematics and philosophy. Advances in physics often enable advances in new technologies. For example, advances in the understanding of electromagnetism and nuclear physics led directly to the development of new products that have dramatically transformed modern-day society, such as television, computers, domestic appliances, and nuclear weapons; advances in thermodynamics led to the development of industrialization; and advances in mechanics inspired the development of calculus.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Physics · See more »

Plane (geometry)

In mathematics, a plane is a flat, two-dimensional surface that extends infinitely far.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Plane (geometry) · See more »

Point (geometry)

In modern mathematics, a point refers usually to an element of some set called a space.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Point (geometry) · See more »

Position (vector)

In geometry, a position or position vector, also known as location vector or radius vector, is a Euclidean vector that represents the position of a point P in space in relation to an arbitrary reference origin O. Usually denoted x, r, or s, it corresponds to the straight-line from O to P. The term "position vector" is used mostly in the fields of differential geometry, mechanics and occasionally vector calculus.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Position (vector) · See more »

Proportionality (mathematics)

In mathematics, two variables are proportional if there is always a constant ratio between them.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Proportionality (mathematics) · See more »

Pseudoscalar

In physics, a pseudoscalar is a quantity that behaves like a scalar, except that it changes sign under a parity inversion such as improper rotations while a true scalar does not.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Pseudoscalar · See more »

Pseudovector

In physics and mathematics, a pseudovector (or axial vector) is a quantity that transforms like a vector under a proper rotation, but in three dimensions gains an additional sign flip under an improper rotation such as a reflection.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Pseudovector · See more »

Pure mathematics

Broadly speaking, pure mathematics is mathematics that studies entirely abstract concepts.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Pure mathematics · See more »

Pythagorean theorem

In mathematics, the Pythagorean theorem, also known as Pythagoras' theorem, is a fundamental relation in Euclidean geometry among the three sides of a right triangle.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Pythagorean theorem · See more »

Quaternion

In mathematics, the quaternions are a number system that extends the complex numbers.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Quaternion · See more »

Radius

In classical geometry, a radius of a circle or sphere is any of the line segments from its center to its perimeter, and in more modern usage, it is also their length.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Radius · See more »

Real line

In mathematics, the real line, or real number line is the line whose points are the real numbers.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Real line · See more »

Real number

In mathematics, a real number is a value of a continuous quantity that can represent a distance along a line.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Real number · See more »

Relative direction

The most common relative directions are left, right, forward(s), backward(s), up, and down.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Relative direction · See more »

Right-hand rule

In mathematics and physics, the right-hand rule is a common mnemonic for understanding orientation conventions for the vector cross product in three dimensions.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Right-hand rule · See more »

Rotation

A rotation is a circular movement of an object around a center (or point) of rotation.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Rotation · See more »

Rotation formalisms in three dimensions

In geometry, various formalisms exist to express a rotation in three dimensions as a mathematical transformation.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Rotation formalisms in three dimensions · See more »

Rotation matrix

In linear algebra, a rotation matrix is a matrix that is used to perform a rotation in Euclidean space.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Rotation matrix · See more »

Row and column vectors

In linear algebra, a column vector or column matrix is an m × 1 matrix, that is, a matrix consisting of a single column of m elements, Similarly, a row vector or row matrix is a 1 × m matrix, that is, a matrix consisting of a single row of m elements Throughout, boldface is used for the row and column vectors.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Row and column vectors · See more »

Seven-dimensional cross product

In mathematics, the seven-dimensional cross product is a bilinear operation on vectors in seven-dimensional Euclidean space.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Seven-dimensional cross product · See more »

Special relativity

In physics, special relativity (SR, also known as the special theory of relativity or STR) is the generally accepted and experimentally well-confirmed physical theory regarding the relationship between space and time.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Special relativity · See more »

Speed

In everyday use and in kinematics, the speed of an object is the magnitude of its velocity (the rate of change of its position); it is thus a scalar quantity.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Speed · See more »

Spherical coordinate system

In mathematics, a spherical coordinate system is a coordinate system for three-dimensional space where the position of a point is specified by three numbers: the radial distance of that point from a fixed origin, its polar angle measured from a fixed zenith direction, and the azimuth angle of its orthogonal projection on a reference plane that passes through the origin and is orthogonal to the zenith, measured from a fixed reference direction on that plane.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Spherical coordinate system · See more »

Standard basis

In mathematics, the standard basis (also called natural basis) for a Euclidean space is the set of unit vectors pointing in the direction of the axes of a Cartesian coordinate system.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Standard basis · See more »

Subtraction

Subtraction is an arithmetic operation that represents the operation of removing objects from a collection.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Subtraction · See more »

Symmetry

Symmetry (from Greek συμμετρία symmetria "agreement in dimensions, due proportion, arrangement") in everyday language refers to a sense of harmonious and beautiful proportion and balance.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Symmetry · See more »

Tangent space

In mathematics, the tangent space of a manifold facilitates the generalization of vectors from affine spaces to general manifolds, since in the latter case one cannot simply subtract two points to obtain a vector that gives the displacement of the one point from the other.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Tangent space · See more »

Tangential and normal components

In mathematics, given a vector at a point on a curve, that vector can be decomposed uniquely as a sum of two vectors, one tangent to the curve, called the tangential component of the vector, and another one perpendicular to the curve, called the normal component of the vector.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Tangential and normal components · See more »

Tensor

In mathematics, tensors are geometric objects that describe linear relations between geometric vectors, scalars, and other tensors.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Tensor · See more »

The Feynman Lectures on Physics

The Feynman Lectures on Physics is a physics textbook based on some lectures by Richard P. Feynman, a Nobel laureate who has sometimes been called "The Great Explainer".

New!!: Euclidean vector and The Feynman Lectures on Physics · See more »

Theory of relativity

The theory of relativity usually encompasses two interrelated theories by Albert Einstein: special relativity and general relativity.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Theory of relativity · See more »

Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics is the branch of physics concerned with heat and temperature and their relation to energy and work.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Thermodynamics · See more »

Tilde

The tilde (in the American Heritage dictionary or; ˜ or ~) is a grapheme with several uses.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Tilde · See more »

Torque

Torque, moment, or moment of force is rotational force.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Torque · See more »

Transformation matrix

In linear algebra, linear transformations can be represented by matrices.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Transformation matrix · See more »

Transpose

In linear algebra, the transpose of a matrix is an operator which flips a matrix over its diagonal, that is it switches the row and column indices of the matrix by producing another matrix denoted as AT (also written A′, Atr, tA or At).

New!!: Euclidean vector and Transpose · See more »

Trigonometric functions

In mathematics, the trigonometric functions (also called circular functions, angle functions or goniometric functions) are functions of an angle.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Trigonometric functions · See more »

Tuple

In mathematics, a tuple is a finite ordered list (sequence) of elements.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Tuple · See more »

Unit vector

In mathematics, a unit vector in a normed vector space is a vector (often a spatial vector) of length 1.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Unit vector · See more »

Vector algebra

In mathematics, vector algebra may mean.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Vector algebra · See more »

Vector Analysis

Vector Analysis is a textbook by Edwin Bidwell Wilson, first published in 1901 and based on the lectures that Josiah Willard Gibbs had delivered on the subject at Yale University.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Vector Analysis · See more »

Vector bundle

In mathematics, a vector bundle is a topological construction that makes precise the idea of a family of vector spaces parameterized by another space X (for example X could be a topological space, a manifold, or an algebraic variety): to every point x of the space X we associate (or "attach") a vector space V(x) in such a way that these vector spaces fit together to form another space of the same kind as X (e.g. a topological space, manifold, or algebraic variety), which is then called a vector bundle over X.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Vector bundle · See more »

Vector calculus

Vector calculus, or vector analysis, is a branch of mathematics concerned with differentiation and integration of vector fields, primarily in 3-dimensional Euclidean space \mathbb^3.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Vector calculus · See more »

Vector field

In vector calculus and physics, a vector field is an assignment of a vector to each point in a subset of space.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Vector field · See more »

Vector notation

Vector notation is a commonly used mathematical notation for working with mathematical vectors, which may be geometric vectors or members of vector spaces.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Vector notation · See more »

Vector projection

The vector projection of a vector a on (or onto) a nonzero vector b (also known as the vector component or vector resolution of a in the direction of b) is the orthogonal projection of a onto a straight line parallel to b. It is a vector parallel to b, defined as where a_1 is a scalar, called the scalar projection of a onto b, and b̂ is the unit vector in the direction of b. In turn, the scalar projection is defined as where the operator · denotes a dot product, |a| is the length of a, and θ is the angle between a and b. The scalar projection is equal to the length of the vector projection, with a minus sign if the direction of the projection is opposite to the direction of b. The vector component or vector resolute of a perpendicular to b, sometimes also called the vector rejection of a from b, is the orthogonal projection of a onto the plane (or, in general, hyperplane) orthogonal to b. Both the projection a1 and rejection a2 of a vector a are vectors, and their sum is equal to a, which implies that the rejection is given by.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Vector projection · See more »

Vector space

A vector space (also called a linear space) is a collection of objects called vectors, which may be added together and multiplied ("scaled") by numbers, called scalars.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Vector space · See more »

Vector-valued function

A vector-valued function, also referred to as a vector function, is a mathematical function of one or more variables whose range is a set of multidimensional vectors or infinite-dimensional vectors.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Vector-valued function · See more »

Velocity

The velocity of an object is the rate of change of its position with respect to a frame of reference, and is a function of time.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Velocity · See more »

Wheel

A wheel is a circular component that is intended to rotate on an axle bearing.

New!!: Euclidean vector and Wheel · See more »

William Kingdon Clifford

William Kingdon Clifford FRS (4 May 1845 – 3 March 1879) was an English mathematician and philosopher.

New!!: Euclidean vector and William Kingdon Clifford · See more »

William Rowan Hamilton

Sir William Rowan Hamilton MRIA (4 August 1805 – 2 September 1865) was an Irish mathematician who made important contributions to classical mechanics, optics, and algebra.

New!!: Euclidean vector and William Rowan Hamilton · See more »

Redirects here:

3D vector, 3d vector, Bound vector, Component (vector), Direction vector, Euclid vector, Euclidean vectors, Euclidian vector, Free vector, Geometric vector, Magnitude of resultant vector, Physical vector, Relative vector, Spacial vector, Spatial vector, Three-vector, Triangle law, Vector (classical mechanics), Vector (geometric), Vector (geometry), Vector (physics), Vector (spatial), Vector addition, Vector component, Vector components, Vector direction, Vector methods (physics), Vector quantity, Vector subtraction, Vector sum.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euclidean_vector

OutgoingIncoming
Hey! We are on Facebook now! »