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Family reunification

Index Family reunification

Family reunification is a recognized reason for immigration in many countries because of the presence of one or more family members in a certain country, therefore, enables the rest of the divided family or only specific members of the family to immigrate to that country as well. [1]

31 relations: Asylum seeker, Asylum shopping, Canadian nationality law, Chain migration, Citizenship Clause, Denmark, Divided family, Europe, Federation for American Immigration Reform, Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Germany, Immigration, Immigration Act 1971, Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, Immigration and Naturalization Service, Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, Indefinite leave to remain, James Robart, Minor (law), Netherlands, Norway, NumbersUSA, Phil Gingrey, Presidency of Donald Trump, Right of asylum, Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, United States federal judge, United States v. Windsor, 24-year rule.

Asylum seeker

An asylum seeker (also rarely called an asylee) is a person who flees his or her home country, 'spontaneously' enters another country and applies for asylum, i.e. the right to international protection, in this other country.

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Asylum shopping

Asylum shopping is the practice by asylum seekers of applying for asylum in several states or seeking to apply in a particular state after transiting other states.

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Canadian nationality law

Canadian nationality law is promulgated by the Citizenship Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. C-29) since 1977.

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Chain migration

Chain migration is a term used by scholars to refer to the social process by which migrants from a particular town follow others from that town to a particular destination.

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Citizenship Clause

The Citizenship Clause is the first sentence of Section 1 in the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which was adopted on July 9, 1868.

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Denmark

Denmark (Danmark), officially the Kingdom of Denmark,Kongeriget Danmark,.

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Divided family

A divided family can be a close family unit or members of the wider family who are separated from each other by borders of one or more countries and are therefore temporarily or permanently not able to live together.

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Europe

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere.

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Federation for American Immigration Reform

The Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) is a non-profit tax exempt organization in the United States that seeks to reduce both legal and illegal immigration.

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Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Fourteenth Amendment (Amendment XIV) to the United States Constitution was adopted on July 9, 1868, as one of the Reconstruction Amendments.

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Germany

Germany (Deutschland), officially the Federal Republic of Germany (Bundesrepublik Deutschland), is a sovereign state in central-western Europe.

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Immigration

Immigration is the international movement of people into a destination country of which they are not natives or where they do not possess citizenship in order to settle or reside there, especially as permanent residents or naturalized citizens, or to take up employment as a migrant worker or temporarily as a foreign worker.

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Immigration Act 1971

The Immigration Act 1971 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom concerning immigration.

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Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965

The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 (H.R. 2580), also known as the Hart–Celler Act, changed the way quotas were allocated by ending the National Origins Formula that had been in place in the United States since the Emergency Quota Act of 1921.

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Immigration and Naturalization Service

The United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) was an agency of the U.S. Department of Labor from 1933 to 1940 and the U.S. Department of Justice from 1940 to 2003. Referred to by some as former INS and by others as legacy INS, the agency ceased to exist under that name on March 1, 2003, when most of its functions were transferred to three new entities – U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) – within the newly created Department of Homeland Security, as part of a major government reorganization following the September 11 attacks of 2001. Prior to 1933, there were separate offices administering immigration and naturalization matters, known as the Bureau of Immigration and the Bureau of Naturalization, respectively. The INS was established on June 10, 1933, merging these previously separate areas of administration. In 1890, the federal government, rather than the individual states, regulated immigration into the United States, and the Immigration Act of 1891 established a Commissioner of Immigration in the Treasury Department. Reflecting changing governmental concerns, immigration was transferred to the purview of the United States Department of Commerce and Labor after 1903 and the Department of Labor after 1913. In 1940, with increasing concern about national security, immigration and naturalization was organized under the authority of the Department of Justice. In 2003 the administration of immigration services, including permanent residence, naturalization, asylum, and other functions, became the responsibility of the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services (BCIS), which existed under that name only for a short time before changing to its current name, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The investigative and enforcement functions of the INS (including investigations, deportation, and intelligence) were combined with the U.S. Customs investigators to create U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). The border functions of the INS, which included the Border Patrol and INS Inspectors, were combined with U.S. Customs Inspectors to create U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

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Immigration and Refugee Protection Act

The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act", (IRPA) (the Act) is an Act of the Parliament of Canada, passed in 2001, which replaced the Immigration Act, 1976 as the primary federal legislation regulating immigration to Canada.

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Indefinite leave to remain

Indefinite leave to remain (ILR) or permanent residency (PR) is an immigration status granted to a person who does not hold the right of abode in the United Kingdom (UK), but who has been admitted to the UK without any time limit on his or her stay and who is free to take up employment or study, without restriction.

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James Robart

James Louis Robart (born September 2, 1947) is a Senior United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Western District of Washington.

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Minor (law)

In law, a minor is a person under a certain age, usually the age of majority, which legally demarcates childhood from adulthood.

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Netherlands

The Netherlands (Nederland), often referred to as Holland, is a country located mostly in Western Europe with a population of seventeen million.

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Norway

Norway (Norwegian: (Bokmål) or (Nynorsk); Norga), officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a unitary sovereign state whose territory comprises the western portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula plus the remote island of Jan Mayen and the archipelago of Svalbard.

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NumbersUSA

NumbersUSA is an immigration reduction organization that seeks to reduce both legal and illegal immigration to the United States. It advocates for immigration reduction through user-generated fax, email, and direct mail campaigns.

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Phil Gingrey

John Phillip Gingrey, (born July 10, 1942) was the U.S. representative for from 2003 to 2015.

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Presidency of Donald Trump

Donald Trump was inaugurated as the 45th President of the United States at noon EST on January 20, 2017, succeeding Barack Obama.

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Right of asylum

The right of asylum (sometimes called right of political asylum, from the Ancient Greek word ἄσυλον) is an ancient juridical concept, under which a person persecuted by his own country may be protected by another sovereign authority, such as another country or church official, who in medieval times could offer sanctuary.

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Supreme Court of the United Kingdom

The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom is the supreme court in all matters under English and Welsh law, Northern Irish law and Scottish civil law.

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United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed with some organisations, including the and preferring to use Britain as shorthand for Great Britain is a sovereign country in western Europe.

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United States Citizenship and Immigration Services

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is a component of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

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United States federal judge

In the United States, the title of federal judge means a judge (pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution) appointed by the President of the United States and confirmed by the United States Senate pursuant to the Appointments Clause in Article II of the United States Constitution.

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United States v. Windsor

United States v. Windsor, (Docket No.), is a landmark civil rights case in which the United States Supreme Court held that restricting U.S. federal interpretation of "marriage" and "spouse" to apply only to opposite-sex unions, by Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), is unconstitutional under the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment.

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24-year rule

The 24-year rule is a rule in Danish immigration law meant to cut down forced marriages and family reunification immigration.

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Redirects here:

Chain immigration, Family unification, Family-reunification.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_reunification

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