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Flight control surfaces

Index Flight control surfaces

Aircraft flight control surfaces are aerodynamic devices allowing a pilot to adjust and control the aircraft's flight attitude. [1]

51 relations: Adverse yaw, Aileron, Aircraft engine controls, Aircraft flight control system, Aircraft flight mechanics, Aircraft principal axes, Angle of attack, Autogyro, Bungee cord, Canard (aeronautics), Center of mass, Counterweight, Delta wing, Dihedral (aeronautics), Drag (physics), Elevator (aeronautics), Elevon, Empennage, Fieseler Fi 156, Fixed-wing aircraft, Flap (aeronautics), Flaperon, Flight dynamics (fixed-wing aircraft), Flight with disabled controls, Glenn Curtiss, Glider (sailplane), Helicopter, Joystick, Leading-edge slat, Lift coefficient, Lift-induced drag, Load factor (aeronautics), McDonnell Douglas MD-80, Rudder, Servo tab, Ship motions, Six degrees of freedom, Slow flight, Spoiler (aeronautics), Spoileron, Spring (device), Stabilator, Stall (fluid mechanics), STOL, Tail rotor, Tailplane, V-tail, Vertical stabilizer, Wing warping, Wright brothers, ..., Wright brothers patent war. Expand index (1 more) »

Adverse yaw

Adverse yaw is the natural and undesirable tendency for an aircraft to yaw in the opposite direction of a roll.

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Aileron

An aileron (French for "little wing" or "fin") is a hinged flight control surface usually forming part of the trailing edge of each wing of a fixed-wing aircraft.

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Aircraft engine controls

Aircraft engine controls provide a means for the pilot to control and monitor the operation of the aircraft's powerplant.

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Aircraft flight control system

A conventional fixed-wing aircraft flight control system consists of flight control surfaces, the respective cockpit controls, connecting linkages, and the necessary operating mechanisms to control an aircraft's direction in flight.

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Aircraft flight mechanics

Flight mechanics are relevant to fixed wing (gliders, aeroplanes) and rotary wing (helicopters) aircraft.

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Aircraft principal axes

An aircraft in flight is free to rotate in three dimensions: yaw, nose left or right about an axis running up and down; pitch, nose up or down about an axis running from wing to wing; and roll, rotation about an axis running from nose to tail.

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Angle of attack

In fluid dynamics, angle of attack (AOA, or \alpha (Greek letter alpha)) is the angle between a reference line on a body (often the chord line of an airfoil) and the vector representing the relative motion between the body and the fluid through which it is moving.

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Autogyro

An autogyro (from Greek αὐτός and γύρος, "self-turning"), also known as a gyroplane or gyrocopter, is a type of rotorcraft that uses an unpowered rotor in free autorotation to develop lift.

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Bungee cord

A bungee cord (sometimes spelled bungie), also known as a shock cord (occy strap or octopus strap in Australian common usage) is an elastic cord composed of one or more elastic strands forming a core, usually covered in a woven cotton or polypropylene sheath.

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Canard (aeronautics)

A canard is an aeronautical arrangement wherein a small forewing or foreplane is placed forward of the main wing of a fixed-wing aircraft.

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Center of mass

In physics, the center of mass of a distribution of mass in space is the unique point where the weighted relative position of the distributed mass sums to zero, or the point where if a force is applied it moves in the direction of the force without rotating.

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Counterweight

A counterweight is a weight that, by exerting an opposite force, provides balance and stability of a mechanical system.

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Delta wing

The delta wing is a wing shaped in the form of a triangle.

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Dihedral (aeronautics)

Dihedral angle is the upward angle from horizontal of the wings or tailplane of a fixed-wing aircraft.

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Drag (physics)

In fluid dynamics, drag (sometimes called air resistance, a type of friction, or fluid resistance, another type of friction or fluid friction) is a force acting opposite to the relative motion of any object moving with respect to a surrounding fluid.

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Elevator (aeronautics)

Elevators are flight control surfaces, usually at the rear of an aircraft, which control the aircraft's pitch, and therefore the angle of attack and the lift of the wing.

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Elevon

Elevons are aircraft control surfaces that combine the functions of the elevator (used for pitch control) and the aileron (used for roll control), hence the name.

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Empennage

The empennage, also known as the tail or tail assembly, is a structure at the rear of an aircraft that provides stability during flight, in a way similar to the feathers on an arrow.

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Fieseler Fi 156

The Fieseler Fi 156 Storch (English: Stork) was a small German liaison aircraft built by Fieseler before and during World War II.

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Fixed-wing aircraft

A fixed-wing aircraft is an aircraft, such as an airplane or aeroplane (note the two different spellings), which is capable of flight using wings that generate lift caused by the vehicle's forward airspeed and the shape of the wings.

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Flap (aeronautics)

Flaps are a type of high-lift device used to increase the lift of an aircraft wing at a given airspeed.

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Flaperon

A flaperon (a portmanteau of flap and aileron) on an aircraft's wing is a type of control surface that combines the functions of both flaps and ailerons.

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Flight dynamics (fixed-wing aircraft)

Flight dynamics is the science of air vehicle orientation and control in three dimensions.

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Flight with disabled controls

Several aviation incidents and accidents have occurred in which the control surfaces of the aircraft became disabled, often due to failure of hydraulic systems or the flight control system.

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Glenn Curtiss

Glenn Hammond Curtiss (May 21, 1878 – July 23, 1930) was an American aviation and motorcycling pioneer, and a founder of the U.S. aircraft industry.

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Glider (sailplane)

A glider or sailplane is a type of glider aircraft used in the leisure activity and sport of gliding.

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Helicopter

A helicopter is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors.

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Joystick

A joystick is an input device consisting of a stick that pivots on a base and reports its angle or direction to the device it is controlling.

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Leading-edge slat

Slats are aerodynamic surfaces on the leading edge of the wings of fixed-wing aircraft which, when deployed, allow the wing to operate at a higher angle of attack.

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Lift coefficient

The lift coefficient (CL, CN or Cz) is a dimensionless coefficient that relates the lift generated by a lifting body to the fluid density around the body, the fluid velocity and an associated reference area.

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Lift-induced drag

In aerodynamics, lift-induced drag, induced drag, vortex drag, or sometimes drag due to lift, is an aerodynamic drag force that occurs whenever a moving object redirects the airflow coming at it.

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Load factor (aeronautics)

In aeronautics, the load factor is defined as the ratio of the lift of an aircraft to its weightHurt, page 37 and represents a global measure of the stress ("load") to which the structure of the aircraft is subjected: where: Since the load factor is the ratio of two forces, it is dimensionless.

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McDonnell Douglas MD-80

The McDonnell Douglas MD-80 is a series of twin-engine, short- to medium-range, single-aisle commercial jet airliners.

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Rudder

A rudder is a primary control surface used to steer a ship, boat, submarine, hovercraft, aircraft, or other conveyance that moves through a fluid medium (generally air or water).

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Servo tab

A servo tab is a small hinged device installed on an aircraft control surface to assist the movement of the control surfaces.

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Ship motions

Ship motions are defined by the six degrees of freedom that a ship, boat or any other craft can experience.

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Six degrees of freedom

Six degrees of freedom (6DoF) refers to the freedom of movement of a rigid body in three-dimensional space.

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Slow flight

Slow flight is a portion of an airplane's performance envelope above the speed at which the plane will stall, but below the aircraft's endurance speed.

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Spoiler (aeronautics)

In aeronautics, a spoiler (sometimes called a lift spoiler or lift dumper) is a device intended to intentionally reduce the lift component of an airfoil in a controlled way.

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Spoileron

In aeronautics spoilerons, also known as spoiler ailerons, are flight control surfaces, specifically spoilers that can be used asymmetrically to provide adequate roll control if aileron action would produce excessive wing twist on a very flexible wing or if wide-span flaps prevent adequate aileron roll control.

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Spring (device)

A spring is an elastic object that stores mechanical energy.

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Stabilator

A stabilator, more frequently all-moving tail or all-flying tail, is a fully movable aircraft stabilizer.

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Stall (fluid mechanics)

In fluid dynamics, a stall is a reduction in the lift coefficient generated by a foil as angle of attack increases.

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STOL

STOL is an acronym for a short takeoff and landing aircraft, which have short runway requirements for takeoff and landing.

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Tail rotor

The tail rotor is a smaller rotor mounted so that it rotates vertically or near-vertically at the end of the tail of a traditional single-rotor helicopter.

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Tailplane

A tailplane, also known as a horizontal stabiliser, is a small lifting surface located on the tail (empennage) behind the main lifting surfaces of a fixed-wing aircraft as well as other non-fixed-wing aircraft such as helicopters and gyroplanes.

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V-tail

In aircraft, a V-tail or Vee-tail (sometimes called a Butterfly tail or Rudlicki's V-tail) is an unconventional arrangement of the tail control surfaces that replaces the traditional fin and horizontal surfaces with two surfaces set in a V-shaped configuration when viewed from the front or rear of the aircraft.

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Vertical stabilizer

The vertical stabilizers, vertical stabilisers, or fins, of aircraft, missiles or bombs are typically found on the aft end of the fuselage or body, and are intended to reduce aerodynamic side slip and provide direction stability.

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Wing warping

Wing warping was an early system for lateral (roll) control of a fixed-wing aircraft.

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Wright brothers

The Wright brothers, Orville (August 19, 1871 – January 30, 1948) and Wilbur (April 16, 1867 – May 30, 1912), were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane.

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Wright brothers patent war

The Wright brothers patent war centers on the patent they received for their method of an airplane's flight control.

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Redirects here:

Aerodynamic control surfaces, Aircraft control surfaces, Control horn, Control surface (aviation), Flight control surface, Lateral axis, Transverse axis (aircraft), Vertical axis (aircraft), Wing control surface.

References

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flight_control_surfaces

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