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First Battle of the Aisne

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The First Battle of the Aisne (1re Bataille de l'Aisne) was the Allied follow-up offensive against the right wing of the German First Army (led by Alexander von Kluck) and the Second Army (led by Karl von Bülow) as they retreated after the First Battle of the Marne earlier in September 1914. [1]

76 relations: Aisne, Aisne (river), Alexander von Kluck, Allies of World War I, Anti-aircraft warfare, Antwerp, Artillery battery, Battalion, Battle of the Yser, Belfort, Belgian Land Component, Berry-au-Bac, BL 60-pounder gun, Bourg-et-Comin, British Expeditionary Force (World War I), Chemin des Dames, Chivres-Val, Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Compiègne, Cover (military), Division (military), Escarpment, Field of fire (weaponry), Fifth Army (France), First Battle of the Marne, Flanking maneuver, Fourth Army (France), French Third Republic, German Empire, Great Retreat, Grenade, Gunpowder, Hans Hartwig von Beseler, Howitzer, John French, 1st Earl of Ypres, Joseph Joffre, Josias von Heeringen, Karl von Bülow, La Ferté-sous-Jouarre memorial, Liège, Louis Franchet d'Espèrey, Louis XV of France, Michel-Joseph Maunoury, Namur, Nancy, France, Neil Douglas Findlay, Netherlands, Nieuwpoort, Belgium, Ninth Army (France), Noyon, ..., Ostend, Pontoon bridge, Race to the Sea, Reims, Rifle grenade, Ronald Simson, Royal Marines, Saint-Mihiel, Scheldt, Second Battle of the Aisne, Sixth Army (France), Smokeless powder, Stokes mortar, Switzerland, The Guns of August, Third Battle of the Aisne, Trench warfare, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Vailly British Cemetery, Venizel, Verdun, Western Front (World War I), World War I, 1st Army (German Empire), 2nd Army (German Empire), 7th Army (German Empire). Expand index (26 more) »

Aisne

Aisne is a French department in the Hauts-de-France region of northern France.

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Aisne (river)

The Aisne is a river in northeastern France.

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Alexander von Kluck

Alexander Heinrich Rudolph von Kluck (20 May 1846 – 19 October 1934) was a German general during World War I.

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Allies of World War I

The Allies of World War I, or Entente Powers, were the countries that opposed the Central Powers in the First World War.

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Anti-aircraft warfare

Anti-aircraft warfare or counter-air defence is defined by NATO as "all measures designed to nullify or reduce the effectiveness of hostile air action."AAP-6 They include ground-and air-based weapon systems, associated sensor systems, command and control arrangements and passive measures (e.g. barrage balloons).

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Antwerp

Antwerp (Antwerpen, Anvers) is a city in Belgium, and is the capital of Antwerp province in Flanders.

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Artillery battery

In military organizations, an artillery battery is a unit of artillery, mortars, rocket artillery, multiple rocket launchers, surface to surface missiles, ballistic missiles, cruise missiles etc, so grouped to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constituent gunnery crews and their systems.

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Battalion

A battalion is a military unit.

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Battle of the Yser

The Battle of the Yser (Bataille de l'Yser, Slag om de IJzer) was a battle of World War I that took place in October 1914 between the towns on Nieuwpoort and Diksmuide, along a stretch of the Yser River and the Yperlee Canal, in Belgium.

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Belfort

Belfort is a city in northeastern France in the Bourgogne-Franche-Comté région, situated between Lyon and Strasbourg.

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Belgian Land Component

The Land Component (Landcomponent, Composante terre) is the land-based branch of the Belgian Armed Forces.

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Berry-au-Bac

Berry-au-Bac is a commune in the department of Aisne in Hauts-de-France in northern France.

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BL 60-pounder gun

The Ordnance BL 60-pounder was a British 5 inch (127 mm) heavy field gun designed in 1903–05 to provide a new capability that had been partially met by the interim QF 4.7 inch Gun.

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Bourg-et-Comin

Bourg-et-Comin is a commune in the department of Aisne in Hauts-de-France in northern France.

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British Expeditionary Force (World War I)

The British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was the British Army sent to the Western Front during the First World War.

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Chemin des Dames

In France, the Chemin des Dames (literally, the "ladies' path") is part of the D18 and runs east and west in the département of Aisne, between in the west, the Route Nationale 2, (Laon to Soissons) and in the east, the D1044 at Corbeny.

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Chivres-Val

Chivres-Val is a commune in the Aisne department in Hauts-de-France in northern France.

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Commonwealth War Graves Commission

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) is an intergovernmental organisation of six independent member states whose principal function is to mark, record and maintain the graves and places of commemoration of Commonwealth of Nations military service members who died in the two World Wars.

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Compiègne

Compiègne is a commune in the Oise department in northern France.

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Cover (military)

In military combat, the concept of cover refers to anything which is capable of physically protecting an individual from enemy fire.

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Division (military)

A division is a large military unit or formation, usually consisting of between 10,000 and 20,000 soldiers.

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Escarpment

An escarpment is a steep slope or long cliff that forms as an effect of faulting or erosion and separates two relatively leveled areas having differing elevations.

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Field of fire (weaponry)

The field of fire of a weapon (or group of weapons) is the area around it that can easily and effectively be reached by gunfire.

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Fifth Army (France)

The Fifth Army was a famous fighting force that participated in World War I. Under its enthusiastic and offensive-minded commander, Louis Franchet d'Espèrey, it led the decisive attacks which resulted in the spectacular victory at the First Battle of the Marne in 1914.

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First Battle of the Marne

The Battle of the Marne (Première bataille de la Marne, also known as the Miracle of the Marne, Le Miracle de la Marne) was a World War I battle fought from It resulted in an Allied victory against the German armies in the west.

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Flanking maneuver

In military tactics, a flanking maneuver, or flanking manoeuvre is a movement of an armed force around a flank to achieve an advantageous position over an enemy.

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Fourth Army (France)

The Fourth Army (IVe Armée) was a Field army of the French Army, which fought during World War I and World War II.

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French Third Republic

The French Third Republic (La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) was the system of government adopted in France from 1870 when the Second French Empire collapsed during the Franco-Prussian War until 1940 when France's defeat by Nazi Germany in World War II led to the formation of the Vichy government in France.

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German Empire

The German Empire (Deutsches Kaiserreich, officially Deutsches Reich),Herbert Tuttle wrote in September 1881 that the term "Reich" does not literally connote an empire as has been commonly assumed by English-speaking people.

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Great Retreat

The Great Retreat, also known as the Retreat from Mons, is the name given to the long withdrawal to the River Marne, in August and September 1914, by the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) and the French Fifth Army, Allied forces on the Western Front in World War I, after their defeat by the Imperial German armies at the Battle of Charleroi (21 August) and the Battle of Mons (23 August).

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Grenade

A grenade is a small weapon typically thrown by hand.

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Gunpowder

Gunpowder, also known as black powder to distinguish it from modern smokeless powder, is the earliest known chemical explosive.

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Hans Hartwig von Beseler

Hans Hartwig von Beseler (27 April 1850 – 20 December 1921) was a German Colonel General.

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Howitzer

A howitzer is a type of artillery piece characterized by a relatively short barrel and the use of comparatively small propellant charges to propel projectiles over relatively high trajectories, with a steep angle of descent.

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John French, 1st Earl of Ypres

Field Marshal John Denton Pinkstone French, 1st Earl of Ypres, (28 September 1852 – 22 May 1925), known as Sir John French from 1901 to 1916, and as The Viscount French between 1916 and 1922, was a senior British Army officer.

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Joseph Joffre

Marshal Joseph Jacques Césaire Joffre (12 January 1852 – 3 January 1931), was a French general who served as Commander-in-Chief of French forces on the Western Front from the start of World War I until the end of 1916.

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Josias von Heeringen

Josias von Heeringen (9 March 1850 – 9 October 1926) was a German general of the imperial era who saw service in the First World War.

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Karl von Bülow

Karl Wilhelm Paul von Bülow (24 March 1846 – 31 August 1921) was a German field marshal commanding the German 2nd Army during World War I from 1914 to 1915.

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La Ferté-sous-Jouarre memorial

The La Ferté-sous-Jouarre memorial is a World War I memorial in France, located on the south bank of the River Marne, on the outskirts of the commune of La Ferté-sous-Jouarre, 66 kilometres east of Paris, in the department of Seine-et-Marne.

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Liège

Liège (Lidje; Luik,; Lüttich) is a major Walloon city and municipality and the capital of the Belgian province of Liège. The city is situated in the valley of the Meuse, in the east of Belgium, not far from borders with the Netherlands (Maastricht is about to the north) and with Germany (Aachen is about north-east). At Liège, the Meuse meets the River Ourthe. The city is part of the sillon industriel, the former industrial backbone of Wallonia. It still is the principal economic and cultural centre of the region. The Liège municipality (i.e. the city proper) includes the former communes of Angleur, Bressoux, Chênée, Glain, Grivegnée, Jupille-sur-Meuse, Rocourt, and Wandre. In November 2012, Liège had 198,280 inhabitants. The metropolitan area, including the outer commuter zone, covers an area of 1,879 km2 (725 sq mi) and had a total population of 749,110 on 1 January 2008. Population of all municipalities in Belgium on 1 January 2008. Retrieved on 2008-10-19. Definitions of metropolitan areas in Belgium. The metropolitan area of Liège is divided into three levels. First, the central agglomeration (agglomeratie) with 480,513 inhabitants (2008-01-01). Adding the closest surroundings (banlieue) gives a total of 641,591. And, including the outer commuter zone (forensenwoonzone) the population is 810,983. Retrieved on 2008-10-19. This includes a total of 52 municipalities, among others, Herstal and Seraing. Liège ranks as the third most populous urban area in Belgium, after Brussels and Antwerp, and the fourth municipality after Antwerp, Ghent and Charleroi.

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Louis Franchet d'Espèrey

Louis Félix Marie François Franchet d'Espèrey (25 May 1856 – 8 July 1942) was a French general during World War I. As commander of the large Allied army based at Salonika, he conducted the successful Macedonian campaign, which caused the collapse of the Southern Front and contributed to the armistice.

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Louis XV of France

Louis XV (15 February 1710 – 10 May 1774), known as Louis the Beloved, was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who ruled as King of France from 1 September 1715 until his death in 1774.

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Michel-Joseph Maunoury

Michel-Joseph Maunoury (17 December 1847 – 28 March 1923) was a commander of French forces in the early days of World War I. Initially commanding in Lorraine, as the success of the German thrust through Belgium became clear he was sent to take command of the new Sixth Army which was assembling near Amiens and then fell back on Paris.

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Namur

Namur (Dutch:, Nameur in Walloon) is a city and municipality in Wallonia, Belgium.

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Nancy, France

Nancy (Nanzig) is the capital of the north-eastern French department of Meurthe-et-Moselle, and formerly the capital of the Duchy of Lorraine, and then the French province of the same name.

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Neil Douglas Findlay

Brigadier General Neil Douglas Findlay (7 May 1859 – 10 September 1914) was a British Army general.

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Netherlands

The Netherlands (Nederland), often referred to as Holland, is a country located mostly in Western Europe with a population of seventeen million.

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Nieuwpoort, Belgium

Nieuwpoort (West Flemish: Nieuwpôort) (French: Nieuport) is a municipality located in Flanders, one of the three regions of Belgium, and in the Flemish province of West Flanders.

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Ninth Army (France)

The Ninth Army (IXe Armée) was a Field army of the French Army during World War I and World War II.

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Noyon

Noyon (Noviomagus Veromanduorum, Noviomagus of the Veromandui) is a commune in the Oise department in northern France.

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Ostend

Ostend (Oostende, or; Ostende; Ostende) is a Belgian coastal city and municipality, located in the province of West Flanders.

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Pontoon bridge

A pontoon bridge (or ponton bridge), also known as a floating bridge, uses floats or shallow-draft boats to support a continuous deck for pedestrian and vehicle travel.

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Race to the Sea

The Race to the Sea took place from about 1914, after the Battle of the Frontiers and the German advance into France, which had been stopped at the First Battle of the Marne and was followed by the First Battle of the Aisne a Franco-British counter-offensive.

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Reims

Reims (also spelled Rheims), a city in the Grand Est region of France, lies east-northeast of Paris.

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Rifle grenade

A rifle grenade is a grenade that uses a rifle-based launcher to permit a longer effective range than would be possible if the grenade was thrown by hand.

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Ronald Simson

Ronald Francis Simson (6 September 1880 – 14 September 1914) was a Scottish rugby union player for.

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Royal Marines

The Corps of Royal Marines (RM) is the amphibious light infantry of the Royal Navy.

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Saint-Mihiel

Saint-Mihiel is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

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Scheldt

The Scheldt (l'Escaut, Escô, Schelde) is a long river in northern France, western Belgium and the southwestern part of the Netherlands.

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Second Battle of the Aisne

The Second Battle of the Aisne (Bataille du Chemin des Dames or Seconde bataille de l'Aisne, 16 April – mid-May 1917) was the main part of the Nivelle Offensive, a Franco-British attempt to inflict a decisive defeat on the German armies in France.

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Sixth Army (France)

The Sixth Army (6eme Armée) was a Field army of the French Army during World War I and World War II.

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Smokeless powder

Smokeless powder is the name given to a number of propellants used in firearms and artillery that produce negligible smoke when fired, unlike the black powder they replaced.

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Stokes mortar

The Stokes mortar was a British trench mortar invented by Sir Wilfred Stokes KBE that was issued to the British, Empire and U.S. armies, as well as the Portuguese Expeditionary Corps (CEP), during the later half of the First World War.

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Switzerland

Switzerland, officially the Swiss Confederation, is a sovereign state in Europe.

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The Guns of August

The Guns of August (1962), also published as August 1914, is a volume of history by Barbara W. Tuchman.

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Third Battle of the Aisne

The Third Battle of the Aisne (3e Bataille de L'Aisne) was a battle of the German Spring Offensive during World War I that focused on capturing the Chemin des Dames Ridge before the American Expeditionary Forces arrived completely in France.

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Trench warfare

Trench warfare is a type of land warfare using occupied fighting lines consisting largely of military trenches, in which troops are well-protected from the enemy's small arms fire and are substantially sheltered from artillery.

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland.

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Vailly British Cemetery

Vailly British Cemetery is a war cemetery at Vailly-sur-Aisne, France, maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

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Venizel

Venizel is a commune in the Aisne department in Hauts-de-France in northern France.

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Verdun

Verdun (official name before 1970 Verdun-sur-Meuse) is a small city in the Meuse department in Grand Est in northeastern France.

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Western Front (World War I)

The Western Front was the main theatre of war during the First World War.

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World War I

World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

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1st Army (German Empire)

The 1st Army (1.) was an army level command of the German Army in World War I. It was formed on mobilization in August 1914 from the VIII Army Inspection.

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2nd Army (German Empire)

The 2nd Army (2.) was an army level command of the German Army in World War I. It was formed on mobilization in August 1914 from the III Army Inspection.

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7th Army (German Empire)

The 7th Army (7.) was an army level command of the German Army in World War I. It was formed on mobilization in August 1914 from the II Army Inspection.

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Redirects here:

Aisne 1914, First Battles of the Aisne, First battle of the aisne.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Battle_of_the_Aisne

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